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FEBRUARY 6, 2019 | Volume 32 No. 11

WEATHER Sunny and cold High -8 C Low -14 C SNOW REPORT Sun Peaks Resort Mid-mountain: 119 cm Alpine: 156 cm Harper Mountain Total snow: 98 cm

30 CENTS AT NEWSSTANDS

WEDNESDAY

WHITE CANE WEEK

BELOVED ‘BOOCH’

Telling the stories of the people behind those canes

Hundreds gather to remember reporter Angelo Iacobucci

COMMUNITY/A15

NEWS/A13

COMBATTING THE COLD ON THE STREET

Shotgun (left) and other homeless residents of Kamloops talk to KTW about how they manage when the temperature gets dangerously low

STORY/PAGE A14

DAVE EAGLES/KTW

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WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

Summers Landing at Tobiano • Currently Under Construction • 5 of 8 sold • Prices start at $509,900

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MEET YOUR LOCAL REALTORS • KAMLOOPS AND DISTRICT

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As a realtor, my clients are very important to me and I take seriously the level of confidence, professionalism and loyalty they come to expect and deserve. Buying or selling, I will provide you with service above and beyond your expectations, negotiating the best deal possible on your behalf, while making the process as seamless as possible. If you have any real estate related questions, please feel free to contact me anytime. I would love the opportunity to work with you.

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Thinking of Selling Your Kamloops Home? Making a Next Move for the Best Results? • More Services: Assisted Home Preparation & Complimentary Staging Consultation • More Marketing: Unparalleled Marketing Reach for Maximized Exposure to Buyers • Best Results: Helping You Maximize the Value You Can Receive for Your Home Sarah devotes 100% of her focus and 100% of her time to your needs, and offers a 100% client satisfaction guarantee.

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CHRIS CHAN

About Chris: • Kamloops resident for over 30 years • Rugby enthusiast • Community, family and team oriented • Proud supporter of JDRF Meet a Machine, Grow A Row, Royal LePage Shelter Foundation and Kamloops Pride • Strong believer in supporting local and shopping local

I believe that when it comes to buying and selling your house, choosing a local member of the community is important as well. Choose an agent that is on your team!

KARPIAK

Born and raised in Kamloops to a long-time, community-supporting medical family, Andrew is a full-time realtor approaching his 13th year serving Kamloops, Tobiano, Shuswap and Sun Peaks.

Check out the new townhouses at Tobiano! andrewkarpiak.com

andrew.karpiak@gmail.com • www.summerslanding.ca

Born in Kamloops and raising a family here makes me proud to call this beautiful city home. Having lived in most areas of Kamloops, I am familiar with all the different neighborhoods and what they have to offer.

ANDREW

Put my experience into action: • Assisted in hundreds of real estate deals • Top 10 Royal LePage Agent 3 years in a row • Approachable, honest and experienced

CALL ANDREW FOR MORE INFO

NORM

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

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Westwin Realty

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MICHELINE

STEPHENSON

I LOVE REAL ESTATE! Your home is your most valuable possession. Whether you are buying, selling or just need “HONEST” advice... you need all the facts.

250-574-0262

chris@uprealestate.ca

“I prefer names to numbers”

My clients are very important to me. My goal is to make the process easy, enjoyable and rewarding. Let me put my knowledge and experience to work for you. Please call me anytime for your real estate needs.

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uprealestate.ca

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STEVE

CHELSEA

HERMAN

Steve has made his home in Kamloops for the past 24 years with his wife and 2 children. From the first time you meet Steve, you will feel at ease with his professional and personable working style and confident in his ability to represent your best interest throughout the Real Estate Transaction.

Steve is more than just a Real Estate salesperson. His clients consider his background of 24 years experience as a carpenter a valuable asset in serving their needs in Buying and Selling residential and commercial properties. This guy knows houses. So give Steve a call before you Buy, Sell, Build or Renovate and put his experience, trust and knowledge to work for you—because it really does matter who you choose to buy and sell Real Estate with.

MANN

My name is Chelsea Mann and I have been a Realtor® in Kamloops for over 12 years. I grew up in this beautiful city, and am proud to call it home! Kamloops has so many amazing things to offer its residents: Great Weather | Outdoor Activities | Central Location

250-319-3322 steveherman @royallepage.ca

Those are just a few of the things that make Kamloops the perfect place to live, work, and play. It’s such a family oriented community and each neighbourhood has its unique qualities, so everyone can find their perfect place to call home. What I love about real estate is working with people. Whether it be finding them the perfect home, that fits with their unique wants and needs, or helping them sell their home, quickly and for the most money by attracting the perfect buyers! After all,

It’s Not Just A House, It’s Your Home!

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A4

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Airport manager departing JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Changes are coming to Kamloops Airport management next month. Heather McCarley is leaving Kamloops Airport after 18 months at the helm as managing director. McCarley has accepted a director position at Vantage Airport Group’s corporate office in Vancouver. She will leave in mid-March and will be replaced by former airport operations manager Ed Ratuski, who is currently in New York City, working at LaGuardia Airport. After spending more than two decades in management at Vancouver Airport Authority, McCarley came to Kamloops

Airport in September 2017, succeeding longtime managing director Fred Legace, who was there for 15 years and helped usher in improvements in airfares and passenger volumes at Fulton Field. During McCarley’s short time at Kamloops Airport, a record number of passengers walked through the doors in 2018 — nearly 11 per cent more than the previous year — and several projects were undertaken, including renovation of the float plane dock and plans to open up lots for aviation development at the property. A June to October Kamloops to Toronto flight was also launched and renewed. McCarley said her experience in Kamloops created a “foundation” for her new corporate role. As Vantage manages a network of

airports, including Kamloops, she said her experience in Kamloops “provides a great foundation for continued work with the Kamloops team.” Replacement Ratuski is a Kamloops resident with more than 25 years of aviation experience. He previously served as airport operations manager at Kamloops Airport from 2010 to 2016 and has more recently been working on an operations team at a Vantage-led organization redeveloping the central terminal at LaGuardia. Ratuski will start the first week of March, after he returns from the Big Apple. McCarley will stay on to help him transition. Kamloops Airport is celebrating its 80th anniversary this year.

SHE’S A LITTLE TEA CUP . . .

ALLEN DOUGLASKTW

Three-year-old Isla Murray displays her edible tea cup she made at Saturday’s Fancy Schmancy Tea Party at the North Kamloops Library. The event was one of many held to bring an end to Family Literacy Week.

Cold snap impacts construction

Hurry, only a few 2bdrm + 1bath suites left! Cozy up this winter in your new home at The Residence at Orchards Walk - Kamloops’ premier 55+ retirement community. Our most popular 2 bedroom, 1 bath floor plan is almost sold out! Enjoy 918 sq ft of modern finishings, in-suite laundry, full size kitchen, private deck, and open concept natural light. Plus, enjoy all-inclusive services and amenities such as daily restaurant credits, weekly housekeeping, on-site fitness and movie theatre, and seasonal maintenance.

2 BE D R O O M M E M B E R S H I P $3, 250 PER MONT H (A DD IT IONAL S E CO ND O CCU P AN C Y F EE $550 PER M ONT H) Join Charmaine for a tour, coffee is always on! Email gm@theresidencekamloops.com or call 778-362-9525 today.

A Kamloops developer says the recent blast of cold weather has been the first this winter to impact construction projects. Arpa Investments partner Joshua Knaak said concrete is waiting to be poured at the Spirit Square mixeduse housing development in North Kamloops. “For us, this is the first week in the winter where we have had to plan our work for weather,” Knaak said.

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Overall, he called it an “excellent” winter for construction. Knaak said there have been no delays in recent months, noting warm weather has cut down on costs. Environment Canada is calling for frosty temperatures to remain through the week, but the winter so far has been milder than usual. Winter will officially end on March 20.

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WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

A5

DID YOU KNOW? In Dallas, Peerless Way is named for the steamer Peerless, the pride of the Mara & Co. fleet built in 1880. — Kamloops Museum and Archives

NEWS FLASH? Call 778-471-7525 or email tips@kamloopsthisweek.com

INSIDE KTW Viewpoint/Your Opinion . . . . A8-9 National News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A13 Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A15 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A22 Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A23 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A27 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A36

TODAY’S FLYERS Canadian Tire, Save-On-Foods, Visions, YIG*, Toys R Us*, The Bay*, Superstore*, Safeway*, Rona*, Rexall, M&M Meats*, Jysk*, Home Depot*, Best Buy* *Selected distribution

WEATHER ALMANAC

One year ago Hi: -1 .9 C Low: -5 C Record High 16 .7 C (1963) Record Low -28 .3 C (1913)

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HOW TO REACH US:

Police make arrests, seize weapons, drugs and cash after two murders in Kamloops MICHAEL POTESTIO STAFF REPORTER michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

Following two gangland slayings in Kamloops last month, the province’s Uniform Gang Enforcement Team (UGET) spent four days conducting road checks and seizing multiple weapons, drugs and cash related to organized crime. According to the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit of B.C., its gang unit was sent to Kamloops in order to suppress any further violence following the two fatal gang-related shootings on Jan. 24. Kamloops RCMP responded to a pair of reported shootings at separate locations in Kamloops. Officers arrived to the Super 8 Motel in Valleyview at about 6 a.m. where they found 31-year-old Cody Mathieu of Kamloops in the parking lot with apparent gunshot wounds. Nearly two hours later, at about 8:25 a.m., police responded to the parking lot of the Comfort Inn and Suites just off Rogers Way where 41-yearold Rex Gill of Penticton was found shot. Both men died at hospital from their injuries. Later that day a white vehicle matching a description given by witnesses at the Comfort Inn was found burning in Barnhartvale. Mathieu was previously known to police, but Gill was not. Investigators have not said whether they are aware of any connection between the two victims, but believe the shootings were targeted

attacks related to organized crime. UGET, which is based out of the Lower Mainland, stopped 78 vehicles and checked 132 people believed to be connected to the streetlevel drug trade over the course of the week in Kamloops. Officers seized four sets of brass knuckles, two spring-loaded knives, three machetes, eight axes, one butterfly knife, nine fixed-bladed knives, one can of pepper spray, four hatchets, nine folding knives, one magazine for a .22 caliber firearm, one box of .22 caliber ammunition, one empty pistol holster and one lock-picking kit. They also confiscated $40,000 they believe was tied to the drug trade, as well as small amounts of cocaine, crystal meth and fentanyl. One of the images police shared shows an axe labelled “The Goof Killer” alongside bear spray containing instructions written in black marker explaining how to use it on a “goof.” “While many of these items may be everyday tools for the general public, for individuals involved in criminal activity, they can represent dangerous weapons used to intimidate or assault others or to protect illegal commodities and proceeds of crime,” Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit said in a statement. Taking these potential weapons off the street and out of the hands of those involved in the drug trade was vital to the [Uniform Gang Enforcement Team’s] violence

suppression efforts while in Kamloops.” Staff Sgt. Lindsey Houghton said UGET was brought in at the request of the Kamloops RCMP to help in mitigating any further violence from happening following the pair of gang-related homicides. “As we’ve seen many, many times in communities all around the province, sometimes an incident like a homicide or an attempted homicide precipitates or the dominos fall to cause other violent incidents and we don’t want that to happen,” Houghton told KTW. He said UGET has conducted this type of operation in Kamloops before, noting it involves liaising with the local RCMP, which provides names of people to target as they are known to be associated to organized crime and the drug trade. Police arrested two people who had outstanding warrants, but more charges could potentially be forthcoming as investigations remain ongoing regarding some of the seized items, Houghton said. “As of right now, there hasn’t been any other arrests or charges,” he said. Kamloops RCMP vowed the public would see an increased police presence following the two murders. More than 50 investigators are now working on the two homicides, according to the Kamloops RCMP. Cpl. Jodi Shelkie said there is no update to provide the public at this time. D#30150

Kamloops This Week 1365-B Dalhousie Dr . Kamloops, B .C ., V2C 5P6 Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Circulation 250-374-0462 classifieds@kamloopsthisweek .com publisher@kamloopsthisweek .com editor@kamloopsthisweek .com

GANGING UP ON CRIME

[web-extra]

See more photos at kamloopsthisweek.com

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A6

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

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LOCAL NEWS

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MICHAEL POTESTIO

STAFF REPORTER

There were no injuries during an early morning fire in Rayleigh that has left a family of four without a home. Kamloops firefighters battled a blaze in a residence on Sabiston Court on Monday, racing to the scene in frigid, -18 C temperatures at about 8:35 a.m. when flames erupted in the master bedroom. An adult female — who was the lone person home at the time of the fire — was outside when she

heard the smoke detector go off, said Kamloops Fire Rescue platoon Capt. Wade Lindoff. After hearing the alarm, she went back inside where she discovered the flames. The woman managed to escape the blaze and called 911. “The fire did spread to most areas of the upstairs of the house,” Lindoff said. Fire investigators were on scene Monday afternoon, but no cause of the fire has yet been determined. Lindoff said one family pet remains missing. By the time firefighters arrived,

the house was fully engulfed, with flames showing through the windows and through the roof of one corner of the house, Lindoff said. “There was significant structural damage, so we pretty much fought it from the outside,” he said. The fire gutted the top floor of the residence and the main floor sustained water and smoke damage. A couple and their two sons have been displaced by the fire. Emergency Social Services will provide 72 hours of emergency shelter for the family, Lindoff said. KFR had four trucks, including a ladder truck, at the scene.

Youth campout raises $50K

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The annual Camp Out to End Youth of youth experiencing street homelessness over Homelessness, held in December, raised $52,000 the past year and an urgent need to act,” said 5”X7” for A Way Home Kamloops’ Safe Suites initiative. Katherine McParland, executive director of A Way REG. On Dec. 14, more than 60 people of all ages and Home Kamloops Society. $79.95 sectors spent the night outside in cardboard boxes “In 2018, three youth on A Way Home to raise funds for Safe Suites, the doors of which Kamloops’ Housing waiting list passed away. These SAVE 53% are scheduled to open in the spring. three vulnerable youth passed away without being ALL unny Shores Dental is very excited to welcome our newest dental hygienist and educator FLOWERS Last year, A Way Home Kamloops had 113 able to access the housing option and supports Colleen Brochu to join our newly renovated clinic. has extensive experience in general ASORTED SIZES youth, ages 13 to 25, Colleen at risk of or experiencing they needed safe suites.” Sunny Shores Dental is very excited & COLOURS. dentistry as well as many years homelessness working withreferred dentaltospecialists such and isoral REG. $1.99 the Kamloops Youthas periodontist Safe Suites a bridgeColleen from the streets toour housBrochu to join newly renova dentistry as well as many years workin SAVE 25% Housing First Wrapforce program. ing with built-in supports for those between the surgeon. She looks forward to welcoming new families and friends looking for quality care. ¢ RUBBER surgeon. She looks forward to welcom “There has been an increase in the number ages of 18 and 24.

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NATHAN RITCHIE PHOTO Kamloops firefighters battle flames in a home on Sabiston Court in Rayleigh on Monday.

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

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WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A7

LOCAL NEWS

Proposed property-tax hike reduced by one-third JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

The City of Kamloops has reduced the provisional property tax rate increase by more than one per cent. Previously set at 3.4 per cent, conservative estimates since shored up have reduced the anticipated increase to 2.26 per cent. City corporate services director Kathy Humphrey told KTW lower than expected carbon tax impacts and growth from housing assessments led to the decrease. The net reduction is about $1.2 million. At 3.4 per cent, the tax hit is about $65 for the average assessed residential property. At 2.26 per cent, the tax hit is about $43 for the average assessed residential property. Humphrey had earlier told this newspaper that information provided last month by BC Assessment would not impact the tax rate. “We dug into it a little bit deeper,” Humphrey said.

The number has yet to be finalized, however, and comes in advance of supplemental budget items, which were discussed by city council on Tuesday. City staff will brainstorm alternative funding options for three supplemental items. Staff detailed for council a series of financial requests, including for managing city assets, Valleyview and Pioneer Park boat launch upgrades, parking at Singh Bowl, accelerating active transportation projects, design consultation work on a Stuart Wood cultural centre and to study the need for an RCMP protective services training facility. No decisions were made on any of the items as those will come next month, following public consultations. However, three items will be taken away to explore other funding following council brainstorming. They include $350,000 in capital funding via taxation for Kamloops Fire and Rescue Training Centre;

$200,000 via taxation for consultations related to the proposed Stuart Wood cultural centre and $25,000 via taxation to investigate the need for an RCMP protective services training facility. Coun. Mike O’Reilly suggested funding the training facility upgrades for KFR via the city’s land reserve. He argued taxpayers should not foot the bill when funds that

resulted from a land sale to BC Hydro, from the previous training facility, were parked in the land reserve. “I’m not actually sure that we have a surplus in our land reserve to move the money back,” city corporate services director Kathy Humphrey said, noting her team will look at additional funding sources. Some council-

lors said Tk’emlups te Secwepemc should contribute financially toward the $200,000 Stuart Wood cultural centre consultations. Council heard grant funding is not an option at this time, but Humphrey said gambling funds could be an alternative funding source. Other thoughts by city councillors, related to supplementary bud-

get items: • Coun. Denis Walsh said he is against the proposed Stuart Wood cultural centre because he believes the school could re-open; • Coun. Arjun Singh wondered whether a proposed $550,000 for managing city assets over the next decade should be increased and suggested a climate action fund; • Coun. Bill Sarai rec-

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ommended user fees to help fund boat launch improvements; • Mayor Ken Christian recommended an app in place of $35,000 pedestrian signage requested for downtown Kamloops. The final tax rate will be set in the spring. A public budget meeting will be held on Thursday night in the Valley First lounge at Sandman Centre.


A8

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

Kamloops This Week is a politically independent newspaper, published Wednesdays and Fridays at 1365-B Dalhousie Dr., Kamloops, B.C., V2C 5P6 Phone: 250-374-7467 | Fax: 250-374-1033 email: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. Tim Shoults Operations manager Aberdeen Publishing Inc.

HELP BRING WARMTH IN THE BITTER COLD

A

s this is being written, the mercury says the outside temperature in Kamloops is -21 C. That is bone-numbing cold. While most of us will be forced to turn up the heat in our homes and use that nifty remote device to start our cars, what do the city’s homeless do? When the wind-chill values bring about a frostbite warning, what do those on the street do to stay safe? That is precisely the question we set out to get answered on Tuesday — and the replies were sensible: stay close to resources, stay in groups, bundle up, create windbreaks and keep moving. More on what reporter Michael Potestio and photographer Dave Eagles learned can be found on page A14 of today’s edition of KTW. But no matter how many layers of clothes one wears and regardless of how sturdy a temporary shelter, the homeless in our community can also use help. A smile and a hot coffee can be a godsend. Some hot food can brighten a day and warm a belly. Simply acknowledging someone’s plight and asking if there is anything you can do can make a massive difference in the life of someone living on the street. Beyond those measures, Kamloopsians can donate much-needed cold-weather items to the three homeless shelters operating: Out of the Cold in St. Paul’s Cathedral, downtown at Nicola Street and Fourth Avenue; The Mustard Seed New Life Community, downtown at 181 West Victoria St.; and the Emerald Centre, downtown at 271 West Victoria St. Some of those shelters could likely use volunteers. Other organizations in the city also help the homeless, from churches to Love Hard Kamloops to the Salvation Army. Any of those organizations would welcome donations and volunteers. We should all remember that there, by the grace of God, go us.

