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APRIL 5, 2019 | Volume 32 No. 28

FRIDAY

MAY IS HEATING UP

Popular Brewloops festival and FireFit competition part of the fun at Riverside Park on May 25 and May 26 A29

Page A34 is your guide to myriad events in the city and region

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JOKES & RIDDLES & OTHER FF FUN STU laughs Enjoy some riddle the and tackle for a at the bottom a prize! win chance to

JOKE’S ON YOU

fish so smart? Q: Why are thety live in A: Because schools.

say the ground Q: What did ake? to the earthqu me up! A: You crack porcupines Q: What do they kiss? say when A; Ouch! it so windy Q: Why is an Centre inside Sandm ’ games? during Blazers fans. A: All those

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What instrum seen? nor heard, but voice Answer: Your BABCOCK Winner: ELLA

WEEKEND WEATHER:

KTW KIDS PAGE

CAPITAL IDEA Sa-Hali secondary student Sarah Seymour is off to Ottawa A17

Get creative and add to our story. You might win a prize! A30

Showers and sun and clouds High 15 C Low 4 C

CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE CITY JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

A CALL FOR FASTER CALLS

Local governments must show leadership in preparing for climate change and reducing impacts of greenhouse gases on the environment. So says Kamloops Mayor Ken Christian following the release this week of a report by Environment and Climate Change Canada that reveals the country is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world — warming the report said is “effectively irreversible.” The federal government report is the first in a series of scientific assessments on changes to Canada due to global warming. The report states the country’s average temperature jumped 1.7 C from 70 years ago, compared to the average global temperature, which is up 0.8 C. “We are already seeing the effects of widespread warming in Canada,” climate-science adviser at Environment Canada Elizabeth Bush said. “It’s clear, the science

DAVE EAGLES/KTW

Kamloops firefighter Jeff Freeze is sounding the alarm over recent changes to responses to emergencies, noting his son was on the ice, injured, while waiting for paramedics to arrive. Under previous policy, Freeze said, Kamloops Fire Rescue firefighters would have been on scene within minutes. Freeze’s concern is being echoed by the president of the BC Professional Firefighters Association. TURN TO PAGE A5 FOR THE STORY.

supports the fact that adapting to climate change is an imperative. Urgent action is needed to reduce emissions.” Christian called the impact of climate change on Canada concerning, but not surprising. He said the city has already begun work to withstand weather changes and events, including dykes for flooding, increased storm sewer capacity for rainstorms and fire protection to combat interface blazes. As the city adjusts, Christian said mitigation is also “imperative.” Impacts already seen today will stay for “centuries to millennia,” according to the ECCC report, and if the world continues emitting greenhouse gas emissions at the current rate, most parts of Canada by 2050 will see temperature increases of between 7 C and 9 C. In the worse case, Canada could see 10 times as many deadly heat waves and twice as many extreme rainstorms.

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A2

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Elevation at Sun Peaks is a development of A&T Project Developments Inc. The developer reserves the right to modify or change plans, specifications, features and prices without notice. Materials may be substituted with equivalent or better at the developer’s sole discretion. All dimensions and sizes are approximate and are based on architectural measurements. This is not an offering for sale and such offer can only made Disclosure Statement E.&O.E. offer canbeonly be by made by Disclosure Statement E.&O.E.

The developer reserves the right to modify or change plans, specifications, features and prices without notice. The developer reserves the right to modify or change plans, specifications, features and prices without Materials may be substituted with equivalent or better atorthe developer’s sole discretion. Alldiscretion. dimensionsAll and notice. Materials may be substituted with equivalent better at the developer’s sole sizes are approximate based on architectural measurements. This measurements. is not an offeringThis for sale andan such dimensions and sizes and are are approximate and are based on architectural is not offer canfor only be made by Disclosure Statement E.&O.E. offering sale and such offer can only be made by Disclosure Statement E.&O.E.

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FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

A3

DID YOU KNOW? Off Holt Street, Goodwin Avenue is named for Eva Gutwein who, in 1957, subdivided her land in the area. — Kamloops Museum and Archives

NEWS FLASH? Call 778-471-7525 or email tips@kamloopsthisweek.com

INSIDE KTW

ENGINEERED TO HELP

Urban Systems staff Trudi McClelland (far left), Kate Kalnin, Lindsay Tithecott and Jen Adiar served lunch on Thursday at The Mustard Seed New Life Community. Staff from the downtown firm were part of The Mustard Seed’s inaugural Meals Sponsorship program, which sees city businesses and community leaders sponsor meals for the less fortunate. If you would like to get involved, call 250-372-9898.

Viewpoint/Your Opinion . . . . A8-9 National News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A20 Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A25 Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A27 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A31 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A40

TODAY’S FLYERS Gord’s Whirpool, Total Pet*, Shoppers*, The Source*, Pharmasave*, Michaels*, Manshadi*, Home Hardware*, Highland Valley Foods*, HealthyLife Nutrition*, CHBA Training House*, Bosley’s Pet Food* *Selected distribution

WEATHER ALMANAC

One year ago Hi: 7 .5 C Low: 3 .5 C Record High 23 .9 C (1905) Record Low -6 .1 C (1911)

ONLINE

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HOW TO REACH US: Kamloops This Week 1365-B Dalhousie Dr . Kamloops, B .C ., V2C 5P6 Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Circulation 250-374-0462 classifieds@kamloopsthisweek .com publisher@kamloopsthisweek .com editor@kamloopsthisweek .com

TRU budget carries $14-million surplus SEAN BRADY STAFF REPORTER sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

Thompson Rivers University has passed its latest budget and is expecting a surplus of more than $14 million — but that amount is less than anticipated. TRU is expecting revenues of $233 million in 2019-2020, an amount that has grown due to a surging number of international students. As a result of the international student growth, the university will spend more than $140 million of that revenue on salaries and $78 million on non-salary expenses. Remaining is a $14-million surplus. While a surplus bodes well for the university, the figure is about $13 million less than what was projected a year ago. The explanation behind the reduced surplus has to do with the balance the university is trying to strike between international enrolment — from where TRU gets 59 per cent of its tuition revenue — and what it spends on salaries. Matt Milovick, TRU’s vice-president of administration and finance, said the university is scaling back its international student enrolment for the time being in order to stabilize. To start, the university will close its summer programs to new international students. “Last year, we had a very significant intake into the university in the summer semester and that was pretty overwhelming,” he said. “We managed it, but in certain schools they wanted to take a step back and evaluate.” The latest report on enrolment shows 3,249 of

the 9,184 students at TRU are international arrivals, a cohort that has grown by 25 per cent since last year. The international student growth over the past couple of years has meant the university has had to hire more teaching staff to accommodate the influx. In this year’s budget, TRU has funded 80 new positions, although the university is not expecting to fill all of them. At a recent TRU board meeting, Milovick said the increased compensation spending is something that “keeps us up at night.” “I get concerned when there is a year-over-year change of $16 million. That’s a big number. We have to better understand and manage that number,” Milovick told KTW, noting the university has obligations under its collective agreement with faculty and education standards to maintain. With compensation spending linked so closely with international students, the university has to keep a close eye on issues ranging from political instability to currency changes. Milovick said international enrolments aren’t exactly stable and, because of that, the surpluses could disappear “overnight.” Four years ago, the university had a Saudi Arabian student population of roughly 330. That number began to decline even before the Saudi government stopped paying the tuition for its students in Canada, Milovick said. Today, only a few Saudi students remain. While the number of students from some countries have declined, the most recent surge is coming from India. Nearly half — 1,536 — of all international students now come from India.

Other sources include China (520), Bangladesh (137), Nigeria (132) and Vietnam (81). The university’s proposed smaller-than-expected surplus may affect how and when the university delivers on its planned capital projects. Now, Milovick said, the university’s capital planning advisory group has plans for projects totalling about $240 million. Those projects would be funded by surpluses, reserves, government funding and donations. But where will the money come from? “That’s a good question,” he said at Friday’s board meeting. One of the university’s capital projects currently underway, the Nursing and Population Health Building, accounts for $24 million of the $35 million in capital spending proposed for the coming year. The remaining spending will be for renovations to the newly purchased Upper College Heights residential development and various other projects, Milovick said. All of the university’s diminished surplus will now go to those projects, plus approximately $20 million from its reserves. To counter the ebb and flow of international students and compensation spending, Milovick said the university is conducting a financial sustainability exercise. The group behind that exercise met for the first time in March. Despite the unpredictable factors with international students and compensation spending, Milovick characterized the latest budget as “good. “It’s a growing university — certainly not without its challenges — but we’re in a pretty good spot,” he said.

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A4

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

CITY PAGE Kamloops.ca

Stay Connected @CityofKamloops

LOVE FOOD HATE WASTE

Council Calendar April 8, 2019 2:30 pm - Community Services Committee Executive Boardroom, 7 Victoria Street West

The City is excited to announce a new partnership with Love Food Hate Waste Canada (LFHW), a program created by the National Zero Waste Council and supported by provincial and local governments. LFHW teaches residents how to avoid waste by purchasing less, storing food properly, and better utilizing leftovers for meals and freezing, among other things.

April 8, 2019 4:00 pm - Community Relations Committee Corporate Boardroom, 7 Victoria Street West

Wasting food hurts the environment and costs you money. According to a national program study, the average Canadian household wastes 308 pounds of food per year, at a cost of more than $1,100.

April 9, 2019 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting 7:00 pm - Public Hearing Council Chambers, 7 Victoria Street West

Residents can begin food waste reduction techniques at home by following three key rules:

April 16, 2019 10:00 am - Committee of the Whole 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting Council Chambers, 7 Victoria Street West

• Keep it Fresh—organize your fridge properly, utilize your freezer, and know the shelf life of products • Plan it Out—plan your meals in advance, make only what you’ll eat, and buy only what you need • Use it Up—cook perishables first, use leftovers, and understand best before dates Discover more about the program, resources, and helpful tips at:

April 29, 2019 4:00 pm - Development and Sustainability Committee Executive Boardroom, 7 Victoria Street West

Kamloops.ca/LoveFoodHateWaste

Spring Line Painting The City will be undertaking its annual spring line painting starting on April 8, 2019, and the painting will continue for the next several weeks. During this time, motorists are asked to watch for posted signs as crews make their way through each neighbourhood. Please slow down and use caution when approaching areas that are being painted, and thank you for your patience.

City of Kamloops Seeking Interactive Booths for Canada Day Festivities Be part of our national holiday celebration on Monday, July 1, 2019, at Riverside Park. Priority will be given to engaging, interactive booths and organizations that promote a creative message of community spirit to the 30,000 expected attendees. Applications must be submitted by May 2, 2019. Applications be found at: Kamloops.ca/CanadaDay

Waste Wise App Never miss a collection day again. Use our free app to sign up for collection day reminders via email, phone call, text, or in-app notification.

9TH ANNUAL VOLUNTEER APPRECIATION BBQ

KEEP GARBAGE OUT OF REACH OF BEARS

SPRING STREET SWEEPING UNDERWAY

Are you a volunteer? April 7–13, 2019, is National Volunteer Week, and the Mayor and Council would like to recognize and thank the many volunteers who make a difference and who help build, maintain, and grow healthy communities. Thank you for Making Kamloops Shine!

The City's “Bear Smart” Bylaw began this week and is in effect until November 30, 2019. This means that garbage should be securely stored until it can be placed at the curb—no earlier than 4:00 am on collection day. Mismanaged garbage is one of the main reasons bears will enter neighbourhoods. When bears learn that garbage means food, they come back again and again. Help keep garbage out of reach of bears and remove the temptation by doing the following:

WATCH FOR SIGNS IN YOUR NEIGHBOURHOOD

You're invited to the 9th Annual Volunteer Appreciation BBQ. Friday, April 12, 2019 11:30 am–1:30 pm Sandman Centre (outdoor plaza) 300 Lorne Street

Street sweeping is happening over the next several weeks. Residents can help City crews by parking their vehicles off of the street when work is underway. Did you know that City crews sweep each road and most sidewalks (and every concrete island) using large sweeping trucks, sidewalk sweepers, water trucks, and other equipment?

Kamloops.ca/WasteWise

• store garbage and recycling in a garage or sturdy enclosure • keep pet food containers indoors • keep barbecues clean • remove bird feeders between May and November • pick ripe fruit quickly and remove unwanted fruit trees

Consider a Career With Us

Learn more about keeping your neighbourhood safe from bears at:

Signs have been posted to inform residents when crews are working in specific neighbourhoods. To view the streets that have been swept and to see the upcoming areas, view the City's new street sweeping map at:

Kamloops.ca/BearSmart

Maps.Kamloops.ca/StreetSweeping

If you're wondering if an item can be recycled or not, simply use the Waste Wizard to find out how to properly dispose of it. For details, visit:

Join our team of over 700 employees, who work in a variety of fulfilling and challenging careers. Visit: Kamloops.ca/Jobs

Looking for volunteer opportunities? Visit: VolunteerKamloops.org

Currently, crews are in Valleyview and Westsyde. Once they're done in those areas, they will move to. Crews will focus on higher elevations in the next few weeks.

LET'S TALK KAMLOOPS Let's Talk Kamloops is our engagement website where you can share your voice and shape our city. We know you have ideas about our city, and we are committed to working more closely with you to improve engagement and better guide our planning and decision making.

ENGAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES Report an issue: 250-828-3461 Emergency after hours: 250-372-1710

• Why Engage? - complete a survey to to inform the City on how you wish to receive information • Staff Shout Outs - send a kudos or a thank you to a City staff member

Sign up and speak up at

LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca

City Hall: 7 Victoria Street West, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1A2 | 250-828-3311


FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A5

LOCAL NEWS

Change in response policy has firefighters concerned TIM PETRUK

STAFF REPORTER

tim@kamloopsthisweek.com

When his son went head-first into the boards during a hockey game on McArthur Island in February, Jeff Freeze sprung into action. It looked like a spinal injury. Precautions were taken and 911 was called. Freeze, a Kamloops firefighter who worked previously as a paramedic, knew what to do thanks to his training. What he wasn’t prepared for was the wait. “It seemed like 20 minutes and no one showed up,” Freeze told KTW. If the incident took place a year earlier, firefighters would have likely been on scene within four minutes. But, as of last June, a change in BC Emergency Health Services’ (BCEHS) response model means firefighters were not notified of the call — one that would have previously been routine. According to KFR statistics, fire crews would have been on scene at McArthur Island Sports Centre within four minutes. According to B.C. Emergency Health Services, an ambulance was at the arena 12 minutes after the 911 call reporting the injury to Freeze’s son. Freeze’s son’s injuries were not serious. But, he said, they could have been. “My concern was why isn’t a 16-year-old with a potential spinal cord injury a call that fire would respond to?” Freeze said, noting he called Kamloops Fire Rescue’s dispatch later to find out if firefighters were tied up with something more serious. They were not and they had no way of finding out about the injuries to Freeze’s son because of the way the call was coded by the BC Ambulance Service. “We are trained for that,” he said. “We are ready for it. But we didn’t even know about it.” Freeze is concerned the move to change dispatch procedure was a political one — a decision that is putting lives at risk in communities across B.C. According to Freeze, BC Ambulance changed its coding to get more vehicles on the road. He speculated the service wants its call volume to increase to demonstrate a need for greater funding. “I used to be a paramedic. I get both sides — I’m 110 per cent for BC Ambulance getting

more funding,” he said. “Now, because they want the call volume to go up, all the calls that used to go to us don’t. Ambulance calls go through the roof, but KFR doesn’t get the call volume we used to get. The general public is not getting the service they would have a year ago.” Freeze said the issue has become one of life and death. “People are actually dying because we’re not getting called,” he said. “Provincially, and even in town, there have been heart attacks where BC Ambulance will not call the fire department to come help. My No. 1 concern is that when you pick up the phone and call 911 and you need help, like I did for my son, they held back care.” Freeze is not alone in his frustration. According to the head of the union that represents municipal firefighters in B.C., the issue is one impacting firehalls across the province. Gord Ditchburn, president of the BC Professional Firefighters Association, told KTW fire crews want to be able to respond to as many calls as possible. “The concern is you have the public waiting exponentially longer for a response than they would normally,” he said. “If you’ve got a firehall blocks away from someone who is injured, why not send firefighters who are trained to at least triage? Coupled with that is the ambulance paramedics are woefully resourced. They’re struggling to keep up with the calls they go to. “Paramedics are underresourced and firefighters can respond. At the end of the day, we’re all just looking after the public and we’re all funded by the same person — the person who calls us when they need help.” Neil Lilley, head of patient care for BC Emergency Health Services, said the new dispatch model was implemented last spring after a review that included a look at best practices around the world and input from a number of doctors and nurses. “The purpose was to ensure we are responding to the sickest patients as quickly as possible,” he said. “We wanted to ensure we’re not over-resourcing patients who had not-so-severe injuries. We’re now dispatching just one resource where before there would have been two resources [paramedics and firefighters] arriving

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within minutes of each other.” Lilley downplayed concerns from firefighters, noting they still play a crucial role in responding to the most severe medical calls. The new dispatch model, he said, ensures fire crews will be free when they are needed. “We really appreciate the partnership with the fire services,” he said. “They really to play a critical role. We really need them to be able to respond to those most critical calls.” KFR responded to 4,070 medical calls in 2017. Last year, that number dropped to 3,278. When asked by KTW, Kamloops Fire Rescue Chief Mike Adams said he is reluctant to offer any comment that could be seen as critical of BC Ambulance. “BC Ambulance Service changed the way they dispatch in June of last year,” he said. “Whenever we receive a call from 911, our response times are usually under four minutes. We have a standard. We have seen a decrease to our call volumes in and around 20 per cent. With regard to potential outcomes, you’d have to talk to BC Ambulance.” Lilley said BCEHS is committed to reviewing its response model every six months. If changes are needed, he said, they will be made. “We do monitor patient outcomes,” he said. “We’re now responding to those critical patients faster than before.” Lilley said B.C. leads all Canadian provinces in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival rates, though he stopped short of directly linking that to the new response model. “We are getting to the higheracuity patients quicker,” he said. Adams said first responders — fire, police and paramedics — work co-operatively while on scene at calls, regardless of how those calls are dispatched. “I don’t want to get into a tit-fortat with other first responders,” he said. “Locally, we have a fantastic relationship with BC Ambulance Service and RCMP. We meet on a regular basis.” According to Lilley, co-operation is key among first responders — a factor noted in a February report from B.C.’s auditor general, calling on BCEHS to improve coordination with fire services. “We’re working hard with our partners in fire services,” he said. “We really do value their responses to those higher-acuity calls. They really do make a difference.”

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Have You made Your Will? Next week is Make-a-Will Week in BC, designed to encourage the public to write or update their Wills. Without a properly written Will, it is possible that your estate may not be distributed as you wish, you may pay more tax or your children may not be cared for in the way you would like. So how do you encourage a loved one to make a Will? By popular demand, we have created Estate Planning Gift Certificates. Contact us at wills@fultonco.com for details, or to arrange an appointment to discuss your estate planning. Next week, keep an eye on our Facebook page as in keeping with the Make a Will Week theme, we will be sharing some practical information, along with announcements for both a free seminar event and a giveaway. If you have questions about estate planning, feel free to reach out to our experienced team - we're here to help.

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A6

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

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members of council: Mayor Ken Christian and councillors Mike O’Reilly, Kathy Sinclair, Dieter Dudy and Bill Sarai. Singh wanted more time, perhaps with a fall deadline for staff to draft a bylaw, while Bass and Walsh maintained May should suffice if public consultations followed information from staff. The second proposed amendment was a call from Dudy to cut out cutlery from the ban. Dudy said he supported elimination of plastic bags, but noted business owners have not yet had a chance to look at alternatives to plastic cutlery. “Give them time, but put them on notice,” Dudy said. Singh agreed and added that while the courts have ruled on single-use bags, he feared the city could open itself up to legal issues if it tried to outpace other municipalities on the issue of banning plastic cutlery. He was among the majority — seven, including the mayor — on council to agree to toss that idea in the garbage. Bass and Walsh were opposed to the amendment and wanted plastic cutlery to remain under the ban. The next plastic to drop was the straw. As Singh called for a notice of motion to remove plastic straws from the proposed ban,

the mayor, in support of that third amendment, had the gallery thirsty following a lengthy debate on a sunny April afternoon. “I don’t want Kamloops residents to be without milkshakes for the summer of 2019,” Christian said, questioning a lack of alternative options to plastic straws and prompting Sinclair to provide proof to the contrary, pulling out from some mysterious location around the horseshoe a reusable straw. She noted the ban would not come into effect until the fall or later, thereby saving the summer of milkshakes in the Tournament Capital. “We’re talking about an inevitable phasing out,” she said. Elimination of straws from the ban passed about as narrowly as a triple-thick milkshake through a plastic straw: by a vote of 5-4. Christian and councillors O’Reilly, Singh, Walsh and Sarai voted in favour of leaving straws outside of a ban, while Bass, Sinclair, Hunter and Dudy wanted to retain the straw prohibition. Additionally, a proposal to add Styrofoam to the ban didn’t make it past the time it takes to order takeout sushi. Walsh could only persuade Bass to vote in favour of such an addition, with the other seven councillors voting against.

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Kamloops Coun. Mike O’Reilly: “There is no win-win unless we have a commercial recycling program in Kamloops because we can’t meet the goals for recycling in the city without it.”

O’Reilly leads push for a city commercial recycling program JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Try to remember household waste before the introduction of the blue bin. Now, imagine that waste on a business-scale level and consider all of the businesses in Kamloops. It’s a night and day scenario, according to Coun. Mike O’Reilly, who is behind a push by council to move a commercial recycling program up the priority list. Following council’s lengthy discussion on Tuesday on banning businesses from handing out plastic bags, O’Reilly issued a notice of motion requesting staff to bring to the city’s civic operations committee a report on implementation of commercial recycling. “I strongly believe that will have the biggest impact on waste, on the amount of items going to the commercial landfill. Greenhouse gas emissions, the list is endless,” O’Reilly said. “People trying to imagine their lives without the recycling bin is an absolute no-brainer.” O’Reilly owns Cafe Motivo downtown and said his business goes through 500 four-litre

plastic milk jugs per month. He said in order to recycle them, he has to take them to the recycling depot and wonders how many jugs and other recyclable products end up in the landfill as a result. “In the same breath, I get scolded from people for having a pickup truck in Kamloops,” he said. “There is no win-win unless we have a commercial recycling program in Kamloops because we can’t meet the goals for recycling in the city without it.” The idea to implement commercial recycling in the city is not new, though it poses significant challenges. Environmental services manager Glen Farrow said the city is awaiting approval from the province after creating a solid waste management plan with the Thompson-Nicola Regional District. Chief among recommendations in that plan is to increase recycling by businesses and institutions through a series of diversion initiatives, including a potential disposal ban at the landfill beginning with cardboard and paper. The challenge the city has is not collecting such materials, but what to do with the product with limited global markets.

“At the end of the day, where is that product going to go?” Farrow said. “We’re struggling enough as it is with the contamination on the residential side of things. I’m not sure there’s a processor out there that would want commercial recycling.” Farrow said the issue is larger than Kamloops and said another option is an expansion to the provincial extended producer responsibility program, which shifts the burden of waste from local governments and puts it back on the producer. All paper and packaging consumed at home, for example, is the responsibility of companies like Johnson and Johnson or Huggies. “Our ask is where are we at with establishing an EPR program with commercial recycling, just like we have with Recycle BC,” Farrow said. Farrow said the issue could come to the city’s civic operations committee as early as this spring. DID YOU KNOW? Business owners are not prohibited from bringing home recycling from their businesses and tossing into their residential blue bins at home.

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Dream Home Want to Pay Off Your Mortgage Faster? Here’s How The moment we get our first mortgage, we begin dreaming about our ‘mortgage burning’ date. While mortgage debt will cost you the lowest interest rate among all debts, there’s a sense of freedom in being able to chip away at that principal balance and shorten the time in which it will take you to become mortgage free. Even if you’re in your very first mortgage, there are some small steps you can take now to reduce the overall amount of money you’ll pay towards owning your property outright. Step 1. One of the easiest ways to put more money towards your mortgage while not significantly impacting your cash flow involves moving to a different payment schedule, such as accelerated bi-weekly mortgage payments. Not to be confused with semi-monthly mortgage payments (24 payments per year), accelerated bi-weekly mortgage payments (26 payments per year) will not

only pay your mortgage off quicker, but will also save you a significant amount of money over the term of your mortgage. This option means you’re making one additional monthly payment per year, which can really add up over the course of your years as a mortgage holder. Step 2. Even rounding up your mortgage payments a few dollars each payment can help make your balance decline sooner. If you round up your mortgage payment from, say, $766 to an even figure such as $800, you can feel confident in knowing that every extra bit goes toward your principal. Step 3. Take advantage of flexible payments. Most lenders allow you to increase your regular payment up to a set maximum, such as 15%, while others allow you to double up your payments. Be sure to know these rules before making extra payments so you’re not penalized for paying too much within the year.

