Page 1

kamloopsthisweek.com kamloopsthisweek kamthisweek

FEBRUARY 1, 2019 | Volume 32 No. 10

FRIDAY

LOCAL NEWS KAMLOOPS THE BALLOTS: TABULATING HOW DEC. 4: Set provisional tax rate increase of 3.4 per cent.

YES YES

DALE BASS

KEN CHRISTIAN

YES

DIETER DUDY

YES

SADIE HUNTER

YES

MIKE O’REILLY

YES

BILL SARAI

YES

KATHY SINCLAIR

YES

ARJUN SINGH

DENIS WALSH

LAKE MAY SEEK NOMINATION The former Kamloops mayor (above with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau) is considering a bid to be the Liberal candidate A3

GUILTY PLEA Former chief Felix Arnouse is sentenced for assault A6

YES

NOTABLE ISSUES DURING COUNCIL MEMBERS HAVE VOTED ON

DEC. 18: Add Riverside Park refrigerated outdoor ice rink to grant application.

JAN. 8: Include the performing-arts centre for discussion during strategic planning.

JAN. 15: Downtown parking rates returned to 2018 levels.

THIS TERM

to JAN. 29: McArthur Island golf course become multi-use park, with 18-hole disc golf course and nature space.

NO YES YES YES YES NO YES YES NO

ABSENT

YES NO

YES

YES NO

NO YES YES YES YES YES YES YES YES NO YES YES YES YES YES ABSENT NO NO

YES YES

Page A24 is your guide to myriad events in the city and region

NO

BALLOT TALLY We tabulate how Kamloops council has voted on issues A7

WEEKEND WEATHER:

Snow and cold is coming High 5 C Low -14 C

Outbreak at RIH impacts surgeries NOROVIRUS HAS ALSO LED TO OUTBREAK DECLARATIONS AT HILLSIDE, BERWICK ON THE PARK AND PINE GROVE CARE HOME CHRISTOPHER FOULDS EDITOR editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

A gastrointestinal outbreak at Royal Inland Hospital has led to surgery postponements and a halt to admitting patients to four units in the building. As of Thursday afternoon, Interior Health said the outbreak has affected more than 30 patients and 24 staff members in the hospital and at the adjacent Hillside Psychiatric Centre. In accordance with an outbreak response management plan, Interior Health said the hospital is not admitting patients to 4North, 5South, 5North and 7North — the medical units experiencing the outbreak. Patients on those wards who are waiting for admission to long-term care or assisted living facilities will not be transferred until the outbreak is over. IH communications consultant Susan Duncan said the four units house adult patients with various medical ailments, but are not postsurgery units. Hillside continues to admit patients, Duncan said, noting new

arrivals are being taken to an unaffected pod in the centre. On Wednesday, 13 surgeries set for Thursday at RIH were postponed. On Thursday, another seven surgeries scheduled for Friday were added to the list of procedures scrubbed. Duncan said the decision was made as a precaution, noting the postponed surgeries encompass a mix of in-patient and day surgeries. She said the surgeries will be rescheduled according to priority. In addition, outbreaks have been declared at two seniors’ homes: Berwick on the Park in Sahali and Pine Grove Care Centre in North Kamloops. Duncan said the first reported symptom of the gastrointestinal outbreak was recorded on Jan. 25, noting an outbreak is declared when two or more patients are affected by the virus. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea and fever. Duncan said several specimens sent to the BC Centre for Disease Control have tested positive for the norovirus. See PUBLIC, A2

Healthier Car, Heavier Wallet

DAVE EAGLES/KTW City of Kamloops community and protective services director Byron McCorkell speaks to media during a tour of the TCC.

Peering into TCC’s future JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

The city wants to gauge public feedback on long-term ideas for the Tournament Capital Centre. City staff hosted media at the McGill Road facility on Thursday to provide an update on upcoming renovations and pave the way for other potential improvements to the facility that could be made

in the coming years. City community and protective services director Byron McCorkell said the facility was first planned for 600 annual memberships by high-performance and competitive athletes. It now sees between 1,600 to 2,000 daily visitors, most of whom — about 70 per cent — are average-Joe athletes who use the track and pool. The facility has grown, due

in part to growth of Thompson Rivers university, and McCorkell said 1,000 more bedrooms expected in the area as a result of development will only make the facility busier. “Let’s talk about it now,” McCorkell said, noting he wants to engage residents and user groups in the conversation about growing the facility. See WE HAVE, A2

SAVE $40 Off Any Oil Change Package

when using your Scotiabank GM Visa Card at Zimmer Wheaton GMC Service Centre!

250-374-1138 • yourgmctruckstore.com


A2

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Public wait to see docs could be impacted by outbreak Incident prompts ‘enhanced’ cleaning efforts at Interior Health facilities From A1

Duncan said the gastrointestinal outbreak is not unusual as the situation in the hospital mirrors what is happening in the community. “We do encourage people to practise appropriate hand hygiene,” Duncan said. “Washing your hands often is key to preventing the virus from spreading. She said each unit in the hospital is being treated individually, so the outbreak may be declared ended at staggered times. An outbreak typically lasts 96 hours, which involves two 48-hour incubation periods after the last case is reported. Duncan said the health authority is stressing that precautions being taken may mean congestion in the emergency department. The public is advised that the wait to see a physician could be longer than normal. People with non-emergent illnesses should contact their family doctor or a walk-in clinic. They may also stay home and rest or consult with a health-care provider by calling Healthlink BC at 811. However, anyone who feels they need emergency care should not hesitate to come to the hospital or call 911. Visitors are being asked to stay home if they are feeling unwell. Healthy people are permitted to visit, but may want to postpone the visit until the outbreak is over. Signage at the entrance of the affected units advises that an outbreak is ongoing so people can take proper precautions. Interior Health said enhanced housekeeping is in place to focus on patient rooms, bathrooms, frequently touched areas and common areas. Staff members on the units with the outbreak have been advised to wear gowns, gloves and facial protection when working with patients. As always, staff, patients and visitors are urged to wash their hands frequently.

THOMAS BEFURT PHOTO/KTW

A ROYAL FAREWELL

A house at 414 Royal Ave. on the North Shore, which has become notorious for its residents’ and visitors’ penchant for attracting police, is in the process of being demolished this week. On three consecutive nights last August, the house was the focus of intense police activity for different reasons — first a violent stabbing, then a standoff and, finally, a reported home invasion. Police later said the house has been on their radar for some time and has been linked to drug activity. In January 2018, police executed a search warrant at the home and seized a large cache of weapons, a stash of drugs and stolen property, including a 1986 Corvette. Last September, Kamloops realtor Brendan Shaw told KTW he had purchased the house, with plans to bulldoze the building.

‘We have a major project regardless’ From A1

At least $12 million worth of renovations are already on the books for the Tournament Capital Centre, most of which ($9 million) will be for the Canada Games Pool, which was built in 1993 and needs siding, roofing, HVAC, electrical and mechanical infrastructure directly due to the facility’s age. Those renovations are slated to begin in late 2020. At that time, however, the city could also install a dive tank, relocate the change rooms and multi-purpose rooms, add a second-level entry and enclose the breezeway to improve energy efficiency. The city proposes filling in a plaza between the pool and fieldhouse, which could provide meeting spaces and free up rooms in the fitness area to expand the gym. City of Kamloops capital projects manager Darren Crundwell explained to KTW that once the city starts tearing things up, it creates an optimal opportunity to start discussing future needs. “We know we have a major project regardless. It’s not up for discussion,” Crundwell said. “We have to get in there and do some of these replacements, but there is opportunities when we’re in there and doing that, we can definitely make some improvements to the facility.”

DAVE EAGLES/KTW City of Kamloops Community and Protective Services director Byron McCorkell gave reporters a tour Thursday of the Tournament Capital Centre and Canada Games Pool.