OUR

VIEW

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. EDITORIAL Publisher: Robert W. Doull Editor: Christopher Foulds Newsroom staff: Dave Eagles Tim Petruk Marty Hastings Jessica Wallace Sean Brady Michael Potestio Todd Sullivan SALES STAFF: Don Levasseur Linda Skelly Kate Potter Jodi Lawrence Darlene Kawa Liz Spivey

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CONTACT US Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Classifieds@Kamloopsthisweek.com Circulation 250-374-0462 All material contained in this publication is protected by copyright. Reproduction is expressly prohibited by the rightsholder.

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A plan for learning

T

here has been much discussion throughout the community about School District 73’s capital plan. People are talking about schools that need to be expanded, others that need to be opened and schools that need to be built. But there is a great deal more planning that goes on that is central to the district’s role of improving student achievement. The District Learning Plan is our road map for improving student achievement. It is designed to extend student opportunities through a focus on critical thinking, creativity and the foundational skills of literacy and numeracy. We have embraced the calls to action outlined in the Truth and Reconciliation Report and we are embedding Indigenous understandings across the curriculum to ensure every student gains an appreciation of the past, preparing them to contribute to a brighter future. Last year, we achieved a resident graduation rate of 88 per cent and we are now setting our sights on a 90 per cent success rate through a focus on equity and excellence. The District Learning Plan will help us get there. It will keep us focused on our many strengths while pointing our way toward areas of future work, such as numeracy, student engagement and Aboriginal student success rates. Numeracy The development of a fulsome plan for improving numeracy includes strategies to ensure stu-

ALISON SIDOW View From

SD73

dents are well supported at school and at home. Our plan includes the implementation of a district-wide numeracy assessment to help educators identify areas for further work with students, workshops for parents on supporting their child with numeracy in the elementary grades and professional workshops to continue to hone our teaching practice. Literacy, while a strength in SD73, will always be a priority and that is why the vast majority of our school learning plans are focused on developing reading and writing skills that are used across all learning areas. Student Engagement Students are motivated by curiosity when learning is relevant. That is why this year we assessed students’ engagement with their learning. The data shows we must continue to focus on building student resiliency and designing learning environments that tap into their interests and passions. We are working to increase

opportunities for experiential and relevant learning for our students. Many of these are learning opportunities that extend beyond the classroom, such as career life education, outdoor education and trades exploration at TRU. More importantly, a focus on teaching strategies that address youth mental health is key to finding joy at school and in life. Aboriginal Student Success We are committed to ensuring Aboriginal students see their culture reflected in our schools and classrooms and that all students learn the history and impact of colonialism on First Nations. Our goal is to ensure every student appreciates the historical and contemporary contributions of the Secwepemc people and other First Nations, Metis and Inuit, and how cultural identity is shaped by our worldview. The annual Day of Secwentwecw is held every year by SD73 and marks our acknowledgement of one another. Our District Learning Plan outlines the way forward to improve students’ achievement. We have adopted the renewed B.C. curriculum and we are working to ensure each student has the skills and understandings needed to connect to their future. Working in collaboration with parents and partners, our goal is to see each student cross the stage with dignity, purpose and options for their future. Alison Sidow is superintendent of School District 73. SD73 columns appear monthly in KTW and online at kamloopsthisweek.com. Sidow’s email is asidow@sd73.bc.ca.


WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

A9

[speak up] You can comment on any story you read at kamloopsthisweek.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

LET’S THINK ABOUT SHUTTLE BUSES Editor: Regarding downtown traffic and parking, allow me to further develop ideas set out by letter writer Leonard P. Piggin in the Jan. 25 edition of KTW (‘Joint project idea: city hall, BCLC, PAC, parkade’). One of Piggin’s ideas is to re-develop the land on West Victoria Street to include a new BCLC building and a new parking facility. Even if no new BCLC building is to be constructed, the land could nevertheless serve to solve downtown’s traffic and parking problems.

We could still build a parkade beside the existing BCLC building. Because this parking lot would be a bit far from the centre of the action downtown, I further propose that we run shuttle buses east along Seymour Street as far as the downtown bus loop, then back west along Lansdowne Street to the parkade. These shuttle buses would keep traffic out of downtown, reduce the need for street parking and get all riders within one or two blocks of any downtown establishment. If desirable, the buses could also

be detoured to Sagebrush Theatre on performance nights. What rider capacity would be required and what the ridership fare would be will need some study and testing. I’d like to see free electric shuttles run frequently enough that everybody would want to use them, whether people arrive downtown by car or bus or on foot. I believe these ideas are worth some serious thought. Ron Ste Marie Kamloops

TERRIFIC TAKE ON WE DON’T WANT A ‘MALL’ IN RIVERSIDE PARK TANGLES Editor: I enjoyed KTW reporter Marty Hastings’ article of Feb. 1 (‘Kamloops themes galore at curling provincials’). Reading it, I envisioned a tangled web of string running across the sheets of ice. An interesting point not noted by Hastings is that Holly Donaldson the third on Karla Thompson’s rink, is engaged to Vancouver Canuck Bo Horvath. Peter Frew Kamloops

Editor: Many Kamloops residents enjoy the grassy and treed parks around our city. People of all ages go there to renew themselves from the daily hustle and bustle of responsibilities. Others have taken a broader meaning to “parks.”

THANK YOU, YOUNG STRANGER

They enjoy water parks, amusement parks, bicycle parks, RV parks, dog parks, car parks, ball parks, industrial parks, skateboard parks, etc. To those who want to add a “mall park” to the list in the form of a public market, I say, “Build it if you

Editor: On Monday, Jan. 21, I was dropped of by the HandyDart vehicle near the Royal Bank in Columbia Place Shopping Centre in Sahali. While I was out, I decided to pick up a couple of things from Save-On-Foods. I am in a wheelchair

must, but somewhere else. Let those of us who want it green and peaceful keep our Riverside Park as is. Let Riverside Park continue to exist as a green and growing space of urban nature.” Let’s not permit another inch of concrete — not up,

and have been for the past couple of years. I have pretty reasonable arm and upper-body strength, but I could not manage the sidewalk ramp. Out of nowhere came a young man. He asked if I needed help and where I was headed. He pushed me all the

across, down or under our beloved Riverside Park. To those who want malls, give them a map and help them get to the 10-plus mall parks already in our city Don’t park a mall in our park. Christina Mader Kamloops

way up to Save-On-Foods, a journey that included three ramps. I would like to take this opportunity to thank this kind stranger. Kindness is never wasted. Mary Yusko Kamloops

TALK BACK Q&A: kamloopsthisweek.com We asked: Do you plan on taking up disc golf once a course is established on McArthur Island?

Results:

No, I’d prefer a nature park: 466 votes Yes, price is right: 126 votes 592 VOTES

21% NO

79% NO

What’s your take?

“If there was any reasonable chance of making money by building an RV Park, private enterprise would have done it. “I suspect that few of our citizens would support any ideas that increase our taxes for something as speculative as this.” — posted by Ggronk

RE: STORY: PROVINCIAL GANG SQUAD MAKES ARRESTS, SEIZES WEAPONS, DRUGS AND CASH AFTER TWO MURDERS IN KAMLOOPS:

“Well done and many thanks to all officers concerned in this.” — posted by Doreen Harrison

RE: FLETCHER COLUMN: MINORITY GOVERNMENT RESUMES TAXING, SPENDING TO BATTLE POVERTY:

“As for the speculation tax, one has to wonder why Whistler is exempt from it. “Do too many politicians own second homes there?” — posted by Bb49

Kamloops This Week is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour.

If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the website at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163.

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We started it — you continue it. If you are in school, between kindergarten and Grade 7, here is your chance to add to our story featured every 2nd and 4th Friday of the month. If your tale is added you will win a movie pass for two! Email to editor@kamloopsthisweek.com - Limit your submission to 150 words.

RE: STORY: RV CROWD EYED AS REVENUE-GENERATOR IN KAMLOOPS:

If you have concerns about editorial content, please email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com or call 250-374-7467.

Have you donated to, or volunteered at, a homeless shelter this season?

KTW/Cain’s Kids Page

A selection of comments on KTW stories, culled online

BE A PART OF

THE STORY Cain’s


A10

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

2018-2019 | kamloopssymphony.com DINA GILBERT, MUSIC DIRECTOR

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UNPLUGGED — AND PLAYING

Taylor Radmacker looks to impress mom Jenna with her building skills during a recent Unplug and Play event at the Tournament Capital Centre as part of Interior Savings Unplug and Play Family Literacy Week in Kamloops, which ran from Jan. 26 to Feb. 2.

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The city’s sustainability services staff are moving into a building in Riverside Park to increase visibility and better engage with the public. Five full-time city staff and five seasonal members, including the EcoSmart team, previously operated out of the city’s civic operations building on Concordia Way west of TRU. On Monday, staff moved into Cunliffe House, a city-owned building formerly occupied by the Sports Council at the southeastern corner of Riverside Park on Lorne Street, across the street from Sandman Centre. “It’s pretty exciting for us,” city sustainability services manager Glen Cheetham told KTW. Cheetham said the plan is to

create over time a demonstration house, taking advantage of park foot traffic to showcase sustainability initiatives and promote it among residents. For example, the property could contain xeriscaping with drought-friendly plants, rainwater harvesting via rain barrels and potentially even solar energy. Cheetham likened it to the BCIT Afresh Home, a project on the Burnaby campus that demonstrates innovation in sustainable housing. “It’s taken some time to get this move happening, so we have some great ideas and we’re going to need to sort out some funding and develop the program, but there will definitely be something starting in the spring, summer,” Cheetham said. The Kamloops Sports Council has moved into space previously occupied by the

Bread Garden restaurant on McArthur Island. That building, at 1500 Island Parkway, is also home to the Kamloops Youth Soccer Association. Meanwhile, the office space formerly home to the sustainability team in the city’s civic operations building on Concordia Way will be used to move some people around in that building after the city’s department restructuring last year. “There’s definitely people upon people upon people here,” city civic operations director Jen Fretz said. Cunliffe House will eventually become the Cunliffe House of Sustainaibility. Cheetham said the sustainability staff also participate frequently in events in the park, which will create some efficiencies in preventing travel from Concordia Way.

Norovirus outbreak to end A gastrointestinal outbreak that impacted four units at Royal Inland Hospital, adjacent Hillside Psychiatric Centre and at least two senior care homes in Kamloops is expected to end this week. The outbreak, due to norovirus, led to the hospital is not admitting patients to 4North, 5South, 5North and 7North — the medical units experiencing the outbreak. It also led to 20 surgeries scheduled for Thursday and Friday to be postponed.

More than 60 patients and more than twodozen Interior Health staff members were affected during the outbreak, which began on Jan. 25. The outbreak is expected to wind down this week as the latest incubation period ends. As of late Tuesday afternoon, 5South, 4North and 7North at RIH were still under the outbreak order, as were the two care homes. Interior Health stressed the need for all people to thoroughly wash their hands.


WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A11

LOCAL NEWS

Boogie the Bridge moving to North Shore Due to a major, two-year reconstruction project on West Victoria Street, the annual Boogie the Bridge event will be moved across the river for 2019 and 2020. McDonald Park will be the new staging area. KTW FILE PHOTO

JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Lace up your running shoes and prepare to boogie the overpass. Boogie the Bridge is moving to North Kamloops this year and in 2020 as the city undertakes a two-year road reconstruction project on West Victoria Street. On April 28, the event will move to McDonald Park, marking the first time in its 20-year-history it has been held in North Kamloops. In light of that move, the sea of red will cross the Tranquille Road overpass instead of Overlanders Bridge. “We have a bridge in there,” Boogie the Bridge race director Karen Henning told KTW. The spring run, which draws more than 2,000 participants annually and raises money

for local community groups, has historically began downtown, travelled along West Victoria Street and across Overlanders Bridge. This year, it will start at McDonald Park and travel at its farthest out to Westsyde. Henning said the route won’t mirror that of the Kamloops Marathon, which begins and ends in July down

the road at McArthur Island. “We’re trying to keep away from that so that people will have that different route,” Henning said. Event co-ordinator and full-time Boogie cheerleader Jo Berry said parking could be an issue at the new location. She recommended transit and carpooling and expects biking valet

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to be another option. She said a good warm-up might be to park at McArthur Island and walk over. “We need to educate the public,” Berry said, noting parking is always of concern with larger events. “Boogie is a big event now.” City of Kamloops capital projects manager Darren Crundwell said

the city is planning to start the West Victoria Street construction project in April. The $13-million, twoyear-project will include roadwork and utility infrastructure upgrades beneath the asphalt. Additional work includes upgraded lighting, sidewalks and landscaping. Now that the BCLC headquarters project has been scrapped, the city is in talks with BCLC to cost-share landscaping work in the area, which were initially expected to be included in the redevelopment. “Now, we’ll be adding some of that back,” Crundwell said. In addition to neces-

sitating a new Boogie location, the West Victoria Street project will impact traffic. Crundwell said lanes will be maintained in both directions at all times to mitigate impacts, noting the city will provide communications during that time similar to that of the Overlanders Bridge project in 2015. Others expected to be impacted include emergency services, transit, businesses and the city’s marginalized, due to the proximity of The Mustard Seed New Life Community and the Emerald House shelter. “We’re working with all of them,” Crundwell said. Berry said it was a bit of a “shock” at first, but noted the city has been supportive. She said the new route will provide a unique twist to the event and provide an opportunity to promote

the North Shore. Participants can expect live music and inspirational messages chalked onto the streets, as has been the case in the past. This year’s Boogie event will raise money for Kamloops Brain Injury Association and Kamloops Early Language and Literacy Initiative. The event has raised more than $1 million, since its inception in 1998. Last year’s walk and run event drew more than 2,800 participants for the mini-Boogie, five-kilometre, 10-kilometre and half-marathon distances. Berry said she hopes to surpass 3,000 participants for the first time.“Kamloops, help us!” she said. For more information, go online to boogiethebridge.com. RunClub training for the event will begin mid-March.

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A12

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Accused in shooting death granted bail A Kamloops-area man accused of shooting an acquaintance to death last month has been released on bail with the consent of prosecutors. Corey Harkness, 31, is facing one count of second-degree murder stemming from a Jan. 14 shooting inside a Cache Creek home that left 33-year-old Brock Ledoux dead. Harkness appeared in B.C. Supreme Court

Law & Order

BRIEFS

on Monday wearing a red prison-issued sweatsuit. About a dozen spectators listened in court as Crown prosecutor Neil Flanagan laid out the circumstances of the alleged shooting, but details are protected by a court-ordered ban on

publication. Harkness turned himself in to police within days of the shooting. Ledoux had been released from prison a short time before he was shot to death. Flanagan and defence lawyer Jeremy Jensen agreed on a series of strict conditions under which Harkness was ordered to live while on bail, including orders bar-

ring him from possessing weapons or contacting anyone who could be called as a witness if his charges proceed to trial. Harkness was ordered to reside with relatives while free on bail. He will not be able to leave B.C. without the permission of his bail supervisor and must surrender his passport to police. He is also barred

SECONDARY PROGRAMS OF CHOICE

from consuming drugs or alcohol and attending bars or pubs. Harkness is expected to make his next appearance in Kamloops provincial court on March 18. JURY SELECTION Six men and six women have been selected to decide the fate of a Kamloops man accused of killing an acquaintance two years ago.

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police, was arrested in the early hours of Sunday morning after Mounties received a call from a resident on Springhill Drive. Shelkie said police were told a man was seen trying the door handles of vehicles parked on the street and, at one point, got into a vehicle for a short time. Shelkie said officers arrived and found the suspect in the area. “He was arrested and found to be in possession of two backpacks, one of which was determined to have just been taken from a nearby vehicle,” Shelkie said. “Kamloops RCMP are grateful to the citizen who called to report this suspicious activity. “He was an excellent witness who gave us a good description of the suspect and a direction of travel.”

James David Bond, 30, is slated to stand trial later this month on one count of manslaughter. Jury selection took place on Monday in B.C. Supreme Court in Kamloops. Sean Dunn, 42, was killed in an altercation near the intersection of Wood Street and Tranquille Road in the early-morning hours of Dec. 30, 2016. At the time, police said they believed the slaying was the result of an incident that began in a nearby bar. Bond’s trial is scheduled to last as long as five weeks, beginning on Feb. 25. THIEF COLLARED A thief was arrested on the weekend after he was spotted breaking into vehicles in Sahali. Kamloops RCMP Cpl. Jodi Shelkie said the 39-year-old man, who is known to

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WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A13

LOCAL NEWS

Hundreds gather to remember beloved ‘Booch’ the week before his death, asking about CBD — cannabidiol — a cannabis compound sometimes used to treat depression. Lake said he didn’t read too much into the query at the time. “You don’t know what people are going through,” he said, calling on everyone to engage with one another on issues of mental health. Premier John Horgan, a regular interview subject for Iacobucci, also shared his remembrances via a letter read by Reynolds. It cited Iacobucci’s integrity, humour and curiosity as a reporter. Kamloops-North Thompson MLA Peter Milobar said he grew up listening to Iacobucci on NL and noted his influence and importance as a broadcaster in the region, especially in the pre-internet era. Milobar, who said Iacobucci once called him “the most boring politician,” also recalled how he dealt with Iacobucci’s tendency to let his phone ring in city council chambers when Milobar was mayor. Milobar told the story of how he enlisted the help of city staff to address Iacobucci’s interruptions. He had a staff member seize Iacobucci’s phone during a council meeting and inconspicuously swap it for another. “And then the gavel came down on it,” Milobar said, recalling the shocked look

SEAN BRADY

STAFF REPORTER

sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

Angelo Iacobucci was remembered on Saturday as a tenacious reporter with a heart of gold who always made his presence known and had a nickname for everyone. Stories from the life of Iacobucci were shared as hundreds — including family, friends, colleagues and politicians — gathered at the Coast Kamloops Hotel and Conference Centre to remember the Kamloops broadcaster whose career spanned nearly 40 years and reach spanned the province. Iacobucci died on Dec. 14, about two weeks before he would have turned 61. Jim Reynolds worked for 35 years with Iacobucci before Reynolds retired as Radio NL’s program director. He recalled Iacobucci’s hard work, dedication to his career and value as a mentor to young journalists before calling upon speakers to share their stories. Former Kamloops mayor and former provincial health minister Terry Lake called Iacobucci “larger than life” and recalled the reach he had around the province — armed with every cellphone number he needed. Lake remembered Iacobucci as a tough, but fair reporter. He also recalled a text message from Iacobucci

on Iacobucci’s face before he realized what had happened. “His phone never buzzed again,” he said. Radio NL broadcaster Brett Mineer first met Iacobucci in the early 2000s. He recalled Iacobucci’s swagger and the teasing relationship the two developed — something common among Iacobucci and his co-workers. “Angelo kept folders of our screw-ups,” he said. Mineer said that after he left Kamloops, he would sometimes receive calls from Iacobucci — but he wasn’t on the line; instead, Mineer would hear clips of his on-air mistakes before Booch hung up. The chance to work with Iacobucci once again was part of the reason Mineer recently returned to Kamloops to work at NL. Recently retired NL news director Jim Harrison, who did not attend the memorial due to illness, wrote that calling Iacobucci “one of a kind” was the most apt description for him. Harrison said Iacobucci was unpretentious and incorrigible and that he didn’t care for titles, relying on an everyman kind of approach regardless who he was speaking with, even if it was the premier. Harrison recalled that when Iacobucci first came to Radio NL, he was tenacious and showed promise, but that his time at the sta-

KAMLOOPS

A tearful Terry Lake (left) shares memories of Angelo Iacobucci during Saturday’s celebration of life. Celebration of life attendees were greeted with a poignant memory of the radio reporter. ALLEN DOUGLAS PHOTOS/KTW

tion had an end date from the beginning, which Booch chose to ignore. “He kept coming to work even after I told him we can’t pay him,” Harrison said, adding that after three months, a position finally opened up and Iacobucci was hired immediately. Iacobucci had a penchant for nicknames. Every Radio NL col-

league of his had at least one. Mineer was known as “Mr. Bean,” Howie Reimer was “Mikey,” Geoff Hastings was “Mr. Hassan” and of two of Reynolds’ nicknames, the only one that can be shared with readers is “Freddy.” Only a few NL staffers understood the origins of the pet names Iacobucci had for them,

but all remembered them fondly. Even family members and those he regularly interviewed recalled monikers given to them by Booch, including local 1-417 United Steelworkers president Marty Gibbons, who was bestowed the nickname “Mr. Baboons.” “I thought it was hurtful until I heard what he called everyone else. I think he liked me,” Gibbons said with a laugh. The veteran broadcaster was also remembered as a mentor — and

someone who helped his younger co-workers grow a thicker skin, something former NL broadcaster Raffelina Sirianni said was needed for a job on the beat. At the end of her first day, Iacobucci told her, “You sound like a duck and your perfume stinks.” “He toughened you up. … He’d give you a hard time to your face, but he’d talk great about you behind your back,” she said. “I think that is the true meaning of a friend.”