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A8

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

Kamloops This Week is a politically independent newspaper, published Wednesdays and Fridays at 1365-B Dalhousie Dr., Kamloops, B.C., V2C 5P6 Phone: 250-374-7467 | Fax: 250-374-1033 email: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. Tim Shoults Operations manager Aberdeen Publishing Inc.

SMOKING 2.0 HAS OUR KIDS PUFFING

I

t’s amazing that companies have convinced a whole new generation to, essentially, smoke. Pre-teens, teens and young adults who wouldn’t think of smoking a cigarette or cigar have taken to vaping like it’s the hottest new fad. We’d bet many think they’re avoiding the pitfalls of smoking with this choice. While vaping is less harmful for people than smoking cigarettes, and thus can be a positive change for people who are already smokers, that doesn’t mean it’s harmless. Health Canada tells us vaping can increase your exposure to chemicals that can cause diseases like lung cancer. It can also expose you to nicotine (nicotine is in many, but not all, e-cigarettes). Nicotine remains highly addictive, even without the lead, arsenic, ammonia and more that are present in traditional tobacco products. Health Canada lists known effects of nicotine, including impact on memory and concentration and ability to alter teen brain development, along with possible effects of exposure to nicotine in adolescence, including reduced impulse control and cognitive and behavioural problems. It’s disturbing, then, that e-cigarettes seem to be targeted toward young people. The flavours alone tell us this, with many of them sounding and smelling like types of candy. Young people are more than likely not thinking about the fact they could be starting a lifelong dependency when they take up vaping. They’re not thinking about reducing their impulse control and possible cognitive problems. They’re not thinking about the expense of decades of addiction to nicotine for which they could be signing up. They’re likely just thinking about how cool they will look to their friends or how vaping will help them fit in if their friends are all doing it. Sound familiar? It’s smoking all over again. We as a society need to take this seriously. For too many kids, it will not be just a bit of harmless experimental fun.

OUR

VIEW

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. EDITORIAL Publisher: Robert W. Doull Editor: Christopher Foulds Newsroom staff: Dave Eagles Tim Petruk Marty Hastings Jessica Wallace Sean Brady Michael Potestio Todd Sullivan SALES STAFF: Don Levasseur Linda Skelly Kate Potter Jodi Lawrence Darlene Kawa Liz Spivey

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Giving away our gas?

B

.C. Green Leader Andrew Weaver ridiculed the minority NDP government last week for its “generational sellout” of exporting the province’s abundant natural gas reserves to Asia. “I sat opposite for four years as I watched the members now in government hurl abuse at the B.C. Liberals,” Weaver roared in debate over Premier John Horgan’s latest tax breaks to seal the huge LNG Canada deal in northern B.C. Weaver summed up his objection to the NDP’s liquefied natural gas policy this way: “That’s the base level of politics and natural gas in B.C. ‘We’re going to try to deliver what Christy Clark couldn’t.’ The only way to do that is to take the giveaway … to a whole new level like we’ve never seen in Canada in terms of corporate welfare.” Weaver has expressed fury since Horgan surprised everyone last fall by announcing his government had reached a deal with LNG Canada partners Shell, PetroChina, Mitsubishi and Korea Gas to make the largest private investment in Canadian history. Petronas, the Malaysian energy giant that walked away from a similar project for Prince Rupert, soon bought in to LNG Canada’s Kitimat shipping complex and Pacific GasLink pipeline to bring the vast gas reserves from the Dawson Creek area to the coast for compression and export as LNG.

TOM FLETCHER Our Man In

VICTORIA Weaver’s accusation of a giveaway focuses on B.C.’s deep-well royalty credit program, which allows gas producers to deduct credits from royalties once qualifying shale gas wells start producing. He notes the accumulated credits for B.C. producers are now more than $3 billion, as thousands of wells have reached into deep shale formations for decades worth of gas production. The latest B.C. budget projects natural gas royalty revenues of $229 million for the current year and $206 million next year. Weaver’s argument is that much of this revenue is clawed back by the deep well credit, and then Shell and other producers get to use nearly free gas to power the refrigeration and compression plants used to turn gas into liquids for loading on ships. Energy Minister Michelle Mungall reminds me there is a minimum royalty that all producers must pay.

It’s not much — three per cent on gas revenue for wells deeper than 1,900 metres and six per cent for wells shallower than 1,900 metres. Royalties also vary with price, which has dipped to historic lows as B.C. gas remains landlocked and our only export customer, the U.S., has developed and started exporting its own shale gas reserves. I reported last fall on the surprise that hit natural gas heating customers when B.C.’s latest increase in carbon tax made the tax more than the charge for the gas they used. Horgan and Mungall, like former premier Clark and former minister Rich Coleman before them, emphasize that B.C. is in a fiercely competitive market that includes Russia, Qatar and other huge gas producers. Either we compete or we wind down the biggest industry in northern B.C. For an independent look at whether B.C. is giving away its gas, University of Calgary economist Jack Mintz has a new study that finds B.C.’s total tax rate on new natural gas investments is 31.9 per cent, fifth-highest of producing regions in North America. Only Saskatchewan’s is higher among provinces. Then there are the environmental impacts of B.C.’s shale gas boom, including hydraulic fracturing and greenhouse gas impact. I’ll examine those in a future column. tfletcher@blackpress.ca


FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A9

OPINION LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

CHAMBER SHOULD HAVE RETAINED PERKS

KTW reader Steven Puhallo says we should all listen to former justice minister Jody WilsonRaybould

TIMELY LESSON IN ‘TRUTH TALKING’ Editor: I think Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his office have been missing something during the SNCLavalin corruption controversy. That something is the re-emergence of the Indigenous “voice” and what we can learn from it. Jody Wilson-Raybould describes herself as a “truth talker.” That is not just a marketing brand or product framing. It is a tenet that lies at the root of the Indigenous Peoples’ Renaissance we are witnessing in Canada today. It is about the telling of truth, and of accepting the truth, around residential schools, conditions on reserves, semi-autonomous self-government, the Delgamuukw decision, the snatchings, voting and access rights — all of the Indigenous experience since first contact with European colonists. Trudeau keeps trying to deny and re-direct and spin this. It’s been failing every time. He has spoken about “reconciliation,” but has sadly missed the most important part of it — speaking and accepting the truth, no matter what. The first settlers who came to this land felt very deeply they had so much to teach the people they found here. It turns out the people had a very important lesson to teach them. This time, with the lesson on “truth talking” from Wilson-Raybould to learn from, we should listen. Steven Puhallo Kamloops

Editor: Re: (‘Chamber rescinds hiring of executive director,’ March 27): I disagree with the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce’s decision to pull back its offer of employment to John Perks based on posts he shared on his personal Facebook page. The Chamber seemed to already be aware of the Facebook posts in question when it made the decision to hire Perks. Now, simply because some of his Facebook posts were noticed by some members of the public, the Chamber has decided to rescind its job offer. There was nothing criminal in the posts on his page and it seems like the posts in question weren’t even his own words, but memes he had shared. I’m sure many of us have shared

memes at times that didn’t accurately reflect our views on a given topic or were maybe a bit off-colour. That is the point of memes — to get a reaction. But that is beside the point. Regardless of whether the memes accurately reflect Perks’ views, it should not be a requirement for his position in the Chamber that he have a certain set of beliefs. I do not see how any of the Facebook posts Perks shared should exclude him from the position of executive director. His beliefs on those particular matters say nothing about his ability to do the job for which he was hired and for which the Chamber obviously thought he was a very highly qualified candidate. KTW editor Christopher Foulds wrote

the following in his column on this subject (‘A job without Perks,’ March 27): “This is about a person hired to lead a business organization that represents a rainbow of beliefs, a person expected to liaise with a wide range of people with an equally wide range of beliefs.” I agree completely with that statement. There are a wide range of beliefs within our country. Perks should not be excluded from this position simply because he has a belief that is not popular on Facebook right now or that does not agree with the current Liberal government’s position. This is an example of intolerance in a culture that prides itself on being tolerant. Jill Enns Kamloops

WE CAN HAVE A PAC, BUT WE NEED TO KNOW LIMITS Editor: The original performing-arts centre proposal would have been viable with a rational budget. At the PAC’s conception in 2015, city council decided to assign the management of the facility to an independent society of its creation, with a board of directors council would appoint. Council was to grant the society an annual $900,000 civic allotment of tax dollars to pay the society’s annual administration expenses and startup costs. The society was not to be

held accountable to the city for use of the allotments, which were itemized in the budget as revenues. Another exorbitant expense — $1.2 million in the fifth year, 2020 — was also budgeted for PAC administration. In the first five years of operation, the society would have received $5.4 million in tax dollars for its administration and the PAC administration would have received about $6.3 million from PAC revenues. A profit of $185,922 was shown for the fifth year of operations. Had the annual $900,000

allotment been itemized as an expense, as it is to taxpayers, a loss of $1.6 million would have been shown. Another budget deception $212,000 in the fifth year for fundraising and grants, which put into revenues. Those funds were earmarked for community organizations and should not have been a budgeted item. It was padding to hide losses. The PAC budget was misrepresented and the facility would have run at a loss to the city of more than $1.8 million a year. We dodged a bullet with the 53 per cent No vote.

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The budget would have balanced if the expense of administration was a realistic $350,000 a year or less. In the fifth year, $369,900 was budgeted for maintenance. From my experience as a rock concert promoter, I know it does not take as many people to manage a hall as it does to maintain one. Taxpayer funding of societies must be examined and limits recognized if we are to have a performing-arts centre in Kamloops. Richard Lodmell Kamloops

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FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

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LOCAL NEWS

Where to go in wee hours of the night? CITY WILL ADD TWO PUBLIC WASHROOOMS DOWNTOWN, TO BE OPEN UNTIL 11 P.M. JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

City council has flushed the Portland Loo and 24-hour public bathroom concept down the toilet, opting to instead construct public bathrooms in pre-existing downtown buildings, with oversight from community groups. The bathrooms will be built in the Kamloops Central Business Improvement Association office, at 103-340 Victoria St., and in the homeless storage facility at 48 West Victoria St. The latter facility will include a shower and both locations will be open from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m., fewer hours than the 24 hours previously planned for the proposed late loos. A closed-door decision released this week states the freestanding bathrooms previously approved in the 2018 supplemental budget were determined “not to be the best solution,” due to the city’s low winter temperatures and difficulty finding a location to install them. Additionally, costs and vandalism were concerns. Kamloops Aboriginal Friendship Society and Kamloops Central Business

Improvement Association will each be paid $20,000 annually to support maintenance, cleaning and renovation. “The problem you have in this day and age that you have with public washrooms is you need a washroom attendant,” Mayor Ken Christian said. “Otherwise, the degree of nonsense that goes on — sex acts, drug use, violence and just general vandalism — is too much. It would be affronting our community values, so we wanted to put them in some place where there would be a partner that could operate them.” Existing public washrooms in Kamloops are generally located in and around parks, open seasonally some time after 5 a.m. and closed at or before 11 p.m., depending on when city staff get to them. No public washrooms are open 24 hours, though some businesses offer patrons late-night loos. As a result of a lack of public facilities, downtown businesses have raised the issue of defecation and urination in the alleyways. One downtown business owner told KTW issues of defecation and urination occur weekly near their business.

They understand it to be part of larger issues of homelessness and enforcement. Problems are not limited to feces and urine, but also include vomit, condoms, discarded needles and sex acts. City CAO David Trawin said the city experimented with keeping public washrooms at Heritage House in Riverside Park open for longer periods of time, but noted it resulted in damage, dirtiness and people sleeping in them. The city ultimately cut back the hours. Jeff Putnam, the city’s parks manager, said in the past two years, the city has seen an increase in the misuse of public washroom facilities in city parks. As a result, it has doubled its crews to include bylaws and parks staff. In the past two weeks, $5,000 worth of damage was done to the Heritage House bathroom, including trashing of the automatic door opener for theft of the electronics inside. There have also been problems in the washrooms at McDonald Park in North Kamloops. “It’s fairly constant, to be honest,” Putnam said.

The mayor said the two primary groups the city hoped to help in adding public bathrooms are the homeless and Rocky Mountaineer tourists. Calling it a “human right” to have a bathroom, Christian said an increase in social housing, including the Tranquille Road modular homes that opened last week, should help alleviate the need for late-night washrooms, noting council sought a balance. As for the bar flush, Christian said those people have access to bathrooms at their respective watering holes. Cost of the facilities was another sticking point for council, which wanted more permanent facilities for the price tag. The loos were estimated to cost $370,000 to install and $55,000 annually to maintain. Operating costs are down for the new bathrooms, though capital costs are expected to be more. Construction of the two downtown bathrooms is estimated at $360,000, including a contingency fund. The KCBIA bathroom will cost $150,000. The West Victoria Street washroom will cost more, $210,000, due to the addition of a shower.

Council approved a similar amount of money to be spent building a public washroom at a location to be determined in North Kamloops. “We’re trying to offer laundry facilities, we have the storage bin facilities there and we want a shower,” Christian said of the washroom that will be added to the storage facility for the homeless across from city hall. “Maybe they’re transients and moving through Kamloops. You want to given them a chance to get a job. Maybe they need a place to store their gear, clean up and get out there and start trying to improve their life,” he said. While appreciative the city is recognizing the problem, the downtown business owner who spoke to KTW said bathrooms open during the day are not enough. The city, however, maintains it would need staff working though the night to monitor 24-hour bathrooms. Kelowna apparently has security personnel monitoring public washrooms near its skating rink. “I don’t think this will resolve the issue of people urinating and defecating downtown, but it will help,” Trawin said.

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LOCAL NEWS

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Assaults on prison staff up: union Corrections spokesman for BCGEU says 2018 was most violent year ever at KRCC TIM PETRUK STAFF REPORTER tim@kamloopsthisweek.com

Before B.C.’s newest maximum-security prison welcomed its first inmates more than two years ago, there was some speculation from the leader of the union representing the province’s corrections officers that the state-of-the-art facility in Oliver would ease tensions at other jails. According to Dean Purdy, corrections spokesman for the B.C. Government Employees Union, that has not been the case at other provincial prisons — Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre included — since Okanagan Correctional Centre opened its doors in October 2016. “I think, initially, that’s what we were hoping for,” Purdy told KTW. “But it hasn’t seemed to level out the violence.” In fact, Purdy said, violent incidents have only increased. He said KRCC recorded a record number of inmate-onstaff assaults last year. “Violence levels are on the rise at all seven of our maximum-security jails and KRCC is no different,” Purdy said. “In 2018, we had 27 assaults on staff and that’s an all-time high.” Purdy said those numbers are based on BCGEU data. B.C.’s Corrections Branch keeps its own statistics, but government numbers compiled for the first

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Kamloops Regional Correctional Centre recorded 27 inmate-on-staff assaults in 2018, according to the union representing corrections officers. KTW FILE PHOTO

half of 2018 show only two assaults officially recorded. According to Purdy, the union describes an assault as any incident involving violence — ranging from a shove or a strike to spitting, punching and throwing human waste. “The severity is all over the map,” he said. “It’s anything from being spit on right up to a full-blown sucker punch or having a cup of feces thrown on you. Things are definitely heating up. Working at a

maximum-security jail is already one of the most stressful jobs out there, especially when things are escalating like this.” According to Purdy, the solution is increased funding and staffing. The union would like to see two correctional officers per living unit when there are 20 or more inmates. KRCC’s ratio ranges between 1 to 36 and 1 to 40 inmates, Purdy said, with ratios at newer facilities like Okanagan Correctional Centre reaching 1 to 72.

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A12

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Short-term rentals not part of city’s suites update A sample of Airbnb rentals available in Kamloops as of April 4. According to City community planner Carmin Mazzotta, Kamloops has about 150 unique listings on websites such as HomeAway, VRBO and Airbnb, and has received only three complaints in the past two to three years.

JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

The City of Kamloops will not look at short-term rental accommodations as it updates its secondary suite regulations. City community planner Carmin Mazzotta said the city so far has minimal listings, which have not been problematic. He said Kamloops has about 150 unique listings on websites such as HomeAway, VRBO and Airbnb, and has received only three complaints in the past two to three years. “The scope of a project to begin regulating short-term rentals is pretty expensive, compared to the scope of the issue,” Mazzotta told KTW. If other communities have issues that need addressing, Mazzotta said, Kamloops can learn

from those municipalities if similar issues arise locally. Other more heavily tourist-based communities — such as Tofino, Victoria, Vancouver, Nelson and Kelowna, — have been impacted by issues related to short-term rentals. Kelowna, for example, has about 2,000 unique listings and is

regulating its shortterm rentals as they encroach on availability of long-term housing. In late February, Kelowna council introduced bylaw amendments that would allow short-term rentals in a principle residence, but generally disallow them in secondary suites or carriage houses, with

some exceptions. Additionally, anyone looking to operate a short-term rental in the Lake City would require a business licence. Mazzotta said that process by the municipality has been lengthy. Public engagement began in fall of 2017 and the city had a fivehour public hearing on

the matter last month. The rules are expected to be implemented this month. “There’s some lessons to be learned from these other municipalities,” Mazzotta said. “Right now, what we’re going to do is we’re going to observe that, we’re going to monitor the numbers here and apply that to a potential future strategy to potential future zoning amendments.” Mazzotta said the city’s existing regulations apply to shortterm rental accommodations. Rules within the zoning bylaw

around borders and lodgers, for example, is the equivalent of an Airbnb. Shared accommodations in someone’s house are allowed under those rules to a maximum of two people. “That is probably the equivalent of an Airbnb shared room,” Mazzotta said. “Where there’s no separate cooking facilities, may or may not have their own bathroom. It’s not a suite. We do allow those in all residential zones to a maximum of two persons.” The city has not heard complaints from the accommodations industry and the focus continues to be on long-term rental accommodations. During a workshop on Tuesday, Kamloops council asked staff to come back with amendments to zoning, business licensing and traffic regulations,

which would pave the way for more secondary and garden suites to increase rental stock. Council also approved development of a suites registry program. A public hearing on the matter will take place later in the spring or in the summer before any changes are adopted. Meanwhile, as the city continues to monitor short-term rentals in Kamloops and how other communities are dealing with them, Coun. Denis Walsh called them a “threat” to long-term accommodations. Walsh said homeowners are taking housing out of the stock for others to purchase or rent because they can make more money renting shortterm than long-term. “It will become a problem in Kamloops if we don’t address it,” he said.

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“I think that we have to recognize that the impact of what they call anthropogenic effects on the environment are really our responsibility,” Christian said. “We have to be prepared to accept that reality and to pay for it.” That responsibility does not lie with Kamloops alone, however. Christian said policy for years in place at the provincial and federal levels has damaged the environment, including regulations around forestry, mining and transportation. He said a city the size of Kamloops deals with staffing and funding capacity issues, noting financial contributions from higher levels of government have been seen and are expected. Christian said it is unfortunate climate-change deniers hold lofty positions — and he expects some may live in Kamloops, though none of whom are on Kamloops city council. In fact, earlier this week, the new council — elected last fall — revealed its high-level strategic priorities for the term and included among its top four “environmental leadership.” Christian addressed those who might view the issue as “frivolous” and called it essential to the city’s other priorities, including a vibrant economy. “There’s a new imperative that

we are responding to as a council,” Christian told KTW. “And I think, to their credit, everybody on this council has done their homework. They know the issues, they know the options and alternatives and they’re prepared to make decisions about that. “You’re going to see over the course of these next four years a lot of those decisions come into play, but that will not be unique to Kamloops. Kamloops will be a leader in terms of some of these, but there’s lots of other cities that will be doing a similar thing.” Coun. Arjun Singh is the longest tenured city councillor and called the mayor’s use of the podium to address the issue of climate change “a first.” Singh also cited council’s inclusion of environmental leadership in its strategic plan as being new. “I’ve never heard a mayor be so sort of up front and direct about concerns that he has,” Singh said. “Mayor Christian on Tuesday really talked about that and I think that’s very, very gratifying to hear, but I also think that’s a natural evolution to where we are now.” Singh has helped push the issue through the years, as city hall implemented a sustainability committee and integrated the development and sustainability departments. He is awaiting a climate-action strategy, which will help direct council toward the most

meaningful actions it can take. He called the ECCC report “very alarming,” but hopes to move the conversation away from debilitating and depressing to actions going forward. Though a cultural shift is challenging, he said a decarbonized world could result in better communities, with healthier people and more vibrancy. “I’m super hopeful for this council,” Singh said. “I think we’re all really thinking about this issue in a way that’s meaningful. We’ve already taken concrete actions, like doubling our active transportation budget, adding transit hours.” Asked if there is anything the city should be doing that it isn’t, Christian said there is always more to do. “What we have is an issue of capacity,” he said. “How much money do we have and how much staff do we have to do the engineering that’s required on a lot of these things? To say that we should be jumping all over these projects and opportunities and using contractors and expensive consultants doesn’t make a lot of sense to me. “So there’s kind of a pace that a city of 100,000 people can do this kind of work and that’s what we try to look for, that sweet spot — what can we reasonably accomplish? “What’s going to give us the best return on our investment.” — with a file from Canadian Press


FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A13

LOCAL NEWS

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STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

A Kamloops councillor says there is an over-concentration of cannabis stores slated for downtown and the Tranquille corridor and he is taking responsibility for zoning changes that have allowed stores to cluster together. “Upon reflection, I think we’re the architect of what I think is a possible problem,” Denis Walsh told KTW. Last spring, about a half-year prior to legalization, city staff recommended cannabis stores be located at least 150 metres apart from one another to avoid clustering. City council of the day, however, decreased that distance to 100 metres, with Walsh suggesting the amendment on the basis that 150 metres was too restrictive. “We need to have adequate supply of retail cannabis dispensaries or we just drive people to the black market again,” Walsh said during a public hearing on the matter last year. “The whole point of them legalizing it is to get rid of the black, underground market. That comes down to issues of safety and access.” The city’s development director

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at the time told council the impact could result in a 30 per cent bump in the number of recreational cannabis stores in the city. Staff had also told council they didn’t want to “throw the door right open” until the impact of the stores was better understood. Today, six months since the federal government legalized recreational cannabis, the city has approved six stores each in the downtown and Tranquille Corridor areas, with more concentration likely. Dave Jones, the city’s property use inspector, said up to 11 applications could be coming for downtown and up to seven are expected in that North Shore area. City councillors have said the market will work itself out based on demand. Walsh, however, said businesses are taking on “huge costs” to enter that market. He estimated costs to open the door, from required licensing to store renovations, at about $200,000. “I think we could have done a better job distributing the licensing,” he said. Walsh is considering opening a cannabis store downtown and has recused himself from cannabis council decisions at city hall as of late, though he has no update on the status of his application.

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FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS CITY HALL

Council will ask for meeting over land title move

Same fate for latest Cavers ghost motion KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

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Winter highway conditions in effect for April Drivers are reminded that winter tire regulations have been extended to April 30 on many highways, including the Coquihalla, to account for early spring snowfall. Drivers should ensure their vehicles are equipped with tires with the mountain/snowflake or mud and snow (M + S) symbol when travelling on designated routes. The tires must be in good condition and have a minimum tread depth of 3.5 millimetres. For rural highways and mountain passes, tires with the mountain/snowflake symbol provide the best traction and handling. This winter, the regulations have been extended to April 30 from March 31 on select highways, most of which are located in the interior and northern parts of the province. Road conditions can change quickly and snowfall is still possible in these regions. For more information on which routes will be impacted and how this could affect travel plans, go online to tranbc.ca.

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LOCAL NEWS

Probation for teen who sexually assaulted two classmates ally assaulted a pair of classmates during a high-school graduation party last spring will spend nearly two years

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Kamloops city limits. It was attended by 60 to 80 students, court heard, with no parental or teacher supervision. Everyone involved in the incident had been drinking. At the time of the incident, the attacker was 15 years old. His victims were 16- and 18-year-old girls. Court heard the attacks began after one of the complainants turned down a sexual advance made by the offender. After being rejected, he asked one of the girls if he could sleep in the tent the two victims were sharing because his friend was vomiting in his tent. The girls said yes, but told the boy to sleep near the door of the tent while they slept near the back. An agreed statement of facts describes the incidents involving the attacker sexually groping the two girls intermittently through the night, despite being told to stop touching them and having the girls physically try to stop him. “[The two victims] describe [the boy’s] behaviour as intermittent, but lasting throughout the night, until around 6:30 a.m., when they packed up their tent and left the campsite,” the agreed statement of facts reads. “[The 16-yearold girl] says that she was scared throughout the night.” The 16-year-old girl spoke in court, reading a victim-impact statement detailing complex anxiety and panic attacks in the months since her sexual assault. She also said she has been the subject of jokes at school. Kamloops provincial court Judge Marianne Armstrong called the girls “courageous” vic-

tims, noting a “quite clear expression of lack of consent” made to the boy. Defence lawyer Ken Walker said the attacker has been an honours student throughout high school and has played varsity sports and been involved in other community organizations. “He is a good young man with lots of supports in his community,” Walker said. “He truly regrets this event and wishes he had not drank to excess like he did.” Armstrong pushed back on the alcohol claim. “Not everybody who drinks alcohol engages in this type of behaviour,” she said. “Even more central to this is the idea of respecting women and how the alcohol interacts with that.” Walker said the boy, who had no prior criminal record, told him he did not blame alcohol for the incident and wanted to take responsibility. Armstrong handed the boy a 20-month probation term with conditions requiring he abstain from alcohol and stay away from the victims, with the exception of a potential letter of apology. “There is some real asymmetry for what has happened to [the attacker] since this has happened and what has happened to the victims,” she said. “School became a horror show for them after this event. Particularly [the 18-year-old girl], she was on the cusp of graduation. … This was supposed to be a celebratory event for graduation. [The 16-year-old girl] ended up dreading school and had to get medicated because she was having anxiety attacks.”