The Canada Games Pool repairs will not begin until late 2020 — after the 55+ Games — with potential impacts during construction related to pool closures, reduced parking and noise in other areas of the TCC. While KTW was previously

told the pool could be closed for between six months to one year, McCorkell said that won’t be known until needs of the roof are made more clear. He stressed the city will do what it can to mitigate impacts on users, including the potential for rolling closures.

However, he said “we need to be prepared that things might go sideways.” Meanwhile, about $2.5 million worth of updates and replacements will take place this year and next year at Hillside Stadium, from lighting, to sound, scoreboard, media booth roof and HVAC and replacement of the artificial turf and track surface. That brings the conversation back toward building a covered dome. Should that project rear its head down the road, McCorkell said the track could possibly have to be ripped up. “All these projects are starting to align with one another,” he said. As for the TCC Fieldhouse, the city will be spending $400,000 to update lighting to LED, line markings on the track, resurface the hardwood courts in 2019, followed with a PA system in 2020. Scheduled construction this year is anticipated during annual maintenance shutdown in August. McCorkell said the city could mitigate impacts on track users when those renovations happen by covering the outdoor track. All of the planned renovations are in the city’s budget, though none of the ideas have any budgets or timelines. The city is seeking public feedback online at letstalk.kamloops. ca/tcc. Users can expect updates about future impacts.


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS NEWS FLASH? Call 778-471-7525 or email tips@kamloopsthisweek.com

A3

DID YOU KNOW? Dalgleish Drive is named for Neil S. Dalgleish, who arrived in Kamloops in 1906. Dalgleish operated a hardware store and was active locally. — Kamloops Museum and Archives

Terry Lake (left) thanks Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for speaking during the prime minister’s visit to Kamloops on Jan. 9. Lake, former mayor of Kamloops and former health minister for B.C., told KTW he has been encouraged by members of the party and other supporters to seek the Liberal nomination in the Kamloops-ThompsonCariboo riding. KTW FILE PHOTO

INSIDE KTW Viewpoint/Your Opinion . . . . A8-9 Regional News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A17 Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A23 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A27 Comics/Crossword . . . . . . . . . .A32 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A37

TODAY’S FLYERS The Connector, Total Pet*, Shoppers*, Princess Auto*, Nature’s Fare*, Michaels*, Maritime Travel*, Manshadi*, GPS-McKesson*, Budget Blinds*, Highland Valley Foods*, HealthyLife Nutrition*, Bosley’s Pet Food* *Selected distribution

WEATHER ALMANAC

One year ago Hi: 1 .7 C Low: -1 .1 C Record High 12 .4 C (2005) Record Low -30 .6 C (1917)

ONLINE

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

facebook.com/ kamloopsthisweek twitter.com/ KamThisWeek

youtube.com/user/ KamloopsThisWeek/videos Instagram: @kamloopsthisweek

HOW TO REACH US: Kamloops This Week 1365-B Dalhousie Dr . Kamloops, B .C ., V2C 5P6 Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Circulation 250-374-0462 classifieds@kamloopsthisweek .com publisher@kamloopsthisweek .com editor@kamloopsthisweek .com

Lake may seek federal Grit nomination MICHAEL POTESTIO STAFF REPORTER michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

Terry Lake, the former Kamloops mayor, B.C. Liberal MLA and health minister, may venture into federal politics. Lake told KTW he is considering seeking the nomination as the federal Liberal party candidate in Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo in the Oct. 21 election, having been encouraged to announce his candidacy by members of the party and other supporters over the past year. “I was pretty sure I was done politics when I didn’t run again provincially, but enough people have asked me about this that it’s at least started me thinking about it,” Lake said. He said seeking the nomination wasn’t something he had planned on doing and there is much for him to consider before making a decision, such as his job as the vice-president of corporate and social responsibility and communications for marijuana producer Hexo Corp. “I would probably seek a leave of absence because you want to work full time once the campaign gets underway in the fall,” he said. Lake said he also wants to get a better understanding of the local riding association structure and find out if there would be work he can do regarding the opioid crisis if he ran successfully in October. “There’s certainly no decision at this point,” Lake said. “I have to make sure that if

In 2004, Terry Lake was campaign manager for federal Liberal candidate John O’Fee. Lake as candidate has amped up local interest FOULDS COLUMN/PAGE A8

I do this it’s going to be meaningful.” His past as a B.C. Liberal is also something Lake is weighing in his decision. While they share the same name, the federal and B.C. Liberal parties are not affiliated. The B.C. Liberals consist of a coalition of conservative and liberal politicians, Lake said, noting he considered himself a liberal in that party when he was first elected MLA in 2009. “One thing that is a challenge for me is that a lot of people that have supported me over the last eight years in provincial politics, a lot of those people were conservatives that supported the B.C. Liberals and many are my friends,” Lake said. “I know some of those people would be disappointed for me thinking about running for the [federal] Liberals.” He said he wants to hear from these individuals and get their opinion. “Ultimately, it’ll be my decision to make with my family, but it’s important for me to know how they feel,” he said.

Lake said he supported the federal Liberal party prior to his provincial career and renewed his membership at about the time he introduced Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at the Liberal Party of Canada’s $300 per plate lunch in Kamloops on Jan. 9. Lake said he has not put a timeline on making a decision, but expects the party will want to have its nomination process underway within the next couple of months. While he isn’t aware of any others who may also be considering the nomination, he hopes many do put their names forward — for the Liberals and other parties, as well. Steve Powrie, the local Liberal candidate in 2015, announced late last year he would not seek the nomination. The 2015 results in Kamloops-ThompsonCariboo saw Conservative Cathy McLeod get re-elected with 24,595 votes, followed by New Democrat Bill Sundhu, with 21,466 votes, and Powrie, with 21,215 votes. Green candidate Matt Greenwood received 2,489 votes. Powrie’s 21,215 votes were the most ever received by a Liberal candidate in the riding. Voter turnout was 73.4 per cent. ONLY ONE CANDIDATE CONFIRMED McLeod will again carry the Conservative flag in the next election, but it remains to be seen who her challengers will be. While Lake mulls a run for the Liberal nomination, there has been no word on possible candidates in the New Democrat, Green or People’s Party ranks.

BOOGIE TRAINING BEGINS SOON!

LOCATED AT THE SANDMAN SIGNATURE HOTEL

Starts: Sunday, March 10 - 8 AM • Tuesday, March 12 - 6 PM All levels: Train for boogie Sunday, April 28 TO REGISTER VISIT WWW.RUNCLUB.CA • FOR MORE INFO: JOBERRY@TELUS.NET OR 250-852-9906


A4

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

CITY PAGE Kamloops.ca

Stay Connected @CityofKamloops

RESIDENTIAL SUITES POLICY UPDATE

Council Calendar February 5, 2019 9:00 am - Council Budget Meeting 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting Council Chambers, 7 Victoria Street West

The City is considering changing the Zoning Bylaw to allow suites in more residential areas of the city. We are looking for your feedback on residential suite policy options. Learn more about this project at LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca/Suites.

February 7, 2019 7:00 pm - Public Budget Meeting Valley First Lounge, Sandman Centre

Suites can offer many benefits to a community. They can provide a form of affordable rental housing for tenants, act as a mortgage helper for homeowners, and help the City increase density in an efficient way by making use of existing services and infrastructure.

February 12, 2019 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting 7:00 pm - Public Hearing CANCELLED Council Chambers, 7 Victoria Street West

Challenges can arise when suites are not constructed under a valid Building Permit or in accordance with zoning regulations. Suites built to BC Building Code standards help protect tenants’ health and safety, and off-street parking requirements in the Zoning Bylaw can help alleviate on-street parking issues in neighbourhoods.

February 26, 2019 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting 7:00 pm - Public Hearing Council Chambers, 7 Victoria Street West

PARTICIPATE ONLINE To complete our online survey, visit LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca/Suites. The survey is open until February 24.