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A14

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Cold spell followed warm January SEAN BRADY

STAFF REPORTER

sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

DAVE EAGLES/KTW Mike Ballis is among the Kamloops homeless population dealing with the brutal cold this week. He spoke about his experience with Kamloops This Week reporter Michael Potestio on Tuesday morning.

On frigid days, smallest things give hope Tuesday morning in Kamloops saw the mercury plunge to -21 (-29 with the wind chill), making it especially difficult for those living on the streets. DAVE EAGLES/KTW

MICHAEL POTESTIO

STAFF REPORTER

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

Tarps and blankets recently hung from a fence next to a staircase in the city’s downtown, surrounded by bikes, backpacks and clothing. By now, there’s likely nothing left. Two people hunkered down inside the makeshift shelter — temporary relief set up to withstand the frigid temperatures on a cold morning in Kamloops. Another three people could be found congregating outside the tent. Two of them — a man and woman — peered through handkerchiefs worn on their faces to combat the cold. The woman, who goes by the nickname Shotgun, which she has tattooed on her knuckles, was busy sorting through her belongings as another group began gathering down the walkway. The three friends have been homeless for years. For them, surviving the bitter cold spell that followed an unseasonably warm winter is all about being adaptable. “It’s really cold — freezing cold,” said

Shotgun, a lifelong Kamloops resident. “This [makeshift tent] was put up just a couple hours ago just to stay warm and it’ll come down.” The materials for it were collected from around town, she said. Shotgun and some friends were caught in a windstorm when the cold snap began a few days ago. They got creative with their bikes and used them to make a shelter to ride out the storm.

“It was pretty intense and we were freezing cold,” she said. “We had some blankets in our bags and we found plastic kicking around, so we just built it.” “We adapt,” said her 27-year-old male companion, who did not wish to give his name. The wind chill can be difficult to deal with, but he tries to keep moving to stay warm. Wearing layers and knowing where the resources are in town are key, he told KTW,

noting he utilizes The Mustard Seed New Life Community drop-in centre and the Out of the Cold shelter at Nicola Street and Fourth Avenue. “There are places that will help you,” he said. The third friend, who goes by the name Lacey — not her real name — said she also spent Monday night outside. “Just been trying to stay warm,” she said. “You get used to it.” Mike Vallis, who passed by the encampment and spoke with KTW before moving on along West Victoria Street, has been homeless for about four years, having moved to Kamloops from the Lower Mainland last March. With a smile on his face and sporting a gold tooth, Vallis said this is the coldest winter he can recall experiencing. His advice: wear plenty of clothing, make sure you have dry mittens and learn what resources are out there to assist you. He cited meals at

Editorial

Help bring warmth in the bitter cold Page A8 New Life and its winter refuge shelter, which is one of the few places he can access 24/7, as important resources to help the homeless escape the cold. Vallis also has a tent set up along Schubert Drive, which he said can be difficult to leave when hunkered down and trying to get warm during cold spells like the current one that has gripped the province. He said he spent nearly an entire day inside his tent recently. “Yesterday I slept for 30 hours. I wake up and it was so cold I just had a bite to eat and went back to sleep,” Vallis said. As for Shotgun and her friends, nights are typically spent accessing a shelter in town. During the day, they ride out the cold as best they can at spots like the makeshift camp — a popular location to use drugs, she said. The hardest part of being homeless is the cold, judgmental public

perception that comes with it, Shotgun said. “We realize that there are people leaving dirty needles places and we recognize that is a huge problem, and us ourselves are trying to come up with a solution because we don’t agree with it either,” Shotgun said, noting she wants to create a group so addicts can start giving back by cleaning up problem areas. Shotgun said she feels such an endeavour could help change public perception. She said she felt a lot of compassion from the public at Christmas when a woman gave her a box of chocolates. She said she had been feeling “down and out” at the time and started crying when she received them. “The smallest thing gave me hope,” she said, noting the smile of a passerby or the chirp of a bird looking one’s way can give you that feeling. “It’s weird what gives you hope.”

If it feels like January’s warm weather has betrayed your sense of winter, there’s data to back that up. January was an unseasonably warm and dry month for Kamloops, with the average temperature, 0.2 C, three degrees above the average and 1.4 degrees warmer than last year. It was also the eighth-driest January on record, with just 5.7 millimetres of snow falling, compared to the 23.7 millimetres that fell in January 2018 and the average precipitation of 21 millimetres. Although the month was the 15th-warmest of any on record, there weren’t any records broken, according to Environment Canada meteorologist Bobby Sekhon. “We came close a couple of times, but it doesn’t look like we broke any maximum temperature records,” Sekhon said. As for the current frozen state of the city, Sekhon said the weather is not going to change any time soon. “It has settled in for awhile, actually. The next week to 10 days looks like below-normal temperatures,” he said. Kamloops has had lows just below -18 C in recent days — with windchill values into the deep minus-20s. Sekhon said that is about as cold as it will get for now, with the mercury expected to rise. Environment Canada’s forecast predicts highs of -10 C on Wednesday, -7 C on Thursday and Friday (with snow both days), -5 C on Saturday and -3 C on Sunday. Lows are expected to range between -9 C and -14 C through Sunday. Sekhon said belownormal temperatures are likely to persist at least until Feb. 20.


WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A15

COMMUNITY 250-374-7467 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

WALKING INTO WHITE CANE WEEK IN KAMLOOPS TODD SULLIVAN

STAFF REPORTER

todd@kamloopsthisweek.com

Y

ou’ve probably seen them around Kamloops — men and women sporting a white cane. You probably even know those using the canes are visually impaired and that they’re able to get around independently thanks to that white cane. But you might not know what it’s like to have that impairment or the challenges faced by those who have lost or are losing their vision. For White Cane Week in 2019 — which runs from Feb. 4 to Feb. 9 — KTW felt it important to tell readers the stories of the people behind those canes. These people include Surander Singh, a financial consultant at IG Wealth Management who sits on the board of the Canadian Council Of The Blind. Singh noted this is the 75th anniversary of White Cane Week, which began with the council. Kamloops’ White Cane Club marked its 25th anniversary in 2018. Singh started to lose his sight in 2008. “I was 42 at the time when I got glaucoma and it came on really quick,” he said. “Once the optic nerve is damaged, there’s no reversing it.” Fortunately, as a certified financial planner, he was working in an industry in which he could continue his career with the help of technology. “I remember my original director telling me, he says, ‘You know what, we’ve got a good disability program here. If you happen to go on disability and you’re not able to do your job, there is disability,’” Singh recounted. “And I said, ‘Well, that’s not happening. I’m not going on disability.’” Singh explained that IG Wealth Management (previously Investors Group) has been incredibly supportive of his desire to continue to work, as have his customers. But more than anything else, he said, it was while talking to others with vision problems that helped him overcome the worst of what he faced. “When I got introduced to some

WHITE CANE WEEK CONTINUES Look for more stories on the people behind the white cane in this Friday’s editions of Kamloops This Week and online at kamloopsthisweek.com. individuals within the Canadian Council of the Blind organization, as well as the CNIB, I was able to get some help,” Singh said. “And, unbelievable, when you start to connect with the individuals within the blind community, they understand you and you get to understand them, and it allows you to know that there is light at the end of the tunnel. “Pardon the pun,” he added. “Talking to people with vision problems helped me to be able to understand how to deal with the loss of sight.” There are a few events planned for White Cane Week. Presentations will be made at local schools, with information provided about the use and types of white canes, braille, low-vision devices and games — such as goalball — specifically designed for the blind. The White Cane Luncheon will be held on Wednesday at Desert Gardens Community Centre downtown. There will be door prizes donated by local businesses and Les Nolin of the CNIB will be the guest speaker. His presentation will deal with vision loss rehabilitation, the CNIB Foundation and the guide dog and Phone-it-Forward programs. Tickets are $14 and available by calling Linda Hall at 250-376-4900.

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DAVE EAGLES/KTW Surander Singh at his workplace at IG Wealth Management. Singh was 42 in 2008 when he was stricken with glaucoma. As a certified financial planner, he was working in an industry in which he could continue his career with the help of technology.

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A16

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

COMMUNITY

Hey bartender, pour me a glass of poison

T

oday, I answer a question from a Kamloops This Week reader, who asks: Is there such a thing as responsible drug use?

It depends. Alcohol, nicotine and caffeine are all drugs, although many don’t consider them to be substances defined as drugs. I am both an alcoholic and a drug addict. I once argued with an alcoholic who told me alcohol was not a drug. I asked what it was. “It’s just alcohol,” he proclaimed. “That’s ridiculous” I countered. “It’s like saying a rose is a rose, but not a flower.” People tend to sanitize personal drug use. They don’t like to think they are consuming a drug.

ASK AN ADDICT Ask an Addict is a column penned by a Kamloops scholar with expertise in addiction issues and someone who is also an addict. The column is meant to inform and help, which is particularly important as we remain mired in an opioid crisis that continues to claim thousands of lives each year. If you have a question you would like answered, email it to editor@kamloopsthisweek.com. Anonymity is guaranteed. Every night, when you drink a glass of wine, you are engaged in actual drug-taking. Cigarettes kill and alcohol is a poisonous substance. Drink too fast and too much alcohol at one time and you may die. Yet because alcohol is socially acceptable, we tend to think it is OK. “Two glasses of poison with my meal is fine” we tend to say. Try saying that

about two lines of cocaine. Both substances are drugs. One is socially acceptable and the other is not. Yet we look at the person consuming cocaine as being deviant. Cigarettes were once considered healthy for us. It seemed as though everyone smoked. Our personal beliefs are what make

the decisions about what is good for our taking. Remember the days of Reefer Madness? When looking back upon that, we tend to laugh. Our social views have undergone tremendous change. Alcohol prohibition is another example. What is deemed unacceptable or not socially OK is not the drug, but our biased and personal beliefs. Back to the question about responsible use. With illicit drugs such as meth, heroin and MDMA, my question is why a person is even taking those drugs. Addiction is cunning, baffling and powerful. You start using without suffering any consequences, but if you have the genetics of this disease, by the time you try to stop and find you cannot, it is

already too late. If you have the genetics for addiction and engage in responsible use, over time you will find you have crossed the line from recreational use to full-blown addiction. Behaviour — not how often or what substance you use — is what defines an addict. If you are only able to relax, have fun or not be anxious when taking a drug (including a drink), you are exhibiting warning signs that addiction may come. True addiction is defined by continued use despite negative legal, social or health consequences. I recall a story about a woman who regularly consumed five milligrams Valium each night. Now, as a hardcore prescription addict, I couldn’t understand why she would con-

KINDERGARTEN REGISTRATION

STARTING KINDERGARTEN AT YOUR NEIGHBOURHOOD SCHOOL THIS YEAR? Registration for Kindergarten will take place from FEBRUARY 11 TO 15, from 9 a.m. until 12 p.m., and 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. each day. Parents are strongly encouraged to register children for Kindergarten in this period.

To register for September 2019, a student must be five years old by December 31, 2019. Bring your child’s original birth certificate, BC Service Card and proof of address to your neighbourhood’s catchment area school.

sider herself an addict. It took some time to understand it wasn’t the amount or the type of drug, but what it did to her life. She suffered tremendously from this single nightly dose. Retrograde amnesia was her biggest concern. (Blackouts — look at what Rosanne Barr said happened to her). This lady did things that hurt her life, but the next day she couldn’t remember. When she tried to stop taking Valium, she was unable to do so. Remember this — the next time you imbibe in a drink, you are consuming poison. If you wouldn’t drink Lysol or mouthwash, why are you consuming alcohol? It is a different chemical composition, but essentially the same poison. If you think it is

healthy because it comes from grapes, a natural ingredient, then think poppies for heroin, plants for marijuana and coca leaves for cocaine. Those are all natural, as well. Thus you are taking poison when taking a drink. One day, we will look back on alcohol as we have on cigarettes and marijuana. We will laugh at our stupidity, at how we could have even considered taking this drug. More Ask An Addict columns can be found online at kamloopsthisweek.com. Search “Ask An Addict” under the Community tab.

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PG17

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

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EYE ON COMMUNITY

A17

[share with us]

If you have a photo of a charity donation, a grand-opening picture or other uplifting images, email them to

editor@kamloopsthisweek.com,

with “eye on community” in the subject line.

HOT RODDERS FUND RIH FOUNDATION Royal Inland Hospital Foundation CEO Heidi Coleman (left) and foundation campaign director Alisa Coquet receive a cheque for $4,500 from Kamloops Street Rod Association vice-president George Torrans and member Donald Potts on Friday outside RIH. The nonprofit hot rod club raised the funds from the Chrome on the Grass event, having made a commitment to annually provide financial support to the Royal Inland Hospital pediatric ward.

GET INVOLVED LOCALLY Saturday Feb. 16th,10 a.m. to 3 p.m. A Repair CafОs in Kamloops at Habitat for Humanity ReStore, 28 - 1425 Cariboo Pl. Bring a broken household item and learn how to fix it with a skilled volunteer. Bicycles, clothing, electrical appliances, electronics, furniture, household items, small engines, textiles are welcome. Skilled volunteers will be available to help make possible repairs and advise on how to fix items free of charge. Tools and materials will also be on hand. repairing things can be, and how easy it often is.” For more information, go online to, facebook.com/RepairCafeKamloops.

DAVE EAGLES/KTW

---------------------------------------------------Thursday, Feb. 7, 5:30p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The Kamloops Y will hold a free screening of Selfless, a documentary film that poses a question: What would happen if a girl lived in the forest without mirrors, magazines or social media? What would beautiful look like to her and how would she view herself? The film looks at how children can live strong and healthy lives in the social media age. The film will show at John Tod Centre, 150 Wood St. Contact 250-319-6648 or mentalwellness@kamloopsy.ca for further details.

LITERACY LEGACY AT OLPH: Alba Covaceuszach (middle) is joined by Our Lady of Perpetual Help student council president and vice-president Maximus and Lucas (at left), granddaughters Emma, Grace and Kate Covaceuszach (at right), as well as her family (left to right) Carolina Covaceuszach, Rob Covaceuszach and Art and Joanna McDonald. OLPH held a special assembly for Alba to acknowledge her late husband Mario Covaceuszach’s wish for funds to be donated to OLPH to enhance the school’s literacy program.

BRAND NEW SCOOTER: Kamloops resident Tina Cole was left housebound over the Christmas holidays after her mobility scooter died and was not able to be repaired. Through the Kamloops Senior Citizens Housing Society Fund, the BC Interior Community Foundation was able to provide Tina with a new scooter to help her get around. Delivering it was BCICF executive director Rob Miller.

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A18

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

MASTERS OF FINANCE Political parties see drop in donations under new rules THE CANADIAN PRESS

VANCOUVER — Donations to political parties in British Columbia dropped significantly last year after new rules banning union and corporate contributions came into effect. Interim financial reports released by Elections BC on Monday show the New Democrats took in $3.3 million in 2018, compared with $15.3 million in 2017. The Opposition Liberals raised $2.4 million last year, compared with $12.7 million the previous year. The Greens received only $709,808 in 2018, compared with $1.4 million in 2017, though the party has refused to take money from unions or corporations since fall 2016. The NDP government brought in the new rules, which also capped donations by individuals at $1,200 annually, and they took effect on Nov. 30, 2017. The changes to the Election Act included a taxpayer-funded, five-year allowance to wean the parties off big-ticket donations. Starting last year, political parties have received $2.50 for every vote they got in the last election, with the funding dropping by 25 cents each year until 2021. That means both the Liberals and New Democrats will receive just over $8.1 million over five years, while the Green party will get $3.4 million.

Canada’s largest cryptocurrency exchange seeks creditor protection ARMINA LIGAYA

CANADIAN PRESS

Canada’s largest cryptocurrency exchange Quadriga was due in court Tuesday as it sought creditor protection in the wake of the sudden death of its founder and chief executive in December and missing cryptocurrency worth roughly $190 million. The Vancouver-based exchange filed an application for creditor protection on Jan. 31 and the Nova Scotia Supreme Court will be asked to appoint a monitor to oversee the proceedings, according to a post on its website, which has been otherwise shut down. Quadriga owes $70 million in currency and an additional amount of cryptocurrency valued at approximately $180 million, based on market prices in December, to roughly 115,000 users, it said in its application. Some have very large balances, with the largest affected user claim reportedly valued at approximately $70 million, court filings show. Users have very little recourse to recover those funds, said Christine Duhaime, a lawyer and founder of the Digital Finance Institute. Most assume the typical Bitcoin user is young, with money to burn, but the average age is closer to 45, she added. “People have emailed me and called me saying they’ve lost their retirement money. Because [Quadriga] have been around for so long and they were the largest exchange in Canada, I think people thought their money was safe.” The online exchange launched in December 2013 and the platform allowed its users to deposit cash or cryptocurrency with Quadriga. Court documents show Quadriga had

It’s your money and our reputation. We take both seriously.

been facing liquidity issues over the past year but a major issue arose in January 2018 when CIBC froze roughly $25.7 million of its funds held in the account of a third-party processor. “Without access to the Affected Funds, Quadriga was unable to satisfy withdraw requests of users resulting in significant delays for users receiving funds from Quadriga,” it said in the application. Then in December, Gerald Cotten, Quadriga’s founder, chief executive and sole director, died suddenly, according to a post on its website and Facebook page. “A visionary leader who transformed the lives of those around him, Gerry died due to complications with Crohn’s disease on December 9, 2018 while travelling in India, where he was opening an orphanage to provide a home and safe refuge for children in need,” the company said. Court filings show that after his death, Quadriga employees have been unable to locate or access cryptocurrencies worth roughly $190 million. Employees tried to access cryptocurrency within Quadriga’s “cold” wallets, a system which stores cryptocurrencies offline to avoid hacking, such as on USB sticks or electronic hardware not connected to the internet.

