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61 ANNUAL ST

INTERIOR LOGGING

ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

THURSDAY, MAY - FRIDAY, MAY 3

SATURDAY, MAY 4

1250 Rogers Way, Kamloops

100-345 Powwow Trail, Kamloops

COAST KAMLOOPS HOTEL POWWOW GROUNDS & CONFERENCE CENTRE (Inside & Outside Displays)

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61ST ANNUAL INTERIOR LOGGING ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

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61ST ANNUAL INTERIOR LOGGING ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW The 61st annual Interior Logging Association annual conference will begin on the night of Thursday, May 2, with a meet-and-greet at the Coast Kamloops Hotel and Conference Centre in Aberdeen and continue on Friday, May 3, with a breakfast, followed by the ILA annual general meeting. There will be a luncheon on Friday with Forests Minister Doug Donaldson, seminars in the afternoon and a dinner and dance to close things out that night. Displays will be at the Tk’emlups te Secwepemc Powwow Grounds through the weekend. DAVE EAGLES/KTW FILE

Interior Logging Association growing yearly

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ccording to Wayne Lintott, general manager of the Interior Logging Association, the 61st annual conference in Kamloops is going to be the biggest and best yet. “There’s probably going to be 32 inside booths and will probably be well over 100 outside displays,” Lintott said. “Probably close to 70 or 80 companies showing what they have between the inside and the outside. It’s probably one of the largest displays we’ve had in the last 25 years.” And he should know. Lintott has been general manager of the ILA since 1998, but has been involved with the conference since 1974. While the conference previously alternated between Kamloops and Vernon, this is the second year in a row that it is being held in Kamloops. Lintott said it’s in large part because of how well the

Tk’emlups te Secwepemc Powwow Grounds work for the event. “The Powwow Grounds [are] an excellent facility for what we require,” he said. The conference begins on the night of Thursday, May 2, with a meet-and-greet at the Coast Kamloops Hotel and Conference Centre in Aberdeen and continues on Friday, May 3, with a breakfast, followed by the ILA annual general meeting. There will be a luncheon on Friday with Forests Minister Doug Donaldson, seminars in the afternoon and a dinner and dance to close things out that night. And, of course, the displays at the Powwow Grounds will be up through the weekend. Tickets for the luncheon, as well as a schedule for the conference, can be found on the ILA website at https:// interiorlogging.org.

The conference is open to the public and Lintott said there’s plenty for visitors to check out. “If anyone wants to come, they’re more than welcome,” he said. “You’re going to see the latest in the harvesting equipment that the contractors use.” Alongside the cutting-edge logging equipment on display at the Powwow Grounds will be a log-loading contest on Friday and Saturday, with prizes of $750, $500 and $250 for first, second and third place, respectively. Though this is only the second year for the contest, Lintott said it was an immediate success when it debuted in 2018. “Some of the kids that were operating wanted to sign up for this year’s as soon as they finished last year’s,” he said. “If you want to see the latest and greatest in log harvesting equipment, come to the convention.”

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61ST ANNUAL INTERIOR LOGGING ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

ILA’s roots stretch back more than 60 years

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n April of 1958, 16 men, all connected to the logging industry, met in Rutland and formed the Okanagan Logging Association as a body independent of any others in the province. Several Okanagan-area loggers and truckers joined. Harold Hildred was elected president and the initial membership fee was $10. The objectives of the association were to promote the interests of those engaged in logging, to protect members against unfair practices, to reform abuses in the industry, to seek freedom from unlawful extractions and to provide accurate information to its members. The mandate spoke to the difficult circumstances that loggers faced at those times, circumstances that have not changed that much in the ensuing 60 years. By 1960, however, membership grew from outside of the Okanagan area and, to reflect the growing area of representation, the name was change to the cur-

rent Interior Logging Association. In the first few years of existence, the association was focused primarily on trucking issues

related to weight restrictions and licensing that were so unfair to loggers that they could no longer sit and do nothing about it.