March 5, 2019 9:00 am - Council Budget Meeting 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting Council Chambers, 7 Victoria Street West

ATTEND OUR OPEN HOUSE Tuesday, February 5, 2019 - 7:00–9:00 pm Valley First Lounge, Sandman Centre, 300 Lorne Street

March 12, 2019 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting 7:00 pm - Public Hearing Council Chambers, 7 Victoria Street West

RSVP to communityplanning@kamloops.ca

March 26, 2019 1:30 pm - Regular Council Meeting 7:00 pm - Public Hearing Council Chambers, 7 Victoria Street West

Waste Wise App Never miss a collection day again. Use our free app to sign up for collection day reminders via email, phone call, text, or in-app notification. If you're wondering if an item can be recycled or not, simply use the Waste Wizard to find out how to properly dispose of it. For details, visit: Kamloops.ca/WasteWise

ICBC Pedestrian Safety The City and ICBC are partners in road safety. Pedestrians should be alert at all times, especially during the winter. Tips for safe walking: • Be careful at intersections. Watch for drivers turning left or right through the crosswalk. • Don't jaywalk—always use crosswalks and follow the pedestrian signs and traffic signals. • Make eye contact with drivers, as it's hard to see pedestrians when visibility is poor. Never assume that a driver has seen you. • Remove your headphones and take a break from your phone while crossing the road. • Be as reflective as possible to make it easier for drivers to see you in wet weather, at dusk, and at night.

Consider a Career With Us Join our team of over 700 employees, who work in a variety of fulfilling and challenging careers. Visit: Kamloops.ca/Jobs

Report an issue: 250-828-3461 Emergency after hours: 250-372-1710

PUBLIC BUDGET MEETING FEBRUARY 7, 2019

ARENA SAFETY WEEK FREE PUBLIC SKATE

The City would like to update residents on the 2019–2023 Five-year Financial Plan and introduce staff and community-driven supplemental items along with potential funding sources.

The public is invited to a free skate on Friday, February 8, 10:00 am–12:00 noon, at McArthur Island Sport and Event Centre as part of an Arena Safety Week celebration hosted by the City.

The public is invited to provide feedback on supplemental items or provide ideas for future consideration to City Council and staff.

Arena Safety Week is February 4–8, 2019, and provides an opportunity for City workers to reinforce safety procedures that keep workers and the public safe. During the week, City crews will participate in training, including an ammonia-leak simulation, in light of recent changes through Technical Safety BC and WorkSafeBC following the tragic ammonia leak at a facility in Fernie, BC, in 2017.

The planning process is continuous, and many projects take multiple years to implement. By sharing your priorities and participating in the City’s budget process, you can help create a strong future for Kamloops.

ATTEND THE MEETING Thursday, February 7, 2019 - 7:00 pm Valley First Lounge, Sandman Centre, 300 Lorne Street For more information, visit: LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca/Budget

During the public skate, which is on a non-instructional day for students, residents will have the opportunity to skate with Digger, the Kamloops Blazers’ mascot; take photos with the Zamboni, and test their arena safety skills to be entered to win prizes. Following the public skate, demonstrations are planned by local skating and hockey clubs.

CELEBRATE FAMILY DAY WITH THE CITY OF KAMLOOPS On Monday, February 18, 2019, the 7th Annual FREE Family Day Festival will take place from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm at the Tournament Capital Centre (TCC). Festival goers will have an opportunity to get creative with arts and crafts, have their faces painted, enjoy live performances, experiment with science, play new sports, and try some musical instruments. Some delicious food vendors will also be on site. Think sustainably—consider alternative transportation to the TCC, bring a lunch from home using reusable containers, and don’t forget to bring your own eco bags from home your festival goodies. The Kamloops Food Bank will also be at the door to collect non-perishable food items. For more festival details, including a list of booths, food vendors, and entertainment, visit Kamloops.ca/FamilyDay. This event is supported by the Province of British Columbia.

LET'S TALK KAMLOOPS

Let's Talk Kamloops is our engagement website where you can share your voice and shape our city. We know you have ideas about our city, and we are committed to working more closely with you to improve engagement and better guide our planning and decision making.

ENGAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES • Residential Suites Policy Update - open house February 5, 2019, 7:00–9:00pm - Valley First Lounge • Budget Consultation 2019 - online Q&A, videos, and info Public Budget Meeting February 7, 2019 - Sandman Centre

Sign up and speak up at

LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca

City Hall: 7 Victoria Street West, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1A2 | 250-828-3311


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A5

LOCAL NEWS

LOOK FOR OUR GREAT DEALS ON PAGES A12-A13 #105-5170 DALLAS DR., KAMLOOPS | 250-573-1193

Athlete of Influence - Finalist

Long debate ends with disc golf, park space replacing Mac Isle’s former golf course JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Every vote mattered on Tuesday afternoon, when Kamloops council approved a new disc golf-nature park for vacant land on McArthur Island. “Obviously, we’re very excited. The disc golf club’s been working really hard. I myself have been working really hard on this project for a while and we’re looking forward to working with the Naturalist Club and the city in putting together a space that’s the best for all of us,” Kamloops Disc Golf Club president Ben Laidlaw said. In a 5-3 vote and under intense pressure from user groups — which have lobbied since the civic election and filled council chambers on multiple occasions, including Tuesday — Sadie Hunter was the final councillor to support the recommended multi-use park, including a controversial 18-hole disc golf course. Calling it an “emotional decision,” Hunter said she saw the issue from both sides, being educated in environmental sciences, but also as a former single mother who sought inexpensive recreation in the city. The latter point ultimately swayed Hunter. Mayor Ken Christian and councillors Kathy Sinclair, Mike O’Reilly and Bill Sarai also voted in favour, while councillors Arjun Singh, Dieter Dudy and Denis Walsh were opposed. Coun. Dale Bass was away on vacation and a tie vote would have defeated the proposal. The vote followed a staff presentation on the multi-use park, set to occupy 7.5 hectares of land formerly home to the McArthur Island Golf Course.

In 2017, Bill Bilton terminated his lease of the course following flooding and relinquished the land to the city, which owns the property. The park plan includes walking paths, picnic areas, running, hiking and biking trails, a natural playground, interpretive signage, a refurbished mini-golf course and an 18-hole disc golf course. It came following direction from council to work with the Kamloops Naturalist Club and Kamloops Disc Golf Club on a plan for the space — consultations that began last year and did not go smoothly, resulting in the difficult decision councillors were faced with this week. The Kamloops Naturalist Club maintained the two concepts were incompatible. Members took to the podium on Tuesday, voicing concerns about safety (flying discs hitting people) and impacts on pollinators (poor garden placement in the city’s plan). Previous concerns were also related to impacts on wildlife. The club put forward what it called a compromise, which would have secluded a smaller nine-hole disc golf course into one corner of the park and kept the rest of the area natural. The club had threatened to walk away from the table, though Naturalist member — and face of the club’s campaign — Jesse Ritcey would not go that far when speaking to KTW after council’s decision. “We’re very disappointed because we feel over 700 people strongly endorsed the Naturalist Club’s vision,” Ritcey said. “The city decided to go in a different direction today.” Ritcey said Tuesday’s vote was only the “first step,” noting Bass was absent and the project still needs to go to supplemental bud-

get talks in February. During the civic election campaign forum, Bass supported a mixed-use park due to free recreation for families. Staff told council safety was apparently not an issue, either. Staff told council they had not heard of issues related to discs hitting and injuring people during visits to other disc golf courses in the province. In addition, the city’s risk manager determined no liability or safety concerns. Councillors who opposed the draft concept had concerns about the size of the space and public consultation that determined passive recreation among top priorities (though staff said disc golf is, in fact, passive). “Public consultation hasn’t really supported this activity in that location,” Singh said, opposing the motion. O’Reilly said marginalized populations could tent and sleep in the area, due to the location on McArthur Island complete with trees and gullies. City of Kamloops community and protective services director Byron McCorkell said that has been an issue. The project will now head to supplemental budget discussions in February. Staff are asking for $198,000 in 2019 to remove old infrastructure, clean up the site, refurbish the mini-golf course and add the disc golf course. City parks manager Jeff Putnam told KTW after the decision the park could be in use as early as this summer, should council elect to move ahead during budget talks. “It may take two or three months to make it safe, get rid of derelict bridges, get the trails going, get the disc golf course set,” he said. “We can move pretty quick.”