“Quadriga was unable to access the cold wallets and/or discovered that the cold wallets contained minimal cryptocurrency units,” it said in court filings. Cotten’s widow, Jennifer Robertson, said she was not involved in the business while he was alive and the laptop which he used is encrypted. “I do not know the password or recovery key,” she said in an affidavit. “Despite repeated and diligent searches, I have not been able to find them written down anywhere.” She also said there have been threats made against her and there has been a “significant amount of commentary on Reddit and other web-based platforms about the state of Quadriga, Gerry’s death (including whether he is really dead) and missing coins.” Robertson declined to comment when reached by the Canadian Press. Quadriga is the latest cryptocurrency exchange to face challenges. Last week, Coinsquare’s head of talent Martin Hauck said in a LinkedIn post that like other companies in the digital currency space it had to make some “tough choices” and had to had to “part ways with a number of talented members” of its team. This comes as cryptocurrencies’ value hover far below the peaks of 2017, when the price of Bitcoin reached upwards of US$17,000. On Monday afternoon, Bitcoin was trading at about US$3,419 according to Bitstamp. Cryptocurrency exchanges have been under increased pressure as a result, as users look to cash out, said Duhaime. “Nobody really thinks the price is going to go back up, so everybody is now wanting to get out. “They’re trying to recover whatever money they have left.”

Eric Davis, BBA, CIWM, PFP Vice-President, Portfolio Manager and Investment Advisor eric.davis@td.com Keith Davis, BBA, CFP®, CIM® Investment Advisor keith.davis@td.com

TD Wealth Private Investment Advice T: 250 314 5124 | daviswealth.ca

Davis Wealth Management Team is a part of TD Wealth Private Investment Advice, a division of TD Waterhouse Canada Inc. which is a subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. ® The TD logo and other trade-marks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. 5946-0119


WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

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A19

FINANCIAL MATTERS Saving And Managing Money

THE ABCS OF ETFS EXPLORING THE EVOLVING WORLD OF EXCHANGE-TRADED FUNDS.

specialized mutual funds, can serve to add targeted exposure to specific areas of the market. Similarly, passively managed and more actively managed ETFs can help investors achieve different goals. Passive ETFs provide exposure to market returns, while strategic beta and active ETFs may seek to deliver market-beating performance and can help achieve goals such as reducing risk in a portfolio. In general, ETFs of all types appeal to investors who are seeking:

MANY INVESTORS ARE LOOKING FOR DIVERSIFIED EXPOSURE to global markets. One solution is an actively managed mutual fund, in which a portfolio manager analyzes and selects individual securities (tradable financial assets like stocks or bonds) within a specific area of the market. Another option is a passively managed exchange-traded fund (ETF) that tracks an index representing a specific area of the market. Recently, innovative solutions have emerged that combine some of the benefits, and help avoid some of the disadvantages, of each of these approaches. They’re ETFs that incorporate elements of active management, and they have the potential to deliver market-beating growth within a lower-cost ETF structure.

• DIVERSIFICATION

WHAT IS AN ETF? First, let’s take a step back and look at how a traditional, passively managed ETF works. ETFs were originally created to track indexes, which are statistical measures of change within the markets. So, for example, an ETF may hold a basket of securities that matches - and is regularly rebalanced to keep matching - the securities in the S&P/ TSX Composite Index. These ETFs offer exposure to a well-defined market - in this case, Canadian equities. Their aim is not to outperform, but to deliver the same performance as the index, minus fees. Passively managed ETFs have low operational costs and don’t require a lot of daily involvement by portfolio managers, so the fees charged are usually low.

Commissions, management fees and expenses all may be associated with exchange-traded funds (ETFs). Investment objectives, risks, fees, expenses and other important information are contained in the prospectus, please read it before investing. ETFs are not guaranteed, their values change frequently and past performance may not be repeated.

A passively managed ETF may hold stocks, bonds, commodities, currencies, options or a blend of assets, depending on which index it is tracking. It’s easy to buy and sell, since it trades on an exchange just like a stock. It’s priced throughout the trading day, rather than only at the end of the trading day like a mutual fund. It can operate tax-efficiently because it’s mirroring an index, and indexes don’t change their composition very frequently. That means low turnover in the ETF, and fewer realized capital gains. It’s also very transparent, with portfolio holdings available daily; in contrast, mutual funds may report their holdings monthly or quarterly. It is important to reiterate, however, that a passively managed ETF doesn’t attempt to beat market returns; its goal is simply to replicate them (minus a fee). In addition, indexes can get skewed towards companies trading at high (sometimes inflated) prices, and a passive approach can’t correct for this. Adding a dash (or more) of active management Newer ETFs aim to outperform market returns and/ or reduce risk, focusing on one of two strategies to achieve this: • STRATEGIC BETA ETFS apply a set of rules, or factors, that may favour a specific type of security - for example, value, growth or lowvolatility stocks; as a result, the weightings of securities in a strategic beta ETF portfolio may be quite different from the index. • ACTIVELY MANAGED ETFS have a portfolio management team that selects individual securities, just like an actively managed mutual fund, but are structured as ETFs to take advantage of ETF features such as tax-efficiency and pricing throughout the trading day. Both of these ETF types give investors access to active portfolio management insights. It’s worth keeping in mind that strategic beta ETFs - even those that use complex, multi.factor approaches - often have lower management fees than actively managed ETFs. That’s because they’re more rules-based, with fewer day-to-day decisions being made by a portfolio management team. Who can benefit from ETFs? Because the universe of ETFs is so wide, with passively managed, strategic beta and actively managed options available, they can play many different roles in an investment portfolio. A broad-based ETF is designed to give an investor exposure to an entire market, and like a broad-based mutual fund, may form the foundation of a portfolio. More specialized ETFs, like more

• LOWER FEES • TAX-EFFICIENCY • TRANSPARENCY Keep in mind that the advantage of lower fees is amplified over time, so investors with a longer time horizon are in the best position to benefit from it. Speak to your advisor about whether ETFs are a good fit for your financial goals. If they are, discuss the various choices to determine the type (or mix of types) of ETF that are most appropriate for you.

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WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

1

2019

A20

MODERN INFILL

WD Wedgewood Developments Inc.

HIDDEN VALE RESIDENCE

HOWARD & MORTON HOME

Best Single Family Detached Home: $500,000 to $750,000

Best Single Family Detached Home: $750,000 to $1,000,000

MDM Contracting

Gordon Ross Contracting Ltd.

RIVERSIDE RESIDENCE Granite Developments Inc.

Motivo Design Group

Best Single Family Detached Home: $350,000 to $500,000

THE ROYAL RENO All by Design Inc.

PROHIBITION WINE CELLAR DW Builders

LOOKOUT RIDGE RETAINING WALL

- HARD LANDSCAPING

Powder Ventures Excavating Ltd.

Best Single Family Detached Home: $1,000,000 to $1,500,000

DUNROBIN PLACE Portfolio Interiors

BEFORE

Thompson Regional Contracting

Greenhome Design & Construction Ltd.

Best Residential Renovation: $300,000 and over

Best Innovative / Special Feature: New or Renovated

Best Outdoor Living Space: New or Renovated

Best Landscape: New or Renovated

2018 TRAINING HOUSE

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WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

14th Annual 2019 MODERN OASIS Hodder Construction

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Best Single Family Detached Home: $1,500,000 and over

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Best Multi-Family Development

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Best Residential Renovation: $75,000 to $150,000

THE ROYAL RENO

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Best Housing Design: New or Renovated

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A22

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

HISTORY 778-471-7533 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Dig It: Archeological record shows skilled carpenters PHOEBE TAYLOR

SPECIAL TO KTW

republicofarchaeology.ca

A

rchaeologists are often only left with the nonperishable remains of past groups to learn details about their former lifeways. This typically involves stone artifacts and occasional charred bone fragments from long-ago meals. While stones and bones comprise the bulk of artifacts discovered by archeologists in the interior of B.C., in reality these items only represent a tiny fraction of the materials utilized in the past. Soil conditions typically do not favour the preservation of organic materials in archeological sites. After hundreds or even thousands of years buried in the ground, items constructed of plant or animal materials have long since decomposed. There are circumstances in which the conditions are ideal to preserve organic items, such as within glacial ice (as discussed in a previous Dig It column), but those situations are location-specific and incredibly rare. It’s easy to focus on what is in front of us as archeologists and forget about the diverse and complex array of items used in the past that were manufactured from wood and other

PHOEBE TAYLOR PHOTOS Clockwise from above: Archaeologists working within an archaeological site; stone adze fragment used to cut down trees, recovered from the Shuswap area; another stone adze fragment.

organic materials we rarely encounter. Fortunately, certain artifacts that do survive in archeological sites can provide clues about the types of perishable items manufactured and used. I recently experienced this while analyzing artifacts collected from an archeological site excavated during the summer. While all of the recovered artifacts were manufactured from stone, the vast woodworking technology of the past was illuminated through the presence of certain types of artifacts. Woodworking on a large scale was inferred through the

presence of stone adze fragments and stone wedges. Adzes were used to cut down trees, while stone wedges were used to split wood for various purposes. Finding these items within an archeological site suggests trees were felled and processed in the general area, perhaps for use as structural timbers for the abandoned pit houses located nearby. Other woodprocessing tools were also present within the archeological site, including a distinctive, slightly curved stonescraping tool. This specially designed tool was used to strip the

leaves, small branches and bark from the stems of shrubs to form wooden shafts. These wooden shafts were important components of various tools, such as digging sticks, spears and arrows. Oral history from Indigenous elders, community knowledge-holders and ethnographic documents completes the picture by providing invaluable details about which types of plants were preferred for making wooden shafts. Saskatoon, yew, Rocky Mountain juniper, ocean spray and hawthorn are a few of the local species

selected because of the natural straightness of the branches and strength of the wood. Many of these plants were observed growing within or near to the archeological site under examination and most are ubiquitous throughout the Southern Interior. These are just a few examples of specific woodworking tools found in archeological sites. Many more woodwork tools existed in the past. It’s not surprising that a variety of tools were designed for this purpose. Essentially every aspect of daily life had a component con-

structed from wood, including timbers for housing, hunting and fishing technology, transportation, plantharvesting equipment, basketry and so on. The use of wood was endless and past groups tailored a specific and expansive set of tools to work with this medium. Although the wooden items of the past have often long decomposed, an archeological site comprised entirely of stone artifacts can still provide information about past woodworking and help to fill in details about daily life in the Southern Interior thousands of years ago.

Phoebe Murphy is a Kamloops archeologist. Interested in more? Go online to republicof archaeology.ca. Dig It is KTW’s regularly published column on the history beneath our feet in the Kamloops region. A group of nine professional archeologists living and working in the area contribute columns to this page and online at kamloopsthisweek. com.

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WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A23

BUSINESS 250-374-7467 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

KORIC, CHBA-CI PHOTOS Among winning projects honoured at the 2019 Keystone Awards were Best Single-Family Detached Home, $350,000 to $500,000: WD Wedgewood Developments Inc. for Modern Infill, project partner Motivo Design Group (above) and Best Outdoor Living Space New or Renovated, Portfolio Interiors, Dunrobin Place (left).

Award-winning homebuilders honoured at gala TWENTY-THREE KEYSTONE AWARDS HANDED OUT BY CANADIAN HOME BUILDERS’ ASSOCIATION KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

The Central Interior chapter of the Canadian Home Builders’ Association handed out the 2019 Keystone Awards of Housing Excellence on the weekend. The black-tie gala event was held in Thompson Rivers University’s Grand Hall on Saturday, with about 300 people in attendance. This year’s master of ceremony was former Kamloops mayor and former provincial minister of health Terry Lake. Sean Watson, a magician who performs at venues such as MGM Grand Casino and Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, entertained the audience before the awards program. “Congratulations to all the winners. We are pleased that the event has grown, both in nominee submissions and in attendance,” said CHBA Central Interior first vice-

president Jere Lorenz. “I encourage those who missed this year’s deadline to start thinking about entering next year to showcase their products and services. The awards also encourage builders to stretch themselves and strive to create the best in home building.” And the winners were: • Best Single-Family Detached Home, $350,000 to $500,000: WD Wedgewood Developments Inc. for Modern Infill, project partner Motivo Design Group; • Best Single-Family Detached Home $500,000 to $750,000: MDM Contracting for Hidden Vale Residence; • Best Single-Family Detached Home, $750,000 to $1,000,000: Gordon Ross Contracting Ltd. for Howard and Morton Home; • Best Single-Family Detached Home, $1,000,000 to $1,500,000: Granite Developments Inc. for Riverside Residence;

• Best Single-Family Detached Home, $1,500,000 and over: Hodder Construction for Modern Oasis, project partner Motivo Design Group; • Best Multi-Family Development: A&T Project Developments for Village Walk; • Best Residential Renovation, $75,000 to $150,000: Motivo Design Group for Happy Wife, Happy Life, project partners DW Builders and 7 Point Millworks; • Best Residential Renovation, $150,000 to $300,000: MDM Contracting for Hook Road Residence; • Best Residential Renovation, $300,000 and over: All by Design Inc. for The Royal Reno, project partner Greenhome Design & Construction Ltd.; • Best Innovative/Special Feature, New or Renovated: DW Builders for Prohibition Wine Cellar;

KTW/Cain’s Kids Page

We started it — you continue it. If you are in school, between kindergarten and Grade 7, here is your chance to add to our story featured every 2nd and 4th Friday of the month. If your tale is added you will win a movie pass for two! Email to editor@kamloopsthisweek.com - Limit your submission to 150 words.

• Best Landscape, New or Renovated: Powder Ventures Excavating Ltd. for Lookout Ridge retaining wall/hard landscaping; • Best Outdoor Living Space, New or Renovated: Portfolio Interiors for Dunrobin Place, project partner Thompson Regional Contracting; • Best Kitchen Design Project under $30,000: Enzo Holdings Ltd. for 2018 Training House, project partners Excel Industries Ltd. and Motivo Design Group; • Best Kitchen Design Project $30,000 and over: Watermark Custom Built Homes for Shaw Residence, project partners Terry Noel and Top 40 Woodworks; • Best Interior Design, New or Renovated: All by Design Inc. for The Royal Reno, project partners Greenhome Design and Construction Ltd.; • Best Housing Design: Motivo Design Group for Modern Infill,

project partner WD Wedgewood Developments Inc.; • Best Marketing Project Website: The Reach for The Reach Website, project partners Coastlines Creative Group and Fresh Inc.; • Best Customer Service by a CHBA-CI member builder : Wrabel Brothers Construction Ltd.; • Best Customer Service by a CHBA-CI member non-builder: BDO Canada LLP; • Best Public/Private Partnership: TRU School of Trades and Technology for 2018 Training House; • Best Sub-Trade: Beattie Insulation Ltd.; • Best Supplier: River City Rock Products Ltd.; • Best Service/Professional: TRUE Consulting and TRUE Land Surveying; • Customer Choice Award (three to five homes): Launch Construction Ltd.

BE A PART OF

THE STORY Cain’s


A24

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

BUSINESS The former Cineplex Odeon theatre building downtown at Victoria Street and Sixth Avenue is being torn down to make way for a seniors housing complex. The development is one of many rising in the city in 2019. ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

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Developers in Kamloops waited longer in 2018 JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Local builders support a proposal by city staff to hire additional staff after experiencing longer wait times at city hall last year. “It’s critical that they do get the increase in staff,” Canadian Home Builders’ Association Central Interior president Kelly Reid told KTW. A report on the city’s development, engineering and sustainability’s year in review, which went to council on Tuesday, noted that, on an average basis, applications for residential building permits last year took about a month, at 4.2 weeks, and commercial/multi-family building permits were processed in just shy of two months, at 7.5 weeks. Those numbers exceed city targets, which are three weeks for residential building permits and four to six weeks for commercial/ multi-family permits. In previous years, residential permits took between two and three-and-a-half weeks, while commercial/ multi-family applications took between three and five weeks. The city said increased application processing timelines

TIME PERMITTING Annual average of building permit processing times in Kamloops in the past five years, in weeks: 2018: Residential: 4.2 Multi-family/commercial: 7.5 2017: Residential: 3.4 Multi-family/commercial: 5.2 2016: Residential: 2.5 Multi-family/commercial: 2.9 2015: Residential: 2.1 Multi-family/commercial: 2.8 2014: Residential: 3 Multi-family/commercial: 4

in 2018 were due to construction in the city — last year saw a record-setting $285 worth of building permits issued — and challenges filling staff vacancies. Reid said permits are taking too long, noting builders have been frustrated. He said the homebuilding industry is a significant economic driver in Kamloops, adding the faster permits are processed, the more economic activity can flourish in the region. “If that slows down, the whole thing slows down,” Reid said. Local developer Joshua Knaak said he is

currently waiting for a building permit at 443 Tranquille Rd. Tenants had given notice at a previous location and planned to move into the space at the end of the month. Delays have postponed that, however, by a couple of weeks. “A couple of weeks means our tenants are moving out of their space on Feb. 28 and March 14 isn’t fast enough,” he said. “There’s your two weeks. I can’t be pushing back my construction schedule by two weeks.” At Tuesday morning’s council supplemental budget talks, staff proposed hiring a building inspector to manage large projects such as the Royal Inland Hospital patient-care tower and Thompson Rivers University growth. Council is expected to make a decision on the request on March 5. The business case for the new full-time position details a financial request of $107,000, which includes office furniture and a vehicle. Staff suggest funding the position via building permit revenues. No building fee increase would result. The city saw a nearly $200,000 revenue surplus in 2018, exceeding its projections.

Both Reid and Knaak support hiring additional staff, noting the city is doing the best it can with the resources it has. Knaak said some staff members work Sundays and late into the evenings and it’s still not enough. “I just think that the city needs to recognize that we have been growing and I think we are going to continue to see growth,” Knaak said. The business case also notes the city has 10 building department staff, compared to Kelowna’s 31 and Vernon’s eight. “Even with the addition of a building official, Kamloops will still process more permits per staff member than the other responding municipalities,” the business case states. Thirteen supplemental budget items went to council on Tuesday morning in advance of Thursday’s public budget meeting. The city is currently anticipating a 2.26 per cent tax increase in 2019. The public budget meeting is from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Thursday night in the Valley First lounge at Sandman Centre. For more on the budget, go online to https://letstalk.kamloops.ca.


WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

BUSINESS

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PUBLIC BUDGET MEETING The City would like to update residents on the 2019–2023 Five-year Financial Plan and introduce staff and community-driven supplemental items along with potential funding sources. ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW Celebrating the opening of the Orchards Walk campus of the Kamloops Kidz Early Learning Center are (from left) owners Michael and Sandra Jodoin, Jere Lorenz of Orchards Developments, Kamloops Coun. Arjun Singh and B.C. Minister of State for Child Care Katrina Chen.

More child-care spots in city Kamloops Kidz Early Learning Center’s fourth facility has now opened, adding 144 spots for child care in the city. The new building at Orchards Walk in Valleyview has 44 spots for infants and toddlers, 50 spots for kids between 30 months and school age and 40 spots for preschoolers. “By providing children with opportunities to try a large variety of activities, materials and interest areas that span a large curriculum, Kamloops Kidz offers quality learning experiences that reflect the unique development of each individual

child,” said Katrina Chen, B.C.’s Minister of State for Child Care in a news release. The purpose-built facility had a price tag of $3.7 million and received $250,000 through the provincial government’s Childcare BC New Spaces Fund. The curriculum at the centre will follow the Montessori method, where kids can learn through art, music, math, language and play. Kamloops Kidz Early Learning Center has three other campuses in the city, in Valleyview, Pineview Valley and Sahali.