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One of its members, Cecil Philpot, elected to spend two weeks in a Kamloops jail rather than pay an overload fine. This act of defiance galvanized the fight for ILA members and membership grew. Through the early 1960s, the ILA pushed hard against the Department of Commercial Transport on road weight restrictions that were causing undue hardship for many ILA members. The politics of the situation became clear, however, when overload restrictions were imposed on Interior roads when the government cited logging trucks as the cause of highway damage. However, as noted by ILA publicity director Harold Hildred, “now that there is an election here, trucks don’t damage roads anymore.” In 1962, the ILA approached the Department of Commercial Transport, but this time regarding truck licensing fees. In a brief presented by president Peter Dyck, the ILA noted the

quarterly system of truck licensing caused problems for many logging truck operators given their seasons of work. The dispute was eventually settled, with changes made to the licensing scheme. By 1972, the ILA had more than 1,000 delegates at its 13th annual convention, where the delegates were warned by Resources Minister Ray Williston that multiple use of B.C’.s forests being promoted by the growing environmental movement was the new mantra and that loggers, like all forest users, had to accept that things were changing. The ILA embraced the need for change and president Audrey Baird noted that “multiple use was the way to go.” In 1977, the BC Logging Association was created via the merger of the ILA and the Central Interior Logging Association, with Derrick Stammer as chairman of the joint board of directors. With growing memberships in both organizations and issues that were common to both, it was felt joining forces and pooling

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61ST ANNUAL INTERIOR LOGGING ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

resources would give a stronger voice to Interior contractors and truckers in policy and regulatory development. While initially the merger provided benefits to the joint memberships, by 1982 local issues forced separation of the two organizations and the ILA once again continued working on behalf of its Southern Interior membership.

Following ongoing pressure brought to the government by the ILA — hand-in-hand with its counterparts in other areas of the province — regarding ongoing abuse of contractors, in 1991 Bill 13 was introduced by minister Claude Richmond. As stated by Richmond upon introduction of the bill, its purpose was to address logging

contractors’ security in British Columbia. With input from the ILA, the act was updated in 1992 to clarify amount of work provisions and in 1996 it was again updated to become the legislation that endured until 2003. Wayne Lintott was hired as the ILA general manager in 1998; and Nancy Hesketh joined as office administrator in June of 1999.

With a background in forest harvesting equipment sales and a keen understanding of logging and trucking, Lintott has led development of the ILA to this day. Also in 1998, the ILA purchased its current office in Vernon in order to secure its longer-term financial stability. With land and building values always on the rise, ownership of its office made economic sense. The fall of 2007 saw Pope and Talbot, one of the province’s major forest-products operators, file for creditor protection in the wake of growing financial losses. As part of the eventual bankruptcy settlement, Interfor purchased its two southern B.C. Interior sawmills in Grand Forks and Castlegar, along with other various company assets. However, not all logging contractors received payment for their services and the logs that they had collectively delivered to Pope and Talbot mills in inventory. In aggregate, more than $4.3 million was owing and each contractor was to be listed as an unsecured creditor and likely to only recover cents on the dollar. The ILA stepped in and worked with forests minister Pat Bell and

the court-appointed receiver to facilitate 98.2 per cent of payments of all money owed to contractors. The lessons learned from the Pope and Talbot bankruptcy and the fight to recover money owed to contractors was a pivotal motivation for government to heed to the 10-year advocacy effort by the ILA and other provincial logging associations for the creation of the Forestry Service Providers Protection Act. For 60 years, the ILA has worked to promote the interests of those engaged in the logging industry in the Cariboo and southern regions of the province, and to promote and support forest education and awareness. Many rural communities depend on the forest industry for their livelihoods’ where ILA members live and work. Looking forward, the ILA has hired an assistant to the general manager, Todd Chamberlain, RFT who will work with Wayne and allow the ILA to continue its advocacy efforts throughout the BC Interior. The ILA will continue to work with the industry that supports them, their membership and their communities.