The Personal Injury Team is thrilled to announce our fifth finalist for the 2018-2019 Athlete of Influence $1000.00 Scholarship, Carsen Day. Carsen (grade 12, Westsyde) has played various sports at his school, but his focus is on basketball and it's paid off. Last year, his team won the Okanagan Championship, then placed 4th at Provincials. This year, he hopes to help his team make it to the Provincial finals. Carsen has been on the Principal's List since grade 8 and has been named Westsyde's Athlete of the Year for three years in a row! After high school, Carsen plans to pursue a science degree at university. Carsen receives a $50.00 Sport Chek gift certificate and is entered as our fifth of ten finalists for the 2018- 2019 $1000.00 Scholarship. Congratulations Carsen from us all at Fulton! Carsen Day

Dennis Hori

Alex Marr

300-350 Lansdowne Street Kamloops, BC Phone: 250-372-5542 www.fultonco.com

FREE

PET TAG ENGRAVING*

with each tag purchased. Offer ends Feb 28, 2019

9

$

00

each

Bring this coupon in and get a name tag for $9.00 with free engraving! *No additional discounts.

905 Notre Dame Dr. 250.828.0810 petlandkamloops.ca Mon-Fri 9am—8pm | Sat 9am—7pm | Sun 10am—6pm

VACATION BABY CONTEST WIN A TRIP FOR 2 TO ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD

Compliments of Kamloops This Week and

Name: Phone: Email: Must enter at above participating business. $1,500 travel voucher from Marlin Travel. No cash value - prizes as awarded. No purchase necessary. Only 1 entry per person per business. Draw date March 29, noon. For contest rules see contests.kamloopsthisweek.com


A6

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

CALLING STRONG

KIDS TEAMS WE WANT YOU! Come join Press Time as we compete against other community minded teams to raise funds and awareness for the great programs offered by YMCA.

When

February 4 - March 31

Where

Both YMCA Locations

Why

For the Kids of Kamloops You will get a free 3 month pass Enjoy social events & prizes

POWERFUL ADDITION TO KAMLOOPS

BC Hydro held a groundbreaking on Thursday to celebrate the opening of its $56-million substation in Kamloops. The facility has been in use for three months and is located on 2.5 hectares (six acres) of land adjacent to Kenna Cartwright Park, next to the city’s public works yard. In January 2017, BC Hydro paid the City of Kamloops $4.2 million for the property at 1455 McGill Rd., in addition to $2 million to fund relocation or replacement of city infrastructure at the property used for fire training.

Former Shuswap chief pleads guilty to assault TIM PETRUK

STAFF REPORTER

tim@kamloopsthisweek.com

Contact Cheryl for more information cheryl.breitkreutz@kamloopsy.ca

PAUL & COMPANY LAWYERS • Mediators • Arbitrators

Paul & Company is pleased to welcome Kelly P. Melnyk to their Legal Team as an Associate. Kelly articled and practiced in the Okanagan after completing her law degree with Thompson Rivers University in 2016. While in the Okanagan, Kelly gained invaluable experience working in a general practice firm and she has appeared in both Provincial and Supreme Court. Kelly will be practicing in Criminal Law, Estate Law, and Real Estate.

172 Battle street • 250-828-9998 kamloopslaw.com

PETER OLSEN/KTW

A Secwepemc First Nations elder and former chief will avoid jail after pleading guilty on Thursday to a charge stemming from a groping incident last year involving a woman half his age. Felix Arnouse, who spent more than 25 years as chief of the Little Shuswap Indian Band, was charged with sexual assault following an incident in Chase on Aug. 26, 2018. He pleaded guilty on Thursday to the lesser included charge of simple assault. Judge Stephen Harrison placed Arnouse on a six-month conditional sentence order, the first three months of which will be served under house arrest. Once six months have passed, Arnouse will spend the next year on probation with terms requiring he have no contact with the victim. Arnouse will also be required to submit a sample of his DNA to a national criminal database. Court heard the victim, a Little Shuswap Indian Band member in her late 30s, was grieving her

mother’s death last summer with support from Arnouse, who is now 72. On Aug. 25, 2018, Arnouse was at the victim’s house for a smudging ceremony. When he departed, he left his hat and glasses behind. Arnouse then sent the woman a text message arranging to pick up his belongings the following day. Over text, he told the woman she owed him “a traditional hug.” She asked what he meant. “I’ll show you when I get there,” Arnouse replied. “You’ll like it.” When Arnouse arrived the following day, he hugged the woman and placed his hands on her behind. “During the hug, he reached down with both hands to her buttocks,” reads an agreed statement of facts read in court. “Mr. Arnouse squeezed twice while holding [her] buttocks. Mr. Arnouse then poked [her] left side. [She] confronted Mr. Arnouse about the fact this was not a ‘traditional hug.’ At that point, Mr. Arnouse reached out and touched [her] lips with his index finger vertically positioned and then left.” The woman read a victim-

4th Meridian Auctions & Vintage Shop Now Accepting Consignments of Fine Art + we buy quality antiques & vintage items ~ We host regular online art auctions & sell art, furniture + collectibles directly at our shop & showroom in the Cannery Trade Centre 104 - 1475 Fairview Road, Penticton

Open Tuesday - Friday 11 - 4 or by appointment: 250-462-4969 or 250-488-0850 www.4thmeridianvintage.ca | www.4thmeridian.ca

impact statement in court, detailing her struggles in the months since the incident. She said she lost her job and has been forced to move away from Chase. “When I think about my mother passing, I think about my mother and then I think about Felix Arnouse’s actions,” she said. “I’m not able to mourn the loss of my mother.” The woman said she has had suicidal thoughts since the incident and consistently has nightmares. “I was in disbelief he could attempt to do something so cruel, especially at that time in my life,” she said. “I felt dirty. … I felt ashamed. I blamed myself.” Harrison noted the impact the incident had on the victim. “There’s no doubt this amounted to a serious affront to her dignity,” he said. “The victim was particularly vulnerable given the loss of her mother a few days before.” Defence lawyer Jeremy Jensen read a written apology, penned by Arnouse, in court. “I did not mean to make you uncomfortable by my behaviour,” the apology read. “I did not think about how you might feel.”

Pamper Your Special Someone this Valentine’s Day We Have Gift Certificates!

Full Hair Services:

Cuts, Colors, Perms, Extensions

Full Esthetic Services:

Gel Nails, Piercing, Waxing, Facials, Massage 556 Tranquille Road

250.376.0510

classicfx@live.com


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS THE BALLOTS: TABULATING HOW KAMLOOPS COUNCIL MEMBERS HAVE VOTED ON NOTABLE ISSUES DURING THIS TERM DEC. 4: Set provisional tax rate increase of 3.4 per cent.

DALE BASS

KEN CHRISTIAN

DIETER DUDY

SADIE HUNTER

MIKE O’REILLY

BILL SARAI

KATHY SINCLAIR

ARJUN SINGH

DENIS WALSH

DEC. 18: Add Riverside Park refrigerated outdoor ice rink to grant application.

JAN. 8: Include the performing-arts centre for discussion during strategic planning.

JAN. 15: Downtown parking rates returned to 2018 levels.

JAN. 29: McArthur Island golf course to become multi-use park, with 18-hole disc golf course and nature space.