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LOCAL NEWS

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PREPPING FOR BETTER PLAY AREA Crews continue work in McDonald Park as the North Kamloops park’s playground undergoes an upgrade. The city is removing old surface material and replacing with a new engineered wood-fibre surface. The playground is fenced off until the project is completed. The playground is scheduled to re-open this coming Monday. THOMAS BEFURT/ KTW READER

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How are mule deer affected by predators and recent huge wildfires? BC’s largest collaborative study was launched last year to find answers to those questions. Dr Adam Ford, Canadian Research Chair in Wildlife Restoration Ecology will be in Kamloops to provide a free public seminar about the project. April 11, 7-9pm TRU Alumni Theatre, Clock Tower Doors open 6:30

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Kamloops digging its safety record KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Compared to similar-sized cities, Kamloops is No. 1 in the province for fewest number of gas line breaches due to digging. According to FortisBC, Kamloops had the highest number of damages for a medium-sized community just nine years ago. April is Safe Digging Awareness Month and Fortis is getting the word out to the public to call before digging. “We have seen a decrease in gas line damages in Kamloops of over 65 per cent in the last 10 years,” said Ian Turnbull, damage prevention and emergency services manager at FortisBC. “We are pleased to see that Kamloops is trending in the right direction and we want to thank the City of Kamloops and its citizens for putting safety first.”

“FortisBC has talked with us about examples from around the province of near misses,” said Mayor Ken Christian. “We fully support their safe digging protocols and value the importance of understanding all underground utility locations before beginning work. The City of Kamloops considers safety a top priority and has an excellent record in regard to safe digging. We are happy to be recognizing best practices during this campaign.” Although Kamloops has seen a reduction in gas line damages, FortisBC wants to remind everyone to continue working safely around natural gas infrastructure. This is important whether digging a small hole in the yard or excavating a job site. When a natural gas line is damaged, it can have serious consequences such as interrupted service and repair costs. What to do before you dig:

• First, call 1-800-474-6886 or go online to bconecall.ca before you dig to find out where gas lines and other utility lines are buried. The call and information is free. Make sure you call a minimum of three business days before you start your project. • Second, follow closely the information you receive from FortisBC. If you need help understanding the information or directions, call 1-888-822-6555 and a representative can assist. Use the information that FortisBC provides to mark the location of gas lines on your site. Dig by hand first to expose the gas line if you are working in this area and do not use any power equipment within one metre of the gas line. For more information about digging safely, go online to fortisbc.com/digsafe.

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Sa-Hali secondary student Sarah Seymour will represent B.C. at the twoday Canada Youth Summit conference next month in Ottawa, where the federal government has invited Canadians ages 16 to 24 to celebrate the launch of the country’s first youth policy and discuss key issues important to them. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

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Sarah snares Youth Summit spot MICHAEL POTESTIO STAFF REPORTER michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

A Grade 11 student from Sa-Hali secondary will be one of 300 youth from across the country attending the first-ever Canada Youth Summit next month. Sarah Seymour will represent B.C. at the two-day conference, May 2 and May 3, in Ottawa, where the federal government has invited Canadians ages 16 to 24 to celebrate the launch of the country’s first youth policy and discuss key issues important to them. Sa-Hali principal Rachael Sdoutz gave Sarah the good news that her application had been selected. “I was over the moon, honoured to be selected and to know that mine was the best out of all the applicants,” Sarah told KTW. There are three key issues affecting youth Sarah hopes to bring to the attention of government while in the nation’s capital — cannabis, vaping and technology. She said she’d like to discuss having more educational programs on the dangers of cannabis and, possibly, an older legal consumption age than the current 19. As for vaping, Sarah said it’s a popular activity among youth and she wants to discuss the dangers of the product, given the lack of known long-term health impacts. “It’s so in right now that everybody wants to do it and I think it’s pretty dangerous to be experimenting with these types

of things,” she said. The pros and cons of cellphone use is another topic Sarah wants to stress, noting that while she doesn’t think there needs to be a full-out ban in schools, there should be some boundaries on their use in the class. “The world is changing every single day and sometimes you can’t keep up with it, so I think giving some feedback of what the student perspective is will definitely benefit the government and the youth of today,” she said. Sarah said she’s not quite sure what will be on her itinerary for the two days, but understands the two-day conference will be used to help develop youth policy. The summit will involve discussing issues such as the environment, jobs and building more equal and inclusive communities, according to a press release from the Prime Minister’s Office. Sarah said she is looking forward to meeting with students from all over the country at next month’s conference and getting a better perspective on their everyday lives. Canadians invited to attend the summit at Carleton University were nominated based on their work on Canada’s Youth Policy, or by provinces, territories and youth-serving organizations. Seymour was selected through a competition held by the BC Principals’ and Vice-Principals’ Association. Sdoutz informed Seymour of the oppor-

tunity to apply, tasked with writing a letter outlining her leadership experiences and why she felt she should attend the conference — and Sarah has a lengthy resume to boast about. This year, she became a member of the B.C. Student Voice Network and is also involved with her school’s Link Leaders program, which involves monthly meetings with Grade 8 and international students to support them in their transition into secondary school. She has also been a member of Sa-Hali secondary’s leadership team since she was in Grade 9 and is part of the Principals’ Advisory Committee — a student group that discusses issues and looks for solutions at the high school level. Sarah also recently attended the Student Voice BC Provincial Regional Forum and helped host a local version of the forum in School District 73. SD73 superintendent Alison Sidow is proud of Sarah’s selection to the Canada Youth Summit. “She is a shining example of what can happen when a student, with hard work and determination, is able to connect with every opportunity to make a difference,” Sidow said. As for Sarah’s career aspirations, she said she would like to study sciences and medicine and possibly become a doctor. “I think I’d like to do my undergrad at TRU and we’ll see where I go from there,” she said.

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FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

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LOCAL NEWS

Mining conference returns to city next week TODD SULLIVAN STAFF REPORTER tsullivan@kamloopsthisweek.com

Whether you’re employed in the mining industry, or just looking to learn a bit more about it, you might want to visit the Kamloops Exploration Group’s conference next week. The Kamloops Exploration Group is a registered, volunteerrun, not-for profit society that promotes and supports the interests of mining and prospecting for minerals, metals, and petroleum. For the last 31 years, their conference has helped bring those interests together with businesses, students and the general public. This year’s conference takes place April 9 and 10 at the Coast Kamloops Hotel and Conference Centre and, according to KEG outreach co-ordinator Julie Dormer, there will be something there for just about everyone. “What a great opportunity to talk to a bunch of different industry reps in a growing sector,” Dormer said. “It’s really an opportunity for everyone.” As part of the conference, there will be two days of technical talks, which will include updates from the Association of Mineral Exploration and the BC Geological Survey, as well as a number of talks from people in the industry. Dormer points to two talks in particular that might be of interest to locals: New Initiatives in BC Public Geoscience by Bruce Madu

and a talk by Cathy Hickson about the recently discovered Wells Gray Provincial Park cave. “We brought her in in January,” Dormer said. “It was standing room only when we brought her in for her lecture.” The conference will also feature a trade show open to the public with 76 booths from all corners of the industry. “There’s helicopter companies, communication companies, lots of mining companies, mapping companies,” she said. There’s even something for the kids, in the way of professional gold-panner Yukon Dan. “Yukon Dan, I don’t care how old you are, that’s amazing. Go learn to gold pan. “Bring the kids after school. There’s lots of cool stuff to look at.” This year will also continue the tradition of a conference hockey game, pitting delegate teams the Lemons against the Blackjacks. The teams were named after a pair of prospectors who, according to legend, found a gold vein in the vicinity of Crowsnest Pass. According to this same legend, this mysterious mine — which prospectors continue to search for — is cursed by the ghost of Blackjack. More information on the Kamloops Exploration Group and the upcoming conference, including a list of vendors at the trade show and a schedule of talks, is available online at keg.bc.ca.

DAVE EAGLES/KTW FILE David Thompson elementary students Aulden Wyman (left) and Eva Marinelli joined their classmates for a school trip to the 2017 Kamloops Exploration Group convention and trade show. This year’s event will take place next Tuesday and Wednesday at the Coast Kamloops Hotel and Conference Centre in Aberdeen.

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LOCAL NEWS SD73 BRIEFS

Elementary in Vavenby set to expand to K-7 KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Starting this fall Vavenby elementary will add a grade every school year until it becomes a kindergarten to Grade 7 school in 2021. The Kamloops-Thompson school board has approved reconfiguring the elementary school from a K-4 to a K-7 model due to enrolment growth beginning in the 2019-2020 school year. According to a staff report there are presently 17 students enrolled in the single-teacher school — three in kindergarten, six in Grade 2, four in Grade 3, and four in Grade 4 — with the possibility of up to eight kindergarten students enrolling in September for the 2019-2020 school year. Community members have advocated for a reorganization of the school due to an increase in young families moving to the area, the staff report stated. A recent poll conducted by the chair of the Vavenby PAC projected enrolment to break 30 by 2022 and reach nearly 40 by the 2023-2024 school year. The additional grades will also warrant a second teacher for better classroom organization between primary and secondary grade students.

District business paying dividends School District 73 has received a $100,000 dividend cheque from its business company that will be used to assist schools and parent advisory councils (PAC) with project fundraising. Having accumulated $1.1 million in shareholder equity since its inception in 2006, the board of directors to SD73’s business company (SD73BC) recently approved the funds to it’s only sharehold-

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er — the Kamloops Thompson school district. The company sells online education courses to students in foreign countries. “The vision we had for starting the business company was always about being able to support students,” SD73BC director and former school district superintendent Terry Sullivan said in a press release. “Giving $100,000 back to students and schools, knowing that we started with nothing 13 years ago is a tribute to the

MICHAEL POTESTIO STAFF REPORTER michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

INCREASING TREND IN DISTRICT Enrolment growth continues to be the trend in School District 73. The Kamloops-Thompson school district is projecting an increase of 237 students over last year’s projections at area schools come September 2019. For 2018-2019 the projected enrolment was about 14,360 full-time students at schools in SD73, with 14,598 expected in 2019-2020. The projections are based on moving the number of students between kindergarten and Grade 11 up a grade, but the estimated projections don’t consider in-migration or out-migration leading up to the start of classes in the fall. New kindergarten students are the x-factor in determining the projection. The number of early registrants for kindergarten collected by the district in February was 846, but SD73 is predicting kindergarten enrolment to be 1,105 based on its data analysis program that takes into account information such as past birth rates. SD73 superintendent Rob Schoen said the program has been 99 per cent accurate over the last 18 years. The actual enrolment numbers across SD73 for 2018 is listed in the long range facilities plan at 14,487 — 12,664 at Kamloops schools and 1,823 at rural schools. Assistant superintendent Bill Hamblett said growth is seen more so in kindergarten to Grade 7 rather than the high school grades.

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steady and prudent management of the company.” The funds are being earmarked to help fund projects aimed at enhancing students’ experiences at school, SD73 board chair Kathleen Karpuk said in the release. The board has struck a committee to determine criteria for the projects, but some examples that could qualify may include recreational equipment, social space, cultural enhancement or sustainability initiatives.


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THERE’S MORE ONLINE For breaking local news and updates, go online to kamloopsthisweek.com

NATIONAL NEWS

U.S. no longer needs ‘improper’ metal tariffs for negotiations, Freeland says CANADIAN PRESS

OTTAWA — The metals tariffs the U.S. imposed as leverage in the contentious NAFTA talks were “improper’’ in the first place, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland says, and they’re no longer required because all three North American countries now have a deal. Freeland said Thursday the continued existence of the steel and aluminum duties makes ratifying the new continental trade pact unpalatable for many Canadians — remarks that cast further uncertainty over the fate of the new trade deal signed but not yet ratified by Canada, the U.S. and Mexico last fall. U.S. President Donald Trump unleashed a provision of U.S. trade law — Section 232 of its Trade Expansion Act — that gives the president the authority to impose tariffs on nationalsecurity grounds because he was

frustrated by the slow pace of the talks. Even though it was improper for the U.S. to use Section 232 as a bargaining chip, Freeland argued that’s now a moot point because all three countries have finished negotiating the deal. “Now 232 was never meant to be a tool to be used as any kind of leverage. That would be a very improper use of it,’’ Freeland said in Washington on Thursday ahead of a NATO meeting. But she added that the Americans “were quite explicit that that was the intention’’ when the tariffs were imposed. “How can that be relevant today when it comes to Canada? The deal is done. No more leverage is needed,’’ Freeland said. “So both on the nationalsecurity grounds and when it comes to the notion that there could be some sort of negotiating purpose served by 232, we really think this is groundless.’’ The minister made the

remarks at the U.S. State Department, where she was attending a meeting of ministers in the NATO transatlantic military alliance. “Standing here in the U.S. State Department, a few minutes before the NATO meeting celebrating the 70th anniversary of this great alliance, I think underscores the absurdity of those 232 steel and aluminium tariffs,’’ Freeland said. “For Canadians, that absurdity is cast in even starker relief by the fact that we now have a trade agreement.’’ Freeland pressed U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo for tariff removal during their Wednesday-night meeting in Washington. “During the meeting, the minister made it clear that the application of Section 232 on imports of Canadian steel and aluminum is unjustified and urged the United States to drop these tariffs,’’ her office said in a statement.

Canada’s pot SASKATCHEWAN laws to be Families honour those Do you have challenged who died in Humboldt AMAZING LOCAL in N.S. court Broncos’ bus crash

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HALIFAX — A lawyer for a Nova Scotia motorist whose licence was suspended after her saliva tested positive for cannabis says he’s planning to launch a constitutional challenge. Jack Lloyd said Michelle Gray’s case shows the law dealing with impaired driving is too broad and too vague. Gray, who uses medical cannabis to treat symptoms of multiple sclerosis, said she shouldn’t have been penalized because other police tests confirmed she was not impaired. Gray said she told police conducting a roadside check in January she had one alcoholic drink over a two-hour period before she got into her car to drive home from downtown Halifax. The officer then said he could detect the smell of cannabis coming from her car. Though Gray passed a roadside alcohol test, a saliva test showed trace amounts of THC, the active ingredient in cannabis.

SASKATOON — Families of those who died in the Humboldt Broncos bus crash say scholarships, events and places named in their honour helps keep their memories alive. Sixteen people — including 10 players and the head coach — were killed and 13 players were injured one year ago when the junior hockey team’s bus and a semi collided at a rural intersection in Saskatchewan. Dozens of bursaries and scholarships have been created in memory of those killed. Their names are also attached to arenas, dressing rooms, playgrounds and even a snowmobile shack. Scott Thomas of Saskatoon, who lost his son Evan, said the memorials are an important part of grieving. “It means the world to our family,’’ he said. “It’s just a way to keep his name alive, if you will. To us, it’s a statement about the impact that he had in those communities in the short

amount of time that he was here on this Earth.’’ Thomas said some of the honours are related to the size and scope of the tragedy that hit the hockey team. “On the other hand, I think a lot of it is just about Evan. He affected a lot of people. He was just a good kid.’’ Many parents said they have been inundated with support from their communities. “It’s kind of overwhelming,’’ said Carol Brons of Lake Lenore, Sask. Her daughter, Dayna, the team’s athletic therapist, was killed. “When she passed away, we knew we wanted to set up something ... to help,’’ Brons said. Brons’ family directed money to the Royal University Hospital in Saskatoon and Mount Royal University in Calgary in the weeks after she died. Since then, Brons said, there have also been bursaries created at the University of Regina and through the CFL Saskatchewan Roughriders.


FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

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WATCH propensities of Latino immigrants won over enough formerly Democratic voters in the Rust Belt states to give him the presidency in 2016. It didn’t just work for Trump. It helped the Brexiteers win their anti-European Union referendum in the United Kingdom, it brought the populists to power in Italy and it underpins Viktor Orban’s soft dictatorship in Hungary (even though Hungary has never let immigrants in and they don’t want to go there, anyway). But the fact is levels of immigration are not particularly high in the United States and most European countries at the moment. Net migration to the United Kingdom has been stable since 2010; in both the United States and in Germany (with the exception of 2016, in the latter case), net migration is down by half since 2000. Something more is needed to explain the level of anger in these countries. It is, of course, unemployment, which is much higher than the published (official) figures in every case, and is particularly high in the post-industrial areas that voted so heavily for Trump in the

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United States, for Brexit in Britain and for ultranationalist parties in Germany. In the United States, according to Nicholas Eberstadt of the American Enterprise Institute, 17.5 per cent of American men of prime working age (24 to 55) are not working. But unemployment will continue to rise because it is increasingly being driven by automation. The Rust Belt went first because assembly lines are the easiest thing in the world to automate, but now Amazon and its friends are destroying the retail jobs. Next to go will be the driving jobs (selfdriving vehicles). Automation is unstoppable and the anger will continue to grow. So you can see why Clinton is concerned, but she seems unaware that the pressure of migration is also going to grow rapidly. According to the UN’s International Labour Organization, there are now 277-million migrants in the world (defined as people who have left their home countries in search of work, or to join their families, or to flee conflicts and persecution). How many more are still in their home countries, but would like to leave? At least a billion, maybe two billion. More than half of Kenyans would immediately move to another country if they could, a 2017 survey by the US-based Pew Research Centre discovered. More than one-third of Nigerians, Ghanaians and Senegalese are planning to emigrate

in the next five years, according to the same survey. Even a third of Chinese millionaires would like to emigrate (half if you include moving to Hong Kong as emigration). And all this is before climate change kicks the numbers into the stratosphere. The chief impact of global warming on human beings is going to be on the food supply, which will fall as the temperature rises. The food shortages will not affect everybody equally. The supply will hold up in the temperate zone (the rich countries), but it will plummet in the tropical and sub-tropical countries, where 70 per cent of the world’s people live. They will be desperate and they will start to move. That’s when the pressure of migration will really take off, and the rich countries are simply not going to let the climate refugees in. Not only would it stress their food supply, but the numbers seeking to get in would be so large — two or three times the resident population — that it would utterly transform the country’s character. So the borders will slam shut. It’s a myth that you cannot close borders. You can, if you’re willing to kill people. Think of the Iron Curtain, which successfully divided all of Europe for 40 years. And the rich countries will, in the end, be willing to kill people.

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I

n a recent survey of potential adult migrants worldwide, 47 million said they would most like to move to Canada. There are only 37 million people in Canada. The same applies for Australia: 36 million would like to move there and only 25 million do live there. Most of these wouldbe immigrants are going to be disappointed. In fact, Canada lets in just 300,000 immigrants a year, while Australia welcomes only 200,000. Other developed countries are significantly less popular destinations, but potential migrants amounting to about half the existing populations want to move to the United States, France, Britain, Germany and Spain. They, too, are going to be disappointed. In its most generous year — 2016 — Germany let in a million immigrants, mostly Syrian refugees, but 80-million Germans are never going to let in the 42-million foreigners who also want to live there. Indeed, former U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton said bluntly last November that “Europe has done its part and must send a very clear message: ‘We are not going to be able to continue to provide refuge and support.’” Clinton was mainly concerned about how anxiety about mass immigration has fueled the rise of populism in Western countries. That’s hardly surprising, given how U.S. President Donald Trump’s tight focus on the alleged criminal and job-stealing

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e h t g n i k a m r o f s p o o l m a K u o y k Than a n o h t o i d a R s ’ l a t i p s o H d n a l n Royal I Through the incredible generosity of our sponsors, volunteers and ! s s e c c u s the community, we raised over ringing $120,000 in support of strong healthcare programs and services at RIH.

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Special thanks to: Telus, Terracom, McDonald’s and Lisa Novak Photography


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HOME SHOW

Welcome to the 2019 Kamloops Spring Home Show

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he Kamloops Spring Home Show returns to McArthur Island this weekend, with more than 150 exhibitors taking part. The 21st annual event takes over the McArthur Island Sport and Event Centre on the North Shore on Saturday and Sunday, with an array of products and information for those looking for ideas for their homes. Home-related products, services, decorating, renovations, gardening, leisure and more will be featured. As always, admission to the show is free. It runs Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Organizer Jim Rice said the latest and greatest in home improvement will again be

featured at the show, with information on renovations, landscaping, health and general interest. In addition, there will be plenty of contests to enter as visitors walk from one exhibit to another in both arenas. As has been the case in recent years, the home show is being held earlier in April, which should result in less traffic congestion on McArthur Island as fewer sporting events will be taking place compared to years past. However, as always, Rice is urging attendees to arrive at the opening hour on both days to secure a parking spot without being forced to drive around searching one out. For those with an appetite, the sport centre’s concession will be open.

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Let’s Talk Real Estate! Stop by for giveaways and prize draw! Ethan and Nate Podoriescach picked up cool firefighter helmets at last year’s spring home show. ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW FILE

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Stepping out on the streets of Stockholm JANE CASSIE

SPECIAL TO KTW

travelwriterstales.com

T

here are lots places to get a magnificent panorama of Stockholm. We could hop on SkyView, which transports us to the roof of Ericsson Globe — the largest spherical building in the world. The transmission tower of Kaknästornet is another bird’s eye beauty. While drinking in the scene from the thirtieth floor’s observation deck, we can also sip on a cocktail. Now that’s my kind of a viewing platform. But when given the option of either taking the easy route, or one that requires more exertion, my exuberant husband usually chooses the latter. “You can do it,” my travelling partner Brent says. “Only a hundred more steps to go.” Is he kidding me? My heart is drum-rolling, quads are seizing and I’m regretting eating that buttery croissant for breakfast. But I continue to huff and puff my way skyward, through the brick-encased tunnels and up all 325 gruelling steps. After summiting, I receive my visual reward. Stockholm’s red-brick City Hall is one of the city’s most recognizable buildings. From this 106-metre tower we’re offered a 360 degree panorama; Saltsjön, an inlet of the Baltic Sea is in the east, Lake Mälaren, lies to the west, the downtown hub is north and the island of Södermalm is south

along with many poplar landmarks that have made Stockholm a world-famous destination. Over the next three days we put our cross-trainer footwear to work and enjoy closer encounters with several tourist haunts. Thanks to purchasing the Stockholm Pass, one price provides admission to over 60 top attractions. Gamla Stan, the island of Old Town, is a great place to burn off (and add on) calories. Restaurants and bars mingle with gift stores and souvenir shops that hug up along narrow cobblestoned streets. Founded in 1252, this medieval centre is one of Europe’s best-preserved. The largest attraction here is the Royal Palace, boasting over 600 rooms. We check out the Orders of Chivalry, gaze at Queen Kristina’s silver throne and learn about Swedish monarchy, while meandering through a maze of authentically furnished rooms. “Let’s try a cruise,” I suggest to Brent, on our second day, when looking at our pass options. As well as the Hop-OnOff boats, there are lots to choose from. While getting a new perspective of this amazing city, my feet will get some down-time. A fleet of long boats moored in neighbouring harbours are equipped to deal with the bustling tourist trade. Some cruise under bridges, others through canals, others to islands. While weaving their way through waterways, they connect modern-day offerings with tidbits from the past. We board MS Östanå I, a

1906 traditional beauty with a turn-of-the-century feel. Seating encircles the outer deck, and it’s here where we revel in the roving view. Nearly 30,000 islands, islets and rocks are scattered between Öregrund in the north to Landsort in the south. Each one possesses its own character and charm. Our guide, Elsa, provides an in-depth commentary along the way. While listening and learning about this beautiful region my resting feet are in their happy place. My tourist tootsies get a grand finale workout on day three. Stockholm is a shopper’s paradise and my guy likes to shop as much as he likes to walk. We stroll Biblioteksgatan where highfalutin names like Prada, Gucci and Louis Vuitton rub elbows. We then slip into our comfort zone at Gallerian — a mall, which boasts 28,000-square metres of shops. But Drottninggatan is the queen bee street when it comes to popularity, prices and pickings. Throngs flood this pedestrian pathway bordered by every retailer imaginable. “There are still amazing museums to check out,” Brent says, after we’re shopped-out. He provides the rundown of his favourites: The Vasa, which showcases a sunken warship, the Nordiska that spans the Nordic lifestyles from the 16th century onward, and Skansen, the world’s first open-air museum and zoo. Our pass also gets us into Gröna Lund, Sweden’s oldest and largest amusement

JANE CASSIE PHOTO Strolling the pedestrian pathway of Biblioteksgatan where designer names like Prada, Gucci and Louis Vuitton rub elbows is fun. Shopping, enjoying restaurants and bars along with gift shops offers travellers to Stockholm some of the many visitor opportunities.

park that hosts 31 rides and attractions. “There are seven roller coasters,” Brent says excitedly, as if he’s six-years-old, instead of 65. “The Jet Liner is supposed to be a real screamer.”