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A26

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

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NATIONAL NEWS

‘Not anything the crew did:’ TSB says fatal train derailment started on its own LAUREN KRUGEL

CANADIAN PRESS

An assortment of guns and other weapons seized by Kamloops RCMP.

KTW FILE PHOTO

New ideas for gun control due in coming weeks, minister says STEPHEN COOK

CANADIAN PRESS

OTTAWA — New ideas for federal gun-control rules will likely come with in weeks, says the minister responsible for devising them. Since August, Bill Blair has been studying ways to get handguns and assault rifles off Canada’s streets, with measures that might include anything from restrictions on sales to crackdowns on smuggling. Tuesday, the former Toronto police chief and current minister for organized-crime reduction told reporters he hopes to complete the work “in the coming

weeks” and present a report to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. “When we’ve got it all compiled, I’ll take it back to him and share with him what Canadians have told us,” he said. When Trudeau named Blair to the cabinet, his instructions included that he lead an examination into “a full ban on handguns and assault weapons in Canada.” Since his appointment, Blair has been travelling the country to discuss the issue. Blair’s mandate also includes supporting Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale’s Bill C-71, currently in its second reading in the Senate. The bill includes changes to

the Firearms Act and Criminal Code. Among its amendments are considering events more than five years in the past when judging applicants’ eligibility for gun licences; requiring a buyer’s licence be verified in the sale of non-restricted firearms; and having businesses record information about the people to whom they sell guns. The Liberal government is concerned that the bill’s provisions won’t do enough to stop gang violence in large cities such as Toronto. In 2016, more than half of firearm-related violent crimes involved handguns, according to Statistics Canada.

Blair says federal officials dealing with backlog of refugee security screens JORDAN PRESS

CANADIAN PRESS

OTTAWA — Canada’s bordersecurity minister says there is a backlog in the screening of asylum seekers, including those who are considered irregular border-crossers walking into the country from the United States, but it doesn’t constitute a security problem. Internal government documents obtained by lawyer Richard Kurland under the federal accessto-information law show that as of Feb. 28, 2018, there were 11,745 asylum-seekers waiting for second security screenings, up from 1,683 just two years earlier — an increase of about 700 per cent. All those in the queue had already been screened once at the

border to see whether they posed clear security threats. Overall, 41 per cent of the backlog cases were refugee claimants “who are already in Canada but who have not been security screened,” Canada Border Services Agency officials wrote in a presentation outlining why things were so backed up, and who was stuck in it. The Toronto Star first reported the details, which lit a political fire in the House of Commons’ daily question period. Border Security Minister Bill Blair said officials check all asylum-seekers at the border and stressed “there is no security threat to Canadians.” He said there is a backlog for the second checks, but didn’t say how many people are in it now.

“As part of the process of determining their eligibility for asylum ... there is an additional screening that takes place,” Blair said. “We are working hard to deal with the backlog that they left to us,” he said, referring to the previous Conservative government, “and we will complete that process before anyone is eligible for refugee status in our country.” The answer didn’t sit well with Conservative immigration critic Michelle Rempel, who questioned how Blair can say there are no security threats if the people involved had yet to go through the full screening process. “One could argue that it would be difficult to evaluate if someone posed a security risk to Canada if their security screening was not completed,” Rempel said.

CALGARY — A Canadian Pacific freight train parked on a frigid night in the Rocky Mountains began to move on its own before a derailment that killed three workers and sent 99 grain cars and two locomotives hurling off the track. The Transportation Safety Board said the westbound train had been parked on a grade with its air brakes applied for two hours near Field, B.C., just west of the Alberta-B.C. boundary, when it started rolling. The handbrakes were never applied. “It was not anything the crew did,” senior investigator James Carmichael said Tuesday. “The train started to move on its own.” He said the Calgary-based crew was taking over the train east of Field on Monday because the previous workers were nearing maximum work hours. The new crew was not yet ready to depart when the train started moving around 1 a.m. He said the train consisting of 112 cars and three locomotives was carrying grain to Vancouver and gained speed well in excess of the 32 km/h maximum for the tight turns in the mountain pass. It barrelled along for just over three kilometres before it derailed at a curve ahead of a bridge over the Kicking Horse River. Only 13 cars and the tail-end locomotive remained on the tracks. “The lead locomotive came to rest on its side in a creek and a number of derailed cars came to rest on an embankment,” said Carmichael. “The remaining cars, including the mid-train remote locomotive, piled up behind.” The crew was in the lead unit, which was severely damaged. Carmichael said the data recorder had not yet been retrieved from that locomotive. The railway identified the men who died as conductor Dylan Paradis, engineer Andrew Dockrell and trainee Daniel WaldenbergerBulmer. The accident happened between the Lower and Upper Spiral Tunnels in Yoho National Park, which were built 110 years ago to help trains traverse the treacherously steep Kicking Horse Pass. “This territory’s among the

most challenging railway territory in North America,” said Carmichael. “Investigators and others are working hard under challenging circumstances to fully understand what went so terribly wrong.” A GoFundMe site to help Paradis’s family said he is survived by his wife and two young daughters. “He was kind, hilarious, hard working, easy going, and IN LOVE with his family. They were everything to him,” said the page set up by Marie Armstrong. Waldenberger-Bulmer’s twin brother Jeremy — also a CP Rail conductor — said it feels like half of him is gone. He said his family is feeling an “emptiness in our home that is indescribable.” He said in a statement that his brother had just started working for the railroad in November. “He was loving it and knew he would make a lifetime career out of it. We had big plans of living out our careers with CP Rail and retiring together to golf all over the world. He and I would go golfing any chance we got in the summer. That was our thing to do.” The derailment sounds “eerily similar” to the 2013 Lac-Megantic rail disaster in Quebec in that both involved a freight train rolling down a grade, said Garland Chow, a professor with transportation expertise at the University of British Columbia’s Sauder School of Business. But there’s a big difference, he said, in that no one was on board when the Lac-Megantic train derailed, killing 47 people in the town. The Transportation Safety Board concluded not enough handbrakes were applied. Chow noted that the transportation board said the crew in B.C. was not responsible for the train starting to move. As soon as it began rolling, the crew would have tried to stop it, Chow suggested, so it’s possible the air brakes failed. “It’s either process or equipment or behaviour,” he said. “If the processes were done right and the behaviour was right, it has to be the equipment. ... Something must have failed to allow the train to go down that hill.” — With files from Kelly Geraldine Malone in Winnipeg and Laura Kane in Vancouver


WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

A27

SPORTS: MARTY HASTINGS Phone: 250-374-7467 Email: sports@kamloopsthisweek.com Twitter: @MarTheReporter

INSIDE: Blazers’ Stuart praised for consistency | A29

Brown shifts focus after B.C. final defeat MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

S

porting event bid wizard Norm Daley used the term “loser cruiser” to describe a ride home to Kamloops from Vancouver in

Corryn Brown and her Kamloops Curling Club-based rink fell one victory shy of a B.C. title in Quesnel on Sunday. CURL BC PHOTO

ed. It would be silly to say we didn’t want to go out there and win it, but they played really well. They made a ton of shots.” The Kamloops quartet had a banner season, winning the B.C. Tour title, becoming the No. 1-ranked B.C. women’s team in the nation and earning about $18,000 along the way. Team Brown joined the women’s circuit in time for the 20172018 campaign and won bronze at the provincial championship in its rookie season. “Last year, for me, there were kind of a few shots that haunted me and kept me up at night,” Brown said of a semifinal loss to Kamloops resident Karla Thompson in the 2018 Scotties semifinal. “This year, it didn’t

SALES

Wark will represent B.C. this year at the Scotties Tournament of Hearts, which will run from Feb. 16 to Feb. 24 in Sydney, N.S. Two provincial medals in two seasons is efficient work and, if the trend continues, Team Brown will be atop the podium next year. The likelihood of that trend continuing depends on what happens to the team this off-season. “We haven’t discussed that,” said Brown, who will graduate this year from Thompson Rivers University. “We just lost yesterday. Everyone is going to have some time to mull it over. We’re kind of all coming to different points in our lives, getting full-time jobs. “Everyone has to reassess what their commitment level looks

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really come down to a shot here and there. It was the simple fact that we were outplayed. “It makes it a little easier to swallow, but it is tough.” Wark, which finished atop round-robin standings with a 6-1 record, scored two in the first end of the championship game on Sunday and never trailed. It was all over but the crying by the sixth end, when Wark scored two to take a 6-1 lead. The Abbotsford rink knocked off Brown 8-6 in the 1 vs. 2 semifinal on Saturday morning, forcing the Kamloops squad into an elimination game against Team Richards. Brown downed Richards 6-4 on Saturday night to earn a rematch against Wark, with gold up for grabs.

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like. We’ll see what happens after that.” Brown reassured KTW in a text message she wants to return to competitive curling next season. “We had lots of fun this year and we definitely enjoyed being around each other,” Brown said. “We’re happy to prove that we’re meant to be on the women’s circuit and compete in B.C.” It can be argued the drive to Kamloops from Quesnel is a buzzkill at the best of times. Whizzing through Chasm in silence following a provincial championship defeat seems a memory Brown will be keen to erase. Evidence suggests she will eventually park it. Better drives are likely ahead.

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2010. He was part of a team that was denied hosting rights to the 2015 Canada Winter Games, which were awarded to Prince George. One depressing trip back up the Coquihalla brightened when wallowing in failure ended with a decision to focus on the future. Right then and there, the group of depressed travellers turned its attention to landing the 2014 Tim Hortons Brier. Perhaps Team Brown — skip Corryn Brown, third Erin Pincott, second Dezaray Hawes, lead Ashley Klymchuk and coach Allison MacInnes — can find motivation from that story, which ended five years ago with Kevin Koe accepting the Brier Tankard at Interior Savings Centre. The Kamloops Curling Clubbased rink wasn’t exactly rocking out to We Are The Champions on the trek home from Quesnel on Sunday, after it fell 7-4 in nine ends to the Abbotsford-based Sarah Wark rink in the B.C. Scotties final. “We were done playing at 5 p.m. and on the road by six,” Brown said. “We packed the hotel up and left. Erin and I travelled back with Allison and just kept to ourselves.” If it wasn’t a loser cruiser, perhaps it was the defeatmobile. It certainly wasn’t a rolling bundle of happiness. But as Daley and crew did nine years ago, Team Brown has switched gears. “We had a really great season this year on tour,” Brown said. “We definitely exceeded our expectations and had a really good run. “Obviously, we’re disappoint-


A28

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

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STAFF REPORTER

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Scott Reeves, head coach of the TRU WolfPack women’s basketball team, is looking past his team’s 4-16 record this season and into the future. “When I first took over this job, we had to rebuild and get new players,” said Reeves, the man in charge for the past 14 years. “It took four years before we were back up in the top 10 and making playoffs. You lose the senior kids. You’ve got to start all over again. This is just the third cycle I’m going through right now. My plan would be to be back for sure. You go through waves. I still love what I’m doing.” The majority of TRU’s players were in their first or second years of Canada West eligibility and inexperience proved harmful in the win column. Opponents outscored the WolfPack 1,464 to 1,156, an average of 15.4 points per game. “In basketball, and certainly in the Canada West world, a 20-point game or a 25-point game, people can say, ‘Oh, they got blown out.’ Well, in reality, with two minutes left, it’s 12 [points]. You’ve got to take some chances. You’ve got to foul. If you get blown out by 50, that’s a different story. We were competitive in every game. That’s really what my goal was.” TRU dropped its final six contests and placed 14th among 16 teams in the conference, missing the playoffs by eight points. Reeves’ daughter, Kanesha, was among three seniors who exhausted their WolfPack eligibility this year. Michelle Bos, a top-50 all-time Canada West scorer, headlines the graduating class, which also includes Kamloops product Emily Vilac. “Our three seniors really stepped up in every game for us this year, but there just wasn’t enough firepower around them to sustain enough wins to get into the playoffs,” said Reeves, noting his team was mathematically in the post-season hunt with two weeks remaining in the regular season. “Overall, I was pleased with our younger players and how they developed and the minutes they got on the floor are going to serve us well in the future.” Two of B.C. high school basketball’s top players, Maddy Gobeil and Olivia Morgan-

ANDREW SNUCINS/TRU WOLFPACK Head coach Scott Reeves took time on Tuesday to reflect on his TRU WolfPack women’s basketball team’s 4-16 campaign.

Cherchas, are Grade 12 seniors at South Kamloops secondary. Neither opted to stay home for their post-secondary careers. Gobeil committed to the Abbotsford-based Fraser Valley Cascades, who also landed her longtime friend, elite prospect Deanna Tuchscherer, a standout forward with the Chilliwackbased G.W. Graham Grizzlies. Morgan-Cherchas, a 6-foot-6 forward, committed to play for the UBC Thunderbirds. “With Deanna staying in Canada West and going to Fraser Valley, that certainly tipped the scales for Maddy, for sure,” Reeves said. “I’ve talked with her [Morgan-Cherchas] since she was in Grade 10. She basically had indicated to me that her intention was to go down south. That’s understandable. Why that didn’t materialize and why she chose UBC … once somebody tells me they have other aspirations, I don’t really keep dogging them and pestering them. I move on and have to get somebody else that’s willing to come here.” Reeves said a mix of younger players and veteran transfers are expected to bolster the WolfPack roster next season. “It’s not like these are the only two people I’ve talked to,” Reeves said, referring to Gobeil and Morgan-Cherchas. “I talk to 15 kids a week. I talked to Jessica Parker [a guard for Riverside of Port Coquitlam], who went to Fraser Valley. You try to promote your program and make

them see the benefits of coming here. The nature of recruiting is sometimes the academic fit isn’t right, they don’t want to be away from home, friendships, family in other cities … it would be a three-hour interview to talk about all the reasons. “You can’t get down in the dumps because you didn’t get this kid or that kid. It is very competitive.” Reeves said highlights to build on from this season were road victories over UBC, the eighth-ranked team in the country at the time, and Winnipeg, which reached the Canada West playoffs with an 8-12 record. “We’re looking good for the future,” Reeves said. THAT’S A WRAP A losing season came to an end for the TRU WolfPack men’s basketball team on the weekend in Calgary, with the Dinos sweeping the visitors from Kamloops in Canada West action. Calgary won 71-62 on Friday and 91-59 on Saturday. The WolfPack men dropped six consecutive games to finish 6-14, a record that left them 14th in the conference and four points out of a playoff spot. Calgary posted a remarkable 20-0 record to finish atop men’s standings. On the women’s side, the Dinos bested the Pack 82-49 on Friday and 84-55 on Saturday. Regina and Calgary recorded matching 17-3 records to lead the conference.


WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

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A29

KAMLOOPS, BC • February 12th, 8:30am - 3:00pm

SPORTS

Farm & Ranch Wildfire Preparedness Workshop Kamloops Fire Rescue Training Centre, 1614 Bunker Road Register: bcwildfirepreparedness.eventbrite.com agwildfireworkshops@gmail.com for more information • Connect with local government representatives responsible for wildfire and emergency planning • Develop customized wildfire preparedness plans that outline what needs to occur before, during, and after a fire Funding for this project has been provided in part by the governments of Canada and British Columbia under the Canadian Agricultural Partnership, a federal-provincial-territorial initiative. The Climate Change Adaptation Program is delivered by the BC Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative.

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Brodi Stuart: “There has been some tough times, both with the team and me, personally, but as long as we keep on working, I know good things are going to come.” ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

Brodi Stuart’s numbers are unremarkable. The 18-year-old Kamloops Blazers’ forward from Langley has 14 goals and 25 points in 50 games — not bad, but not great for a top-line staple aiming to impress pro scouts. Stats don’t tell Stuart’s story, but this quote from head coach Serge Lajoie speaks volumes. “He has been our most consistent performer,” the Blazers’ rookie bench boss told KTW on Friday, when Stuart’s insurance marker sealed victory over the Prince George Cougars at Sandman Centre. “The strong scouts, they will see that there is more to a player than just a stat line. That’s what Brodi is. He’s a quiet leader. He’s a glue guy. You know what you’re getting from him day in and day out. Same approach in practice.” Glue guys are great, but arts-and-crafts sessions usually benefit from a little sparkle. Points do tend to shine and shimmer in scouts’ eyes and Stuart would love to have more of them. “It’s always nice to get points,” Stuart said on Friday. “At times, it can definitely get frustrating, but as long as I keep working, I know, eventually, they will come. “At the start of the year, I put a lot of pressure on myself to just have a really big year and come in and have a really big role here. Just putting that pressure on myself was a bit too much. I needed to relax and keep working.” Stuart was passed over in last year’s NHL Draft, despite being pegged 129th among North American skaters in NHL Central Scouting’s final rankings. Jermaine Loewen, ranked 160th, was selected by the Dallas Stars in Round 7. He felt dejected, but Stuart — who had 16 goals and 38 points in 70 games last season — quickly turned focus to showing well when consolation came in the form of an invite to the Pittsburgh Penguins’ development camp. “I’ve got to keep pushing,” he said after the draft. “It’s just a speed bump right now. Hopefully, the dream can still come true.” Family and coaching staff have been sounding boards for Stuart, who likely wasn’t feeling so hot after a six-game pointless streak in October. He went four consecutive games without a point in November. Opportunities were presenting themselves, but Stuart was snakebitten while linemates produced. Zane Franklin, 19, leads the Blazers with 52 points and 24 goals in 50 games. Orrin Centazzo, 18, has 13 goals and 40 points in 49 games. Both have already dwarfed their 2017-2018 point totals. Those breakout seasons have a lot to do with Stuart. “He’s a good teammate and he’s such a complementary player,” Lajoie said. “We’ve moved him to different lines. He is almost like the

fire starter, the spark that lines need. “That’s why, when he works so hard, it’s nice to see him get rewarded for those offensive opportunities he is getting and finally putting them in.” Blazers’ director of hockey operations Tim O’Donovan studies his team as much as anybody. Video analysis backs up what he sees live. “His work ethic and habits are consistent,” O’Donovan said. “He has not been rewarded on the scoresheet as often as he’s deserved, but what he brings every game does not go unnoticed.” He was rewarded on Friday. Anti-venom overwhelmed snakebite when Stuart pounced on a loose puck, fended a Cougars’ defender and slithered the puck through netminder Taylor Gauthier. The sparkling goal glued nicely with an assist on a first-star night. Kamloops won 4-1. “There have been ups and downs,” Stuart said. “There has been some tough times, both with the team and me, personally, but as long as we keep on working, I know good things are going to come.” ONYEBUCHI INCIDENT Kamloops Blazers’ defenceman Montana Onyebuchi took issue with something that happened during a game against the hometown Kelowna Rockets on Saturday. Early in the third period, Onyebuchi charged at Rockets’ forward Conner Bruggen-Cate. Onyebuchi dropped his gloves and wanted to fight Bruggen-Cate, who did not shed his mitts and instead fell to the ice and curled up to protect himself from a flurry of punches. The WHL on Tuesday handed both players twogame suspensions — Onyebuchi for a one-man fight and Bruggen-Cate for “actions during game versus Kamloops.” Exactly what those actions were has not been revealed publicly. KTW will have more on the suspensions in its Friday edition. Kelowna won 2-1 in overtime. Loewen had the Blazers’ only goal in support of goaltender Dylan Ferguson, who made 22 saves in a losing effort. Bruggen-Cate is eligible to return to the lineup against Kamloops at Sandman Centre on Saturday. Onyebuchi can next play against the Victoria Royals in Kamloops on Feb. 13. The Blazers will play host to the Vancouver Giants on Friday. Game time is 7 p.m. IN THE STANDINGS Kamloops (20-25-4-1) holds the second and final wild card playoff spot in the Western Conference, sitting one point ahead of Seattle and 10 points behind the Tri-City Americans, who are in the first wild card position. B.C. Division standings: Vancouver (69 points), Victoria (53 points), Kelowna (47 points), Kamloops (45 points) and Prince George (37 points).