YES YES

NO YES YES YES YES NO

ABSENT

YES

YES YES NO

NO

YES

NO

YES NO

YES

YES

YES YES YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES YES YES NO YES YES

YES

YES YES

ABSENT

NO

YES

NO

YES YES

NO

KTW/Cain’s Kids Page

We started it — you continue it. If you are in school, between kindergarten and Grade 7, here is your chance to add to our story featured every 2nd and 4th Friday of the month. If your tale is added you will win a movie pass for two! Email to editor@kamloopsthisweek.com - Limit your submission to 150 words.

YES

YES

BE A PART OF

THE STORY Cain’s

A7


A8

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

Kamloops This Week is a politically independent newspaper, published Wednesdays and Fridays at 1365-B Dalhousie Dr., Kamloops, B.C., V2C 5P6 Phone: 250-374-7467 | Fax: 250-374-1033 email: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. Tim Shoults Operations manager Aberdeen Publishing Inc.

LET’S TALK ALL 365 DAYS OF THE YEAR

A

sking someone, ‘Are you OK?’ isn’t exactly the same as asking “How’s it going?’ The more we’re willing to ask about mental health, the more answers we’ll get. The annual Bell Let’s Talk Day initiative — which was held on Wednesday — is an ongoing effort to spark conversations about mental health through a generous charitable commitment. Bell Let’s Talk Day has raised nearly $100 million for Canadian mental health programs since 2011. It’s tallied close to one-billion interactions, mostly over social media, by making it easy for people, with a ‘like’ or a ‘share,’ to essentially make a pledge that they are willing to talk or listen. All year long, all of us can help, if we’re willing to identify when an opportunity is presenting itself. Talking and listening will almost never be the whole solution, but it will almost always be better than the alternative of not talking and not listening. We won’t know that we can’t help if we don’t know what’s being asked of us. None of us are in the exact same head space and maintaining our mental health means something a little different to each of us. If we’re doing OK, maybe we’re in a place where we can help someone else, sometimes just by being there. Let’s educate ourselves about mental health and mental illness and the facts and the myths. Let’s be aware of the resources that are available. Let’s avoid language that could hurt people who are vulnerable. Let’s be kind. Let’s talk. No, ‘Are you OK?’ is not the same as ‘How’s it going?’ Everyone asks rhetorical questions sometimes. But if we want an answer, if we want to help, if we care about mental health, then we may have to ask harder questions to learn truer answers. To find resources and to learn how you can help every day, go online to letstalk.bell.ca.

OUR

VIEW

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. EDITORIAL Publisher: Robert W. Doull Editor: Christopher Foulds Newsroom staff: Dave Eagles Tim Petruk Marty Hastings Jessica Wallace Sean Brady Michael Potestio Todd Sullivan SALES STAFF: Don Levasseur Linda Skelly Kate Potter Jodi Lawrence Darlene Kawa Liz Spivey

ADVERTISING Sales manager: Ray Jolicoeur Digital sales manager: Chris Wilson Max Patel Bonnie Steeves Promotions: Tara Holmes PRODUCTION Manager: Lee Malbeuf Production staff: Fernanda Fisher Mike Eng Sean Graham Dayana Rescigno Moneca Jantzen Erin Johnson

FRONT OFFICE Manager: Sherrie Manholt Front office staff: Nancy Graham Lorraine Dickinson Angela Wilson Marilyn Emery CIRCULATION Manager: Anne-Marie John Circulation staff: Serena Platzer Rosalynn Bartello

CONTACT US Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Classifieds@Kamloopsthisweek.com Circulation 250-374-0462 All material contained in this publication is protected by copyright. Reproduction is expressly prohibited by the rightsholder.

Follow us online at kamloopsthisweek.com

kamthisweek kamloopsthisweek

Will Lake jump in?

N

ow that Terry Lake has confirmed he is considering seeking the local federal Liberal nomination in the Oct. 21 election, interest in the upcoming campaign has amped up. The last election, in October 2015, was among the most exciting in recent memory, with incumbent Conservative MP Cathy McLeod emerging victorious via a 3,000vote victory over New Democrat Bill Sundhu and Liberal Steve Powrie. Powrie’s 21,215 votes were the most ever received by a Liberal candidate in the riding. McLeod’s victory, with 35 per cent of the vote, was the tightest in her three election triumphs. In 2011, McLeod was re-elected with 52 per cent of the vote. In 2008, she won with 46 per cent of the vote. Interestingly, the 2015 election in Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo surely saw some voters cast ballots strategically, with a portion of votes handed to Sundhu and Powrie coming from the ABC (anybody but Conservative) contingent among the electorate. Had a good number of those voters properly read the tea leaves, Kamloops could today have a government MP. The strength of the campaigns of Sundhu and Powrie led to a split that led to McLeod’s victory, which continues a streak of Conservative/ Alliance triumphs that began in 2000 when Betty Hinton halted Nelson Riis’s 20-year NDP MP reign. With the federal NDP today a political mess, it may well be a two-party race in the riding, with McLeod battling the Liberal candi-

CHRISTOPHER FOULDS Newsroom

MUSINGS date (be it Lake or someone else). Then again, nine months is an eternity in politics, so strategic voting may again be employed. What is notable is that, had Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s biggest campaign promise in the 2015 campaign been honoured, strategic voting would no longer be an issue. Rather than some voters casting ballots in an effort to prevent an outcome, they could vote for candidates they support, knowing the popular vote percentages would mirror the percentage of seats in Ottawa. Alas, the sunny ways of electoral reform, which Trudeau promised in exchange for votes, turned cloudy soon after his Liberals formed a majority government. Here is what voters read when they logged onto the Liberal Party of Canada website during the 2015 election campaign: “We are committed to ensuring that 2015 will be the last federal election conducted under the firstpast-the-post voting system. “We will convene an all-party Parliamentary committee to review a wide variety of reforms, such as

ranked ballots, proportional representation, mandatory voting and online voting. This committee will deliver its recommendations to Parliament. Within 18 months of forming government, we will introduce legislation to enact electoral reform.” Trudeau repeated that mantra until October 2016, when he told Le Devoir in Quebec that electoral reform is no longer needed because people liked the Liberals better than they did the Conservatives under Stephen Harper. “Under Mr. Harper, there were so many people unhappy with the government and its approach that they were saying, ‘We need electoral reform in order to no longer have a government we don’t like,’” Trudeau said. “However, under the current system, they now have a government they are more satisfied with. And the motivation to want to change the electoral system is less compelling.” Yes, he said that with a straight face. In any event, if Lake does carry the Liberal flag in this year’s federal election campaign, he will have come full circle, politically. In the 2004 federal election, before he became mayor or MLA, Lake served as campaign manager for Liberal candidate John O’Fee, who is today a KamloopsThompson school trustee. O’Fee finished second that year to Conservative Hinton. Fun fact from that election? An Independent candidate named Arjun Singh finished fifth in the five-person race, garnering 480 votes (0.86 per cent of the vote) and spending a mere $289. editor@kamloopsthisweek.com


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

A9

[speak up] You can comment on any story you read at kamloopsthisweek.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

TRU SHOULD GIVE EVERYONE A CHANCE

KTW’s Tara Holmes (right) with Word Walk participants.

KTW HELPS SHAPE THE CITY Editor: The classic icon of a newspaper reporter is Clark Kent-esque, notebook in hand and a pen tucked behind an ear. We lament the gradual loss of large newsrooms teeming with the clatter of typewriters and the frantic buzz of a breaking story. The role I see Kamloops This Week playing in our community today is so much more than this. I see a team of community-minded people pitching in at literacy events (Interior Saving Unplug & Play), bolstering the arts and volunteerism (TimeRaiser)

and lending a hand to initiatives that empower Kamloopsians from all walks of life (the Big Edition street newspaper). That’s just the tip of the iceberg. It’s no surprise to see KTW awarded Corporate Champion of the Arts at the 2019 Mayor’s Gala. Last weekend, I helped organize Word Walk Unplugged, part of the Interior Savings Unplug & Play Family Literacy Week. It is just one of the many community events KTW sponsors. The support of this event goes beyond widely distributed advertising.