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61ST ANNUAL INTERIOR LOGGING ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

Get to know your different types of forests

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anada stretches across five time zones and numerous climate regions. The Arctic Circle is covered in permafrost, yet Point Pelee in southern Ontario is further south than northern California. The soil and water and conditions that sustain the nations forest, vary greatly across such geographic expanse. As a result, Canada features 12 forest regions and sub-regions, each supporting characteristic tree species and forest types.

SUBALPINE FOREST

Boreal (predominantly forest) The largest forested area in Canada. This region forms a continuous belt from Newfoundland and Labrador west to the Rocky Mountains and north to Alaska. The boreal forest is mostly coniferous, but includes a mix of deciduous trees such as white birch and trembling aspen.

Boreal (forest and barren)

aspen and willow flourish along the edge of the prairie.

BOREAL FOREST A sub-region north of the Boreal Forest Region. A colder climate and shorter growing season nurtures predominately spruce and larch (tamarack). Along the northern edge the forest thins into open lichen-

Subalpine

woodland and then treeless Tundra.

Boreal (forest and grass) A sub-region south of the main Boreal Forest Region. A warmer climate nurtures this deciduous forest where trembling

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A coniferous forest stretching from the mountainous uplands of Alberta, across the Rocky Mountain range, through the interior of British Columbia to the Pacific Coast. The Sub-alpine and Boreal

regions both features species such as black spruce, white spruce and trembling aspen.

Montane Covers most of the interior uplands of British Columbia, part of the Kootenay Valley and a small area east of the Rocky Mountains. It is a northern extension of the typical forest of much of the west-

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61ST ANNUAL INTERIOR LOGGING ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW tion to the principal tree species includes wide ranges of eastern white cedar and largetooth aspen.

Acadian Stretches across most of the Maritime provinces. The region is closely related to the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Region and to some extent Boreal Region.

Grasslands

TUNDRA

DECIDUOUS FOREST

leys and the Quesnel Lake area of British Columbia. This coniferous region merges with Coast, Montane and Subalpine forest regions.

Deciduous (Carolinian) ern mountain system of the United States. Extensive prairie communities of bunch-grasses and herbs are found in many of the river valleys.

Coast A unique area along the Pacific

coast of British Columbia that is almost exclusively made up of coniferous vegetation.

Columbian Encompasses a large part of the Kootenay Valley, the upper Thompson and Fraser river val-

Widespread across the eastern United States and extending into southwestern Ontario between Lakes Huron, Erie and Ontario. Some southern deciduous trees have their northern limits in this region: tulip tree, cucumber tree, pawpaw, red mulberry, Kentucky

coffee tree, sassafras, black oak and pin oak. Conifers are few but there is a scattered distribution of eastern white pine, Tamarack, eastern red cedar and eastern hemlock.

Great Lakes/St.Lawrence Extends inland from the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River to southeastern Manitoba, but does not include the area north of Lake Superior. This region is mixed coniferous-deciduous which in addi-

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Though not a forest region, the prairies of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta support several species of trees in great numbers. Trembling aspen forms groves or bluffs around wet depressions and continuous dense stands along the northern boundary.

Tundra A treeless area between the polar icecap and the treeline of the Arctic region. Its permanently frozen sub-soil (permafrost) and a short growing season supports only small, hardy vegetation. Different kinds of forests in Canada according to the Canadian Forestry Association. Learn more online at canadianforestry.com


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61ST ANNUAL INTERIOR LOGGING ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

Thank Interior Logging Association sponsors Youngster Xander Russon checks out a Volvo EC220 processor with his parents during a visit to the 2018 Interior Logging Association conference and trade show. Great West Equipment is again a sponsor and exhibitor this year.