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A30

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

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SPORTS

Cotter wins B.C. title, books spot at Brier Jim Cotter of Kamloops claimed his eighth B.C. Men’s Curling Championship title on the weekend in Quesnel. The Kelowna-and-

Vernon based rink of skip Cotter, third Steve Laycock, second Tyrel Griffith, lead Rick Sawatsky and fifth Brad Wood claimed the provincial champion-

ship with a 9-4 victory over Victoria-based Montgomery in the final. “Probably our strongest thing is our team bond. It’s just remark-

Closure Advisory

Pritchard Bridge Rehabilitation Project The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure notifies the public that the Pritchard Bridge will be closed to vehicles and pedestrians for up to seven days, from: Friday, February 8 at 6 a.m. up to Friday, February 15 at 6 a.m. The closure is required for rehabilitation work to keep the bridge in safe operating condition. Your patience during the project is appreciated.

For more information, please contact Project Manager Dave Shibata at 250 434-9514 or at dshibata@mcelhanney.com

PHOTO CONTEST

JANUARY WINNER

able,” Cotter told Curl BC. “We’re really close on and off the ice and I think that that’s what brings success.” Team Cotter will represent B.C. at the Tim Hortons Brier, which will run from March 2 to March 10 in Brandon. “It never gets old. It feels great,” Cotter said of returning to the Brier. “The guys played fabulous all week and I couldn’t be happier right now.” RUNNING HOT Calum Carrigan of Kamloops was the fastest of three TRU WolfPack runners at the Harry Jerome Indoor Meet in Richmond on the weekend. He placed second in the 1,500-metre run with a time of 4:13.04. WolfPack teammates Troy Morgan of Hythe, Alta., and Liam McGrath of Vernon were ninth and 11th, respectively. “That’s a new school record that Calum set,” WolfPack cross-country running head coach Carmin Mazzotta told TRU Sports Information. “That’s a great sign of things to come for him. Troy’s time was the best he’s ever run in university and Liam’s time was a new personal best.” Carrigan posted a time of 1:27.20 in the 600m to place seventh. Morgan was ninth and McGrath was 13th. ON THE PODIUM Two Kamloops Track and Field Club athletes were in action at the Nike Boise Indoor track and field meet in Idaho

CONGRATULATIONS Jim Motokado

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW Jesse Marshall stickhandles at a Kamloops Adapted Sports Association event at McArthur Island Sport and Event Centre on the weekend. For more photos, go online to kamloopsthisweek.com. The association will play host to another sledge hockey event this Saturday. Learn more by searching for KASA on Facebook.

Tournament Capital Sports

BRIEFS on the weekend. Bazil Spencer jumped 1.95 metres to placed third in the men’s senior high jump and Kian Zabihi was fourth in the weight throw with a toss of 14.10 metres. There were about 850 high school athletes in attendance. FREEZE FRAME Freeze Athletics cheerleaders found the podium at Battle of the Champions, an international event in Calgary held last the weekend.

The Arctic Chill Senior 4 squad earned gold, the Shiver International Junior 3 team placed second and the Blizzard International Junior 2 group won bronze. There were 40 Freeze athletes at the event, which featured hundreds of competitors from Canada and the U.S. MIXED RESULTS The Kamloops Vibe posted a win, a tie and a loss in weekend South Coast Women’s Hockey League play on the Lower Mainland. League-leading Kamloops (15-3-3) fell 2-0 to Island Surge (7-8-3) on Friday, finished knotted at 1-1 with the Richmond Devils (6-9-5) on

Saturday and earned a 5-2 victory over the Surge on Sunday. Recording points on the weekend for the Vibe were Emily Edmundson (2G, 2A), Alyssa Reid (2G), Jenna Ormondy (1G, 1A), Melinda Smith (1G), Sarah Botter (1A) and Catriona Young (1A). Ashley Fisher is Kamloops’ netminder. The Vibe will play host to three games against the Northern Penguins (1-12-1) of Prince George this weekend. Game times are 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., respectively, at McArthur Island Sport and Event Centre on Friday and Saturday and 11 a.m. at Memorial Arena on Sunday.

Kamloops Realty

for submitting this month’s winning photo For a chance to win a prize valued at $50 submit your photos here:

contests.kamloopsthisweek.com Submission Deadline: 12:00 pm on Feb 27 Photos must as high quality as possible. One winner selected at the end of each month from all acceptable entries. Physical copies not accepted. Read terms and conditions online for details.

Jessica MARVIN

MATT MATT 250.374.3022

je-matt@hotmail.com JessicaMattRealEstate.ca

250.319.8784 mmatt@shaw.ca

RealEstateKamloops.ca Member of Kamloops Chamber of Commerce

ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD FOUND ON A34


WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A31

SPORTS

Homan takes stand against bullying

Edler released from hospital

Let Us Do The Cooking! Home Delivered Meals

3 Course Dinner for only

STEPHEN WHYNO GREGORY STRONG

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rachel Homan is seeking an apology after an incident at the Ontario curling championship last week that she called “disappointing” and “hurtful and disrespectful to all involved.’’ Homan, a three-time national women’s champion, issued a statement Tuesday on Twitter that included the post: “Let’s be better than yesterday. Stand up and speak out #antibullying.’’ The Ottawa skip did not reveal specifics, only saying the incident happened Thursday at the eight-team provincial playdowns in Elmira, Ont. “On a positive note, many have come forward to apologize and take responsibility for their participation,’’ Homan said. “It takes a lot of courage to do so. We appreciate that we all make mistakes and there is a lot of room for forgiveness. To those still attempting to hide and take no responsibility, it is a shame. We are simply seeking an apology. “To personally tear someone down for reasons we may never know, is not a part of curling. There is no place for bullying in or out of sport.’’

WASHINGTON — Vancouver Canucks’ defenceman Alexander Edler avoided long-term injury from hitting his head on the ice, but will be out at least a week with a concussion. Coach Travis Green said Tuesday that X-rays revealed no facial fractures. Edler was released from the hospital and headed back to Vancouver. Edler will miss at least three games, but the Canucks are glad it wasn’t worse. “Obviously a scary incident,’’ Green said. “Medical staff I thought did a great job getting out there as quick as they did and we’re thankful that he’s going to be all right.’’ Edler’s skate got caught in the stick of Flyers’ winger Jakub Voracek in the first period Monday night, causing him to lose his balance and slam into the ice. Edler lay motionless on the ice before being wheeled off on a stretcher. The 32-year-old Swede leads the Canucks in ice time and has 20 points in 38 games this season. “You don’t want to lose your top guys,’’ Green said before facing the defending Stanley Cup champion Capitals after KTW’s press deadline on Tuesday. “He’s a big part of our team. It’s what it is. Teams face injuries a lot. He’s one of our best players on our team. He’s a good player.’’ Rookie goaltender Thatcher Demko was injured in warmups Monday, forcing Jacob Markstrom to make back-to-back starts. Green said Demko was returning to Vancouver to have an MRI on one of his knees. The Canucks recalled defenceman Guillaume Brisebois and junior goalie Mike DiPietro before facing the Capitals. Green figures DiPietro will be with the team through its game at Chicago on Thursday.

THE CANADIAN PRESS

DEAN MOUHTAROPOULOS/GETTY IMAGES Rachel Homan is seeking apologies after a bullying incident.

Homan also said her team would be making a donation to an anti-bullying campaign in Ottawa. “I’m sure at one point we have all been in the wrong; whether we were the bully, the ones who jumped onboard, or the bystander that didn’t speak up,’’ she said. “We need to learn from mistakes of the past and of others to be better. It’s OK to speak up, to reach out. Bullies should never win.’’ The Ontario Curling Association said Tuesday that a review was underway. “All I can say is that we have received a harassment complaint against

an individual — not a participant in the event,’’ said executive director Stephen Chenier. “We’ve initiated a review. We have a harassment policy and so we’re in that due process right now. Until both parties have had an opportunity for their day in court, for lack of a better term, I really can’t comment further than that.’’ Homan, who represented Canada at the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics, defeated Julie Tippin in Saturday’s final and will represent Ontario at the Scotties Tournament of Hearts later this month in Sydney, N.S.

1-888-838-1888 BETTER MEALS

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ACTIVITY PROGRAMS

For registration please call 250-828-3500 and please quote program number provided. For online registration please visit

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Programs are cancelled if the minimum numbers are not met.

An Artist’s Archive

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Test & Tune Race Race Western Championships Western Championships Race - Rain Date

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Kamloops Museum & Archives » Feb 21 Thu

Pub

6:30 PM-8:30 PM 297234

Winter Walking

$5

Get your boots on and stay active outside this winter. Join our knowledgeable Parks staff to learn about the trails that are great for winter walks in the snowy months.

Westsyde Centennial Park » Feb 14 Thu

10:00 AM-12:00 PM 293451

Beginner - Quilt-As-You-Go

$80

This is a great beginner quilt class. The quilt-as-you-go method is a great way to make a quilt from start to finish on your own sewing machine. You can complete even up to a king size quilt without needing to push all that fabric through your sewing machine. Bring a lunch, sewing machine, and supplies.

9:00 AM-5:00 PM 295605

Archery: Beginner 10+

$40

In this program you will be introduced to the sport of archery. You will learn about the equipment, safety, and basic techniques. In partnership with the Kamloops Target Sports Association.

Westsyde Neighbourhood Centre » Mar 10-Apr 7 Sun

Clay Play

$32

» Feb 13 Wed » Feb 28 Thu

6:30-8:00 PM 295587 10:30 AM-12:00 PM 295588

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Redemption Pottery Studio

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The KMA’s latest exhibition, Ted Smith: Ideal Forms, is based on the donation of the late artist’s personal and artistic archive to the KMA. The KMA is hosting a workshop for artists about creating their own personal archive - what to include, how to catalogue and best practices for preservation and storage. Registration required.

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A32

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

Valentine’s Day

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A good old Fashioned Romantic

Valentine’s Day PRESENTED BY

CANADIAN PRESS PHOTO KR apparently loves Sonia, but folks in Newfoundland are wondering why he or she has bought billboards to declare it so prominently.

Enter to Win a Romantic Prize Package $50 GIFTCARD to Nandis Flavours of India

DELICIOUS BOUQUET OF CUPCAKES from Chey can Bake ONE DOZEN ROSES from Safeway Floral A SPECIAL SERENADE from Slow No Tempo A Capella Quartet

Town gripped by billboards that declare love for ‘Sonia’ CANADIAN PRESS

CONCEPTION BAY SOUTH, N.L. — An eastern Newfoundland town has been gripped by the mystery of billboards that declare large-lettered love for Sonia, from KR. The 10-foot by 20-foot billboards went up on a road leading into Conception Bay South before Christmas, bearing the simple message: “KR (hearts) SONIA.’’ Another declares: “KR & SONIA, SOULMATES,’’ bracketed by large red hearts. While KR is loud and proud about their feelings for Sonia, their identity remains shrouded in mystery as Valentine’s Day approaches. The mystery has deepened over the weeks, as the posters appeared in various combinations on different sides. Residents have been exchanging theories in a community Facebook group since mid-December. Some suggested KR wronged Sonia and is trying to win her back. “Screwed up so bad [that] flowers just won’t do,’’ one Facebook user wrote. Others posited it might be a marketing gimmick by a dating app or by the billboard company.

According to Pattison Outdoor Advertising, the company that rents the billboard space, a private buyer purchased the space, but a spokesperson had little else to add due to privacy reasons. The company’s St. John’s account executive said even he doesn’t know the full story behind his client’s roadside proclamation. Phil Quann said the billboard buyer requested privacy, noting he didn’t have details to share about his client’s identity, motivations or relationship status. “They wanted to be very private about it and not release any details,’’ Quann said in an interview. Quann declined to share what the company charged to display the personal messages, but said the client purchased four posters with the same messages that were displayed at different times. Quann said KR’s was the first personal, anonymous message he has displayed on a Pattison billboard in Newfoundland, but added he has heard of a similar instance in Nova Scotia. It was an unusual sale, but Quann said the company had no issue sharing the message. “The person wanted to pay for it, so it was up to them,” he said.

Your weekend starts here... Dunes Breakfast - $6.95

A good old Fashioned Romantic

Valentine’s Day

Name: ______________________________________________________ Email: ______________________________________________________ Phone: ______________________________________________________ Enter at Kamloops This Week 1365B Dalhousie Drive. No Photocopies will be accepted. No cash value - prizes as awarded. No purchase necessary. Draw date Wednesday February 13 - 4:00pm.

2 eggs any style, 2 pieces of toast hashbrowns and choice of Bacon, Sausage or Ham

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Call for Reservations

Sat & Sun 8 am noon

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WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A33

month of the

Del Press What organization(s) did you volunteer with to pay for your art? I volunteered mainly with Fours Paws Food Bank. I also volunteered for the BC Winter Games, Kamloops Women’s Society (Vagina Monologues), North Shore Business Improvement Association, Kamloops This Week Raise-a-Reader, and Brennan’s Ugly Sweater Run.

What did you like best about your artwork? My piece of art, Shell on North Beach by Bill Fell, reminds me of the stark beauty of the absolute simplicity only found in nature. You can almost hear the water on the shoreline. It also reminds me of my love of being near the water, be it a lake, river or ocean. It’s my happy place!

What do you like best about the organization you volunteered for? I get a sense of connection to our community through my volunteer work, particularly with Four Paws. I am still fairly new to Kamloops so it’s easy to get caught up in all the good things about the city but volunteering with the less fortunate reminds me that every community needs support. To me as a citizen it just makes sense to give back. Volunteering where people can come to get help keeping their pets is so rewarding. I know I would be devastated to be separated from my pets so this is important work.

What do you like about the Timeraiser event? The Timeraiser event brings different communities together. It is a wonderful way to present the need for volunteerism in our city through the lens of local artwork. And likewise, it’s an event that showcases the talent of local artists through the generosity of volunteerism. It’s a good match. And it’s just plain fun!

HOW TIME RAISER WORKS

Local artwork is selected and purchased for auction

Non-profit agencies gather at the time raiser event

SPONSOR of the MONTH

Participants bid volunteer hours on works of art they are interested in

Volunteer Kamloops

Current Hot Opportunities Volunteer Kamloops Snow Angels Canadian Mental Health Association Clubhouse Certified Yoga Instructor MS Society Friendly Visiting Program Out of the Cold Shift Support Volunteers

www.kamloopsthisweek.com www.ktwdigital.com PH: 250-374-7467 • FAX: 250-374-1033 1365B Dalhousie Drive

The winning bidders complete their volunteer pledge over a year

Bidders bring their artwork home!

The next KTW COMMUNITY

TIMERAISER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15 7:00 - 11:00 pm The Rex Hall 417 Seymour St.

Kamloops Hospice Assocaition Snow Removal

Live Music ~ Appies ~ Art

FOR DETAILS VISIT

EVERYONE WELCOME

www.volunteerkamloops.org or call 250-372-8313

No obligation to volunteer


A34

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEEKLY CROSSWORDS

CLUES ACROSS 1. Got paid 7. Sets free 13. Domestic hybrid cattle 14. Quality of one’s character 16. Doctor’s helper 17. Not holding back 19. Type of degree 20. Short but severe 22. 007’s creator 23. Linguistics icon 25. Large integers 26. Upset 28. Former 29. Peyton’s younger brother 30. An Irish dance 31. Title of respect 33. Small lump 34. Baroque musical instrument 36. The third sign of the zodiac 38. The 1st letter of the Hebrew alphabet 40. A group of nine

CLUES DOWN 1. Nix 2. Indicates position 3. Quantitative facts 4. Strong and healthy 5. Former measure of length 6. Dads tend to be this 7. Parts of a movie 8. An animal’s foot 9. Expression of sorrow or pity 10. Saudi Arabian money 11. One billion gigabytes 12. Smallest musical interval 13. A rugged box (usually made of wood) 15. Cheese dish 18. An ugly, evil-looking old woman 21. Widely used 24. Makes into pages 26. Afflict in mind or body 27. Set up 30. Toilets 32. “Life of Jesus” theologian

41. Garment 43. Capital of Yemen 44. One point south of due east 45. Drain 47. Moved quickly 48. Bar bill 51. An idiot 53. Indicates silence 55. Protein-rich liquids 56. Samoan monetary units 58. “__ your i’s, cross your t’s” 59. Forms the bottom 60. Potato state 61. Toy that spins around 64. Barium 65. Type of molding 67. Closes again 69. Sounds the same 70. Come into view

35. A big deal on Wall St. 37. Western Thai people 38. Free from contamination 39. Type of dog 42. Revolver 43. High schoolers’ exam 46. San Diego ballplayers 47. Hit the sack 49. Suitable for crops 50. Red mineral 52. Yellowish-brown 54. Lowest point between two peaks 55. Late TNT broadcaster 57. Thin strip to align parts 59. Swiss wind 62. A way to chill 63. Jewel 66. Rhodium 68. The top lawyer in the land

CROSSWORD ANSWERS FOUND ON A30

MATH MIND BENDER

SUDOKU FUN BY THE NUMBERS

Addition Problem

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Consider the problem AAA + BBB = DCCC, where A, B,C and D are digits. Note that leading zeroes are not valid. Find all solutions or prove that there are none.

ANSWERS

Answer to last week’s CITY NAMES PUZZLE:

For each name, the common pronunciation and the native pronunciation are so different that they contain a different number of syllables. THIS PUZZLE IS BY GENE WIRCHENKO Find more puzzles, articles, and full solutions online at genew.ca

WEEKLY HOROSCOPES

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

Change is on the horizon, but you don’t yet know where you fit into the equation, Aries. Enjoy the unexpected and don’t worry so much about the future.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, though you may think you can only choose one direction in life, you really can reverse course and go in another direction if you so desire.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, normally you are conservative and weigh things carefully, However, this week your other side takes over and you are apt to be a little more spontaneous.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

Cancer, there is only so much time to learn something new at work and you may be worried a bit. Someone will talk you through, and you’ll find your way.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

FEBRUARY 6 - FEBRUARY 12, 2018 LIBRA

- Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, you may be compelled to be introspective this week. Use this time to reflect and explore all the reasons why you typically enjoy being an extrovert.

SCORPIO

Leo, if life seems a little more hectic these days, you may be taking on too many responsibilities. Lighten the load and focus on what matters most.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

- Oct 24/Nov 22 If there is something on your mind, Scorpio, now is not the time to share it with everyone. Let this settle for a bit, then choose the right time to share your discovery.

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21

It can be challenging to wrap your head around certain goals, Virgo. However, you will manage to pick and choose those tasks that are most important and get things done.

People around you who are irritable might try to pull you into their situations, Sagittarius. Resist the urge to become influenced by their bad moods and perceptions.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan20 Capricorn, a little extra concentration will have you flying through your to-do list in no time. Devote the time now and enjoy the reward and time off later.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, it is never too late to get some exercise, even if you think that a dedicated workout regimen can’t fit in your schedule. Try socializing while working out.