KTW staff show up and help make community happen. The ever-charismatic Tara Holmes spent the afternoon at Word Walk Unplugged running the KTW Blackout Poetry station. People of all ages pulled up a chair and unleashed their creativity with the help of a Sharpie and back issues of the newspaper. We were all reminded that nothing can replace a story captured in ink, one that can be held, clipped, preserved in a scrapbook or used as the starting point for a new story. Tamara Vukusic Kamloops

Editor: Re: Carey Derkesen’s letter of Jan 23 (‘City should back TRU’s growth’): I wish to express a counteropinion. During the past few years, I have noted Thompson Rivers University’s lamentable hiring practices. I find it difficult to support TRU when it has such practices. Note this statement at the end of every job posting I have read recently: “Diversity and Inclusion Commitment: Thompson Rivers University is strongly committed to fostering diversity within our community. “We welcome those who would contribute to the further diversification of our staff, our faculty and its scholarship, including, but not limited to, women, visible minorities, Aboriginal people, persons with disabilities and persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity. “Please note that all qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, applications from

Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.” Note the bit about further diversification being given priority. Where is that coming from? Well, from the chances that a, say, 58-year-old white heterosexual male (me, if you are wondering) or others similar to me would have. Never mind that I have a lot of experience and graduated top of my class at TRU. I no longer feel I can get a fair shake from my own alma mater. I would much rather that TRU had a stated commitment to getting the best people it can. I had some excellent instructors at TRU. Some were white, some were not. Some were male, some were female, etc. I think that all candidates should have a fair chance. When TRU goes fair, I would be more comfortable about giving them further influence. Gene Wirchenko Kamloops

MEET MY SISTER IS A HOOT Editor: My wife and I really enjoyed the Western Canada Theatre play Meet My Sister. We thought the appearance of the owl toward the end was a real hoot. Paul Corcoran Kamloops

TALK BACK Q&A: kamloopsthisweek.com We asked:

Results:

How significant will the impact to downtown Kamloops be now that BCLC has opted to scrap its planned headquarters redevelopment?

City centre will be fine: 220 votes Bad news: 210 votes No impact: 177 votes Better without: 36 votes

643 VOTES

5% Better off without it

28% No impact

What’s your take? 34% We’ll be fine

33% Bad news

Do you plan on taking up disc golf once a course is established on McArthur Island?

Vote online:

kamloopsthisweek.com

Before you head out, check road conditions on the radio or visit DriveBC.ca. Even the most confident drivers are at risk in hazardous road conditions. Slow down and drive at a Safe Speed - Visit ShiftIntoWinter.ca.

A selection of comments on KTW stories, culled online RE: STORY: DRIVER OF BOAT IN FATAL MAGNA BAY CRASH HAS APPEAL REJECTED:

“Thank goodness that the appeal court had some level-headed judges on it. “The guy acted like a complete moron and deserved what he got. In fact, his sentence should have been harsher.” — posted by Grouchy1

RE: STORY: KAMLOOPS COUNCIL GIVES NOD TO PARK, DISC GOLF COURSE ON MCARTHUR ISLAND:

“The disc golf course on Rose Hill Road is well used in all seasons — and very well cared for. “The golfers are respectful to other park users, including me. “I have never, nor nearly been, hit by a disc. The coyotes and deer seem pretty happy, too. Opposition to this is senseless.” — posted by Pfft “As usual, we are ignored by the powers in city hall.” — posted by GeoBut “Can hardly wait for the annoying sounds of chains banging. “That’s great for the birds — and so is this decision by council.” — posted by Steve

Kamloops This Week is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please email  editor@kamloopsthisweek.com or call 250-374-7467. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the website at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163.

Thompson Inc.

YOUR SAFETY IS OUR CONCERN Know Before you go! ShiftIntoWinter.ca


A10

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS Leon Reinbrecht (seen at left during a 2015 court appearance), drove his speedboat into a houseboat on Magna Bay in 2010, killing houseboat operator Ken Brown. KTW FILE PHOTOS

WANTED BUYING gold dust, gold nuggets, coins, jewelry, scrap gold+, antique silver, all sterling, silverware, bullion, bars, collections of coins+.

(250)-864-3521

Spring Coastal Cruise & Stay

VANCOUVER DEPARTURE: APRIL 15, 2019

from

598 p.p.

$

INSIDE cabin, double occupancy

3 NIGHTS COASTAL CRUISE 2 NIGHTS ANAHEIM | 3 NIGHTS LAS VEGAS Package price includes: • 3 nights cruise Vancouver to Los Angeles - Emerald Princess • Transfers: LAX Pier - Hotel - LAX Airport • 2 nights hotel accommodation at Clarion Hotel Anaheim Resort or similar • 3 nights hotel accommodation at The Linq Hotel Las Vegas or similar • Air: Los Angeles - Las Vegas - Vancouver • Macy’s International Savings Card (10% discount on most items) Package price does not include: Travel insurance, hotel resort fee (if applicable), transfers not mentioned in the package, airline baggage fees, gratuities or fuel supplement. Taxes & Fees: Airport & Hotel taxes, $ government fees & port charges

398

(250) 374-8757

237 Seymour St, Kamloops, BC www.marlintravel.ca/kamloops

VACATION BABY CONTEST WIN A TRIP FOR 2 TO ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD

Compliments of Kamloops This Week and

Name: Phone: Email: Must enter at above participating business. $1,500 travel voucher from Marlin Travel. No cash value - prizes as awarded. No purchase necessary. Only 1 entry per person per business. Draw date March 29, noon. For contest rules see contests.kamloopsthisweek.com

Driver of boat in fatal crash has appeal rejected TIM PETRUK

STAFF REPORTER

tim@kamloopsthisweek.com

The man behind the wheel of a speedboat on Shuswap Lake nearly nine years ago when it plowed into a houseboat, killing its driver, has had his conviction upheld by B.C.’s highest court. Leon Reinbrecht was sentenced to three years in a federal penitentiary following his conviction in 2015 on charges stemming from the July 3, 2010, incident that killed houseboat operator Ken Brown and left several other people injured. Reinbrecht appealed his conviction on the grounds the provincial government waited too long to take his matter to trial. The 56-year-old has been free on bail in Alberta pending his appeal. The legal proceedings against Reinbrecht have been protracted. He was not charged in connection with the fatal boat collision until 17 months after it had taken place. Another 46 months passed before he was convicted. Defence lawyer Greg DelBigio argued in the B.C. Court of Appeal in Kamloops in October that Reinbrecht had a constitutional right to be tried within a reasonable time under legal framework laid out by the Supreme Court of Canada — a case called R. v. Jordan — the year after Reinbrecht was convicted. The framework sets strict timelines for accused people to proceed through the legal process — beginning when a charge is laid. In Reinbrecht’s case, 30 months would have been the limit laid out under the new regime from the Supreme Court of Canada. A B.C. Court of Appeal decision dismissing Reinbrecht’s appeal is

dated Wednesday, Jan. 30. The court found, in part, the complexity of the case against Reinbrecht made it a lengthy one — and that delays did not violate his constitutional right to a trial within a reasonable timeframe. “The judge’s finding with respect to the complexity of this case, having presided over 32 days of trial, is entitled to deference and … justifies marginal delay that may exceed the presumptive ceiling,” the decision reads. October’s appeal hearing was not the first time lawyers had argued on Reinbrecht’s behalf about delay. Following his trial, B.C. Supreme Court Justice Sheri Donegan presided over a hearing to determine whether Reinbrecht’s conviction should be thrown out because it took too long. Donegan ruled that it should not and she apportioned blame for each delay. Donegan ruled Reinbrecht had suffered some prejudice because of delay, but not enough to overturn his conviction. In October, DelBigio asked the three-judge B.C. Court of Appeal panel to look at Reinbrecht’s case through the delay lens established by Canada’s highest court in 2016 — after Donegan’s decision. “The sole issue in this appeal is whether or not, under the new Jordan framework, a trial has taken too long,” he said. DelBigio focussed on a specific period of delay for Reinbrecht between October 2012 and July 2013 — time during which Reinbrecht was applying through court to receive government funding to pay his legal expenses. In Donegan’s decision, she declared that stretch to be neutral as far as blame goes. Reinbrecht’s income precluded