Although we are two decades older than anyone else in line, we hop aboard this thriller, which definitely wakes up our inner child. As well as being treated to another stunning panorama on the first ascent, this

time our lungs get a workout instead of our legs and feet. Travel Writers’ Tales is an independent travel article syndicate. For more information, go online to travelwriterstales.com.

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FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

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COMMUNITY

The Kamloops YMCA-YWCA’s third annual Strength in Being a Boy event will take place on Wednesday, April 24, at the Tournament Capital Centre. The free one-day conference, which will be filled with fun and informative workshops and activities, is being offered to 110 boys, ages 10 to 12, with registration now open. This year, boys will experience all of their favourite elements from last year’s event, with the addition of the following workshops: • Constructing and Deconstructing Anger: Participants will create expressions of what anger looks like and healthy ways to work with anger out of boxes, tape and other alternative materials; • Inside Out: Participants will learn about anxiety and depression through the movie Inside Out. Participants will then create their own movie strips using collage materials to explore, understand, express and digest the topic of anxiety and depression; • Beading Spirit: Using beads to represent and explore the multiple aspects of their spirit, participants will discover their authentic selves.

Participants will work on personal empowerment and permission to be who they are and will literally string the pieces of their spirit into unity. • Parkour and Problem Solving 101: Wikipedia says parkour involves seeing one’s environment in a new way and imagining the potential for navigating it by movement around, across, through, over and under its features. This is about thinking and problem-solving on the go. The focus of Strength In Being a Boy is to promote the development of spirit, mind and body by encouraging healthy lifestyles and personal growth, while being a service to the community in which the boys will live and grow, sharing values of caring, respect, honesty and responsibility. Those interested in participating can download and print the registration and waiver form online at kamloopsy.org/sbb.htm or pick up a copy at either Kamloops Y location (downtown at Battle Street and Fourth Avenue and in North Kamloops at 150 Wood St.). For more information, contact the downtown Y at 250-372-7725 or the John Tod Centre Y at 250554-9622.

Junior fire crew workshop to be held April 25-27 The KamloopsThompson school district’s trades and transitions program is working with the Kamloops Wildfire Centre to sponsor a junior fire crew workshop from April 25 to April 27. The workshop is a hands-on learning experience designed to give students an idea of what to expect if they want to join a fire crew

as a summer job. This is the first time the workshop has been offered to KamloopsThompson school district students. “Working on a fire crew during the summer season is a viable way to pay for university,” said Rob Weilgoz, the school district’s vice-principal of trades and transitions. “If you are in Grade

12, you are physically fit and you want to learn how this work could become a recurring summer job to take you through your postsecondary studies, this is where you can find out what you need to know.” Interested students can apply online at tinyurl.com/y3vd5yry. Deadline for application is Monday, April 8.

Westsyde grad fundraiser The Westsyde secondary graduation commitee is holding a fundraiser at the Westsyder Pub on April 18 at 7 p.m. There will be a live auction with a professional auctioneer. The grad commitee has collected

MS Society needs you

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Kamloops & District

There’s Strength in Being a Boy at the Y

more than $5,000 worth of donations from local businesses. All donated items will be auctioned off, with all proceeds going to Westsyde’s 2019 graduation festivities. All are welcome to attend the fundraiser and bid on the items.

The MS Society is looking for volunteer ambassadors who will be given extensive training and become involved in the work of the MS Society. For more information, contact Rebecca Cooke by phone at 1-800-268-7582 (extension 7262) or by email at rebecca.cooke@mssociety.ca.

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CRIMES OF THE WEEK SHOTS Business burglars sought In the early-morning hours of Sunday, March 10, a business was broken into and two laptop computers were stolen. There were two suspects, both wearing light-coloured jackets with the hoods pulled up. One suspect is a male; the other is possibly a female. If you can have any information that could help identify the people in the photo, call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

GRAHAM, Brandon Anthony

DOB: 1988-10-11 Race: Middle Eastern Height: 178 cm / 5’10” Weight: 73 kg / 161 lbs Hair: Brown | Eyes: Brown Wanted For: Personation, Drive While Suspended, Drive While Prohibited, Fail to Appear after Adjournment, Fail to Attend Court

Help ID this bleacher creature On Thursday, March 14, a man walked into the Tournament Capital Centre and stole a gym bag from the bleachers area. The suspect, as seen in the photo, is white and in his 40s. He has short, grey hair and was wearing a grey and black plaid jacket with a hood and black pants. If you can help identify him, call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222TIPS (8477).

GREGOIRE, Sonny Abraham

Bully with pink shoes carries a heavy stick On Saturday, March 27, at 8 p.m., a man was waiting at a bus stop on the North Shore when he was approached by another man who demanded money and his cellphone. When the victim

refused, the suspect hit him with a wooden stick he had been carrying and left the area. The suspect stands six feet and has black hair. He was wearing a white shirt and red pants. In

DOB: 1985-07-20 Height: 185 cm / 6’01” Weight: 84 kg / 186 lbs Race: First Nations Hair: Black | Eyes: Brown Wanted For: Fail to Comply

addition to the wooden stick, the suspect was carrying a pair of pink shoes. Can you help collar this criminal? Call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222TIPS (8477).

www.kamloopsCrimeStoppers.ca If you know where any of these people are, call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). The tip line pays up to $2,000 for information leading to the arrest of fugitives. Remember, Crime Stoppers just wants your information, not your name. Crime doesn’t pay, but Crime Stoppers does.

This program is jointly sponsored by Kamloops Crime Stoppers & Kamloops This Week. People featured are wanted on arrest warrants not vacated as of 3 p.m. on April 3, 2019

PEGG, Jody Lynn

DOB: 1986-07-03 Height: 165 cm / 5’05” Weight: 64 kg / 141 lbs Race: Caucasian Hair: Brown | Eyes: Blue Wanted For:Theft Under $5000, PSP

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A L i g h t i n t h e n i g h t. . .


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FAITH

Accepting a gift that changes everything

J

amie was broken in body and spirit when he got back from Afghanistan. The improvised explosive device that had taken his left leg wasn’t the worst of it. It was the night sweats, the flashbacks, the vision of his best friend dying in a dusty street. They called it PTSD — Jamie just called it a never-ending nightmare. He was in the midst of depression and drinking too much. His prosthetic leg helped a little, but he hated going out in public with it, enduring the stares and sympathy. Jamie was laying in his darkened room with curtains drawn, head throbbing from the mickey of whisky he had downed the night before. His mother knocked on his door. “If you’re up to it, the lawn really needs mowing. Please, Jamie. I don’t even know how to start it. Your dad …” she trailed off. Jamie’s father died of a heart attack two months after Jamie returned home from his deployment. Jamie sighed. He hadn’t been much help around the house, even though his mother really needed it. He put on his leg, threw on some clothes and, after splashing some water on his face

CHRIS KEMPLING You Gotta Have

FAITH

and drinking a cup of coffee, wandered out into the garage. He managed to get the mower started and did half the yard before he ran out of gas. When he came back out with the gas container, his neighbour, Dan, motioned him over. “Hey, Jimbo, how’s it going?” Dan asked. Dan was the only one who called him Jimbo and he’d done so since Jamie was a kid. Dan was kind of the grandfather Jamie never had. “OK, I guess,” Jamie replied. “Didn’t really want to do the yard, but my mom guilted me into it.“ “Well, when you’re done, I could really use a hand with the Olds,” Dan said. Jamie smiled. Dan had two classic rides — a mint 1938 Buick and a 1936 Oldsmobile threewindow coupe that was running,

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but needed a fair bit of work. Jamie had helped Dan work on both vehicles when he was a teenager and occasionally went along to the car shows with him. But he hadn’t been over at all since his return from Afghanistan. “OK. Should be done in about half an hour,” Jamie said. He wandered over to Dan’s after finishing the yard. They spent two hard hours sanding on the Oldsmobile, getting it ready for paint. Then Dan called a break and cracked a beer for them both. “We haven’t really talked since you got back. How’s it going for you?” Dan asked kindly. Dan was the one person to whom Jamie found it easy to talk. He found himself telling Dan everything — the horror of battle, the trauma of losing his leg and the endless stress of PTSD. He admitted his drinking wasn’t helping, but at least it deadened the pain of it all. Dan listened quietly, not interrupting. Then he spoke. “You know Jimbo, a man needs a focus in his life when things go off the rails. My girls aren’t at all interested in these old wrecks. I don’t have room for the Olds. I want to you have it. It’s a gift and you’re not allowed to say no. Your dad helped me out a lot back in the day and you have, too,” Dan said. “Plus, I know whatever the

government gave you doesn’t even come close to paying for your leg or the mess inside your head. You take the Olds and I’ll show you how to paint it up good. Car show season starts in two months and you’ll be a big hit with ‘er when she’s done. Whadya say, Jimbo?” Jamie was speechless. He threw his arms around Dan and gave him a huge bear hug. Four months later, Jamie was grinning ear to ear, holding a trophy for the best 1930s car in the town’s major show and shine. He stopped drinking and started socializing with the local car club. The PTSD was fading and rarely bothered him anymore. There was even a girl with a 1963 Corvair who caught his eye. That Olds was the gift that changed everything. Salvation is a gift like that

— precious beyond words and offered freely. In the Bible, Paul writes in Romans, “The gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.” And to the Ephesians, he writes, “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith … it is the gift of God.” But it is a gift that should change you — for the better. Far too many Christians hide their gift. It needs to be shown off, like a freshly painted car, so everyone can see what God has done for you. Let your gift shine. KTW welcomes submissions to its Faith page. Columns should be between 600 and 800 words in length and can be emailed to editor@ kamloopsthisweek.com. Please include a very short bio and a photo.

Clearwater Sikh community donates thousands to charity after sale of temple KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

A large heart remains at the centre of Clearwater’s shrinking Sikh community. The tiny Sikh community has sold its temple and given the $164,000 it made from the sale to local charities. Narinder Singh Heer, president of Guru Tegh Bahadur Sikh Temple in Clearwater, said the community had shrunk to five families and did not need the space. Until about 15 years ago, the community had 55 families, he said, noting the temple opened its doors in 1985. The Sikh community dispersed because of job losses in the lumber industry and a younger generation moving to live in bigger cities. “In the last 10 years, we have only five members and we’re doing only a monthly congregation,” Heer said. “We talked about it. Five members can’t keep the gurudwara going.” The building, which can hold up to 400 people, was

bought by locals for $180,000. The community donated another $4,000 it had in savings enabling them to give $10,000 each to two temples in Kamloops and the rest to 19 local charities. Proceeds from the sale resulted in $164,000 being distributed to organizations throughout the valley, including $10,000 for Raft River elementary and $30,000 for Clearwater secondary. “Schools are an integral part of any community but in particular, a small community. “This generosity speaks to the giving nature that is symbolic of the Guru Tegh Sikh temple members,” said Shelley Sim, School District 73 trustee. “Many students will benefit from this beautiful legacy and we are grateful that the members saw value in giving so thoughtfully to both Raft River and Clearwater secondary.” “We felt it was important to give back to the communities we have lived in,” said Narinder Heer, president, Guru Tegh Sikh Temple.

“The decision to give back the proceeds from the property sale [to the community] was easy.” “It was a heartwarming and humbling gift, leaving everyone who was a recipient of their incredible generosity feeling overwhelmed and so grateful,” said Lori Bradstock, principal at Raft River elementary school. Principal Darren Coates accepted the gift on behalf of Clearwater secondary. “This is a remarkable gift and will go a long way towards enhancing the learning of the students,” Coates said. Clearwater mayor Merlin Blackwell said the temple members’ donations will help a number of organizations, such as the local ski hill, skating club and food bank. Blackwell expressed his disappointment in seeing the Clearwater Sikh community shrinking. “The minute the Sikh community wants to come back to Clearwater, I’ll give the first thousand dollars to start the new temple,” Blackwell said.


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KTW’s Arts and Entertainment section is published on Fridays. A&E co-ordinator: Sean Brady Call 778-471-7521 or email sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

arts&entertainment

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Madison Violet: from duo and couple to just duo Brenley MacEachern and Lisa MacIsaac to play Kamloops house concert SEAN BRADY STAFF REPORTER sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

O

n Oct. 31, 2019, it will be the 20-year anniversary of when Brenley MacEachern and Lisa MacIsaac first met. The two spent 10 years as a couple, but that milestone isn’t the headline of their relationship together. Instead, it’s what they have done in twice that time. The two make up the Juno and ECMA nominated duo Madison Violet, which is set to stop by Kamloops for a house concert on Wednesday. Brenley does the bulk of the vocal and rhythm guitar work, while Lisa covers harmonies and provides the more plucky guitars and violin. Both are multi-instrumentalists and their roles in the duo aren’t set in stone. MacEachern said the two like to challenge each other. The two met and fell in love in Toronto in 1999. As their romance formed, so did their music careers. Initially, the two were the only members of a band that weren’t doing music full time, so they split off to do their own thing. “We got an agent, a manager — things were going really great,” MacEachern told KTW. In their time as a couple, the two released four full-length albums and three singles. They also earned ECMA nominations for best new artist, pop recording of the year, group recording of the year and folk recording of the year. Add to that, a Canadian Folk Music Award for best vocal group and a Juno nomination for roots/traditional album of the year. But all of their professional success took a toll on their personal relationship. “After about 10 years of touring together and doing everything together — sharing the same cell phone, the same apartment — it just got to be too much,”

Brenley MacEachern and Lisa MacIsaac started out as a couple and a duo — now they’re just a duo, performing as the Juno and ECMA nominated group Madison Violet. The duo will play a house concert at McArthur Castle on Wednesday.

MacEachern said. Their romance sputtered out and the couple was left with a hard choice on whether or not to continue together or split both professionally and romantically. “We knew that we still really enjoyed touring the world together and writing music together, so we decided that we wouldn’t have to give up our professional life together and we’re still a band 10 years later,” MacEachern said. That decision led to even more output. Since 2011, the two have released five albums and two more

KAMLOOPS DL#8989

MA Z DA GO E S P R EMI U M

singles, including their recent and only music video. Tell Me was released on March 27 and tells the story duo’s early days. It was shot by director Jillian Martin, who sought out the opportunity to work with the band. MacEachern called it the group’s “first real music video in 20 years.” It’s also the first single off their latest album, Everything’s Shifting, released March 8. Nowadays, the two see each other as family, and while both still do things that get under each others’ skin, MacEachern said “there’s a

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foundation there that is so strong.” The strength of that foundation has been necessary. Each of the two songwriters have had to endure a lot of loss throughout their lives — including the murder of MacEachern’s brother, the death of MacIsaac’s brother in a car accident, MacEachern’s niece in a car accident, among other events. “We have a lot to write about, and sometimes that doesn’t make for a great pop record,” MacEachern said. “It’s not what somebody wants to listen to at seven o’clock in the morning on

their drive to work — which is probably why we’ve never had a big radio hit. “But people come to our shows because they want to hear these stories. They want to feel connected and not so alone in their own pain. And we definitely write enough stuff to give them that sort of solidarity.” The duo will play an intimate house concert at McArthur Castle, which has a location only disclosed to ticketholders, on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $30 and available online at sidedooraccess.com.


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SUNDAY: YUKON BLONDE | THE BLUE GROTTO, 319 VICTORIA ST.

Vancouver-based Yukon Blonde is returning to Kamloops. The indie rockers released their fourth full-length album Critical Hit last summer and will put some of its 13 tracks on display at the Grotto. They will be playing with Johnny Payne, another Vancouver-based artist that plays alternative, Americana and pop.

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Barb’s Used Book and Music Sale has returned for another year. Those hunting for literary or musical treasures can find the sale at the former Value Village site downtown. New donations will be added as they come in. All sales are cash only.

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DIRECTORS FESTIVAL Wednesday to Saturday, 7:15 p.m. daily, TRU Black Box Theatre, 805 TRU Way

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The annual Directors Festival — a multi-day set of performances by fourth-year TRU theatre students — will run until Saturday. Plays include I’m Not Stupid, St. Francis Preaches to the Birds, A Roz by Any Other Name, Throws of Love and Realer Than That. Tickets are $15 and available online at brownpapertickets.com.

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JAM AT THE CENTRAL Thursdays, 8:30 p.m., Central Station Pub, 126 Fourth Ave.

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Paramount Theatre

503 Victoria Street • 250-372-7434

SYNTHPOP Saturday, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m., The Art We Are, 246 Victoria St.

PADDLING FILMS Friday, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., TRU Clock Tower Alumni Theatre, 805 TRU Way

The year’s best paddling films will be presented by Rapid Media, the TRUSU AdventureU Club, the student union and TRU’s adventure studies department. Bottomless popcorn will be available for $2. Bring your own bowl. Tickets are $5 for TRU students and $10 for non-students, available online at eventbrite.ca.

GEEKY QUEST Saturday, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Thompson-Nicola Regional Library, 100-465 Victoria St.

As part of Geek Week, the library is hosting a scavenger quest, which will contain riddles and a race around downtown Kamloops to see who can complete their challenges first. Register as a team (no more than four) or as an individual. Register online at tnrl.ca, email questions@tnrl.ca or call 250-372-5145.

AN INTRIGUING TITLE Wednesday to Saturday, 8 p.m., Pavilion Theatre, 1025 Lorne St.

Local theatre company The Saucy Fops have returned with a new production: An Intriguing Title. The production is a collection of comedies written by Cayman Duncan. Tickets are available through the Kamloops Live box office, 1025 Lorne St., 250-374-5483 or online at kamloopslive.ca.

Vanden Dool is Lethbridge born and raised, and that’s also where he studied and developed his own style while studying in the University of Lethbridge’s digital audio arts program. He will be playing with Ruby Bruce, a singer-songwriter from Scotch Creek. She has opened for bands like Delhi to Dublin, Shred Kelly and Irish Mythen. Cover charge is $10.

SUBMIT EVENTS FOR THE FRIDAY LISTINGS TO LISTINGS@KAMLOOPSTHISWEEK.COM AND FIND THEM EVERY WEEK IN FRIDAY’S B SECTION OR ONLINE AT

What’s Playing Downtown APRIL 5 - APRIL 11 Hummingbird Project

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FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

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arts&entertainment

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Beer and firefighters paired up for two-day spring festival SEAN BRADY STAFF REPORTER sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

T

his spring’s Brewloops event combines two unlikely things: the event’s usual bevy of craft beer and music, plus dozens of firefighters putting their physical fitness to the test and pushing themselves to the limit for the sake of competition. The Brewloops downtown block party will take place May 25 and May 26 and run alongside the 2019 southern B.C. FireFit regional championships. FireFit is a competition where firefighters put their skills to the test, completing tasks they might perform in real emergency situations, like climbing stairs, carrying and pulling fire hose, rescuing victims and opening a hydrant — and they will have to do many of these tasks in all of their gear, racing against the clock and their matched opponents. Kamloops firefighters have an exceptional record when it comes to firefighting competitions, especially as of late. Firefighters from the department won world championships in 2011, 2012 and 2015, won the national championship from 2009 to 2013, took national individual titles in 2010 and 2011, relay championship titles in 2010, 2011 and 2013 and won

dozens of regional championships. At least one of those championship wins was from Kamloops Fire Rescue firefighter Graham MacKenzie, who took first overall in the national FireFit competition individual category in 2018. MacKenzie also won last year’s B.C. regional championship and three other Kamloops Fire Rescue members, Mark Brise, Shawn Davidson and Scott Wasden, finished in the top 10. The foursome also won the team event. That team, plus Mike Brown, will be attending the FireFit event in May, Brise told KTW. He also said there will be at least one more KFR team on the pavement that day. The KFR team is still looking for corporate sponsors ahead of the event, and Brise said anyone interested in sponsoring the firefighter team can contact event partner Tourism Kamloops by emailing roxanne@tourismkamloops.com. The music lineup for the event has also been set. Saturday’s acts during the day include Kelowna-based pop artist Andrew Judah, local jazz group Aaron MacInnis Ensemble and Kamloops folk/pop artist Jared Doherty, who also plays with bands Mother Sun and At Mission Dolores. On Saturday evening, Small

Kamloops firefighters have an exceptional track record when it comes to FireFit competitions. At least one team from Kamloops Fire Rescue will be at the upcoming Brewloops event.

Town Artillery will headline. The Vancouver-based rock and brass band originally from Kaslo last played Kamloops in January. Also playing Saturday night will be Gleneagle, a rock ’n’ roll band originally based in Kamloops (now Vancouver), and Thunderchild, a local funk band. On Sunday, catch local jug

band The Dungbeatles, folk singer-songwriter Deandra Dey and folk duo Johnson Sandwich. Putting the brew in Brewloops will be more than 20 breweries and cideries. The event will be held in the parking lot on the north side of Sandman Centre at 300 Lorne St. The free and family-friendly

Salmon Arm set to host annual writers festival KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Registration has opened for the annual Word on the Lake Writers’ Festival in Salmon Arm. Writers will have access to skill development workshops and open forums with presenters, which include: Karen Autio, Brenda Baker, Nancy Bell, Norma Charles, Anthony Dalton, Gail Bowen, Linda Kidder, Robert Mackwood, Judy Millar, Kat Montagu, Jonas Saul, Bill Stenson and Louis Thomas. Workshops will cover a range of topics, including non-fiction, meaningful dialogue, young writers, comedy writing, point

of view, screenplays, working with freelance editors, self-publishing, literary fiction, writers’ block and script analysis. The event hosted by the Shuswap Association of Writers also includes blue pencil sessions, where writers can discuss their work with a professional. An event open to the public called Café Lit will kick things off on Friday, May 10, from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. in the Balmoral Room of the Prestige Harbourfront Resort, 251 Northeast Harbour Front Dr. in Salmon Arm. Those attending will get a chance to hear readings and mingle with the festival’s presenters.

events will run each day from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., with beer service beginning at 11 a.m. On Saturday evening, there will be a ticketed Brewloops party event beginning at 6 p.m. Tickets for that event are available at the Kamloops Live box office, 1025 Lorne St., 250-374-5483 or online at kamloopslive.ca.

Drag Race drag queen coming

Admission to that event is $20. To register or for more information, go online to wordon-

thelakewritersfestival.com. Early-bird registration rates will end on April 30.

Tatianna, who is best known for her appearance on the second season of RuPaul’s Drag Race, will perform at The Duchess, 377 Tranquille Rd., on May 10. The American performer was also featured in the second season of Drag Race All Stars in 2016, and in 2018, released her debut 11-track album, T1. She will appear on stage alongside Okanagan drag queens Sparkle and Freida Whales, among others. Tickets are $35 plus tax and fees and went on sale Tuesday. VIP meet-and-greet packages are also available for $55 and include a photo op. Buy tickets online at the event producer’s website at rebelliousunicorns.com.

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FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

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Cain’s Kids Page The Neverending Story …

We started it — you continue it. If you are in school, between kindergarten and Grade 7, here is your chance to add to our story. Read the opening paragraph and send in the next part to the story. Limit your submission to 120 words. Perhaps your tale will be added! Email to editor@kamloopsthisweek.com. Bobby always wanted to go to space. Chris Hadfield was his hero and Bobby, now in Grade 4, could not wait until he was old enough to become an astronaut. One day in class, while staring out the window at Mount Paul, Bobby saw something that made his heart leap. “Maybe,” he thought to himself, “I won’t have to wait until I am older to visit space!” (The next part was written by Danica Cain.) “A rocket ship!” Bobby cried in delight. Indeed, a space shuttle had landed on the back field of Mount Paul School. The grass was scorched. Thank goodness it was winter or the entire building would be on fire. Then the high side door folded down and two astronauts walked down the ramp. Bobby sprang from his seat and bounded to the door. He raced over to the astronauts and skidded to a stop at their feet. “Hello!” Bobby cried. “Can I come to space with you?” he asked. “Can you fix a rocket ship?” one of the astronauts asked. “I think so . . .” Bobby said. He walked over and gasped. On the bottom of the rocket was a blue-skinned, skinny creature with huge eyes, staring up at him. “Can you help me?” the creature hissed.