The 2019 Interior Logging Association conference and trade show welcomes the following sponsors and exhibitors: • Anser Manufacturing Ltd. • BC Forest Safety • Balcaen Consolidated Contracting Ltd. • BDO Canada LLP • Brandt Tractor Ltd. • Canadian Western Bank • Capri CMW • Sovereign General Insurance Company • Cummins Western Canada • Dynamic Capital • Finning (Canada) • Gorman Bros. Lumber Ltd. • Great West Equipment • Gudeit Bros. Contracting Ltd. • Inland Group • ILA Trades Association • IRL International Truck Centres • Johnstone’s Benefits • Kineshanko Logging Ltd. • Logging & Sawmilling Journal • Morfco Supplies Ltd. • Nor-Mar Industries Ltd. / Brutus Truck Bodies

• Profab Manufacturing Ltd. • Quadco Inc. • R.J. Schunter Contracting Ltd. • R James Western Star

• Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers Canada • SMS Equipment Inc. • Southstar Equipment Ltd. • Stride Capital Corp

• Supply Post Newspaper • Tirecraft • Tolko Industries Ltd. • Wajax Equipment • Waratah Forestry Canada

• Western Financial Group • Westerra Equipment • Weyerhaeuser • Woodland Equipment Inc. • WorkSafeBC

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61ST ANNUAL INTERIOR LOGGING ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

Did you know? FUN FACTS ABOUT FORESTRY • One large, healthy tree can lift up to 4,000 litres of water from the ground and release it into the air, absorb as many as 7,000 dust particles per litre of air, absorb 75 per cent of the CO2 produced by the average car and provide a day’s oxygen for four people. — Canadian Forestry Association • White pines have soft, medium-length needles in bundles of five. How do you remember that? Just count the needles W-H-I-T-E. — Canadian Forestry Association • Trees grow from the top, not the bottom. — Canadian Forestry Association • Canadian forest product companies will need to hire 60,000 or more new workers by 2020 to meet demand. — Forest Products Association of Canada. • Forestry in British Columbia is big business. More than 40 per cent of the province’s regional economies are based on forestry activities, supporting 55,000 direct jobs in more than 7,300 businesses. Several of the world’s largest forestry companies are headquartered in B.C. and the province is the world’s largest supplier of softwood lumber to world markets. — Forestry Innovation Initiative

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61ST ANNUAL INTERIOR LOGGING ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW CUT TO THE QUICK

Last year marked the 60th anniversary of the Interior Logging Association Conference and Trade Show in Kamloops, and the event featured demonstrations of equipment. This year’s event begins on May 2 and runs through May 4.

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61ST ANNUAL INTERIOR LOGGING ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

Buckle up and save lives in all vehicles Wearing seatbelts on all roads in all vehicles and machines saves lives — whether you are the driver or a passenger. Among log truck drivers in B.C., the latest self-reporting BC Forest Safety Council (BCFSC) surveys show that while 75 per cent of log truck drivers say they wear their seatbelts, 25 per cent say they don’t, which puts those who don’t at higher risk of serious injury or death in any incident. “We want to help motivate all drivers on B.C.’s resource and public roads, including log truck drivers, to wear their seatbelts every time they climb into a vehicle,” said Rob Moonen, CEO of BCFSC. “Please check in with your work colleagues, your crew, your friends and family members and remind them why it’s important to wear a seatbelt. It’s not just their life that depends on it. “The choice to wear a seatbelt positively impacts a lot more people,” Moonen said. “If unrestrained, you face serious injury or death when you hit some-

BCFSC CEO ROB MOONEN thing inside the vehicle. “It could be the windshield or the reinforced pillars that surround the windows and doors or something or someone else hits you,” he said. Moonen noted any unrestrained passenger becomes a projectile. Anyone in the way can be crushed or you can be thrown from the vehicle and severely hurt or worse when they hit the road, smash into a pole or rock or are hit

by another vehicle. “Any action you can take to keep from being ejected, hitting something inside the vehicle or having something hit you, will greatly increase your chances of surviving a crash,” he said. Five benefits of wearing seatbelts: • You greatly increase your chances of going home safe to your families and loved ones; • You have less chance of dying or suffering life-altering injuries; • You have an increased chance of staying in control of your vehicle in a motor-vehicle incident; • You reduce the risk of unsafe behaviours (reaching for a thermos or other items while moving); • You have a greater chance of reducing the seriousness of injuries that could lead to losing your livelihood because of life-altering injuries. Watch a video of a B.C. log truck driver on how a seatbelt saved his life in a rollover, online at http:// www.bcforestsafe.org/seatbelt. More information is available online at bcforestsafe.org.