PISCES

- Feb 19/Mar 20 This could be a week passion comes to the forefront, Pisces. If you keep your options open, you may be surprised at what comes your way.

BOOGIE TRAINING BEGINS SOON!

LOCATED AT THE SANDMAN SIGNATURE HOTEL

Starts: Sunday, March 10 - 8 AM • Tuesday, March 12 - 6 PM All levels: Train for boogie Sunday, April 28 TO REGISTER VISIT WWW.RUNCLUB.CA • FOR MORE INFO: JOBERRY@TELUS.NET OR 250-852-9906


WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A35

OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM David John Kurylowich

Jamie Ann Sunderland

Gordon “Bud” Mabbett July 23, 1921 – January 19, 2019

Mr. David John Kurylowich passed away suddenly on Sunday, January 27, 2019 in his home at the age of 81 years. He leaves behind his sons Dennis, Gerry, Kevin (Lorena) and a daughter Debra (Terry), his grandchildren Lindsay, Jaymz, Rhea, Catherine, Katrina, Valerie and great-granddaughter Rylee, his brother Ben (Carole) and sister Stephanie.

Bud passed enjoying the spectacular views of ocean, mountains and birds from his only home since leaving Kamloops 45 years ago. Sons Roy and Bill were at his side.

He was predeceased in death by the love of his life, wife Margaret Rose in 1996, parents Steven and Mary Kurylowich, his sisters Patricia and Violet, brothers-in-law Robert and Lloyd and daughter-in-law Rebecca. David was born in Kelowna, BC on May 25, 1937 and grew up in many small communities along the CN Rail Line, with most of those years spent in Little Fort. In 1958, he married Margaret Rose Shilling and together they settled in Boston Bar. Dave worked his life in construction for the Ministry of Transportation. His most notable projects were working in the Fraser Canyon, the Boston Bar to Yale route and the Island Highway from Campbell River to Gold River. He moved to 100 Mile House in 1968 as a District Technician where he raised his family. Camping, hockey, dances and curling were many of the pleasures he enjoyed. He was a very active volunteer with the 100 Mile House Fire Department, BPO Elks and the Knights of Columbus. He retired in Kamloops in 1992 and then they moved to their present home in Sorrento where he enjoyed golfing, curling, fishing, gardening, camping and spending time with family, especially the grandkids. He was also a member of the Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in Chase.

Born and raised in Port Coquitlam, he joined the army at 18, fought in the Italian campaign until being severely wounded in December 1944. After 6 months of recovery, Bud worked in Boys Detention Centers, until he became a Probation Officer in 1960. He transferred to Kamloops in 1961 and worked there until 1973. Bud was very active in Lions, Rotary and minor sports. He was president of North Kamloops Minor Hockey, where he fundraised and advocated for the inclusion of all who wanted to play. He, wife Alice and the boys enjoyed camping, fishing and being outdoors in this beautiful region. They made lifelong friends and leaving was bittersweet. Bud rose through the ranks of Correction and retired in 1983 as one of three regional correction directors on Vancouver Island. After his working life, Bud took up antique furniture restoration, art collecting, gardening and lawn bowling. He and Alice wintered in Arizona. Volunteering their time and fundraising for the lawn bowling club, entertaining and yard saleing. At home in Union Bay their front yard was a frequent gathering area for friends and neighbours to enjoy happy hour.

The Reverend Father Derrick Cameron will celebrate the Funeral Mass on Friday, February 8, 2019 at 10:00 am in the Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in Chase, BC.

Nothing made Bud and Alice happier than family, sons Roy and Bill (Brenda), granddaughters Kelsey James (Chris), Kara Mayberry (Marty), grand-son Will Mabbett, great-granddaughters Alise and Harper James, and numerous nieces and nephews all held special spots in Bud’s heart.

Should friends desire, donations to the Heart & Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Diabetes Association would be appreciated in memory of David.

Bud’s was a life well lived. A celebration of life will take place in the summer.

Condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com

A Division of Service Corporation International (Canada) ULC.

Flowers gratefully declined. Donations to the B.C. Children’s Hospital would be appreciated.

With membership in the Memorial Society of BC, further discounts are available to you and your family for all services and merchandise at First Memorial. Come and ask us how to join. You will be pleased with our already low family friendly cremation prices.

Judith Ann Beaver (née Whynott)

COXON Walter

Kamloops, BC/ Louisbourg, NS

On Tuesday, January 15, 2019 Judy left us without saying goodbye to all those that knew her and loved her. Judy was born in Halifax, NS and moved to Louisbourg at the age of 2. Judy was a graduate of the Cape Breton Business College. In 1973, Judy married the love of her life Mel and moved west to Manitoba eventually arriving in BC in 1979. Judy and Mel enjoyed the next 12 years working in the high artic. It was a unique and memorable time for the couple. Mel enjoyed a challenging career working in remote locations while Judy continued her career with CIBC and then TRU. Judy was a hardworking, dedicated employee and friend no matter the job or the challenge. Even though Judy was miles away from Mel and her family, she stayed in constant contact with her family and friends, visiting and calling whenever she could. Judy never had children, her nieces Michelle and Amy, nephews Matthew and Adam, their children and godson John were also the loves of her life, showing of pictures and bragging all the time. Judy is survived by her husband Melvin, sister Nora (Wayne), brother Stewart (Bonnie), mother and father-in-law Greta and Everett Beaver, many cousins, nieces, nephews and her best friends Jean Dunbar and Sylvia Gandy. Judy is predeceased by her mom and dad, Jenny (Riggs) and Stephen Whynott, grandparents William and Nora Riggs / Stewart and Mary Whynott. Judy In our hearts your memory lingers Always tender, fond and true There’s not a day dear Judy We won’t think of you. As per Judy’s wishes, Judy was cremated and there will be no funeral service. The family would like to extend a very special thanks to all Judy’s friends at Earls – Judy’s favourite restaurant. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Kamloops SPCA in memory of Judy Beaver. Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home 250-554-2577 Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

250-554-2577

It is with great sadness that the family of Walt Coxon announces his passing on December 6, 2018 at the age of 80. Walt will be lovingly remembered by his wife of 56 years, Heather, and his children, Susan (Jack) and Catherine (Craig). Walt is also fondly remembered by his six grandchildren; Jacqueline, Jessica, Aaron, Matthew, Shivaun and Sean; and by his sisters, Lillian, Evelyn, Janet, Bette and Mavis. He was predeceased by his sister Alice. Walt attended the University of Alberta. In the summer of 1962, he began work for the Federal Government in the Banff National Park working on Highway 1. He then went to work for BC Highways on projects in Canal Flats, Lytton, Kelowna, Red Pass, Salmon Arm and Mission. He joined Dawson Construction in 1972, starting in the head offices. Walt then went to Kamloops to help set up a satellite office and became the Director of Operations there until his retirement in 2000. Walt also served on various boards of the Road Builders Association during this time. After his retirement, he started up his own consulting company which he worked at until his passing. From 1992 to 2000, Walt and Heather owned and operated the Pantry Family Restaurant in Kamloops. Walt’s hobbies and passions included time with his family, travelling and golfing. A Memorial Service is to be held on Saturday, March 2, 2019 at 1:30 pm at the Cedar Valley Mennonite Church 32860 Cherry Ave., Mission, BC. Pastor Dan Rempel officiating.

(née Colborn) May 1961 – January 2019

Jamie Ann Sunderland passed away on January 25, 2019 in the ICU at RIH. Jamie was predeceased by her sister Jeri DeMille and mother Joan Colborn. Jamie is survived by husband Bob, dad Jerry, sister Judy, nephew Ross, niece Ionela, daughters Katie, Amy, Tessa and Jessica, granddaughters Layla, Kaitlyn and Angelique, grandson Ryken, and sons Jordan, Gary and Geoff. After Jamie graduated from Cariboo College in 1991, she worked as RN at Overlander Extended Care and later as outreach nurse retiring in 2009 due to health reasons. No services to be held as previously requested.

Schoening Funeral Service 250-374-1454

First Memorial Funeral Service 250-554-2429

schoeningfuneralservice.com

Cody Marcel Mathieu It is with great sadness we announce the passing of Cody Marcel Mathieu, know to all his friends as Bobby Zed. He leaves behind his beloved dad Mark Marcel Mathieu, his mother Lorraine Mathieu, his sister Ashley Mathieu, his grandparents Minnie and Marcel Mathieu, grandmother Debbie Luszca and many uncles, aunts and cousins. Cody was born in Fort St. John, BC on December 23, 1987. In 1992, the family moved to Kamloops. Cody loved his sports, at 5 years old he started playing Tee ball, softball and then hard ball. He loved wrestling and did that a lot with his friends. He was a big fan of WWE. He also played rugby in high school and his coach nicknamed him the Little Wolverine. During grades 11 - 12 he played Provincial Baseball. Cody touched many friends and neighbors lives. He will be deeply missed! A Viewing will be held for family and friends wishing to pay their respects on Thursday, February 7, 2019 from 5:00 to 7:00 pm in the Schoening Funeral Chapel, 513 Seymour Street. The Funeral Service will be celebrated on Friday, February 8, 2019 at 2:00 pm in the Holy Family Catholic Church, 2797 Sunset Drive, with Father Fred Weisbeck Celebrant. A reception will follow in the church foyer. Condolences may be expressed at www.firstmemorialkamloops.com


A36

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

KamloopsThisWeek.com

CLASSIFIEDS Phone: 250-371-4949 DEADLINES

INDEX

LISTINGS

Announcements . . . . 001-099 Employment . . . . . . . . .100-165 Service Guide . . . . . . . 170-399 Pets/Farm . . . . . . . . . . .450-499 For Sale/Wanted. . . . .500-599 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . .600-699 Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700-799 Automotive . . . . . . . . . . 800-915 Legal Notices . . . . . . 920-1000

REGULAR RATES

WEDNESDAY ISSUES • 10:00 am Tuesday

Based on 3 lines

FRIDAY ISSUES • 10:00 am Thursday

1 Week . . . . . . . . . $2500

1 Issue . . . . . . . . . $1300

ALL ADS MUST BE PREPAID. No refunds on classified ads.

1 Month . . . . . . . . $8000 ADD COLOUR . . $2500 to your classified add Tax not included

|

Fax: 250-374-1033

RUN UNTIL SOLD

|

Email: classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com

RUN UNTIL RENTED

GARAGE SALE

$

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Houses, condos, duplexes, suites, etc. (3 months max) $ 5300 Add an extra line to your ad for $10

$

Tax not included Some restrictions apply

Scheduled for one month at a time. Customer must call to reschedule. Tax not included. Some restrictions apply

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Merchandise, vehicles, trailers, RV’s, boats, ATV’s, furniture, etc.

3500

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue. . . . . . . $1638

BONUS (pick up only):

1 Week . . . . . . $3150

• 2 large Garage Sale Signs • Instructions • FREE 6” Sub compliments of

1 Month . . . $10460

Tax not included

Tax not included

Announcements

Announcements

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Anniversaries

Coming Events

Lost & Found

Business Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Education/Trade Schools

Help Wanted

Lost Camera Sony Cybershot in blue case Sometime between December and now (250) 573-3556

FAMILY DAY

CLASSIFIEDS

Travel

Housesitting Word Classified Deadlines •

12 Friday - 3 lines or less 1750 Wed/Fri - 3 lines or less

$

Announcements

Kamloops This Week will be closed on Monday, February 18, 2019 for the Family Day Statutory Holiday.

EMPLOYMENT

50

Coming Events

If you have an

upcoming event for our

COMMUNITY CALENDAR go to

kamloopsthisweek.com and click on the menu and go to events to submit your event.

Bill

250-371-4949

Business Opportunities

Education/Trade Schools

Historical Arms Gun Show

Information

PERFECT Part-Time Opportunity

2 Days Per Week call 250-374-0462 TROUBLE WALKING? HIP or KNEE REPLACEMENT, or other conditions causing restrictions in daily activities? $2,000 tax credit. $40,000 refund cheque/rebates. Disability Tax Credit. 1-844-453-5372

Personals Looking For Love? Try your luck with 1x1 boxed ad $35 plus tax for 2 weeks. Price includes box number. Call 250-371-4949 to place your ad and for more details.

~ Caution ~ While we try to ensure all advertisements appearing in Kamloops This Week are placed by reputable businesses with legitimate offers, we do caution our readers to undertake due diligence when answering any advertisement, particularly when the advertiser is asking for monies up front.

Log Hauling Contract available for southern Vancouver Island. Approx 120,000m3 per year. For more information please email haulingopportunity @gmail.com

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Long-Term Stump-To-Dump Harvest/ Hauling Contracts in Northern Ontario Contact Denis Roy 705-869-4020 ext 235 Denis.Roy@EACOM.ca

250-374-0462

We are located east of the City of Kamloops, on Dallas Drive and are requiring full time General Laborers. We offer a great benefits package after a satisfactory probation period. Please submit your resume in person, Monday to Friday 8:00 - 4:30 pm.

THOMPSON RIVER VENEER PRODUCTS LTD. If you cannot apply in person you can fax a full resume with references to 250-573-6052

8982148

Funding available for those who qualify!

February 9-10, 2019

Courses start every week!

Class 1, 2, & 3 B-Train

Call 250.828.5104 or visit tru.ca/trades

Activation Laboratories We are looking to fill positions for Laboratory Technician (BSc required) and Sample Prep Technician. No experience necessary. Email resumes to: nolangoddard@actlabs.com or apply in person at 9989 Dallas Drive. Competitive wages and benefits. I PAY Cash $$$ For All Scrap Vehicles! and $5 for auto batteries Call or Text Brendan 250-574-4679

ndimambro@marios-towing.com

No Phone Calls Please!

RUN TILL

RENTED

3500

RUN TILL $

SOLD

Mario’s Towing Is Expanding! Our Kamloops Office is Growing Fast! Looking for Heavy Tow Truck operator. Must Pass Criminal Records Check. Experience an asset but will train the successful candidate. Must be available for all shifts. Please forward Resumes & Current Drivers Abstract to:

PLUS TAX

250-371-4949

Help Wanted

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Help Wanted

LOOKING FOR DOOR TO DOOR CARRIERS

We are a well established, growing plywood and veneer manufacturer. If you have your own transportation, can work shift work, are fit and have a good work ethic, then we need you.

CERTIFIED ICBC AIR BRAKE COURSE

CONTRACTORS WANTED

courses mid-week & weekends. NEW - Intro to Reloading & Bear Aware courses on demand. For schedules see www.pal-core-ed.com or 778-470-3030

GENERAL LABORERS

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING

Career Opportunities

AAA - Pal & Core

is looking for substitute distributors for door-to-door deliveries. Vehicle is required. For more information please call the Circulation Department at

250-376-7970

Help Wanted

Employment

10:00am Thursday for Friday’s Paper.

It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event that errors occur in the publishing of any advertising shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only and there will be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement.

Courses. A Great Gift. Next C.O.R.E. February 23rd and 24th. Saturday and Sunday. P.A.L. February 17th Sunday. Professional outdoorsman & Master Instructor:

Peace of mind house sitting and pet care. Keep your house and pets safe while your away. 374-6007.

10:00am Tuesday for Wednesday’s Paper.

Advertisements should be read on the first publication day. We are not responsible for errors appearing beyond the first insertion.

HUNTER & FIREARMS

Kids & Adults needed! DOWNTOWN

Rte 308 - 355 9thAve, 703977 St. Paul St. – 40 p Rte 311- 423-676 1st Ave, 440-533 2nd Ave, 107-237 Battle St, 135-137 St Paul St. – 30 p. Rte 317 - 535-649 7th Ave. 702-794 Columbia St,(evenside)702-799 Nicola St.-46 p Rte 319 - 545 6th Ave, 609-690 Columbia St,(evenside), 604-692 Nicola St.-16 p Rte 320 – 483-587 9th Ave, 801-991 Battle St, 804-992 Columbia St (Even Side), 803-995 Nicola St. - 51 p. Rte 322 - 694 11th Ave, 575-694 13th Ave, 1003-1091 Battle St, 1008-1286 Columbia St, 1004- 1314 Nicola St. – 61 p Rte 324 – 606-795 Pine St. – 29 p. Rte 325 - 764-825 9th Ave, 805-979 Columbia St(odd side), 804-987 Dominion St, 805-986 Pine St.-65p Rte 327 – 1003 Columbia St, 1203-1296 Dominion St. – 38 p. Rte 328 – 935 13th Ave, Cloverleaf Cres, Dominion Cres, Pine Cres, Park Cres. – 62 p. Rte 331 – 984-987 9th Ave, 1125 10th Ave, 901-981 Dominion St, 902-999 Munro St, 806-990 Pleasant St. – 37 p. Rte 333 – 1005-1090 Pine St, 1003-1176 Pleasant St. -39 p. Rte 339 - 1265-1401 9TH Ave, 916-1095 Fraser St. – 49 p Rte 372 - 22-255 W. Battle St, 660 Lee Rd, 11-179 W. Nicola St. – 53 papers Rte 380 - Arbutus St, Chaparral Pl, Powers Rd, Sequoia Pl. – 71 p Rte 385 – 350-390 W. Battle St, Strathcona Terr. – 30 p. Rte 387 – 643-670 McBeth Pl. – 22 p.

Rte 389 – Bluff Pl, 390 Centre Ave, 242-416 W. Columbia St, Dufferin Terr, Garden Terr, Grandview Terr. – 61 p. Rte 390 – Fernie Crt, 158-400 Fernie Pl, Guerin Creek Way. – 49 p.

LOWER SAHALI/SAHALI Rte 401 - 250-395 Pemberton Terrace, 395-425 Pemberton Terrace – 84 p. Rte 403 – 405-482 Greenstone Dr, Tod Cres. – 28 p. Rte 405 – Anvil Cres, 98-279 Bestwick Dr, Bestwick Crt E. & W, Morrisey Pl. – 49 p. Rte 453 - 1575-1580 Springhill Drive – 73 p. Rte 470 – Farnham Wynd, 102-298 Waddington Dr. – 67 p. Rte 472 - 1750-1795 Summit Dr. – 34 p Rte 474 – Coppertree Ct, Trophy Crt. – 20 p. Rte 482 - 101-403 Robson Dr. – 67 p Rte 484 - 1923-2069 Gladstone Dr, 1869-1888 Gladstone Pl,611-680 Robson Dr,695 Robson Dr-64p Rte 492 – 2000-2099 Monteith Dr, Sentinel Crt. – 38 p.

ABERDEEN

Rte 510 - 372-586 Aberdeen Dr, 402-455 Laurier Dr. – 42 p

JUNIPER

Rte 655 – 1685 Finlay Ave, 2202-2385, 2416-2458 (Even Side) Skeena Dr. – 36 p. Rte 670 - 1900-2099 Galore Cres, 1600-1647 Galore Crt, 1712-1799 Galore Pl. - 107 p.

VALLEYVIEW

Rte 602 – Apple Lane, Knollwood Cres, Parkhill Dr, 1783 Valleyview Dr. – 47 p.