WATCH FOR THE KTW/CAIN’S KIDS’ PAGE EVERY TWO WEEKS “I want to, but how?” Bobby replied. Then the alien reached out and touched Bobby’s hand. (The next part was written by Hailey Traynor, a kindergarten student.) All of a sudden, two ears popped out of Bobby’s head and he turned green, just like the alien. They became friends. The alien needed help finding his spaceship because he was on another alien’s spaceship. While they were holding hands, they began to float up to the universe. (The next part was written by siblings Ava and Juliet Lavigne. Ava is in Grade 1 and Juliet is in Grade 4.) Wow!” said Bobby. “What’s happening?” The blue alien answered without speaking: “We are ascending to the mother ship to grab some more supplies. It’s hovering just above the clouds.”

Bobby was amazed he could hear his new friend’s thoughts. He thought that was so fun! Then they began to do somersaults and cartwheels in the air. They rose above the clouds and there, lo and behold, was a beautiful spacecraft the size of Sandman Centre. (The next part was written by Emma Garossino, who is in Grade 3.) Once they were on the ship, Bobby and the alien — whose name was Moon — heard some scuffling sounds. “What’s that,” Bobby asked. “Probably just Sparkles, my dog,” Moon the alien replied. Right then, a creature with four long ears and seven legs came out, covered in sparkles. “Oh!” said Bobby. Then everything suddenly went pitch dark.

Cain’s

(The next part was written by Sophie Leadley, who is in Grade 5.) In the dark, all Bobby could hear was the shuffling of seven legs across the hard floor of the rocket. All he could see was the dim light of a red dwarf star in the distance, alongside two other stars. Bobby couldn’t believe his eyes when he saw a planet orbiting the three stars. They landed on the planet and started searching the misty atmosphere for the mother ship. The planet was a lot like Earth, but with twiggy ground and sparkling purple water. Bobby gasped. The sky was an incredible sight. Stars were aligned and getting ready to set. Looking off into that distance, Bobby then saw that one side of the planet was night.

JOKES & RIDDLES & OTHER FUN STUFF Enjoy some laughs and tackle the riddle at the bottom for a chance to win a prize!

JOKE’S ON YOU Q: Why did the tomato blush? A: Because he saw the salad dressing! Q: What washes up on tiny beaches? A: Microwaves! Q: What do you call a sheep with no legs? A: A cloud! Q: Why did the picture go to jail? A: It was framed!

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? YOU TELL US IN 120 WORDS OR LESS!

RIDDLE ME THIS

The winning entry will be added to this story in the April 19 edition of KTW. Email the next chapter to editor@ kamloopsthisweek.com by April 16 for a chance to be published and win a prize!

What gets broken without being held? Send your answer by email to editor@ kamloopsthisweek.com.

Previous riddle:

What instrument can be heard, but nor seen? Answer: Your voice Winner: ELLA BABCOCK

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YOUTH SPRING

SPORTS

SOCCER

INSIDE: RiverDogs hosting tournament this weekend | A34

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Analyzing the Blazers OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, COACHES, PLAYERS SHARE THOUGHTS ON TEAM MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

The Kamloops Blazers held exit meetings on Wednesday at Sandman Centre. Players met with coaches before meeting with general manager Matt Bardsley and director of hockey Tim O’Donovan. KTW hung around to ask a few questions. LOOKING BACK One month ago, doom seemed destined, but the Kamloops Blazers flipped the script with an unlikely run to the playoffs that galvanized a hockey town, a city that was not in the mood for another season without WHL post-season action on Mark Recchi Way. The club earned 11 of a possible 12 points in the final six regular-season contests of the 2018-2019 campaign and knocked off the Kelowna Rockets in a playin game to reach the post-season. Victoria bested Kamloops 4-2 in a first-round playoff series, but not before the Blazers further endeared themselves to the fan base, most notably in a Game 4 barnburner. “People had questions. What’s going on?” Blazers’ general manager Matt Bardsley said. “It was a young group, but how we finished the year showed where the group is at. “I’m really, really excited for next year. Outside of the overagers, we’re pretty much able to return every player on our team.” Reasons for the turnaround are up for debate. Perhaps it took more than three-quarters of the campaign for players to buy into systems put in place by head coach Serge Lajoie

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW FILE Kamloops Blazers’ forward Brodi Stuart (left) fights for a puck along the wall at Sandman Centre in February.

and assistant coach Dan Kordic, both new to the WHL. Bardsley, a rookie GM, moved out two veteran players, Nolan Kneen and Luc Smith, in a November shakeup. Maybe it took a few months for the new-look squad to gel. The arrival of assistant coach Darryl Sydor coincided with the sputtering team’s late surge, which was highlighted by the play-in game victory over the Rockets — in front of a raucous, sellout crowd. There were lineups at the box office to get tickets for Blazers’ games, remarkable considering a paltry, forlorn crowd left the building following a 5-0 defeat

to Vancouver on March 6, a dark night at Sandman Centre. Development and circumstance are funny things. Maybe 17-year-old Connor Zary’s built-in hockey clock had him scheduled to explode at the perfect time, while an unfortunate injury to overage goalie Dylan Ferguson during the March 6 debacle paved the way for 16-year-old Dylan Garand’s lightsout push to the playoffs. Lajoie said it was a season of growth in which culture was established. “I think we’ve taken some huge strides in that aspect and same thing for myself, with personal growth and professional growth,”

Lajoie said. “I’m not the same coach now that I was at the start of the year. “It’s very gratifying to see the work that Dan Kordic and I have put forth and the players prospering under our guidance and how much they’ve developed and matured. “It’s exciting when you look and project what the future holds.” Here is a look at the team for 2019-2020: THE GOALIES Next up: Dylan Garand. The 16-year-old netminder from Victoria solidified his position as the No. 1 guy for 2019-2020 during the Blazers’ improbable

run to the playoffs, posting incredible numbers— 6-0-1-0, with a save percentage of .943 in seven starts — while filling in for the injured Ferguson. “I’m definitely ready,” Garand said. “I waited and learned a lot this year. With Fergy out, I had to start in goal, the go-to guy every game. “You definitely learn mental toughness, playing back-to-backs when you’re already tired. That really prepared me and I think I can take on the challenge next year and I think it’s going to be really fun.” The Blazers’ 17-year-old starter will be pushed by an 18-yearold backup, Rayce Ramsay, who earned valuable experience playing in 2018-2019 for the Humboldt Broncos in the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League. Ramsay posted a .923 save percentage in 27 regular-season games and .925 save percentage in seven playoff games, with the junior A Broncos falling to Estevan 3-2 in overtime in Game 7 of a Round 1 series. Goaltending has been a position of strength in recent years. Vegas Golden Knights-signed Ferguson accepted the torch from Tampa Bay Lightning-signed Connor Ingram. The club appears to have another gem in Garand. THE FORWARDS Eligible to return, with their age groups for next season in brackets: Logan Stankoven (16), Josh Pillar (17), Martin Lang (18), Connor Zary (18), Jerzy Orchard (18), Kyrell Sopotyk (18), Brodi Stuart (19), Ryley Appelt (19), Orrin Centazzo (19), Kobe Mohr (20), Zane Franklin (20) and Travis Walton (20). See BLUE, A33

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A32

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

Gaglardi shares on all things Kamloops Blazers Will Serge be the head coach to start next season? I suspect so. He’s got a long-term contract and we haven’t had any conversation about anything other than that. We’re very happy with where we are. We had a great finish to the year and we’re excited about next season, but this week is just a week to lick our wounds. This is a series [vs. Victoria] we truly thought we could win.

MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

KTW caught up with Kamloops Blazers’ majority owner Tom Gaglardi on Wednesday. Here are excerpts from the conversation: What’s your take on the season that was? To me, the storyline on the entire season is clearly the way that this team galvanized the community. I’ve never seen support like this. It’s the most interest we’ve seen in the Kamloops Blazers in way over a decade. The entire league is talking about it. The amount of comments and feedback from around the league, other managers and owners, has just been incredible. Kamloops has really shaken the WHL with what our community and fan base did during that stretch. The experience our group got in that last seven games or so, the battle to get in the playoffs, the one-game playoff versus Kelowna and then to really battle Victoria hard, and frankly I thought we deserved better in the series, is really valuable. That will no doubt help us next year. Did it feel extra special to beat Kelowna in the play-in game? They love to beat us and

DAVE EAGLES/KTW FILE Kamloops Blazers’ majority owner Tom Gaglardi views the city’s support for his team as the No. 1 storyline of the season.

we love to beat them. If you’re going pick a team to knock out, there’s no doubt you want to pick one of your division mates. I don’t think there is any more natural rival to Kamloops than Kelowna. I think they would say the same thing. They consider us their biggest natural rival. I think it was fitting that it was against Kelowna and it felt good to win that at home. What area, positionally, is most important to address this off-season? That’s probably more a GM question. I know the answer to it.

How do you assess head coach Serge Lajoie’s first season? It’s a big learning curve. It was a challenging year for us because we had a rookie GM and a rookie head coach and, frankly, other than the goalie coach and coaches like Chris Murray, the whole staff was rookie. It’s certainly challenging, but it’s exciting, as well, to see these guys have different approaches and different ways of doing things. With the way the season ended, you’ve got to give everyone credit for finding a way when it looked like we were dead to rights.

What do you think assistant coach Darryl Sydor brought to the team? Darryl really understands what it takes to win and what a successful bench feels like. He’s been a long-time player and had success at the junior level, had success at the NHL level, won a couple of Stanley Cups. He knows what benches need. I think he was really instrumental in figuring out what his role could be to help. Sometimes you’ve got a coach that’s a hard coach and the kids need to be brought up and built back, and Darryl really understands the ying and yang, the methods, and figured out a role that he could help in. He really worked hard to make sure the kids believed they could actually get the job done. He perhaps brought something to the staff that was missing. Darryl is a tremendous guy and I was thrilled when

he agreed to join full-time and come on board and he made a difference. Does Darryl have what it takes to be a head coach here or somewhere else? I’ve got to think so, if that’s what he wants to do. He’s come home and I think he’d like to be involved in some way. We’ve had lots of talks around this for a long time. What this blossoms into, I’m not sure. He’s a tremendous guy and we’d love to have him involved. He’s got kids playing competitive hockey. I’m not sure where he’s going to be, in terms of level of commitment next year, whether he’s ready to step in and take on some sort of full-time role again with the club. I’m not sure. He did make a big difference to us down the stretch. How different might this interview have been if the season ended a month ago? Ask me about anything. Ask me about the [Dallas] Stars two-and-a-half-weeks ago, too. It would have been a totally different interview than today. Not totally, but frustrating, you know. That’s hockey, though. It can turn. In terms of Dallas, we went 1-4-1 at home and we thought, oh boy, we’ve got to go on the road now for four tough games in Western Canada and we’re on the brink. We got seven out of eight points on that

road trip, came home and won last night. We are in the playoffs. Everything is rosy and wonderful. It’s a crazy game. What are expectations for next season? We’ll be a better team next year, but I also think the division will get tougher. It’s going to be a really tight race. Some of the weaker teams get better. We’ll be better. I don’t see the top end changing a whole lot. I think Vancouver will be another strong team again. We should move up in the standings and be more competitive. We’ll have Logan Stankoven in the lineup full-time. We’ve got two or three really good 03-born kids. We’ve got two first-rounders [first-round picks at the WHL Bantam Draft] this year. We brought in Centazzo and Onyebuchi. Those guys are going to have to step up now and really play key roles for us. Zane Franklin came in and did a great job. We see this club on the way up and next year we expect to be a lot better, with fewer changes and less rookies, in terms of coaching and managing. The great news is it looks like we’ve got another solid goaltender. It’s amazing what he’s [Dylan Garand] done as a 16-year-old. That’s a key spot filled. We’ve got to find a way to improve our depth.


SPORTS

Blue line an area for improvement

THE DEFENCEMEN General consensus: The blue line needs work. Eligible to return, with their age groups for next season in brackets: Jonas Sillanpaa (18), Montana Onyebuchi (19), Luke Zazula (19), Sean Strange (19), Quinn Schmiemann (18) and Caller (20). “The level of intellectual maturity got better over the course of the year, but we need to really stabilize our defence, whether with some

M E S M E R S T I L L U P

From A31

That group, the mostpromising in recent club history, is expected to remain mostly intact, although the Blazers’ 20-year-old situation is one to watch. What Bardsley decides to do with defenceman Jackson Caller and forwards Mohr and Walton remains to be seen. Franklin led the Blazers with 68 points, proving an astute acquisition by Bardsley last off-season, and seems certain to return. Walton struggled to get into the lineup. Mohr came on late in the season, despite a tendency for untimely discipline gaffes, and scored the game-winning goal in the play-in game against Kelowna. Lajoie is bullish on his forwards, but is concerned about the void created by the departures of Jermaine Loewen and Jeff Faith, who have aged out of junior hockey, along with Ferguson. “The biggest question mark is leadership,” Lajoie said. “Jermaine was clearly our emotional and offensive leader down the stretch. Jeff Faith was a glue guy, a tremendous role model for the young guys. “Who is going to take on those roles?” Among those expected to push for roster spots up front at training camp this summer are 2002-born prospects Riley Ginnell, Daylan Kuefler and Reese Belton. “Hopefully, we can keep the momentum with our fans and keep the city behind us,” said Zary, who made a habit of scoring clutch goals down the stretch and is entering his draft year. “You just want to stay at the rink every day. I’ll get back [to Saskatoon], relax, get back to summer training and get ready for the big season next year.” Blazers’ majority owner Tom Gaglardi said the Massimo Rizzo ship has likely sailed, but noted his club will remain in contact with the University of North Dakotacommitted forward picked 15th overall by Kamloops in the 2016 bantam draft.

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City of Kamloops

ACTIVITY PROGRAMS The City is transitioning to a new registration system, PerfectMind, which will launch on March 6, 2019. To learn more and to set up your new account, visit Kamloops.ca/PerfectMind Programs are cancelled if the minimum numbers are not met.

Herbs–Growing and Maintaining

Herbs are a welcome addition to any garden. They look, smell, and taste amazing. They are also easy to grow, attract pollinators, repel pests, and produce large harvests. Offered in partnership with the Kamloops Food Policy Council, in this course you will learn how to start, transplant, and care for herbs in your garden or pots. You’ll even take home some small plants to get you started! McDonald Park Public Produce Garden Wed Apr 10 6:00–7:30 pm 1/$14.29

Growing Great Trees

We grow them for shade, food, and beauty, but growing healthy trees can be tricky. Let an ISAcertified Arborist teach you how to choose the right type of tree and select a good one from the store. You’ll leave with planting instructions and tips for caring for your tree as it grows. Parkview Activity Centre Sat Apr 13 1:00–4:00 pm 1/$23.75

Pottery Clay Play

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW FILE Quinn Schmiemann scores in overtime against the Saskatoon Blades in November at Sandman Centre.

more veteran presence or is that just going to be the natural growth of a few of our 18-year-olds?” Lajoie said. “Consistency is the operative word.” Schmiemann had an exceptional season and, at 17, was perhaps the team’s most reliable defenceman during the playoffs. Onyebuchi and Strange improved and have garnered favour with Blazers’ brass. Sillanpaa, a Finnish import, was often a healthy scratch, while Zazula showed flashes of what made him an exciting young prospect, finishing second in team scoring among defencemen, but struggled with consistency.

“He’s [Sillanpaa] such a big kid,” Bardsley said. “He gets around the ice pretty good. There are some things Jonas is going to have to work on. I still believe he has some upside, for sure.” Caller, the Kamloops product acquired via trade in November, provided calming veteran presence and told KTW he will work hard this off-season in pursuit of a 20-year-old spot. “A lot of them probably played in a position maybe higher than they were quite ready for,” Bardsley said. “They got valuable experience. We saw signs of improvement. “In saying that, we’re cer-

tainly going to be seeing how we can improve our team. We do have assets, with draft picks.” Bardsley in May will be running his first WHL Bantam Draft for the Blazers, who are scheduled to pick seventh and 20th overall in Round 1. “I’m not sure what’s going to happen,” Zazula said. “If we’re going forward with the defencemen we have now, we’d be experienced. Throw a little bit of talent in there and we could be one of the best defence corps in the league.” Ethan Brandwood and Trevor Thurston, both of whom will be 17 next season, are among those aiming to crack the team this summer.

Be inspired as you play in the clay at Redemption Pottery Studio! Explore the unlimited possibilities in this basic workshop suitable for those with little or no experience of working with clay. You will learn hand-building techniques and how to use the potter’s wheel. Your creations will be bisque fired, then you will have the opportunity to glaze your work before the last firing. All supplies are included. Redemption Pottery Studio Wed Apr 17 10:30 am–12:00 pm 1/$30.50 Thu Apr 25 6:30–8:00 pm 1/$30.50

FAST Tennis

Fun Adult Starter Tennis (FAST). In this program you will learn tennis fundamentals, including basic tactics and techniques, rules, and scoring. In partnership with the Kamloops Tennis Centre. Repeat participants, please register by phone to qualify for a discount. Kamloops Tennis Centre Bubble Sat Apr 6–May 4 10:30 am–12:00 pm 4/$75 Tue Apr 9–30 7:00–8:30 pm 4/$75

Kamloops.ca


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FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

SPORTS

WolfPack axes rugby sevens The TRU WolfPack have nixed their women’s rugby sevens program, which has been involved in a Canada West pilot project for the past two years. “We had a chance to review the last two seasons with head coach Derek Pue and assistant coach Jesse Olynyk and made the difficult decision not to continue at this point regardless of what the final decision on the sport will be in Canada West,” WolfPack athletics and recreation director Curtis Atkinson said in a TRU Sports Information press release. Canada West is expected to decide this

spring whether rugby sevens will be incorporated as a varsity sport. “I respect and admire both Derek and Jesse for guiding us through the project,” Atkinson said. “They were absolutely the right people to take this on and lead us through it. “It is very difficult to start from scratch when you are going up against schools that have established rugby 15s programs from which they can pull their top sevens athletes.” Pue said he is disappointed the program did not work out as planned.

RiverDogs hosting tourney The Kamloops Kal Tire RiverDogs will continue pre-season baseball play this weekend, with the B.C. College Prep League squad hosting its annual Best of the West Tournament on McArthur Island. The Dogs have announced their 2019 roster: Nicolas Bradley, Jordan Calibaba, Matthiew Coxon, Mitchell Coxon, Austin Coyle, Lane Grunerud, Colby Jepson, Brett MacDonald, Tallis Mcleod, Keegan Pittendreigh, Carter Sauer, Parker Sauer and Lochlan Scholefield. Kamloops is led by first-year head coach Mark Orr and assistant coaches Luc Simpson and Brendan Reid. The Dogs will open regular-season play against Cloverdale on April 20. Game time is 1 p.m. on the Canada Games Field.

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Experience ruling the Madness JOHN MARSHALL

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MINNEAPOLIS — Zion Williamson is not here. Neither is R.J. Barrett or the rest of Duke’s freshmen. North Carolina’s Coby White? Knocked out in the Sweet 16. So was LSU’s Tremont Waters. Those Kentucky kids, all done by the Elite Eight. For the hype about college basketball’s fantastic freshmen this season, none made it to the Final Four. The one and dones are done. It’s a veterans weekend in Minneapolis. “It’s funny. Everybody would like to have what Duke and Kentucky have as far as personnel,’’ Michigan State coach Tom Izzo said. “Both of them have had incredible years, but experience does matter too. Somewhere there’s probably a happy medium. If you don’t have the best talent, you’d better be very old and very experienced.’’ Virginia is loaded with players from last year’s first-round NCAA Tournament loss to No. 16 seed Baltimore-Maryland Country, motivated to make a different kind of history. Point guard Kihei Clark is the Cavaliers’ only freshman in the regular rotation. Texas Tech is led by sophomore Jarrett Culver, senior Matt Mooney and sophomore Davide Moretti. Guard Kyler Edwards is the only freshman who sees regular playing time, averaging 5.3 points. Aaron Henry and Gabe Brown had huge games in Michigan State’s Sweet 16 win over LSU, but juniors Cassius Winston and Nick Ward with sophomore Xavier Tillman are the leaders who have been through the NCAA Tournament grind before. Auburn has no freshmen in its rotation and is led by senior Bryce Brown and junior Jared Harper. Sophomore Chuma Okeke was a key cog, too, before he tore his left ACL in the Sweet 16. All three played last year while leading the program to its first NCAA Tournament trip since 2003. The Tigers were crushed by Clemson in the second round, but the experience helped them understand what to expect and advance in this year’s bracket.

“The reason sometimes some of the kids that are coming in as freshmen haven’t been able to advance past a certain round and not get to the Final Four, win a national championship, is because they don’t have the experience of having not gotten there,’’ Auburn coach Bruce Pearl said. “That experience we had a year ago of not being able to advance through the tournament helped us as well.’’ Most coaches would love to have the one-and-done players. Only a small percentage have a shot, forcing those who don’t to seek players with fewer stars coming out of high school. They may end up with players who won’t immediately head to the NBA, but it can have other advantages. Having players for multiple seasons breeds continuity. Returning players already know the coaches’ expectations, the offensive and defensive systems, the grind of the season. They develop a cohesiveness with each other on the court, knowing what the other is going to do even before they do it. By the time they reach the NCAA Tournament, the muscle and memory is so ingrained they can just go out and play, not think about where they are or what they have to do. “Our formula has always been ... how can you build a program that can compete against the best in your conference?’’

Virginia coach Tony Bennett said. “And it was to get guys experienced, get them to where they have two or three years where they learn and maybe learn the hard way. And then when they get to be upperclassmen, they’re ready to play the best.’’ The cliche says defence wins championships. More often than not, experience does the trick even better. Villanova won two of the past three national championships with veteranladen teams. North Carolina was led by upperclassmen in its 2017 title run. Connecticut’s top five scorers were upperclassmen on its 2014 championship team, including senior Shabazz Napier, who learned from Kemba Walker three years earlier as a freshman. Freshman-led champions are rare. Carmelo Anthony did it at Syracuse in 2003. Anthony Davis dominated while leading a young Kentucky team to the 2012 national title. Freshmen Jahlil Okafor, Justise Winslow and Tyus Jones were keys when Duke set off the confetti canons in 2015. “It helps knowing what to expect and how guys play with each other,’’ Auburn senior Malik Dunbar said. “We won’t be intimidated by the big stage. We want to win and do it again.’’ The Tigers certainly have the right mix. Of course, so do the other three Final Four teams.

MEMORIES & MILESTONES Helen Saemerow is celebrating her

90th Birthday! She invites you to stop by for morning coffee and cake: 8:30am - 11:30am Friday, April 12th At O.L.P.H. Parish Centre, North Shore Please no gifts. Hugs & Wishes Welcomed! Mailing address: c/o Chartwell Residence, 628 Tranquille Road, Kamloops, BC V2B 8M6

Let us help you share that

EMBARRASSING BIRTHDAY MOMENT For details or to place your announcement in next Friday’s paper call

250-374-7467


FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

EMMA PAPPALARDO Sound engineer RunClub+

JAIME AULT 5K Sweet

What a week! April is here and the sun is out. I haven’t been outside as much as I would have liked, but the time I have spent in the sun has been amazing. As Boogie grows closer, my training is getting more intense. I’ve been power walking with my Monday RunClub+ tribe and running my butt off in the 5K Bold group on Tuesdays. This past Tuesday, we ran seven kilometres in an hour. It was tough for me, but at the end I didn’t feel like I had worked too hard and I was so proud of what I accomplished. It took a little mental math to figure out that with my run on Tuesday, I was on pace to complete my 10K in less than 90 minutes, which is 17 minutes faster than my last 10K. We hardly ever realize how strong and powerful we become when we stick to something over time, because for us it’s so gradual. So, to have a reminder and proof that all my hard work is paying off is the best feeling. On top of the Run accomplishments, there was also Club accomplishments. I made some new friends, caught up with old friends and found myself once again being grateful and thankful that I have these wonderful people in my life. If it wasn’t for them, I wouldn’t even consider running, let alone a 10K. It just goes to show that if you surround yourself with good people, good things happen.

GROUP GOAL WARM-UP PLAYWORK

COOL DOWN TIPS

I was feeling confident as I went to RunClub this past Tuesday night. I was hydrated, I was re-joining the 5K Sweet group so I wouldn’t be pushing myself too hard. I could do this. As we ran, I could feel my calves starting to cramp up again, just as they had done the week before, and I couldn’t ignore it anymore. Something else is wrong. It’s frustrating, to say the least. My lungs weren’t out of breath, I wasn’t sweating or in any other way unable or unwilling to run, but my calves weren’t having it. Again, I was surrounded by coaches; Arjun, Jo and Jeremy were all right there with me, talking it through and giving me ideas to try to work through it. While my body is yelling at me, I have to listen and work through the problem. It’s the mental part that’s going to be difficult. To not beat myself up will be the biggest challenge. The mantra of injuryfree running/living rang very true to me that evening. I won’t give up. I’ll take all of the valuable lessons and information from the coaches and I will find my pace. As much as I dislike falling short of a goal, I also enjoy a challenge. I think my 30-minute goal is something I have to let go of at this point, but I will keep going and I will cross the finish line.