him from receiving legal aid, but he could not afford to pay a lawyer to defend him against such complex allegations, court heard in October. He had to proceed through a complicated process to apply for a state-funded defence. According to DelBigio, the Crown should be held responsible for those nine months of delay because Crown — prosecutors and the provincial government — could have signed off on funding from the outset. They did not and DelBigio described the process of financial disclosure required of Reinbrecht as a “daunting” one. “It was a case which is far too complex for Mr. Reinbrecht to be self-represented and have there been a fair trial,” DelBigio said. “So there’s no doubt that a fair trial required Mr. Reinbrecht to be represented by counsel. … It’s absolutely in the control of the Crown. The Crown can consent to an application.” The appeal court judges found there was nothing unreasonable about any of the delays in Reinbrecht’s case. “The net total delay was, in my view, reasonable,” the decision reads. “In any event, under the transitional exceptional circumstance, any marginal delay that may have exceeded the presumptive ceiling was justified.” At trial in 2015, witnesses described Reinbrecht as piloting his speedboat recklessly in the minutes leading up to the crash that killed Brown. The collision saw Reinbrecht’s speedboat embedded in Brown’s houseboat. The crash took place in darkness near Magna Bay following a post-Canada Day fireworks display. Reinbrecht’s defence lawyer argued during trial that Brown’s houseboat was not sufficiently lit.


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A11

LOCAL NEWS

ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD FOR JANUARY 30 PAGE A25

choose from our large selection of quality pre-owned toyota vehicles

09 Honda Accord EX Stk#18587A. V6, Sunroof, Keyless Entry, 2 Sets of Tires on Rims (Winter & Summer). Only 79,000 kms!

MICHAEL POTESTIO/KTW A city woodchipper was used on Monday to get rid of logs that fell from this truck after it became stuck under the CP Rail overpass at Lansdowne and Lorne streets in downtown Kamloops.

Why was rig on non-truck route? TIM PETRUK

STAFF REPORTER

tim@kamloopsthisweek.com

The driver behind the wheel of a logging truck that struck a downtown Kamloops CP Rail overpass on Monday, knocking loose a number of large pieces of timber and breaking a drainage pipe underneath the overpass, is not out of a job. According to Commercial Vehicles Safety Enforcement inspector Kerry Hegedus, the incident was the culmination of an honest mistake followed by a series of unfortunate decisions. Hegedus said the trucker mistakenly entered downtown from Highway 5 on Lorne Street, a route he had travelled in the past before it was made off-limits for commercial vehicles. “He figured he could make it through there,” Hegedus said. “But things have changed.

He’d hauled that route before, but it has changed.” The driver did not make it through. The top of his load struck the bottom of the CP Rail overpass at Lorne and Lansdowne streets, knocking loose a number of logs and breaking a drainage pipe on the bottom of the bridge. The driver, who was headed to the Domtar pulp mill, was ticketed for driving without reasonable consideration, given the fact the route he took does not allow commercial trucks. Lorne Street is not a truck route. Lansdowne Street, one block south, is a truck route. “He kind of got off track through a series of wrong choices on his part,” Hegedus said. “He should have come down Lansdowne, but he was one street off.” The truck involved in the crash was operated by

13,995

$

11 Grand Caravan Stk#18282A. Rear Stow ‘n Go, Power Windows & Locks, Cruise, Keyless Entry

13,995

$

09 Venza AWD Stk#18399A. V6, Leather Seats, Power Sunroof, Plus Much More!

15,995

$

15 Corolla LE Stk#19043A. Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, Keyless Entry, A/C. Only 58,000 kms!

16,995

$

15 Avalon Limited The logging truck became stuck at point D on this City of Kamloops map. Grey lines indicate non-truck routes. Yellow lines denote truck routes. Green lines mark highway truck routes. Red lines show dangerous-goods routes.

Westwold-based Buff Lumber. Company owner Erik Buff told KTW the issue was settled. “It’s been dealt with by the city, CVSE,” he said. “Everything’s been addressed and no one’s out of a job.” The rig was taken off the

road for a mechanical inspection as a precaution. Hegedus said the incident could have been much worse. “No one got hurt,” he said. “Mistakes happen. This was just a bad choice that wasn’t done on purpose.”

Stk#19001A. Toyota’s Top of the Line Car! Too Many Options to List! Only 68,000 kms!

26,995

$

17 Prius V Stk#19066A. Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, Keyless Entry. 5.5L / 100 kms City Driving!

27,995

$

14 Ford F150 Crew 4x4 Lariat Stk#18216A. Fully Loaded, Canopy, Only 62,000 kms! Too Many Options to Mention!

38,995

$

17 Tundra CrewMax SR5

New location across from TRU #103 - 759 McGill Road, Kamloops New location across from TRU

#103 - 759 McGill Road, Kamloops

Bring your loved ones to Canada! New Location We can help you reunite Across From TRU with your family. #103-759 McGill Rd, New location across from TRUKamloops #103 - 759 McGill Road, KamloopsSINCE 2011

Bring your loved ones to Canada! We can help you reunite Bring your loved ones with your family.

to Canada! New location across TRUyou reunite We canfrom help

#103 - 759 McGill Road, Kamloops

Stk#B0058. Running Boards, Towing Mirrors, Power Seat, Heated Seats, Has Extended Warranty!

42,995

$

Visit us at www.suncountrytoyota.ca Prices exclude taxes, plus $295 documentation fee. Sale ends January 31, 2019. Toll Free Dealer #25081

1-877-378-7800 • 1355 Cariboo Place • 250-828-7966


A12

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Kamloops couple files lawsuit against Mountie TIM PETRUK

STAFF REPORTER

tim@kamloopsthisweek.com

A Kamloops police officer is being sued after a pair of unlawful arrests in 2017 led to claims of police brutality and an assertion that a Mountie lied in court — allegations not denied last year by a provincial court judge who ruled that the officer’s description of events was problematic. RCMP Const. Lane Tobin accused a Westsyde couple of assaulting him during a call nearly two years ago. Mark and Olive Klassen were exonerated by a Kamloops judge following a trial last year. At the conclusion of the trial, provincial court Judge Chris Cleaveley called Tobin’s testimony “troublesome.” Mark and Olive Klassen have now filed a notice of civil claim in B.C. Supreme Court seeking unspecified compensation for multiple physical injuries, lost income, legal fees to defend against criminal charges, as well as aggravated and punitive damages, among others. The claim alleges serious police misconduct. “The plaintiffs claim that Const. Tobin and other RCMP members intentionally inflicted emotional distress on the plaintiffs during and after the plaintiffs’ arrest,” the claim reads. “Const. Tobin intentionally caused the plaintiffs emotional distress by forwarding charges for approval to Crown counsel and by lying at trial about the basis for their arrest.” The incident began when Olive Klassen called 911 on Feb. 17, 2017, to report what she thought was the smell of natural gas. The call ended abruptly when her cordless landline phone’s battery died midcall, prompting a police response per RCMP policy. Court heard a chemical discharge at the Domtar pulp mill led to a rash of odour complaints on the day police responded to the Klassens’ home. In court, Tobin said he arrived at the scene and quickly determined “things didn’t add up.”