Don’t Miss These Exciting Features at the Show: • Interior Safety Conference on Friday • Recruitment Fair on Saturday • Drop by the Demo Zone to see machines and portable sawmills in action! • The latest makes & models from THE Top Manufacturers will be at the show!

THE EQUIPMENT TO GET THE JOBS DONE! Check out our growing exhibitor list below

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Alliance Tire Americas, Inc. All-West Glass Apex Specialized Rigging & Moving Armtec Inc. Artic Machinery Ltd. Axis Forestry Inc. B.K. Two-Way Radio Ltd. Babine Truck & Equipment Ltd. Baum Publications BC Forest Safety Council BGE Service & Supply Ltd. Brandt Tractor Ltd. Brikers Brunette Machinery Co. Brutus Truck Bodies Canadian Mental Health Association Caster Town Central Interior Catering and Consulting Certified Labs Cleanfix North America Inc. ColdFront Connexus Industries Inc. Crushing Mechanics D&L Timber Technologies Ltd. De-On Supply Inc. DES Vancouver Duz Cho Group of Companies Dymin Mechanical and Refrigeration Inc. DZ Grinders LLC Easy Kleen Pressure Systems Factors Western Inc.

Falcon Equipment FastCover Fabric Structures Ltd. FBC Finning (Canada) Flash Fire & Safety Flexxaire Inc. FMDC Watermist Canada Ltd. Foreman Equipment Ltd. Forest Power Sports Forestry Trader Fort Garry Industries Fraser Valley Tarp and Tie Ltd. FreFlyt Industries Inc. Frontier Power Products Ltd. Global Troxler Groeneveld Lubrication Solutions HearingLife Heatmaster SS/ Steeltech Inc Heavy Equipment Guide Hunter Engineering Company Independent Contractors & Business Association Inland Group Integral Equipment Ltd. IRL International Truck Centres Ltd. James Western Star Jepson Petroleum Jim Pattison Lease Kasco Canada Kinshofer Lawson Products Inc. Lease Link Canada Corp. Leavitt Machinery

Liteway Systems Inc. Logging & Sawmilling Journal Marlim Ecological Consulting Ltd. Masonlift Limited MNP LLP Morfco Supplies Ltd. Myshak Crane & Rigging Ltd. Northern Mat & Bridge Northern Metalic Lubricants Ltd. Northland Dodge Northland Nissan Norwood Sawmills Inc. Ocean Trailer Olofsfors Inc. Pacbrake Company Paladin Attachments Peerless Peterbilt Pacific Inc. Pioneer OFFroad Pioneer Parts Rebuilding Polymershapes Premium Truck & Trailer Inc. Prime Tech Shredding Equipment Ltd. Progressive Auctions and Equipment Sales Inc. Prolenc Manufacturing Inc. Promac Manufacturing Ltd. Quadco Inc. Quality Chain Canada Quantum Foam R.L. Rurka Sales & Service Ritchie Bros

Rotobec Secure-Rite Structures Shaw Business Shocker Positive Air Shut Off System Skilled Trades Employment Program SMS Equipment Star West Petroleum Summit Trailer Ltd. Supply Post Surespan Construction Tabor Mountain Recreation Society Teleforest Tero Consulting The Gear Centre Off-Highway Division TimberNorth Consulting Ltd. Tufport Industries Ltd. Tycrop Trailers Valid Manufacturing Ltd. Vallen Vandervelt Equipment Parts Ltd. Vishay Transducers Ltd. Wajax Wallingford’s Inc. Waratah Forestry Canada Weldco-Beales Mfg. Western Equipment Western Oil Services Williams Machinery Williams Petroleum Wood-Mizer Canada Inc. Wurth Canada Zenco Hydrovac Excvation Ltd.