Rte 603 – Chickadee Rd, Comazzetto Rd, Strom Rd, 1625-1648 & 1652-1769 Valleyview Dr.- 44 Rte 605 – 1770-1919 Glenwood Dr, Knollwood Dr, Vicars Rd. – 64 p. Rte 606 – Orchard Dr, Russet Wynd, 1815-1899 Valleyview Dr. – 41 p. Rte 608 – Curlew Rd & Pl, 1925-1980 Glenwood Dr. - 73 p. Rte 612 – 2079 Falcon Rd, Flamingo Rd, 2040-2177 Glenwood Dr. – 64 p. Rte 613 - 2210-2291 Crescent Dr, 115-155 Highland Rd, 2244-2296 Park Dr,2207-2385 E TCH-64 p Rte 620 – MacAdam Rd, McKay Pl, Pyper Way, 25162580 Valleyview Dr. – 70 p. Rte 621 – Duck Rd, Skelly Rd, 96 Tanager Dr, 2606-2876 Thompson Dr. – 50 p.

RAYLEIGH

Rte 830 – Chetwynd Dr, Stevens Dr. – 56 p. Rte 833 – Cameron Rd, Davie Rd. – 44 p. Rte 836 – 133-197 Cahilty Cres, 150-187 Hyas Pl, 4551-4648 Spurraway Rd. – 36 p. Rte 837 – 103-190 Helmcken Dr, 4654-4802 Spurraway Rd. – 22 p. Rte 842 – 3945-4691 Yellowhead Hwy. – 35 p.

DALLAS/ BARNHARTVALE

Rte 701 – Freda Ave, Klahanie Dr, Morris Pl, Shelly Dr, 901-935 Todd Rd. – 91 p. Rte 706 – 1078-1298 Lamar Dr, Molin Pl, - 29 p. Rte 750 - 5101-5299 Dallas Dr, Mary Pl, Nina Pl, Rachel Pl-31p Rte 751 – 5310 Barnhartvale Rd, Bogetti Pl, 5300-5599 Dallas Dr, 5485-5497 ETC Hwy, Viking Dr,

Wade Pl. – 64 p. Rte 754 – Hillview Dr, Mountview Dr. – 39 p. Rte 755 – 6159-6596 Dallas Dr, McAuley, Melrose, Yarrow. – 72 p. Rte 759 – Beverly Pl, 6724-7250 Furrer Rd, McIver Pl, Pat Rd, Stockton Rd. – 40 p. Rte 760 – Beaver Cres, Chukar Dr. – 64 p. Rte 761 – 6022-6686 Furrer Rd, Houston Pl, Parlow Rd, Pearse Pl, Urban Rd. – 57 p.

BROCKLEHURSTS/ NORTH SHORE

Rte 30 – 1810-1897 Fleetwood Ave, 995-1085 Southill St. – 33 p. Rte 121 - 103-105 Dot St, 501-556 McKenzie Ave, 290-381 Maple St, 102-196 Yew St. – 55 p. Rte 123 - 301-599 Royal Ave. – 37 p Rte 151 - 1020-1132 7th St, 1024-1112 8th St, Berkley Pl, Dundas St, Richmond Ave-72 p

BATCHELOR

Rte 175 – 1800-1899 Norfolk Crt, Norview Pl, 821-991 Norview Rd. – 38 p. Rte 183 – 2003-2074 Saddleback Dr, 2003-2085 Grasslands Blvd. – 74 p. Rte 187 – 2100-2130 Doubletree Cres, 1050-1100 Latigo Dr, 21002169 Saddleback Dr. – 56 p,

WESTSYDE

Rte 246 - 806-970 Mcarthur Dr, 819-931 McConnell Cres. – 56 p. Rte 253 - Irving P, 2401-2477 Parkview Dr, Rhonmohe Cres, 2380&2416 Westsyde Rd.-54p Rte 258 - 806-879 McQueen Dr, 2136-2199 Perryville P. – 36p Rte 260 - 2040 – 2185 Westsyde Rd. – 24 p.

INTERESTED IN A ROUTE?

For more information call the Circulation department 250-374-0462


WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Livestock

Livestock

Misc. for Sale

For Sale By Owner

SHAVINGS & SAWDUST 10 TO 150 YARD LOADS

Carboys 23L. $30. 11.5L $20. 1-gal jugs $3/each. Bottle dry rack $15. 250-376-0313.

The special includes a 1x1.5 ad (in-

- Regular & Screened Sizes -

EARN EXTRA $$$

BARK MULCH FIR OR CEDAR

REIMER’S FARM SERVICES

250-260-0110 Office/Retail

Office/Retail

For Sale By Owner $55.00 Special!

Classic Infrared zone heater w/air purifier extra filter and remote $60 (778) 471-7687

KTW requires door to door substitute carriers for all areas in the city. Vehicle is an asset Call 250-374-0462 Fishing Kayak 10ft. $450. IGO Titan 36 Electric Bike w/battery. $900. 778-4711096.

Auto Accessories/Parts

RUN TILL

RENTED cluding photo) that will run for one week (two editions) in Kamloops This Week. Our award winning paper is delivered to over 30,000 homes in Kamloops every Wednesday and Friday.

Call or email us for more info:

250-374-7467

classifieds@ kamloopsthisweek.com

Houses For Sale

$53

00 Plus Tax

3 Lines - 12 Weeks

Add an extra line to your ad for $10 Must be pre-paid Scheduled for 4 weeks at a time Private parties only - no businesses Some Restrictions Apply

Hockey Gear fits 5’4” 120 lbs, brand new + skates 6.5 size. Serious inquires only $650/obo. for all. Call 9-6pm 250-374-7992.

9034176

La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX climbing boots, men size 10. New. $500. 2-161cm Snowboards. Never used $375. Gently used. $325. 578-7776. MISC4Sale: Oak Table Chairs-$400, Call 250-8511346 after 6pm or leave msg.

A37

4-Avalanche X-treme winters on rims 275/60/R20 fits 1/2T Dodge truck 5-stud. $1450. 250-573-5635. 4-Goodyear Noridc winter tires. P215/65/R17 on winter rims. $400/obo. 250-375-2375. 4 - Goodyear Winter tires with rims. 215/75/R15. off GMC Sonoma $200. 250-377-3002.

Cars - Domestic 1992 Ford XLT Explorer 4x4 New tires, runs good, clean. $1500. 250-319-2101

2010 Dodge Charger SXT Sedan. 4dr., AWD, V-6, auto. 50,001 kms. Excellent condition. $12,900. 250-374-1541.

CHECK US OUT

ONLINE

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Under the Real Estate Tab

1365 DALHOUSIE DRIVE

250-371-4949

RUN TILL SOLD Turn your stuff

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED DOWNTOWN, FURNISHED OR UNFURNISHED, WITH PARKING OPTION. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: KAREN AT 250-372-3053 WWW.RIVERVIEWEXECUSUITES.CA

Scrap Car Removal

Scrap Car Removal

Please recycle this newspaper.

Temporary/ PT/Seasonal

Need extra $ $ $ Kamloops This Week is currently hiring Substitute Carriers for door-to-door deliveries. Call 250-374-0462 for more information.

Work Wanted Experienced caregiver looking for full time live in position caring for elderly person or couple. (250) 299-8582 HOME & YARD HANDYMAN If you need it done, Give us a call ! Steve 250-320-7774.

Building Supplies STEEL BUILDING SALE...”REALLY BIG SALE-EXTRA WINTER DISCOUNT ON NOW!!” 20X21 $5,726. 25X25 $6,370. 30X31 $8,818. 32X33 $8,995. 35X35 $12,464. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1855-212-7036. www.pioneersteel.ca

$500 & Under Do you have an item for sale under $750? Did you know that you can place your item in our classifieds for one week for FREE?

Call our Classified Department for details!

250-371-4949

Job wanted by Computer Programmer-Analyst /Office Worker/Tutor Detail oriented, organized, problem-solver, extremely computer literate. Strong proofreading, editing, technical writing, public speaking skills. Can teach practically anything I know. IT work preferred but any job using problem-solving skills could be a good match. Gene Wirchenko at 250-8281474. genew@telus.net

ALL SEASON FIREWOOD. For delivery birch, fir & pine. Stock up now. Campfire wood. (250) 377-3457.

Pets

Furniture

Pets Animals sold as “purebred stock” must be registrable in compliance with the Canadian Pedigree Act.

PETS For Sale?

8ft Antique Couch $900. Round dining room table w/4chairs & 2 bar stools. $700. Couch & matching chairs $200. 250-374-1541. Diningroom table w/8-chairs, c/w Buffet and Hutch. Med Colour. $850. 250-374-8933.

for only $46.81/week, we will place your classified ad into Kamloops, Vernon & Salmon Arm.

5th wheel hitch $300. Ford air flow tailgate w/lock black $160. 250-374-8285.

*some restrictions apply.

Misc. Wanted 001 Able buyer of all your old coins,coin collections,R.C. MINT COINS, all silver, gold, rare, common, old money.+ Todd The Coin Guy (250)-864-3521

BUYING gold dust,gold nuggets,coins, jewelry, scrap gold+, antique silver, all sterling, silverware, bullion, bars, collections of coins+. (250)-864-3521 Christine is Buying Vintage Jewellery, Gold, Silver, Coins, Sterling, China, Estates, etc. 1-778-281-0030 Housecalls.

Musical Instruments 2-3/4 French and German Violins c/w case/bows. $150$250. 250-434-6738.

SOLD

Misc. for Sale

(250)371-4949

SAWMILLS from only $4,397 - MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-567-0404 Ext:400OT.

RUN TILL Firewood/Fuel

Butcher-Boy commercial meat grinder 3-hp. 220 volt. c/w attachments. $1800. 250318-2030.

INTO CA$H * RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Mobile Homes & Parks

Kamloops BC call for availability 250-374-7467

*some restrictions apply

TRI-CITY SPECIAL!

classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com

ROLL ENDS AVAILABLE $5-$10/ ROLL 1365 B Dalhousie Drive

$

35

Bed & Breakfast BC Best Buy Classifieds Place your classified ad in over 71 Papers across BC. Call 250-371-4949 for more information

HOME & LAND PACKAGE STARTING AT

5% Down

$615 Bi-Weekly Custom Floor Plan Call us at

250.573.2278 or toll free at

866.573.1288 eaglehomes.ca

OSPREY HOME & LAND PACKAGES Starting as low as $603.07 bi-weekly Includes Free 1 Year Home Insurance

00

Suites, Lower 1BDRM Sep. Entr. Shared Lndry. N/S N/P $900/mo+DD+ ref’s, util. incl. Brock 554-2228 2-bdrms N/Shore, 4 appl’s. $950 +utilities. 250-852-0909 or 250-376-5913. Avail. w/ref. 2bdrm Kit/liv, sep ent, patio, nice yrd $950 376-0633

Suites, Upper Brand New Westsyde 3bdrm 2bth w/garage $2200 plus util n/s, n/p (250) 682-5338

Want to Rent

Homes for Rent N/Shore 3bdrms, 2bath, W/D, DW. Garage, fenced yard. $1900/mo +util. 778-471-1740

Recreation **BOOK NOW FOR BEST WEEKS IN 2019** Shuswap Lake! 5 Star Resort in Scotch Creek BC. REST & RELAX ON THIS PRIVATE CORNER LOT. Newer 1bdrm, 1-bath park model sleeps 4 . Tastefully decorated guest cabin for 2 more. One of only 15 lots on the beautiful sandy beach with a wharf for your boat. Provincial park, Golf, Grocery/Liquor store & Marina all minutes away. Resort has 2 pools, 2 hot tubs, Adult & Family Clubhouse, Park, Playground. Only $1,400 week. BOOK NOW! Rental options available for 3 & 4 day, 1 week, 2 week & monthly. Call for more information. 1-250-371-1333.

Shared Accommodation

Senior Citizen looking for rental $825 per mth, very quiet, long term rental 250-299-5114

2015 CHRYSLER 200 Like new only 15000 km, white exterior, & interior leather $27,500 obo call 250-819-0918 or 250-5543331

RUN UNTIL SOLD ONLY $35.00(plus Tax) (250)371-4949 *some restrictions apply call for details

Cars - Sports & Imports One owner 2007 Type S Acura T/L 210,000km. Exec cond. $8500 (250) 828-2331

Transportation Antiques / Classics

1965 Mercury 4dr., hardtop. 55,000 miles. 390-330HP. $4,000. 250-574-3794. 1978 Ford T. Bird hardtop. 160,000kms. One owner, like new. $2695. 250-374-8285.

Silver 2006 Mazda RX8 136,000km. Auto or Manual, Sunroof, A/C, leather heated seats, great body, tires and interior, Suicide style back doors. $7900. 250-376-7672 Financing avail 855-600-7750

Motorcycles Wanted: HARLEY GEAR. Chaps, Jacket, Vest and Gloves. Ladies Medium and Mens Xlg. Send pics to: rajol@telus.net

Off Road Vehicles

Downtown for quiet N.S. Male, student or working male. $500/mo. 236-425-1499.

1989 Mercedes 560 SEC. 61,000kms. Hagerty Appraisals #2 car $10,000USD. Selling $10,000 CDN 250-574-3794

Free Items

Free Items

Yamaha Grizzly ATV. KMS 011031 $4,500 250-579-3252

Recreational/Sale 1994 Fleetwood Cobra 37.5 ft. 5th Wheel. $6000 trade for 1 ton diesel p/up 250-299-9342.

Free Items

PLUS TAX

250-371-4949 * RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Real Estate Apt/Condos for Sale RiverBend 2bdrms, full kitchen. W/D, 920 sq/ft. $349,000. 780-904-3551 or 250-6721946 or 778-470-8338. The Willows 55+ condo across from Northills Mall. 2bdrms, 5appl. $269,000. 250-376-6637 or 250-3768824.

For Sale By Owner 2018 - 16x58 Mobile Home. 2bdrms, 2bths. Pad $400. Patio, shed, gas heat. $165,000/obo. 250-819-0227.

1.866.573.1288 or 250.573.2278

eaglehomes.ca

Rentals Apt/Condo for Rent Northland Apartments

Renovated Bachelor Suites $975. Renovated 1&2 Bedroom Suites with New Fixtures; SS Appliances; Luxury Plank Flooring. Adult Oriented, No Pets, No Smoking Elevators / Common Laundry $1,050 - 1,750 per month. North Shore 250-376-1427 South Shore 250-314-1135 nnkamloops@northland.ca nskamloops@northland.ca

TIME TO DECLUTTER? ask us about our

RUN TILL SOLD SPECIAL

Packages start at $35 Non-business ads only • Some restrictions apply

1365 DALHOUSIE DRIVE

250-371-4949


A38

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Recreational/Sale

Recreational/Sale

Sport Utility Vehicle

Legal Notices

1997 Ford Expedition. 200,000+kms. New brakes. Runs well. $3,700. 372-5033.

CRIMINAL RECORD?

Why suffer Employment/ Licensing loss? Travel/ Business opportunities? Be embarrassed? Think: Criminal Pardon. US Entry Waiver. Record Purge. File Destruction. Free Consultation 1-800-347-2540. accesslegalmjf.com

Run until sold

New Price $56.00+tax

Do you have a vehicle, boat, rv, or trailer to sell? With our Run til sold specials you pay one flat rate and we will run your ad until your vehicle sells.* • $56.00 (boxed ad with photo) • $35.00 (regular 3 line ad)

1999 - 32ft. Southwind. Slide, V-10, Jacks, Solar, Generator, Dual-air, TV’s, Vacuum, Inverter etc. Low kms. $31,500 250-828-0466

2013 Hyundai Tucson BLACK. Clean title, FWD, 108,000km, 2 sets of tires. $10,250/obo 250-319-8292 for info.

Call: 250-371-4949

*Some conditions & restrictions apply. Private party only (no businesses).

2005, 38’ RV trailer 2 slides, sleeps 6, appl incld, fully loaded, $16,900. 236-421-2251

Scrap Car Removal

Trucks & Vans

2013 Keystone Fusion Toy Hauler slps 9, 41ft 12ft garage asking $65,000 250-374-4723

1996 GMC Suburban 4x4 good shape runs great $2900obo Call (250) 571-2107

RUN TILL

RENTED CLASSIFIEDS 250-374-7467 .

Snowmobiles

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

WAREHOUSE LIEN ACT Notice is hereby given to Rochelle Signorello, last known address PO Box 26007, Kamloops, BC, V2C 0A9, that to recover the charges under the provisions of the Warehousemen’s Lien Act, all contents in the storage locker located at 2664 Tranquille Road, Kamloops, BC, will be sold or discarded on February 15, 2019 with any proceeds put towards the outstanding debt unless the outstanding debt in the amount of $531.75 is paid in full to Columbia Property Management Ltd., #1009-388 First Avenue, Kamloops, BC, V2C 6W3.

2014 Ford Platinum 4x4 Immaculate F150 Supercrew, 3.5 Ecoboost, Sun Roof, white, brown leather, Fully Loaded Only $36,800 250-319-8784

2003 Arctic Cat 600 EFI - 1M Mountain Cat 144” track, 1582 miles as new cond trailer avail $2399/obo. (250)376-3881 or 250-371-7605

BUSINESSES & SERVICES Services

Services

Services

Financial Services

Home Improvements

Landscaping

RENTED

Plus Tax

3 Lines - 12 Weeks

Add an extra line to your ad for $10

Bushwacker Contracting

Deliver Kamloops This Week Only 2 issues a week!

SERVING KAMLOOPS 11 YRS

250.318.6776

call 250-374-0462 for a route near you!

Cleaning Services Call for your free estimate today Call Spring at (250) 574-5482

Handypersons RICKS’S SMALL HAUL

$5300

Seniors Discounts

WE will pay you to exercise!

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Tree Pruning & Removal Free Estimates

Fitness/Exercise

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SNOW SHOVELING

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For all Deliveries & Dump Runs. Extra large dump trailers for rent. Dump Truck Long and Short Hauls!!

Must be pre-paid Scheduled for 4 weeks at a time Restrictions Apply. Call for details.

250-377-3457

Landscaping

Misc Services

PETER’S YARD SERVICE

JA ENTERPRISES Furniture Moving and Rubbish Removal jaenterpriseskam@gmail.com 778-257-4943

Time to Prune Your Fruit Trees Tree Pruning or Removal Yard clean-up, Hedge trimming

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SOLD Turn your stuff into

250-572-0753

CA$H

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250-371-4949

Licensed & Certied

RENTED

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3500

RUN TILL $

SOLD

PLUS TAX

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1365 DALHOUSIE DRIVE

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The printed paper

remains the most popular method of reading Q: How do you generally read the newspaper? *check all that apply.

90% of our readers will spend at least 10-20 minutes reading the paper Q: How much time do our readers spend reading the newspaper Less than 10 minutes

22%

91%

10%

30 minutes +

17%

PRINTED NEWSPAPER

17%

4%

3%

ONLINE

TABLET

SMARTPHONE

10 - 20 minutes

50%

21- 30 minutes

250-374-7467

BIGGER circulation, BETTER value Every Wednesday and Friday over 65,690 readers in over 30,000 homes and businesses receive Kamloops This Week and find it full of relevant, local news. Communicating with customers must be cost-effective. Our large circulation and reasonable ad rates mean your cost per reader is exceptionally affordable. Your ROI is high!

1365B Dalhousie Drive, Kamloops, BC V2C5P6


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

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250-374-3588 • 1289 Dalhousie Dr.

See in-store for details. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Some pictures may not be identical to current models. Some items may not be exactly as shown. Some items sold in sets.

DALHOUSIE

www.kamloopsthisweek.com WEDNESDAY, February 6, 2019

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Kamloops This Week February 6, 2019  

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Kamloops This Week February 6, 2019  

Kamloops This Week February 6, 2019

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