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WEEK 5

MAX PATEL KTW digital sales associate 10K Sweet As Boogie the Bridge draws nearer, I find myself pondering new questions. “What is the average time it takes to complete a 10K event?” and “Should I have a time goal for my first race?” The answer to both queries I got from RunClub coaches was simple: Don’t worry about timing and just enjoy the race. I think that is the right way to go, at least for someone like me, who is still a rookie. In our last training session, we started on McArthur Island, where Jo Berry talked about injury-free running and an injuryfree life. It’s great how RunClub includes talks about more than just running and also teaches you very simple and small life lessons. After missing a session last Sunday, my confidence was a little low in the beginning of this past Tuesday’s run, but with coaches around, it wasn’t long before I found myself ready to finish strong. While we were running around McArthur Island, I explored new areas of the park. Soon after completing my training, for the very first time in my life, I experienced an allergy attack. I never had allergies before and to have an attack is not fun. Finally, a reminder to everyone about the Boogie fundraiser taking place next Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Red Collar Brewing, downtown at 355 Lansdowne St. Please join us for some great beer and fun.

Walkers

5K Sweet

10K Sweet

10K Bold

21 Club

5K or 10K Boogie walk

5K Boogie learn to run

10K Boogie run, entry-level

10K Boogie run

Half-marathon distance

Walking warm-up of 5 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

Walking warm-up of 10 minutes.

1) Walk easy for 15 minutes, then power walk for 35. Total 50 minutes.

1) Walk 3 minutes, run 3 minutes. Repeat 8 times. Total 48 minutes.

1) Walk 2 minutes, run 7 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 54 minutes.

1) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 8 times. Total 80 minutes.

1) 16-kilometre run.

2) Walk easy for 20 minutes, then power walk for 25. Total 45 minutes.

2) Walk 3 minutes, run 3 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 36 minutes.

2) Walk 2 minutes, run 7 minutes. Repeat 5 times. Total 45 minutes.

2) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 5 times. Total 50 minutes (with hills).

3) Walk easy for 20 minutes, then power walk for 25. Total 45 minutes.

3) Walk 3 minutes, run 3 minutes. Repeat 7 times. Total 42 minutes.

3) Walk 2 minutes, run 7 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 54 minutes.

3) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 60 minutes.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

10 minutes walking cool down and stretching.

Make sure you vary your pace. The power walk component assist in increasing aerobic activity and improving fitness.

Five tips for form: Relax, slight lean forward, arms at 90 degrees, quick leg turnover — and smile.

Your program is peaking. The weekend long run is your anchor and endurance-builder. Consistency is key — three times per week and no two days in a row.

You’re getting stronger. Look after your body by practising cold-water therapy, stretching and sound nutrition. All go hand-in-hand in a healthy, injury-free lifestyle.

The longest run of your program is next week. Prepare this week with highly nutritious food and use rest days to repair and prepare your body. Three weeks to go.

2) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 6 times. Total 60 minutes. 2) Walk 2 minutes, run 8 minutes. Repeat 7 times with some hills. Total 70 minutes.

For tickets visit spca.bc.ca/kamloopsfurball

MOVEMENT IS CHANGE with Jo Berry, RunClub and Boogie the Bridge founder

We are all Soul Rockers Soul Rocker: “One who lives from the heart, with compassion for all and possesses a tenacious enthusiasm for music, life and the planet.” — Michael Franti

O

ne of our Boogie participants sent the above quote to me, saying, “This reminds me of you, Jo!” Instantly my thoughts were, “This is us.” This is what Boogie is all about. Sou

Rocker is us. Boogie is a Kamloops heart project and an environment of fantastic energy. The colour red is used to symbolize this vibration: love, passion, energy and change. On Boogie day, the thousands of red shirts represent people who live from the heart, have great passion for life and are open to contributing to others. Questions? Boogie and Go online to runclub.ca RunClub are growing or send an email to rapidly into creating joberry@ an abundance of boogiethebridge.com. opportunities for all to learn and grow as people, improve our health and raise our consciousness. By reaching out to others, we create a vibrancy of healthy living. When we smile, high-five and give each other love and support, we are increasing our health every moment. This Boogie philosophy has been around for two decades. High vibrational living is scientifically proven and exactly where our society is heading. Those of you who show up at Boogie (and in life) are creating fresh beginnings for your family, friends, co-workers and communities. On Boogie day, as we all stand together in a sea of red, it is you who decided to go out on a limb and experience something out of the norm, so thank you. Thank you for investing in yourselves. Thank you for investing in each other. Thank you for being Soul Rockers. You deserve it. Times are changing and, as always, so are we. We have been waiting for the mainstream to join in and are ecstatic that it’s happening.


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FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM Remembering Edward Allan Russell January 28, 1943 October 26, 2018

A gathering of family and friends will be held on Saturday, April 20, 2019 from 1:30 pm to 4:00 pm at West Highlands Community Centre, 1185 Links Way, Kamloops. Casual Seahawks sports attire most welcome. Drop in for coffee/tea and desserts and share your stories of Ed.

Kvetoslav “John” Erman It is with great sadness that we announce the passing, of Kvetoslav “John” Erman on March 2, 2019, at the age of 89. John was born in Radostin, Czechoslovakia and escaped to Canada in 1951. He first set down roots in Edmonton, where he met Vera, who would soon become his wife. Together they moved throughout BC with John, a talented carpenter, being involved in a variety of construction projects ranging from bridges to mills, and finally homes. He was proud of his time in the military, attending the Royal Canadian School of Military Engineering in Chilliwack from 1958 to 1961. John and Vera settled in Kamloops in 1964 and would become longtime residents of the North Shore. John continued to work in construction, though later shifted careers and worked at the Tranquille Institution until his retirement in 1984. He loved tending his garden at “the house on Ord Road”, particularly the roses and fruit trees. He also enjoyed pickling the bountiful produce they grew. Eventually, John and Vera relocated to Clearwater Avenue, and after Vera’s passing John moved to Library Square. John is often recognized from his walks along the Thompson River, wearing his favourite hats and documenting his outings with his camera. He was passionate about photography, especially blossoms, and enjoyed discussing hockey, enthusiastically following the Kamloops Blazers. He was a wonderful neighbour and friend to many. John was predeceased by Vera in 2004. He is survived by cousin Eva Plachy of Whistler and was a beloved “Uncle” to Lenka Hennessey and Paula Plachy. In the Czech Republic, his surviving family includes siblings Marie Kopecka, Bohumila Danielova, and Josef Kasal, as well as step-son, Jan Peremsky. John was predeceased by his sister Irena Loubkova. He will be dearly missed by his extended family in the Czech Republic, Germany and California. John will be lovingly remembered for his respectful, kind and gentle nature, his incredible passion for numbers, as well as, his fierce independence. Our thanks to the caring staff of Ponderosa Lodge, Chartwell and Royal Inland Hospital. There will be no service by request. Cremation entrusted to Schoenings Funeral Home. Memorial donations may be made to the Salvation Army.

December 2, 1928 – March 26, 2019

It is with profound sadness that we announce the passing of our beloved father. He was a kind, gentle man and was loved and respected by so many. Dad was predeceased by his wife Alice, parents Claude and Yvonne, sisters Lorraine and Louise, brother George and step-son David. Left to cherish his memory are children Margaret (Don), Barb (Jerry), Debbie (Randy), Leona (Karl), Ken (Michelle), Shirley (Richard) and Joanne (Joe), twenty-three grandchildren, twenty-four greatgrandchildren and ex-wife Betty (Cliff). Also stepchildren Lyle (Brenda), Ted (Colleen), Danny (Sandra), nine grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

Malcolm Fraser Mason October 3, 1935 February 25, 2019

Announcing a Celebration of Life for Malcolm Fraser Mason on Saturday, April 13, 2019 from 1:00 to 3:00 pm.

Dad was born in Chase and was proud to call it home for 90 years. His sharp mind made him a wonderful resource for anyone seeking information on the area and many of those who lived there. He spent his earlier years farming, running his trucking/backhoe business and working for the Department of Highways. After retiring Dad and Alice took up woodworking, which they both loved.

Join us at his home to share memories of Malcolm as a teacher, leather crafter, pool player, friend, husband, father, all-around interesting and good guy.

Our family would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to Dr. Bernard, the nurses on 5 South and Doctors Rollheiser and Montgomery for the great compassion they showed Dad and ourselves as we went through this difficult time. A Celebration of Dad’s Life will be held on May 11, 2019 at 11:00 am in the Chase Community Hall.

Light refreshments will be provided.

Dad will be dearly missed by all who knew and loved him.

Any questions please call Donna at 250-376-1905 or email for address donna61@telus.net.

Online condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com

We’ll miss you, Kveto!

A Division of Service Corporation International (Canada) ULC.

Eamonn Oliver O’Regan To sleep—perchance to dream, Eamonn O’Regan passed away peacefully on Friday, March 29, 2019. The love of your life Brigitta, your children Rory (Tina), Martina (Paul) and Karen and your grandchildren Mirin, Seamus, Erin and Torin miss you desperately. You filled our lives with happiness and showed us how to appreciate life’s wonders: the symmetry of a leaf, the thunder of ocean surf, the light at dusk, the nuzzle of a furry companion, a song after a drop o’ the creature with family and friends . . . You also taught us that love and compassion are the only truths. From Ireland to Canada, Jamaica, Ghana, Nigeria, Trinidad and Botswana, you embraced difference and respected all peoples. In schools and universities across the globe, you delighted in sharing your knowledge and experience with students as much as you enjoyed learning from others. Whether in a classroom in the Caribbean, building a road in Nigeria or working with elders in Nunavut, you listened and opened your arms. Your legacy lives on in us, who love you always. Dia leat. A Funeral Mass was celebrated on Tuesday, April 2, 2019 at St. Mark’s Catholic Church in Vancouver. Burial followed at Hillside Cemetery in Kamloops, BC. Visit www.mbfuneralsbc.com to send a personal condolence.

.....

While the price difference for a cremation with NO Service is similar at most funeral homes in Kamloops, First Memorial is proud to have facilities to accommodate all of your needs, whether you choose a Celebration of Life or a full Traditional service. We can do it all at First Memorial. Come talk to us and have a look around. You will be pleasantly surprised.

Schoening Funeral Service 250-374-1454

First Memorial Funeral Service 250-554-2429

schoeningfuneralservice.com

Edward Skomorski

1934 - 2019

www.mbfuneralsbc.com

Celebration of Life

Robert John (Bob) Carlin

..

It is with heavy hearts that we announce the passing of Edward Skomorski on Saturday March 9, 2019 in Salmon Arm, B.C. at the age of 86. He leaves behind his wife of 63 years Ann; his children Donna (Brian) Rollier, Sandra (Tracy) Rankel; his grandchildren Nicole (Steven) Dolson, Nick Rankel, Miranda (Russell) Taylor and Julie Rollier (Ross) and his great grandchildren Iver, Charlie and Lennon. Dad grew up in Shortdale, Manitoba and after he graduated from Solsgirth High School he joined The Bank of Nova Scotia in Winnipegosis, Manitoba in 1951 at the tender age of 19 as a teller. Never satisfied dad always strived to be or do better and his working career was no different. While working in the Scotiabank world dad and mom lived in many cities and provinces in Canada. When dad retired from head office in Vancouver in 1988 they moved to the Shuswap. Dad had a passion for woodworking and built an array of items that many of us have adorning our homes today. His work was always top shelf! His treasures ranged from houses, boats, fine furniture - he covered it all. Everything was built with love and painstaking detail. When dad put his mind to it there wasn’t anything he could not build. Dad enjoyed most sports, he especially loved water and snow skiing and he made it a point to pass his love of sports on to his family. After retiring dad took up golf. He spent many hours with family and friends on various courses throughout Western Canada and the United States. Hosting the Skomorski Open quickly became a family tradition. Dad also loved crib and would take on anyone who would play with him. Dad’s family was very important to him and he often said he was a lucky man to have such a wonderful family. A special “thank you” to all the amazing staff at Mt. Ida Mews for the wonderful care Dad received during his last 20 months, you were his “other family”. A Celebration of Life will be held on Friday May 10 at 2:00 pm at Elks Hall 3690 30th Street N.E., Salmon Arm, B.C. Online condolences may be forwarded to Edward’s family through his obituary at www.bowersfuneralservice.com

Celebration of Life in Honour of Keith Studer

Ask DRAKE

May 16, 1958 January 1, 2019

Drake Smith, MSW Funeral Director

Every Friday in KTW!

Q. Can I make Mom’s ashes into something like a diamond ring?

A Celebration of Life for Keith Studer will be held at The Dunes at Kamloops, 652 Dunes Dr., Kamloops, BC on Sunday, April 14, 2019 at 12:00 pm. !

A. Yes you can. It costs quite a bit of money (I’ve never had a client follow through with this, after they learn the price!) But people are doing some incredible things these days. Including making nice glass ornaments with ashes. Most people want something more simple, however. !

Drake DrakeCremation Cremation !

!

& Funeral Services

& Funeral Services

210 Lansdowne 425 Tranquille Rd. 250-377-8225 DrakeCremation.com AFFORDABLE & NO BLACK SUITS

210 Lansdowne Street, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1X7 4638 Town Road, Box 859, Barriere, BC, V0E 1E0

73 Taren Drive, Clearwater, BC, V0E 1N2 Toll free: 1-877-674-3030

www.DrakeCremation.com


FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A37

OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM In Loving Memory of Kent E. Hendricks

Pat Comeau (née Rennie)

January 9, 1981 – March 29, 2019

Kent passed away on March 29, 2019. He was born on January 9, 1981 in Richmond, BC. Kent leaves behind his partner Salina, his parents Randy and Vickie, brothers Kevin (Trish), Kory (Heather), son Zachery, uncles, aunts, nieces and nephews. No service by request. Memorial donations can be made to The Heart & Stroke Foundation in memory of Kent.

Goodbyes are not forever. Goodbyes are not the end. They simply mean “I’ll miss you”, Until we meet again. Condolences may be sent to the family at Drakecremation.com

Mom passed away peacefully on March 21, 2019 at the age of 79 with her family by her side, after a sudden and unexpected illness. She is survived by her son Don Lacey and wife Connie, grandsons Taylor Quinn and Garrett, great-grandchildren Viola and Alo, granddaughter Lacey Gerbrandt, very close sister Norma Wheeler and nieces and nephew Sandy, Sheryl and Brad and step-daughter Michelle Comeau. Pat was predeceased by her son Doug in 1983 and husband Len in 2016. Pat was born January 27, 1940 and raised in New Westminster by her parents Jack and Irene Rennie. Whenever the Rennie’s, family and friends gathered there was always a sing along around the piano. Mom also learned to play and over the years if someone with a guitar showed up - the party just became all the better.

Pat, first husband Frank and boys moved to Loon Lake in 1969 and owned and operated the Wildwood Fishing Resort. Over the following twelve years most of the clientele became annual summer friends due to the excellent experience mom provided, although she did tire of being asked “when are they going to bite?”

a soft spot for animals. We were very blessed to live near mom and enjoyed daily visits, Sunday dinners and regular outings.

After selling the resort the family relocated to Kamloops where Pat worked for the Ministry of Agriculture. Mom loved her job and her “office family”, the many field staff and the customers who wandered in daily with pieces of plants or bugs in jars.

Mom suffered for many years with crippling arthritis, but never let that slow her down nor did she ever complain much about it. She never passed up an opportunity to socialize and loved any opportunity to get “all gussied up” (as her dad would say) and always brought a special energy to any event with her humour and laughter. Pat truly was a classy woman that will be missed by many.

Mom met Len in 1989 and moved to Lee Creek on the Shuswap and were married in Hawaii on Valentines Day in 1991. They were truly a perfect match as they both loved being out on the boat, socializing with friends and travel. Mom was affectionately known as the “cruise queen” and they enjoyed many Caribbean cruises, Panama Canal and Alaska trips as well as many winter weeks basking on the shores of Maui. They relocated to Chase in 2001 and became an active part of the community. Mom and Len had many years of mutual love, caring and support until his passing in 2016. Mom relocated to Kamloops and lived independently and close by in a home she loved at West Pines, with her new buddy Gulliver the cat. She always had

Thank you to all of her long-time and new friends who came to visit and make her days brighter, she truly treasured you all.

Mom we will miss you so much. Mom and family are sincerely thankful to the many support staff that helped her during her 30 years of rheumatoid arthritis and the wonderful staff at RIH that were so compassionate during her periodic visits and kept her comfortable as she passed. A Celebration of Life will be held on June 8, 2019 at the Kamloops Funeral Home. Donations in Pat’s memory can be made to the RIH Foundation.

Family run for four generations. & CREMATION SERVICES

• Family owned & operated •

Cynthia (Cyndy) Denise Einfeld (née Whiteley) It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Cynthia (Cyndy) Denise Einfeld (née Whiteley). After a battle with cancer, Cyndy passed away peacefully in her home in Chase on Monday, March 25, 2019. From her birth on October 19, 1955 in Vancouver she nourished people around her with love, kindness, laughter and a smile that would light up a room. Cyndy was a beloved wife, mother, grandmother, aunt and sister, whose legacy will live on through her husband Craig, children Colin (Cristena), Courtni (Kyle), Cole and CJ (Melissa), her twelve grandchildren and her siblings Lynn, Fran and Gord. A public service will be held at the Chase Community Hall on Saturday April 6, 2019 at 1:00 pm. In lieu of flowers, please contribute a donation to the Chase and District Health Services Foundation in Cyndy’s name.

Alfred ‘Alf’ De Frane

My Grandfather started in funeral service after WWII. Later my dad also taught me the value of funeral service, now even my own children are fully involved. Four generations of our family helping your family with caring compassionate support every step of the way. Tradition. Trust. Affordable.

William Ernest Dodds

285 Fortune Drive, Kamloops

250-554-2577

Lawrence Schrader

See more at: www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

Through the 50s and 60s, his lineman career took him to sweet and undiscovered locales such as Kitimat, Sechelt and the Sunshine Coast, the Darcy/Pemberton corridor and the wide open skys of the Peace River Country before Bill and Dusty finally choose to settle in Kamloops in 1970. Along the way he and Dusty had five children: Darcy (Shelly), Gordon (Donna), Greg (Sheila), Stephen (Cheryl) and Kelly (Jeff). From here on, Bill focused on his career and his family which soon expanded with his grandchildren Bobbi Ann (Geoff), Matthew, Olivia, Bronwyn, Alisdair, Madisen as well as his great-grandchildren Harrison and Thomson.

William Ernest Dodds, was born on January 8,1931 to Isabelle and Ernest at the Mona Township homestead and passed away peacefully, and on his own terms, on March 21, 2019 in Kamloops, British Columbia. Bill graduated Grade 13 from Orangeville High School where he excelled in athletics including rugby and lacrosse. Bill played lacrosse with the Fergus Junior A Thistles and later with the Brampton Excelsiors. In 1951, Bill left for the west coast of Canada with his best friend Ivan Tees. The two rookies soon signed on with MacMillan Bloedel without proper logging attire and wearing their “slippery city shoes.” The two were sent up the coast to work in isolated logging camps. Bill worked as a choker and soon graduated to become a rigger. This demanding and dangerous work set him up for his career as a lineman with BC Hydro. In 1952, Bill returned to Toronto, Ontario to marry the love of his life Ethel Thomson (Dusty). The newlyweds immediately returned to British Columbia as the mountains, the ocean and the west coast lifestyle totally captivated Bill’s imagination. He never looked back and gladly left the Ontario farm behind.

Bill was a voracious reader, enjoyed current events, politics, debates as well as a good game of Euchre, Skip Bo and croquet. He was also a closet thespian. The pinnacle of his acting career came when he played the role of Dangerous Dan McGrew. Bill was also a baritone singer with the Kamloops United Church choir and he was an active member of the Kamloops Desert Gardens Seniors Center. Bill’s big love was a large gathering with great food, good friends and his family. Thank you to the doctors and nurses at the RIH Emergency Department as well as the staff on 4 North and to the caregivers at the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Memorial Hospice. Bill departed sound of mind, true to his spirit and in keeping with his Canadian Irish heritage. His energy and love for life will be missed. A Celebration of Life for Bill will be held on July 28, 2019 at the Desert Gardens Seniors facility in Kamloops, BC. In lieu of flowers, please send a donation to the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Memorial Hospice.


A38

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM Patricia Anne Bauer July 13, 1942 - March 23, 2019

Celebration of Life Wynne Frost Funeral Service for Wynne Frost formerly of Flag Antiques and Monte Creek, followed by a Celebration of Life Tea on Saturday, April 13, 2019 at 1:00 pm at St. Peter’s Anglican Church in Monte Creek.

It is with deep sadness that we announce the death of Patricia Anne Langton/Brookbank/Bauer on Saturday, March 23, 2019 at Overlander Extended Care, Kamloops. Pat was born in Peterborough, Ontario, the first child of Marjory and Norman Langton. She eventually became the eldest of five children. The family moved to Victoria, BC after the war and Pat grew up in Victoria. She and her husband Birke Brookbank had four children and lived in a variety of communities in Ontario and BC. They settled in Kamloops in 1972. Pat eventually joined Canada Post and worked there for more than 30 years in several different locations in Kamloops. In 1983, she married Peter Bauer. She and Peter lived in Kamloops until her death. She leaves behind her mother Marjory, husband Peter, brothers Bob and Stewart, sisters Barbara and Judy, daughters Susan and Laura, son Chris, step-children Jan, Cliff, Bob, Bruce and Brian, numerous nieces and nephews, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her brother David and her son David. A celebration of Pat’s life will be held at a later date. Donations in Pat’s name may be made to The Kidney Foundation, Overlander Extended Care or a charity of your choice.

Margaret Lila Huntington On March 30, 2019, Margaret passed away peacefully in Kamloops at the age of 88. She will be sadly missed by her children John, Kathleen (Dennis) Johnson, Lorna (Brian) Bussa and Cal, her brotherin-law John Phipps (Sheila), sister-in-law Joan O’Keefe, her grandchildren Tim, Lilah, Vanessa, Kevin, Stephen, Jessica, Tyrel and Elissa, great-grandchildren Karaya, Daylan and Harvey and her nieces and nephews. Margaret started her life in Medicine Hat, living on a farm and as a teenager moved to Cloverdale. There, she met Bert (Herbert), her beloved husband of 56 years, while delivering his family’s newspapers. After a short banking career at the Cloverdale Bank of Montreal, she and Bert married and together spent their lives in Cloverdale, Prince George and Kamloops. Once they retired, they travelled extensively, visiting all seven continents. The family would like to thank the staff of the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Memorial Kamloops Hospice Home who supported Margaret and her family during the last days of her final journey. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Kamloops Hospice Association. Margaret’s Memorial Service will be held on Tuesday, April 9, 2019 at 2:00 pm at the Kamloops United Church.

DO NOT STAND AT MY GRAVE & WEEP MARY FRYE (1932) Do not stand at my grave and weep, I am not there, I do not sleep. I am a thousand winds that blow. I am the diamond glint on snow. I am the sunlight on ripened grain. I am the gentle autumn rain. When you wake in the morning hush, I am the swift, uplifting rush Of quiet birds in circling flight. I am the soft starlight at night. Do not stand at my grave and weep. I am not there, I do not sleep. Do not stand at my grave and cry. I am not there, I did not die!

Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

Thank You to all our sponsors for your support in making this wonderful event happen


FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD TAKE ONE FOR THE TEAM

A39

By Andrew J. Ries

ACROSS

1. Top 10-rated sitcom each season from 1972 to 1976 6. Chilling 11. Payment vouchers 16. Dugout propeller 19. Mexico City daily 20. Dish of cooked buckwheat 21. Site of a 2019 Trump/ Kim meeting 22. ____ hug 23. Moved stealthily, colloquially 24. Not a nice look 25. Pronounces breathily 27. Hearty pasta topping 29. Absolute truth 31. A singer can carry one 32. Some plumbing joints 33. Ask too-personal questions 34. Tailor’s tool 35. Uses as a perch 37. Mold into something new 39. Historic San Francisco thoroughfare 41. ____ y Plata (Montana’s motto) 42. Aid in tapestry-making 43. Itinerant sorts 44. Outfits in the operating room 48. Stockholm stock unit 50. “Look at me — I did it!” 54. Precisely 55. Saint in a children’s rhyme 56. ____ Maria (coffee liqueur) 57. Sister in a children’s story 59. Small pain 60. Upright building support 61. Travel group 64. Big name in 1950s politics 65. “Flowers” and “Sticky Fingers” for the Stones 66. Some Sunday broadcasting 69. Cakes and ____ (simple material pleasures) 70. Buncha

72. Hockey venues 73. Wonka portrayer 74. Rock band with the 1994 4x platinum album “The Downward Spiral,” for short 75. Many Jazz fans 77. Elusive sort 78. Smooth-talking 79. ____ Reader (quarterly magazine) 80. Prefix with scope 81. Bestow 84. “The Wonder Years” star 86. Goldman’s partner in banking 88. Symbol of poverty 89. Unwieldy boat 90. Visited out of deference (to) 94. Bright light in inclement conditions 98. Doesn’t bring up again, say 99. “Sad to say …” 100. Go off 101. Dodgers broadcaster Hershiser 102. K-12 103. Casting choice 105. Colorless mode at a copy shop 107. Strong servings with dessert 109. Bit of dental work 111. Where the Firestone tire company was founded 112. “____ Beso” (Paul Anka hit) 113. Sharp 114. Bull ____ 115. Tilted, in Stilton 116. Barbecue bone 117. Awful-smelling 118. Went back, as a tide 119. Like the Chelsea neighborhood in Manhattan

DOWN

1

1. Physician Franz who coined the term “animal magnetism” 2. Variant of a gene 3. Unsurprising people to show up 4. “Inside voices, please” 5. ____ Lodge 6. “All right, why not” 7. With 90-Down, first woman to lead a major party in Congress 8. “Mm-hmm” 9. Narrator of “Evita” 10. Tremendous auditory pleasure, in slang 11. Drink after drink? 12. Trunk fastener 13. Not remotely 14. Traveler’s holder of bathroom supplies 15. “Kind ____” (term of politeness) 16. Thickheaded 17. Playground comeback 18. Nevada senator Jacky 26. Sworn (to) 28. Fitting 30. Make a decision 34. New Mexico county or its seat 36. Hit sign 38. Wall St. professional 39. Hotel rollouts 40. “Look what I found!” 42. Schubert compositions 44. Burning the midnight oil 45. Dessert with a sugary syrup 46. Drake, for one 47. Something seen with a tiny flashlight 48. What cowboys are, in poker lingo 49. High praise 51. Home of Spelman College 52. Business transaction 53. Property recipient, legally 56. Related to pitches 58. Intensify, with “up” 60. Hall-of-Famer Musial 61. Like some porch chairs 62. Popular radio format

63. 67. 68. 71. 76. 78.

Farmer’s concern Turn sharply John le Carré specialty “No turning back now” [See note] List for charitable givers, for short 79. Sunscreen ingredient 82. Something removed when changing a tire 83. Pompous sort 84. Domino, familiarly 85. 8/ 87. Throw in 88. Former Indianapolis sports venue 90. See 7-Down 91. Pulsating 92. Analyzed 93. “Xanadu” band, briefly 94. Loose around the edges 95. Peak in Genesis 96. They have thick skins 97. Good supply 98. Outcast 100. Make blank 104. Legendary humanoid 105. Shapeless mass 106. Hacienda room 108. Mil. program discontinued in 1976 110. Head, in slang

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CROSSWORD ANSWERS FOUND ON A33

WORD SEARCH

JAZZ MUSIC WORD SEARCH

SUDOKU FUN BY THE NUMBERS

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

ANSWERS

Find the words hidden vertically, horizontally & diagonally throughout the puzzle AWARDS BACKBEAT BALLAD BAND BARS BASS BEBOP BLOW BLUES BOOGIE BRIDGE CHANGES

CHORD CHORUS DIATONIC DOUBLE TIME FUSION GROOVE HARMONY HORN IMPROVISE INTERLUDE JAZZ LICK

MAINSTREAM ANSWERS MEASURE PICKUP QUALITY RHYTHM RIFF ROOTS RUN SCALE SECTION SYNCOPATION VOICE

WE WANT YOU TO JOIN PARTY ON THE RUN 8:00 am warm up at McDonald Park • 8:30 am Half Marathon followed by other distances SIGN UP WITH A TEAM • SIGN UP WITH A FRIEND • SIGN UP BY YOURSELF 1K KIDS MINI BOOGIE • 5K RUN OR WALK • 10K RUN OR WALK • 21K RUN OR WALK

BOOGIETHEBRIDGE.COM • TO REGISTER EMAIL TEAMS@BOOGIETHEBRIDGE.COM


A40

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

KamloopsThisWeek.com

CLASSIFIEDS Phone: 250-371-4949

INDEX

LISTINGS

Announcements . . . . 001-099 Employment . . . . . . . . .100-165 Service Guide . . . . . . . 170-399 Pets/Farm . . . . . . . . . . .450-499 For Sale/Wanted. . . . .500-599 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . .600-699 Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700-799 Automotive . . . . . . . . . . 800-915 Legal Notices . . . . . . 920-1000

|

Fax: 250-374-1033

|

Email: classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com

DEADLINES

REGULAR RATES

RUN UNTIL SOLD

RUN UNTIL RENTED

GARAGE SALE

WEDNESDAY ISSUES • 10:00 am Tuesday

Based on 3 lines

1 Week . . . . . . . . . $2500

$

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Houses, condos, duplexes, suites, etc. (3 months max) $ 5300 Add an extra line to your ad for $10

$

FRIDAY ISSUES • 10:00 am Thursday

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Merchandise, vehicles, trailers, RV’s, boats, ATV’s, furniture, etc. Tax not included Some restrictions apply

Scheduled for one month at a time. Customer must call to reschedule. Tax not included. Some restrictions apply

1 Issue . . . . . . . . . $1300 1 Month . . . . . . . .

80 2500

$

$

ALL ADS MUST BE PREPAID. No refunds on classiďŹ ed ads.

00

ADD COLOUR . . to your classiďŹ ed add Tax not included

3500

Announcements

Announcements

Announcements

Announcements

Employment

Anniversaries

Coming Events

Information

Lost & Found

Business Opportunities

2 Days Per Week

Found: 100blk West St. Paul St. small grey & cinnamon stripped cat, 4-white paws & chest. 250-374-5703 Lost: car keys one with a blue top near Thrift City in the downtown area. 250-5733970.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

call 250-374-0462

Travel

go to

Personals

Word ClassiďŹ ed Deadlines •

10:00am Tuesday for Wednesday’s Paper.

•

10:00am Thursday for Friday’s Paper.

Advertisements should be read on the ďŹ rst publication day. We are not responsible for errors appearing beyond the ďŹ rst insertion. It is agreed by any Display or ClassiďŹ ed Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event that errors occur in the publishing of any advertising shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only and there will be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement.

Career Opportunities

If you have an

upcoming event for our

kamloopsthisweek.com and click on the menu and go to events to submit your event.

Information Buying Coin Collections+ Paper Money Collections United States,Canada & World Collections WANTED! Todd’s Coins

(250)-864-3521

Opportunity

Housesitting

Looking For Love? Try your luck with 1x1 boxed ad $35 plus tax for 2 weeks. Price includes box number. Call 250-371-4949 to place your ad and for more details.

Career Opportunities

Peace of mind house sitting and pet care. Keep your house and pets safe while your away. 374-6007.

Career Opportunities

Share your event KamloopsThisWeek.com /events

Kamloops # recruitment agency

Career Opportunities

250-374-3853

1

Own your own business in friendly hair & esthetics studio in Valleyview. Good location, free parking.

Call Judy 250-374-1236 DRIVER TRAINING

Funding available for those who qualify!

CERTIFIED ICBC AIR BRAKE COURSE

Haisla Nation Council has an immediate opening for a:

DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES Haisla Nation Council located in Beautiful Kitimaat Village, has an opening in the community for a Director of Human Resources. This role involves working with the Chief Executive OďŹƒcer in the development, implementation, and management of all projects to improve human resources systems, practices, contract negotiations, labour relations and resources. QualiďŹ cations: t6OJWFSTJUZEFHSFFJO)VNBO3FMBUJPOT FEVDBUJPO PSSFMBUFE experience; t$FSUJmFE)VNBO3FTPVSDFT1SPGFTTJPOBMEFTJHOBUJPO t"UMFBTUmWF  ZFBSTPGFYQFSJFODFJOBTFOJPSIVNBOSFTPVSDFTSPMF t1SPmDJFOUJODPNQVUFSBOE.JDSPTPGU0ĂśDFQSPHSBNTJODMVEJOH Word, Excel and Outlook; t&YDFMMFOUJOUFSQFSTPOBMBOEDPNNVOJDBUJPOTLJMMT t"CJMJUZUPXPSLJOBCVTZFOWJSPONFOUBOENBJOUBJODPOmEFOUJBMJUZ t8JMMJOHBOEBCMFUPQBTTB1PMJDF*OGPSNBUJPOBOEDSJNJOBM record check; t.VTUQPTTFTTBWBMJE#$%SJWFSTMJDFOTF t,OPXMFEHFPG8PSLFST$PNQFOTBUJPO#PBSESFHVMBUJPOT t,OPXMFEHFPG*OEJHFOPVTBOE/PSUIFSO"ĂľBJST$BOBEBQPMJDJFTBOE procedures, Human Rights legislation, Labour Canada regulations, and knowledge of union agreements.

April 6-7, 2019

0ĂľFSJOH DPNQFUJUJWF XBHF  DPNQSFIFOTJWF CFOFmUT QBDLBHF BOE possible relocation allowance to the suitable candidate.

Courses start every week!

For full details visit: https://haisla.ca/council/job-opportunities/

Class 1, 2, & 3 B-Train

Call 250.828.5104 or visit tru.ca/trades

Share your event with the community

KamloopsThisWeek.com/events

12 Friday - 3 lines or less 1750 Wed/Fri - 3 lines or less

*OUFSFTUFEJOEJWJEVBMTTIPVMETVCNJUBDPWFSMFUUFS OBNFTPGUISFF references and the express permission for HNC to contact these references, as well as your resume to: Stephanie McClure Human Resources Manager Haisla Nation Council Haisla PO Box 1101, Kitamaat Village, B.C. V0T 2B0 Phone (250) 639-9361 Fax (250) 632-2840 Email: HNCjobs@haisla.ca No later than 4 pm on April 26, 2019 While we sincerely appreciate all applications, only those candidates selected for interview will be contacted.

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue. . . . . . . $1638

$

BONUS (pick up only):

1 Week . . . . . . $3150

• 2 large Garage Sale Signs • Instructions • FREE 6� Sub compliments of

1 Month . . . $10460

Tax not included

Tax not included

Employment Career Opportunities Considering a Career 8979235 in Real Estate?

Century21 Desert Hills Realty. We provide training & tutoring. Talk to Karl Neff 250 377 250-377-3030 SStart your new career today!

Employment Education/Trade Schools HUNTER & FIREARMS

Courses. A Great Gift. Next C.O.R.E. May 4th and 5th. Saturday and Sunday. P.A.L. Sunday, April 14th. Professional outdoorsman & Master Instructor:

Education/Trade Schools AAA - Pal & Core

courses mid-week & weekends. NEW - Intro to Reloading & Bear Aware courses on demand. For schedules see www.pal-core-ed.com or 778-470-3030

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

HAIRSTYLISTS Chair Rental $700 per month

8982148 TRUCK

PERFECT Part-Time

~ Caution ~ While we try to ensure all advertisements appearing in Kamloops This Week are placed by reputable businesses with legitimate offers, we do caution our readers to undertake due diligence when answering any advertisement, particularly when the advertiser is asking for monies up front.

EMPLOYMENT

50

Bill

250-376-7970

INTERIOR HEAVY EQUIPMENT SCHOOL Hands-On Tasks. Start Weekly. GPS Training! Funding & Housing Available! Job Aid! Already a HEO? Get certification proof. Call 1-866-399-3853 or go to: iheschool.com

facebook.com/ kamloopsthisweek

Career Opportunities

SALES ASSOCIATE & ASSISTANT STORE MANAGER -0ub1Ń´-m7_-vĆ‘rovbাomv-ˆ-bŃ´-0Ń´; FULL TIME ASSISTANT STORE MANAGER in Kamloops, BC. ;m;C|vġ1olr;ŕŚžŕŚžÂˆ;v-Ń´-u‹ĺ ";‰bm];Šr;ub;m1;-m-vv;|Äş

PART TIME SALES ASSOCIATE ќŊƑƓ_o†uvbm1Ѵ†7bm]‰;;h;m7vÄş APPLY IN PERSON WITH RESUME TO "$!  !Ňƒ$$ $Äš

2121 East Trans Canada Hwy. | fabriclandwest.com 250-374-3360

THERE’S MORE ONLINE Be a part of your community paper & comment online.

KamloopsThisWeek.com


FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Employment

Employment

Merchandise for Sale

Merchandise for Sale

Help Wanted

Work Wanted

Auctions

Misc. for Sale

Job wanted by Computer Programmer-Analyst /Office Worker/Tutor Detail oriented, organized, problem-solver, extremely computer literate. Strong proofreading, editing, technical writing, public speaking skills. Can teach practically anything I know. IT work preferred but any job using problem-solving skills could be a good match. Gene Wirchenko at 250-8281474. genew@telus.net

April 13/14 Huge Restaurant Equip Auction

I PAY Cash $$$ For All Scrap Vehicles! and $5 for auto batteries Call or Text Brendan 250-574-4679

is looking for substitute distributors for door-to-door deliveries. Vehicle is required. For more information please call the Circulation Department at

250-374-0462

Mario’s Towing is Hiring a Part/time Yard person in our Kamloops Location. Must have the following Customer service oriented. BC Drivers Licence Class #5. Basic Computer Skills. Ability to work outside in all conditions, year round. 100% commitment to a safe Ability to perform physical work with medium and heavy lifting. Related experience and knowledge an asset. Excellent listening, communication, and interpersonal skills. Ability to work independently or with a team. Opening and closing duties. Janitorial Skills. Please send Resume to: Kamloops@mariostowing.com No phone calls please only those selected will be contacted.

Pets

Pets Animals sold as “purebred stock” must be registrable in compliance with the Canadian Pedigree Act. BOUVIER Pups parents CKC. Family/farm raised. Classic Black. $1200. 250-494-4092

PETS For Sale? TRI-CITY SPECIAL! for only $46.81/week, we will place your classified ad into Kamloops, Vernon & Salmon Arm. (250)371-4949

classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com

Janitorial

*some restrictions apply.

Part time cleaning person needed. Evenings 4hrs a night 5 nights a week. Reply to Box 1087, c/o KTW, 1365B Dalhousie Dr. Kamloops, BC. V2C 5P6

Merchandise for Sale

Temporary/ PT/Seasonal

BUYING & SELLING: Vintage & mid-century metal, teak, wood furniture; original signed paintings, prints; antique paper items, local history ephemera; BC pottery, ceramics. 4th Meridian Art & Vintage, 104 1475 Fairview, Penticton. Leanne@4thmeridian.ca

Need extra $ $ $ Kamloops This Week is currently hiring Substitute Carriers for door-to-door deliveries. Call 250-374-0462 for more information.

Work Wanted HOME & YARD HANDYMAN If you need it done, Give us a call ! Steve 250-320-7774. House cleaner $25 per hour 10 years Experience 250-3764406 Semi-retired Artistic Carpenter with 25 yrs exp. Phone Jamie 250-574-0307

Career Opportunities

Featuring: Like-New Rental Return Silverchef Certified Used Equipment, Woodstone Oven, Contents of Restaurants, Bakery & HighEnd Microsoft Cafeteria! Over 200 Lots of NEW Discontinued and Overstock Appliances - Refrigeration, NG & LPG Cooking, Countertop Electric Appliances, Massive Quantities of Glassware, Cutlery, Cookware & Stainless Fixtures 10am start * Online www.KwikAuctions.com 7305 Meadow Ave, Bby BC Shipping & Storage Available Auction Hosted Online by Bidspotter.com View our Auction Showroom Monday-Friday, 9-3

$500 & Under Do you have an item for sale under $750? Did you know that you can place your item in our classifieds for one week for FREE?

Call our Classified Department for details!

250-371-4949 *some restrictions apply

Antiques / Vintage

RUN TIL RENTED

5300

$

+ TAX

Estate Sales Everything Must Go! Furniture, some shop tools. misc items. 250-377-5956.

Free Items

New and Established. Equipment for Sale. R600 Backpack blower (Stihl). H100 Hedge trimmerp +extension (Stihl). Chainsaw 16” bar (Stihl). 110 Grass trimmer (Stihl). HRX Honda lawnmower. 12ft. alum orchard ladder. Trailer 4x8 w/working lights. $2,150. Call John 1250-889-1290. BEE FRAMES ETC For price list email boxworks @shaw.ca Quality work at a fair price 250-573-4078 Butcher-Boy commercial meat grinder 3-hp. 220 volt. c/w attachments. $1600. 250318-2030.

EARN EXTRA $$$

KTW requires door to door substitute carriers for all areas in the city. Vehicle is an asset Call 250-374-0462 Fishing Kayak 10ft. $450. IGO Titan 36 Electric Bike w/battery. $900. 778-4711096. Golf 3-wheel pull cart with bag. C/W woods, irons & putter. $235. 250-372-8932. Hockey Gear fits 5’4” 120 lbs, brand new + skates 6.5 size. Serious inquires only $650/obo. for all. Call 9-6pm 250-374-7992. La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX climbing boots, men size 10. New. $500. 2-161cm Snowboards. Never used $375. Gently used. $325. 578-7776. Queen Boxspring/mattress like new $200. 12ft. alum boat, oars, seats, 55 elec motor $650. 2-New cedar chest $250/each. Steel boat rack for p/up $50. 750 Spoon collection $375. 236-421-4201.

Furniture

Add an extra line to your ad for $10

250-371-4949 *RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Diningroom table w/8-chairs, c/w Buffet and Hutch. Med Colour. $850. 250-374-8933.

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Real Estate

Real Estate

Misc. for Sale

For Sale By Owner

Mobile Homes & Parks

Steel Shipping Storage Containers 20,40,45,53ft. Rentals/insulated/modification Sales 1-866-528-7108

001 Able buyer of all your old coins,coin collections,Collector COINS, all silver, gold, rare, common, old money.+ Todd’s Coins (250)864-3521

BUYING gold dust,gold nuggets,coins, jewelry, scrap gold+, antique silver, all sterling, silverware, bullion, bars, collections of coins+. Todd’s Coins (250)864-3521

Key requirements for this job are: At least 2 yrs experience working with A/R, A/P, payroll and general office duties. Familiarity with Simply Accounting, Microsoft Office, Excel & Publisher. Able to work without supervision, be self motivated and have superior organization skills. Great people/phone skills. Must have a driver’s license and access to own transportation and be available for weekend and evening work on occasion. The ideal candidate should also have formal accounting credentials and familiarity with Improvement District operations and regulations.

Plants /Nursery Colorado Blue Green Spruce. Field grown major trees - 6’ to 14’ 32” B&B - blue $16 per ft. green $14 per ft. Min base width - 6’ to 10’. Call 250-8199712 or 778-220-4443 (McLure). Save 10% on 3 or more order.

Real Estate

Rayleigh Waterworks District Office 4953 Spurraway Road Kamloops, BC V2H 1M6 Or email Or fax

admin@rwwd.ca HYPERLINK "mailto:admin@rwwd.ca" admin@rwwd.ca 250-578-0502

The closing date for applications to be received is 5:00pm April 15, 2019. Only those chosen for an interview will be contacted. Thank you to all those who apply.

HOME & LAND PACKAGE

Call or email for more info:

250-374-7467 classifieds@

STARTING AT

5% Down

kamloopsthisweek.com

$615 Bi-Weekly

For Sale By Owner $55.00 Special!

Custom Floor Plan

ROLL ENDS AVAILABLE $5-$10/ ROLL 1365 B Dalhousie Drive Kamloops BC call for availability 250-374-7467

or toll free at

866.573.1288 The special includes a 1x1.5 ad (including photo) that will run for one week (two editions) in Kamloops This Week. Our award winning paper is delivered to over 30,000 homes in Kamloops every Wednesday and Friday.

eaglehomes.ca

Call or email us for more info:

250-374-7467

classifieds@ kamloopsthisweek.com

OSPREY HOME & LAND PACKAGES

Houses For Sale

Starting as low as $603.07 bi-weekly

160 Acre Estate or 50 Potential View Lots

Includes Free 1 Year Home Insurance

Located in the Village of Lumby. 2 springs on property. $675,000 Call 250-260-0217

RiverBend 2bdrms, full kitchen. W/D, 920 sq/ft. $349,000. 780-904-3551 or 778-4708338.

Share your event with the community KamloopsThisWeek.com /events

CHECK US OUT

ONLINE

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Under the Real Estate Tab

1.866.573.1288 or 250.573.2278

facebook.com/ kamloopsthisweek

eaglehomes.ca

Share your event KamloopsThisWeek.com /events

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

9125829

LegaL assistant RequiRed for expanding conveyancing practice.

Shop Rider Scooter Good battery Low Milage Red $1500 250-554-4427 aft 5pm

Career Opportunities

Call us at

250.573.2278

Acreage for Sale

Career Opportunities

Interior Health is seeking Permanent Part Time Community Health Workers in Lillooet. If you have current registration with the BC Care Aide and Community Health Worker registry, apply today!

Competition #1231641

Excellent Salary and Benefits for a Qualified Candidate. send Resume to: Roger Webber or Ashley Ricalton Webber Law #209 – 1211 Summit Drive Kamloops, BC V2C 5R9 roger@webberlaw.ca ashley@webberlaw.ca tel: (250) 851-0100 | fax: (250) 851-0104

Jobs.InteriorHealth.ca

GET YOUR STEPS IN AND GET PAID

Those who reside in Rayleigh will be considered preferential only if Candidates’ Qualifications are equal. Send applications with resumes and covering letter to:

$55.00 Special!

1-3/4 Violin c/w teardrop case or rectangular case. $150-$250. 250-434-6738.

Rayleigh Waterworks District Administrator Position

We are now taking applications for a permanent part time position for the Administrator of Rayleigh Waterworks District.

BY OWNER

Misc. Wanted

Apt/Condos for Sale

Firewood/Fuel ALL SEASON FIREWOOD. For delivery birch, fir & pine. Stock up now. Campfire wood. (250) 377-3457.

Merchandise for Sale

Musical Instruments

Free Fill, sod and soil 42 yards (250) 573-5065

8ft Antique Couch $900. Round dining room table w/4chairs & 2 bar stools. $700. Couch & matching chairs $200. 250-374-1541.

ƒ "҃ƐƑ) "

ATTENTION: LANDSCAPERS

A41

TRU invites applications for the following position:

ADMINISTRATIVE Community Coordinator, Continuing Studies Lillooet Regional Centre Lillooet, BC

PAPER

ROUTES

AVAILABLE

For further information, please visit:

tru.ca/careers

We wish to thank all applicants; however, only those under consideration will be contacted.

250-374-7467 1bu1†Ѵ-ঞomŠh-lѴoorv|_bv‰;;hĺ1ol


A42

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Rentals

Rentals

Rentals

Transportation

Transportation

Apt/Condo for Rent

Commercial/ Industrial

Recreation

Antiques / Classics

Cars - Domestic

Northland Apartments

Renovated Bachelor Suites $1,000 Renovated 1&2 Bedroom Suites with New Fixtures; SS Appliances; Luxury Plank Flooring. Adult Oriented, No Pets, No Smoking Elevators / Common Laundry $1,100 - 1,650 per month. North Shore 250-376-1427 South Shore 250-314-1135 nnkamloops@northland.ca nskamloops@northland.ca

Bed & Breakfast BC Best Buy Classifieds Place your classified ad in over 71 Papers across BC. Call 250-371-4949 for more information

Commercial space for rent, was previously used as a Dance Studio. Approximately 1500 sq feet. Great parking, close to downtown, bus stops. 2000 a month plus utilities to view please contact Scott at (250) 318-0485 or conex @shaw.ca or Randy at (250) 214-0485 or conex randy@gmail.com

Homes for Rent Louis Creek

1 Bedroom + Den 2008 Park Model Trailer

In adult orientated park, $750/mo includes grounds and yard maintenance. Available May 1st

250-299-2252

PAPER ROUTES

**BOOK NOW FOR BEST WEEKS IN 2019** Shuswap Lake! 5 Star Resort in Scotch Creek BC. REST & RELAX ON THIS PRIVATE CORNER LOT. Newer 1bdrm, 1-bath park model sleeps 4 . Tastefully decorated guest cabin for 2 more. One of only 15 lots on the beautiful sandy beach with a wharf for your boat. Provincial park, Golf, Grocery/Liquor store & Marina all minutes away. Resort has 2 pools, 2 hot tubs, Adult & Family Clubhouse, Park, Playground. Only $1,400 week. BOOK NOW! Rental options available for 3 & 4 day, 1 week, 2 week & monthly. Call for more information. 1-250-371-1333.

Suites, Lower Lrg-2bdrms above grnd large yard. In unit laundry, Inclds Hispd Int & cable. $1250 inclds utils. N/S, N/P, Ref, DD. Avail May 1st 250-851-1563.