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61ST ANNUAL INTERIOR LOGGING ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

Did you know?

B

ritish Columbia’s forests are a global treasure — a diverse geography and climate across a very large area combine to create an incredible range of forest ecosystems. In fact, B.C. has a higher degree of ecosystem diversity than any other province or territory in Canada and is among the most diverse in the world. Here are a few facts about B.C.’s forests and the industry they propel: • Timber harvesting is very important for B.C.’s economy, and the province harvests more timber than any other jurisdiction in Canada. The provincial government allows companies to harvest timber in certain areas according to a very strict set of rules, including requirements to grow new forests after harvest. • B.C.’s forests cover almost two-thirds of the province’s land mass — an area spanning more than 55-million hectares. They range from dry pine forests in the

Southern Interior to the boreal in the northeast to the temperate rain forests along the coast. • Most of B.C.’s forests — about 83 per cent — are dominated by conifer species like pine, fir, spruce, cedar and hemlock. More than 40 per cent of those areas are older than 140 years. • About 14 per cent of B.C.’s forests are in parks and protected areas that preclude resource extraction activity like harvesting. • According to B.C.’s government, about 98 per cent of the province’s forests have achieved sustainable forest management certification from one or more of the major certification standards. • The amount of B.C. timber harvested each year has increased over the last century. Today, about 69-million cubic metres are cleared in the province each year — enough to fill 1.73 million logging trucks or B.C. Place Stadium 31 times over. • B.C. is home to more than 23,000 campsites —most in forested parts of the province. — BC Tomorrow Society

STOP BY AND SEE US AT THE ILA CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW KAMLOOPS, BC MAY 2 - 4, 2019

DOOSAN OFFERS A FULL LINE OF FORESTRY EQUIPMENT TO HELP YOU GET THE JOB DONE RIGHT. Fast, powerful, and efficient DOOSAN log loaders are designed to make every phase of forestry work more productive.

www.WESTERRAEQUIPMENT.com | 1.888.713.GRIT Abbotsford Authorized Doosan Dealer

31260 South Fraser Way V2T 6L5

Kamloops

585 Cree Road V2H 1H9

Nanaimo

2140 School House Road V9X 1T4


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Wednesday, May 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

61ST ANNUAL INTERIOR LOGGING ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

What’s in a name? In the forest, quite a bit

F

orestry is a major employer in B.C., yet few people outside of the sector understand the differences between the various job titles and designations. The Association of BC Forest Professionals registers and regulates the province’s forest professionals — registered professional foresters, registered forest technologists, special permit and limited license holders, accredited timber cruisers and accredited timber evaluators. These professionals have post-secondary education, or equivalent, in forestry, in addition to many years of experience and are responsible for managing the forests. They may look after all aspects of the forest, including forest health (insect infestations, diseases and fire), fish and wildlife habitat, preparing areas for harvesting and much more. In general, forest professionals ensure forests are managed sustainably.

H I G H

• Forester usually refers to a registered professional forester (RPF). Foresters have university degrees, or equivalent, specializing in forestry and have spent at least two years articling before passing a rigorous registration exam. • Tech or technologist usually refers to a registered forest technologist (RFT). RFTs have a two-year college diploma, or equivalent, in forestry and have spent at least two years articling before passing a rigorous registration exam. • Accredited timber cruiser (ATC) is a specialist who is trained to accurately figure out how much and the quality of each tree species is available for harvesting. A cruiser has on-the-job training and must demonstrate competency before being allowed to use the title ATC. Note that RPFs and (more commonly) RFTs may also be ATCs. • Accredited timber evaluator (ATE) is a specialist similar to an ATC; however, the timber evaluator has more experience

and is able to supervise a team of cruisers. Like ATCs, ATEs must demonstrate their competency before being allowed to use the ATE designation. Note that RPFs and (more commonly) RFTs may also be ATEs. • Silvicultural accredited surveyor (SAS) measures the quantity and quality of young forest stands, usually planted after harvesting, and provides recommendations to ensure these stands reach maturity. Like ATCs and ATEs, they must demonstrate their competency before being allowed to use the SAS designation. Note that RPFs and (more commonly) RFTs may also be SASs. • Forest professional is a generic phrase that refers to any of the above five job categories. Other forest workers: • Logger usually refers to a number of workers whose job it is to harvest timber and bring it to a mill. The term “lumberjack” is similar to logger, but is not used in B.C. It is an eastern North American term.

I N D U S T R Y

STANDARDS OF

E X C E L L E N C E

KOMATSU’s NEW XT465L-5 DEMONSTRATES HIGH PERFORMANCE AND PRODUCTIVITY It has a powerful swing torque and high tractive effort that delivers fast and dependable performance in demanding sloped and rough terrain conditions. It is also built for cold weather operation and includes a standard charge oil relief heater to provide faster hydraulic oil warm-up. It also has an optional fuel-fired jacket water and hydraulic oil pre-heater to facilitate faster cold weather start-ups. Get in touch with us today for more information.

smsequip.com 1 866 458 0101


Wednesday, May 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

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61ST ANNUAL INTERIOR LOGGING ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

CUSTOMIZATION. CRAFTMANSHIP. CLASS.

• Fallers are specialists who may have voluntarily become certified for the dangerous position. They are specifically trained to hand fall trees and are highly skilled. • Forest technician usually refers to someone with some postsecondary education, such as a certificate. Forest technicians perform important data collection work in the forest. • Forest worker usually refers to non-professionals who work in the forest, such as loggers, fallers and technicians. • Machine operator refers to a forest worker who operates various types of machinery during forest harvesting operations.

FIND YOUR PETERBILT.

Get the best value in the industry, whether you’re the first owner or the third owner. Peterbilt is synonymous with quality. It’s why our trucks consistently provide the industry’s best value whether you’re buying new or used. And with Peterbilt’s Red Oval certified pre-owned truck program, you will be confident with your purchase.

FINANCE • PARTS • SERVICE 1955 Trans-Canada Hwy, Kamloops 250-374-3181 • www.peterbiltpacific.com

Yes, we have a tire for that!

We have a complete lineup (including Michelin, Solideal, Westlake). Our products include solid rubber, press-on tires, pneumatic shaped solid tires, moulded tires, resilient tires and industrial pneumatic tires – all manufactured in various compounds with different treads and traction. This means we can be very specific about what tire is best suited for your application and budget. We also offer industrial retread solutions and repair services. Our industrial tires and services are applicable to vehicles such as: • Forklift tires • OTR truck tires – for waste management, metal recycling, mining operation, heavy industrial & transfer stations • Graders • Mini Excavators • Rough Terrain Forklifts

• Scrapers • Tracked Vehicles • Aerial Access Equipment • Skid Steer Loader • Aircraft Support Equipment • Port Trailers • Back Hoe Loaders • Compactors

WE DO MORE THAN TIRES

3 Kamloops locations to serve you! | kaltire.com 825 Notre Dame Dr • (250) 372-3302

788 Mt Paul Way • (250) 374-6258

Quality mechanical work performed by certified technicians

1032 Victoria St • (250) 374-6248


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Wednesday, May 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

61ST ANNUAL INTERIOR LOGGING ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

FINNING’S COMMITMENT TO FORESTRY GOES WAY BELOW THE SURFACE. Our roots in forestry run deep. We’ve been supplying you with logging equipment solutions since the 1930s, and we’re not going anywhere. We’re partnering with the most trusted brands—Weiler, T-Mar, Wagner, MultiDocker, and Caterpillar—to handle your toughest forestry jobs, now and well into the future.

1-888-Finning | Finning.com/forestry 346-6464

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61st Annual Interior Logging Association Conference & Trade Show  

61st Annual Interior Logging Association Conference & Trade Show

61st Annual Interior Logging Association Conference & Trade Show  

61st Annual Interior Logging Association Conference & Trade Show

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