AVAILABLE

facebook.com/ kamloopsthisweek

Help Wanted

250-374-7467

THERE’S MORE ONLINE

1bu1†Ѵ-ঞomŠh-lѴoorv|_bv‰;;hĺ1ol

KamloopsThisWeek.com

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

LOOKING FOR DOOR TO DOOR CARRIERS

Kids & Adults needed! ABERDEEN

Rte 527 - 2009-2045 Hunter Pl, 902-992 Huntleigh Cres. – 28 p

BATCHELOR

Rte 175 – 1800-1899 Norfolk Crt, Norview Pl, 821-991 Norview Rd. – 38 p. Rte 183 – 2003-2074 Saddleback Dr, 2003-2085 Grasslands Blvd. – 74 p. Rte 187 – 2100-2130 Doubletree Cres, 1050-1100 Latigo Dr, 21002169 Saddleback Dr. – 56 p.

BROCKLEHURST/NORTH KAMLOOPS

Rte 4 - 727-795 Crestline St, 2412-2714 Tranquille Rd. – 73 p. Rte 138 - 304-442 McGowan Ave, 335-418 Mulberry Ave.-76 p.

DOWNTOWN

Rte 308 - 355 9thAve, 703-977 St. Paul St. – 40 p Rte 317 - 535-649 7th Ave. 702-794 Columbia St,(evenside)702-799 Nicola St.-46 p Rte 319 - 545 6th Ave, 609-690 Columbia St,(evenside), 604-692 Nicola St.-16 p Rte 320 – 483-587 9th Ave, 801991 Battle St, 804-992 Columbia St (Even Side), 803-995 Nicola St. - 51 p. Rte 322 - 694 11th Ave, 575-694 13th Ave, 1003-1091 Battle St, 1008-1286 Columbia St, 1004- 1314 Nicola St. – 61 p Rte 324 – 606-795 Pine St. – 29 p. Rte 325 - 764-825 9th Ave, 805-979 Columbia St(odd side), 804-987 Dominion St, 805-986 Pine St.-65p Rte 327 – 1103-1459 Columbia St, 1203-1296 Dominion St. – 38 p.

Rte 328 – 935 13th Ave, Cloverleaf Cres, Dominion Cres, Pine Cres, Park Cres. – 62 p. Rte 331 - 948-987 9th Ave, 1125 10th Ave, 901-981 Douglas St, 902-999 Munro St, 806-999 Pleasant St. – 37 p. Rte 333 - 1003-1176 Pleasant St, 1005-1090 Pine St.– 37 p. Rte 339 - 1265-1401 9th Ave, 916-1095 Fraser St.-29 p. Rte 372 - 22-255 W. Battle St, 660 Lee Rd, 11-179 W. Nicola St. – 54 p. Rte 380 - Arbutus St, Chaparral Pl, Powers Rd, Sequoia Pl. – 71 p Rte 387 – 643-670 McBeth Pl. – 22 p. Rte 389 – Bluff Pl, 390 Centre Ave, 242-416 W. Columbia St, Dufferin Terr, Garden Terr, Grandview Terr. – 61 p. Rte 390 – Fernie Crt, 158-400 Fernie Pl, Guerin Creek Way. – 49 p.

Rte 761 – 6022-6686 Furrer Rd, Houston Pl, Parlow Rd, Pearse Pl, Urban Rd. – 57 p.

DALLAS/ BARNHARTVALE

PINEVIEW VALLEY

Rte 706 – 1078-1298 Lamar Dr, Molin Pl, - 29 p. Rte 750 - 5101-5299 Dallas Dr, Mary Pl, Nina Pl, Rachel Pl-31p Rte 751 – 5310 Barnhartvale Rd, Bogetti Pl, 5300-5599 Dallas Dr, 5485-5497 ETC Hwy, Viking Dr, Wade Pl. – 64 p. Rte 754 – Hillview Dr, Mountview Dr. – 39 p. Rte 755 – 6159-6596 Dallas Dr, McAuley, Melrose, Yarrow. – 72 p. Rte 759 – Beverly Pl, 6724-7250 Furrer Rd, McIver Pl, Pat Rd, Stockton Rd. – 40 p. Rte 760 – Beaver Cres, Chukar Dr. – 64 p.

Rte 603 – Chickadee Rd, Comazzetto Rd, Strom Rd, 1625-1648 & 1652-1769 Valleyview Dr.- 44 Rte 605 – 1770-1919 Glenwood Dr, Knollwood Dr, Vicars Rd. – 64 p. Rte 606 – Orchard Dr, Russet Wynd, 1815-1899 Valleyview Dr. – 41 p. Rte 608 – Curlew Rd & Pl, 1925-1980 Glenwood Dr. - 73 p. Rte 612 – 2079 Falcon Rd, Flamingo Rd, 2040-2177 Glenwood Dr. – 64 p. Rte 621 – Duck Rd, Skelly Rd, 96 Tanager Dr, 2606-2876 Thompson Dr. – 50 p.

LOWER SAHALI/SAHALI Rte 403 – 405-482 Greenstone Dr, Tod Cres. – 28 p. Rte 405 – Anvil Cres, 98-279 Bestwick Dr, Bestwick Crt E. & W, Morrisey Pl. – 49 p. Rte 449 - Assiniboine Rd, Azure Pl, Chino Pl, Sedona Dr. – 90 p Rte 470 – Farnham Wynd, 102-298 Waddington Dr. – 67 p. Rte 472 - 1750-1795 Summit Dr. – 34 p Rte 474 – Coppertree Ct, Trophy Crt. – 20 p. Rte 482 - 101-403 Robson Dr. – 67 p Rte 487 - 201-475 Hollyburn Dr, 485-495 Hollyburn Dr, 20032091 Panorama Crt.-76 p. Rte 492 – 2000-2099 Monteith Dr, Sentinel Crt. – 38 p.

WESTSYDE

Rte 561 - 1908-1980 Ashwynd, 1915-1975 Fir Pl, 1700-1798 Lodgepole Dr. – 54 p.

RAYLEIGH

Rte 830 – Chetwynd Dr, Stevens Dr. – 56 p. Rte 833 – Cameron Rd, Davie Rd. – 44 p. Rte 836 – 133-197 Cahilty Cres, 150-187 Hyas Pl, 4551-4648 Spurraway Rd. – 36 p. Rte 837 – 103-190 Helmcken Dr, 4654-4802 Spurraway Rd. – 22 p. Rte 842 – 3945-4691 Yellowhead Hwy. – 35 p.

Rte 253 - Irving P, 2401-2477 Parkview Dr, Rhonmohe Cres, 2380&2416 Westsyde Rd.-54p Rte 257 - 801-863 Alpine Terr, 2137-2197 Community Pl, 21922207 Grasslands Blvd, 908-918 Grasslands Pl, 881-936 McQueen Dr, 805-880 Woodhaven Dr.-53 p Rte 258 - 806-879 McQueen Dr, 2136-2199 Perryville P. – 36p Rte 260 - 2040 – 2185 Westsyde Rd. – 24 p.

VALLEYVIEW

RUN UNTIL SOLD ONLY $35.00(plus Tax) (250)371-4949

1965 Mercury 4dr., hardtop. 55,000 miles. 390-330HP. $4,000. 250-574-3794.

*some restrictions apply call for details

SALE Directory Garage Sales

Garage Sales

ABERDEEN House Stark Mega Garage Sale. Saturday, April 6th. 10:00am-2:00pm. 2271 Garymede Dr. Everything Must Go! No Early Birds.

IT’S GARAGE SALE TIME

Cars - Sports & Imports One owner 2007 Type S Acura T/L 210,000km. Exec cond. $7500/obo. (250) 828-2331

1989 Mercedes 560 SEC. 61,000kms. Hagerty Appraisals #2 car $10,000USD. Selling $10,000 CDN 250-574-3794

Auto Accessories/Parts 4 Summer tires on rims and balanced. 195/60/R15. $400. Used 1 season. 250-579-9710

Cars - Domestic

classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com

Falkland

Thursday 10am for Friday

Motorcycles

3633 Smith Road (off Hwy 97) Saturday, April 6 Sunday April 7 10:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. Sleigh bed, compressor, drill press, walker,table saw and lots more!

Wanted: HARLEY GEAR. Chaps, Jacket, Vest and Gloves. Ladies Medium and Mens Xlg. Send pics to: rajol@telus.net

Off Road Vehicles

One owner 92 Toyota Camry 204,000 km, good condition, new tires $2600 250-314-1002

Yamaha Grizzly ATV. KMS 011031 $4,500 250-579-3252

Landscaping

Landscaping

53 ƒ "҃ƐƑ) " + TAX

77-m;Š|u-Ѵbm;|o‹o†u-7=ouŪƐƏ

250-371-4949 *RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Call Tuesday before 10am for our 2 day special for $17.50 for Wednesday and Friday Garage Sale Packages must be picked up Prior to the Garage Sale.

Transportation

Transportation

Recreational/Sale

Scrap Car Removal

250-851-6127 Request a Free Estimate at ConfluxGS.com

Livestock

Livestock

SHAVINGS & SAWDUST 10 TO 150 YARD LOADS

1999 - 32ft. Southwind. Slide, V-10, Jacks, Solar, Generator, Dual-air, TV’s, Vacuum, Inverter etc. Low kms. $31,500 250-828-0466 2005, 38’ RV trailer 2 slides, sleeps 6, appl incld, fully loaded, $16,900. 236-421-2251 2013 Keystone Fusion Toy Hauler slps 9, 41ft 12ft garage asking $60,000 250-374-4723

BARK MULCH FIR OR CEDAR

- Regular & Screened Sizes -

REIMER’S FARM SERVICE

250-838-0111

Share your event with the community

Run until sold

New Price $56.00+tax

Do you have a vehicle, boat, rv, or trailer to sell? With our Run til sold specials you pay one flat rate and we will run your ad until your vehicle sells.* • $56.00 (boxed ad with photo) • $35.00 (regular 3 line ad)

.

Snowmobiles 2003 Arctic Cat 600 EFI - 1M Mountain Cat 144” track, 1582 miles as new cond trailer avail $2199/obo. (250)376-3881 or 250-371-7605

Sport Utility Vehicle 1997 Ford Expedition. 200,000+kms. New brakes. Runs well. $3,700. 250-3725033. 1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee LTD. V-8, 168,000kms. Good Shape. $3300. 250-815-0120

Trucks & Vans 1996 GMC Suburban 4x4 good shape runs great $2750obo Call (250) 571-2107

Call: 250-371-4949

*Some conditions & restrictions apply. Private party only (no businesses).

Free Items

Free Items

INTERESTED IN A ROUTE?

00

Garage Sale deadline is

Garage Sale

For more information call the Circulation department 250-374-0462

$

250-371-4949

Commercial & Residential Gardening Services Offered by a Certified Horticulturist

Free Items

RUN TIL RENTED

ONLY $12.50 FOR 3 LINES (Plus Tax) ($1 per additional line)

BROCK Sat, April 6th. 9am-1pm. 2658 Ayr Place. Moving. Furn, toys, garden/tools, Good cheap & free stuff. Rain or Shine.

2015 Honda CRF 250L Street Legal, like new, one owner 1100 kms $3500. 604-991-0080 2010 Dodge Charger SXT Sedan. 4dr., AWD, V-6, auto. 50,001 kms. Excellent condition. $12,900. 250-374-1541.

Call and ask us about our GARAGE SALE SPECIAL

Silver 2006 Mazda RX8 136,000km. Auto, Sunroof, A/C, leather heated seats, great body, tires and interior, Suicide style back doors. $7900. 250-376-7672 Financing avail 855-6007750

KamloopsThisWeek.com/events

Rte 602 – Apple Lane, Knollwood Cres, Parkhill Dr, 1783 Valleyview Dr. – 47 p.

Garage

2014 Ford Platinum 4x4 Immaculate F150 Supercrew, 3.5 Ecoboost, Sun Roof, white, brown leather, Fully Loaded Only $35,800 250-319-8784

Boats

TIME TO DECLUTTER? ask us about our

RUN TILL SOLD SPECIAL

Packages start at $35 Non-business ads only • Some restrictions apply

1365 DALHOUSIE DRIVE

250-371-4949

14ft. Runabout boat. 40hp Johnson motor on trailer. $1500/obo. 778-469-5434.

RUN TIL

SOLD

3500

$

+ TAX

TURN YOUR STUFF INTO

CA$H 250-371-4949

*RESTRICTIONS APPLY


FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Commercial/ Industrial

Commercial/ Industrial

Misc. Wanted

Misc. Wanted

100 Mile House, B.C.

RUN TILL

RENTED

$5300 Plus Tax

3 Lines - 12 Weeks

Add an extra line to your ad for $10

WANTED: PULPWOOD Dead, Alive or Scorched 1JOFt4QSVDFt'JSt"TQFO Please contact us at

250-395-6218 Scrap Car Removal

Scrap Car Removal

Must be pre-paid Scheduled for 4 weeks at a time Private parties only - no businesses Some Restrictions Apply

A43

BUSINESSES & SERVICES Services

Services

Services

Financial Services

Handy Persons

Home Improvements

GET BACK ON TRACK!

RICKS’S SMALL HAUL

Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

Fitness/Exercise

For all Deliveries & Dump Runs. Extra large dump trailers for rent. Dump Truck Long and Short Hauls!!

250-377-3457

Home Improvements

WE will pay you to exercise! Deliver Kamloops This Week Only 2 issues a week!

call 250-374-0462 for a route near you!

Please recycle this newspaper.

THERE’S MORE ONLINE

Cleaning Services Springs Home Cleaning Services

Call for your free estimate today Call Spring at (250) 574-5482

Landscaping

Landscaping

BOLTON LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE 1365 DALHOUSIE DRIVE

250-371-4949

KamloopsThisWeek.com

10% OFF YOUR FIRST MOW!

Yard Clean-up, Irrigation, Planting, Lawn, Hedges, Pruning Certified Horticulturist, Licensed Pesticide Applicator

250-573-5598 or 250-320-8109 Grow-n-mow@telus.net

Masonry & Brickwork 9012857

Masonry & Brickwork

Luigi’s SMALL

Do you have

AMAZING LOCAL

PHOTOS?

.

Renovations, finishing sundecks, framing hourly or contract. 604-240-1920.

Landscaping Jonathan’s Landscaping Tree pruning. Yard Clean-up. Trimming Hedges and Shrubs. Irrigation Start-ups. Call 1-250889-1290 or Email: cariboo895@gmail.com

Misc Services

CONCRETE JOBS

JA ENTERPRISES Furniture Moving and Rubbish Removal jaenterpriseskam@gmail.com 778-257-4943

Lawn Care & Odd Jobs Reasonable Rates

BRICKS, BLOCKS, PAVERS, SIDEWALKS + PRUNING

F R E E E S T I M AT E S !

250.851.5079 • 250.554.1018 Home Improvements

Trustworthy Reliable Service General Cleanup, Painting, Gardening, Lawn Care, Organizing, Hauling and much more.

Customer References Available

Call or Text Mike 250-682-7012

Home Improvements Home Improvements

We’re looking for your local photos to use in local publications

50

WIN A PRIZE $ VALUED AT

This month show us how you enjoy spring To win, submit your photos at

contests.kamloopsthisweek.com Submission Deadline: 12:00 pm on April 24

Photos must as high quality as possible. One winner selected at the end of each month from all acceptable entries. Physical copies not accepted. Read terms and conditions online for details.

PAPER ROUTES PAPER AVAILABLE GET YOUR STEPS IN AND GET PAID

GET YOUR STEPS IN AND GET PAID

250-374-7467

circulation@kamloopsthisweek.com


A44

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Largest Selection of Kamloops Grown Produce April 4th - April 10th

1

1

¢ 68 lb

98

98 /pint

/lb

ll Green Be n w o r G BC Peppers

¢ 78

Bananas

¢ 98

/bunch ions

Green On

/lb

lb

4

/lb

¢ 78

98

each

20lb Bag

1 98

it

Grapefru

toes

et Pota MBO Russ

JU

¢ 98

n BC Grow pples Spartan A

n Beets BC Grow

1

¢ 88

matoes

Grape To

¢ 98

98

quash

S Assorted

¢ 88

/lb

/lb

each

each

ans Green Be he Cob Corn on t

e ine Lettuc

Roma

¢ 98

1

/lb et Onions

we JUMBO S

Zucchini

18

98

58 /lb

atoes

Roma Tom

5lb Bag k, BC Chilliwac eberries Frozen Blu

Farm Fresh Produce Arrives Daily #2 - 740 Fortune Drive Kamloops, BC www.nuleafproduce.com

+ 30 Local Suppliers!


FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Kamloops & District Animal Centre

B1

The BC SPCA’s new Community Animal Centre in Kamloops is located at 2815 Tranquille Rd. in Brocklehurst, right across from the entrance to Kamloops Airport. The $6.5-million, 10,500-square-foot stateof-the-art facility replaces the organization’s cramped location on Eighth Street. Also relocating to the new site is the agency’s spay and neuter clinic, which had also been operating in North Kamloops. The shelter portion of the facility will open to the public on Saturday, April 6, with the clinical side of the building opening later this month. Turn to page B4 to see more photos of the centre. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

BC SPCA USHERS IN NEW ERA IN ANIMAL CARE

A

fter many years of planning, securing money and fundraising, the BC SPCA’s new Community Animal Centre in Kamloops is set to open. The $6.5-million, 10,500-square-foot facility is at 2815 Tranquille Rd. in Brocklehurst, right across from the entrance to Kamloops Airport. The facility will open to the public this Saturday, with the shelter portion of the building opening this weekend and the clinical side of the building set to open later this month. The shelter and the new spay

and neuter clinic are larger than the facilities they are leaving. The BC SPCA Kamloops shelter had long operated out of cramped quarters on Eighth Street in North Kamloops, while the agency’s spay and neuter clinic will be relocating from its Tranquille Road site in North Kamloops. While the shelter won’t house more animals, it will provide much-needed additional space for the human staff and animal tenants alike. The Community Animal Centre will incorporate modern designs, including 12 shared apartments for dogs to encourage natural movement and socialization, five

large cat rooms, designated areas for temperament and behaviour assessments and specialized isolation areas for sick and injured animals. The centre will also have a large retail area for pet supplies, a dogwash station for the public, office space for regional animal-cruelty investigators and a multi-purpose space for dog training, SPCA youth camps, workshops and other events for the community. The clinic will have its own entrance, complete with exam rooms, surgery rooms and offices. The new facility will have three examination rooms — two for dogs and one for cats.

There will be two prep areas and two surgery tables, along with a recovery area and warming section in front of the recovery kennels for patients to rest after surgery. The branch in Kamloops cares for more than 1,500 neglected, abused and homeless animals each year and offers a wide range of programs to promote the welfare of animals. Funding for the new Community Animal Centre includes $1.5 million from the provincial government, while a community fundraising campaign to raise $700,000 toward the overall costs has led to more than

$400,000 being collected. Those wishing to help with raising the final portion of money can call Lisa Fuller, manager of community development for the Kamloops & District Branch, at 250-572-3297 or email her at lfuller@spca.bc.ca. For more information, go online to spca.bc.ca/highfive. In 2018, The Kamloops and District branch won the BC SPCA Branch of the Year Award. It was recognized for its efforts to reduce the length of stay for cats and dogs in the shelter by maximizing use of the society’s Drive for Lives animal transfer program.

Congratulations to our friends at the Kamloops branch of the BC SPCA on your new facility. We were pleased to be a supplier to the project.

Proudly Canadian

107 - 805 Notre Dame Dr., Kamloops | 250-374-1223 | unitedfloors.ca


B2

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Kamloops & District Animal Centre

Furry faces help complete a community schools, seniors’ homes — and even the airport — in Kamloops. Let’s not forget the joy of crossing paths with someone out for a walk with their own dog. A quick hello and a scratch behind the dog’s ear is almost guaranteed to put a smile on your face as you continue on your way. The bond between people and their pets can increase fitness, lower stress and provide higher levels of happiness to their owners. We have heard many stories of how a person’s pet is the main reason for them to get up every day — because they have to care for another being. The power animals have in an individual’s life is often taken for granted or misunderstood until you hear the many stories of the bonds created, fortifying a person’s life, be it a child, youth, adult or senior. So, when you think of community, make sure you include those fuzzy faces that lift us up and keep us going. If we didn’t have them around us, things would look a lot bleaker.

According to many studies, having a pet is good for your physical and mental health. In fact, a story in the latest edition of Time magazine cites new data from the University of Michigan National Poll on Healthy Aging. Researchers polled about 2,000 U.S. adults, ages 50 to 80. Of those, 55 per cent said they owned at least one pet. Dogs were the most common pet, followed by cats and small animals, such as birds and hamsters. Regardless of the type of animal, the vast majority of owners said their pets boosted their mental and physical health.

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When you think about what makes up a community, you’ll probably start by thinking of your own family and friends — the people closest to you. You might then think about your neighbours, people you know from organizations you’re involved with or your co-workers. Maybe you will reference the faces you recognize at the shops you frequent. And perhaps you will think about the cats and dogs and other pets that belong to all these people. Because our furry friends are also an important part of our community. Sometimes they’re the only family we have, but the fact they have four legs and fur doesn’t make them any less important in our lives. In fact, there is significant research showing how having a pet can help people get through everything, from minor day-to-day problems to some of the biggest and most stressful events of their lives. This is why the BC SPCA has been working to bring furry friends to more and more workplaces,


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

Kamloops & District Animal Centre

Having a Furball of a time with the BC SPCA

T

he Furball Gala is the Kamloops branch of the BC SPCA’s major fundraising event of the year, an event that helps keep the doors open and the lights on. “This is one of the ways that we raise a lot of the funding that we need over the year,” said Hayley Bennett Ortner, manager of community engagement with the local branch of the BC SPCA. It’s also a great opportunity for a night out. This year marks the sixth annual Furball and it will be taking place at Colombo Lodge on Saturday, May 4, at 5:30 p.m. with a dinner and a dance. The evening will actually begin in the Cuddle Lounge, with cocktails, appetizers and, best of all, puppies for attendees to mingle with. After all, it wouldn’t be a Furball without some furballs. The bar will include beverages from local wine and beer makers, including Harper’s Trail Estate Winery. There will be animal entrances throughout the evening and a dance to finish up the night. According to Bennett Ortner, organizers

B3

Miami Heat forward and Kamloops product Kelly Olynyk has fun with a furry friend at the 2018 BC SPCA Furball Gala in the Tournament Capital. STACEY KROLOW PHOTOGRAPHY

are hoping to have an event that is 100 per cent sponsored. There are still sponsorship opportunities available. Those who would like to help with a sponsorship can contact the branch by phone at 250-376-7722 or go online to spca.bc.ca/kamloopsfurball. The $95 tickets are selling quickly. They can be purchased online at spca.bc.ca/kamloopsfurball. Last year’s Furball Gala, also held at Colombo Hall, served as the beginning of the capital campaign for the new Community Animal Centre. The Olynyk family of Kamloops — Ken, Arlene, Kelly, Jesse and Maya — are serving as ambassadors of the BC SPCA’s High Five Capital Campaign to raise $700,000 in community donations still needed to complete the facility. Since then, more than $400,000 has been raised. Kelly Olynyk, a forward with the NBA’s Miami Heat, said his family is passionate about animals. “We take comfort in knowing that the BC SPCA is advocating and actively caring for animals,” Olynyk said.

Proud to be the Civil Contractor for the new

BCSPCA Kamloops & District Animal Centre

For tickets visit spca.bc.ca/kamloopsfurball

778-471-6441 | www.rivermist.ca info@rivermist.ca


B4

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Kamloops & District Animal Centre

Clockwise from top: Kennels line the rear of the BC SPCA’s new Community Animal Centre in Brocklehurst; a washing station is ready to be used on animals as they arrive; Hayley Bennett Ortner, manager of community engagement with the local branch of the BC SPCA, stands in the foyer of the $6.5-million, 10,500-squarefoot building that is located on Tranquille Road, across from the entrance to Kamloops Airport. DAVE EAGLES PHOTOS/KTW

T-Bar Ceilings Steel Stud Soundproofing Fire Rating

“Pardon our dust” We are so happy to have been part of such a great project in Kamloops


W4

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

1 |

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NE NLY!

21

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

W1

River City Cycle | 2

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W2

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

3 |

River City Cycle

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

KAMLOOPS’ FRIENDLIEST MOTORSPORTS DEALER

MEET THE RIVERCITY CYCLE TEAM - 123 YEARS OF MOTORSPORT EXPERIENCE Rivercity Cycle is your dealer that has it all. Kawasaki and Suzuki on and offroad Motorbikes & ATV’s, Outboard Motors, Husqvarna & Motoguzzi Motorbikes,Textron, Arctic Cats, Jet Ski’s and more! Whether you are going off road, or on a bike road trip, Rivercity Cycle has you covered. Stop

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FRIDAY, April 5, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

W3

River City Cycle | 4

DL 30329

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