He said he told the Klassens he needed to search their home. Olive Klassen warned Tobin not to enter the home, fearing there was a gas leak inside. She said in court she did so out of concern for the officer’s safety. Tobin attempted to enter the home and a physical altercation ensued. Tobin claimed in court he arrested Olive Klassen after she assaulted her husband during the altercation — a claim Cleaveley found to be untrue. Olive Klassen was placed in handcuffs following a physical struggle with Tobin. She said he choked her and claimed she believed she would die in the struggle. She said she was “stomped” by another Mountie following her arrest. Klassen said Tobin pushed her down a set of porch stairs during the incident, something defence lawyer Jay Michi described as “a gross use of force.” Klassen said Tobin called her “trailer trash” and claimed he was “trained to kill.” “There was no basis on which Const. Tobin could arrest Ms. Klassen,” Cleaveley said following last year’s trial, noting Tobin was “exceeding his authority.” A BC Sheriffs Service deputy, Rhonda Anderson, also took the stand during the trial, describing an incident in which Olive Klassen became hysterical after arriving at the Kamloops Law Courts days after her arrest. The Klassens showed up at the building hoping to speak with a lawyer about their rights following the incident with Tobin, court heard. Olive Klassen broke down in tears and fell to the ground after she saw Anderson in her sheriff’s uniform. At trial, Klassen said her reaction was due to her being traumatized following the incident with Tobin. Anderson changed from her uniform to street clothes to help calm Olive Klassen. She also detailed in court bruising on Klassen’s body she saw while the women were in a public washroom inside the courthouse — injuries alleged to have been

inflicted by Tobin during the course of the arrest. The Crown has

appealed the Klassens’ acquittal. An appeal hearing is slated to take

place on April 8 in B.C. Supreme Court. Tobin has not yet filed

fresh chicken breasts

a response to the lawsuit. He continues to work. None of the allega-

tions in the notice of claim have been proven in court.

fresh striploin grilling steak

Club Pack , boneless, skinless ®

cut from Canada AA grade beef or higher, Club Pack®

av or ca or

6s,

3

9

99

99

/lb

8.80/kg

22.02/kg

D’Italiano sliced Tostitos salsa or dips bread, or hamburger 416 - 430 mL or tortilla or hot dog buns chips 205 - 295 g, selected varieties, 328 - 675 g

selected varieties

daily deals! previously frozen, great for Superbowl entertaining!

PC®

sele refr

LIMIT 2

no name® bacon

PC® cheese cake

2FOR$5

PC deli sliced cheese ®

fresh centre cut pork chop or roast boneless

2

2 $ 5

299

MONDAY

249

/lb 5.49/kg

Campbell’s Chunky soup 540 mL or chili 425 g, selected varieties or Christie’s crackers selected varieties, 127 - 454 g

199 chicken wings split

/lb

/lb 59 5.71/kg

FOR

WEDNESDAY

LIMIT 2

1299

$

PC extra meaty dog food ®

TH

ten

Cracker Barrel cheese shredded

Farm clem

selected varieties, frozen

999

320 g, selected varieties

599

prod 2lb b

3

no name® original wieners

PC® 5-layer dip or Yucatan guacamole selected varieties,

Lay

249

599

2

PC® chicken wings with sauce 800 - 907 g or Swiss Chalet™ bbq pork ribs 600 g,

selected varieties, 500 g

selected varieties, frozen, 600 g

449

799

General Mills cereal

Minute Maid 100% orange juice or Five Alive beverage

Betty Crocker cake mix or frosting selected varieties,

Bush’s Best baked beans

Sap

289

7

selected varieties, 526 - 778 g

499

Whiskas Temptations cat treats selected varieties, 130 - 180 g

499

selected varieties, refrigerated 1.75 L

Pedigree jumbone pkg of 2, Dentastix 125 - 292 g or biscuits 500 - 737 g, selected varieties

399

450 g

340 - 454 g

selec 240 -

169

selec 100 g

199

selected varieties, 398 mL

Whiskas dry cat food

Pedigree dry dog food

no n

selected varieties, 1.4 - 2 kg

selected varieties, 5.4 - 8 kg

340 - 461 g

699

1799

Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. No Rainchecks OR Substitutions on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised regular pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Pricing: All references to any savings claims (ie. “Save,” “Was”, “1/2 Price”, etc.) is in comparison to our lowest regular retail prices at Freshmart locations. Savings on items shown may vary in each store location. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. ®/™ The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this flyer are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2019 Loblaws Inc.

selec

1

F


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

McLeod in last Parliament sitting before election MICHAEL POTESTIO

STAFF REPORTER

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

gher,

With the final sitting of the 42nd Parliament underway this week

and an election set for Oct. 21, KamloopsThompson-Cariboo MP

avocado bags 6s, product of Mexico or Farmer’s Market mini carrots 2 lb. bag, product of U.S.A. or mini cucumbers

ed

ood

an

s

checks OR ricing and ht to limit misprints in , etc.) is in on items ronmental ented and displayed

solutions to Canadians. “Over the next year, it’s absolutely our job to

Delissio rising crust or thin crust pizza selected varieties, 519 - 888 g

399

4

99

Robin Hood flour

selected varieties, 2.5 kg

PC® hummus or dips selected varieties, refrigerated, 227 - 280 g

GREAT DEALS!

299

R

99

Cathy McLeod knows her Conservative party needs to start conveying its

6s, product of Mexico

9

up

A13

THURSDAY FROZEN $ 7 tenderloins 2 PK

ribs

Farmer’s Market™ clementine oranges product of Spain 2lb bag

/lb 7.69/kg

selected varieties, 240 - 255 g

McCain Superfries selected varieties, frozen, 454 - 650 g

Sapporo Ichiban noodles selected varieties, 100 g

no name® mushrooms selected varieties, 284 mL

fresh bananas

saturDAY

LIMIT 2

romaine hearts product of U.S.A., 3 pack

Farmer’s Market™ muffins

299

399

Motts clamato

Bicks dill pickles, beets or sauerkraut

selected varieties, 1.89 L

750 mL - 1 L

Pillsbury pizza pops

Heluva Good! dip

129

249

249

selected varieties, 500 mL

1

28

selected varieties, frozen, 4s

Rooster coconut milk

12

78

99

MICHAEL POTESTIO/KTW

selected varieties, 250 g

Rooster jasmine scented rice 8 kg

At least six Kamloops RCMP vehicles arrived at Northills Shopping Centre on Monday night after a Mountie pulled over the driver of a stolen vehicle.

Stolen car was reason for swarm of police

398 mL

¢

FULL GROCERY • MEAT • FRESH BAKERY DELI • PRODUCE

8AM 9PM EVERYDAY! #105-5170 DALLAS DR., KAMLOOPS | 250-573-1193 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

GET THE APP!

agreement done with the U.S. and for the fact aluminum tariffs remain in place. The three-term MP also pointed to the government’s inability to construct the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. “They’ve had three years and they haven’t built an inch of pipeline,” she said. She said the details of the Conservatives’ solutions to issues raised in the final Parliament will come out over the coming months as the election campaign ramps up. As the party’s Indigenous Affairs critic, McLeod has a number of priorities, including ensuring proposed child welfare legislation the government has yet to table is a positive piece of legislation. “That is an important issue for the Conservatives,” McLeod said. With the Centre Block in the House of Commons undergoing decade-long renovations, Canada’s 338 MPs are meeting in their temporary home, the West Block.

selected varieties, 660 g

Knorr Sidekicks side dishes

Rooster soya sauce

4

$ 49

Farmer’s Market™ coffee cake

379

selected varieties, 116 - 167 g

79¢

¢ 47/lb

349

299

269

LIMIT 10 LBS.

greenhouse red, orange or yellow peppers

349

Lays potato chips

1

6 /kg

$ 99

FRIDAY

product of Mexico

399

28

449

100’S MORE DAILY SPECIALS & IN-STORE DEALS WEEKLY

tell Canadians how we think we could do a better job,” McLeod said. She said the goal of the remaining 14 weeks in the House will be continuing to hold the Liberal government to account, noting increased spending by the Liberal government is one of the official opposition’s key priorities. “Their spending’s out of control,” McLeod said. “They promised a balanced budget, but what we know more importantly is it will mean higher taxes for tomorrow.” International relations is another area of concern for the Conservatives, McLeod said, citing the rift with China over Canada’s detainment of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou on behalf of the U.S., which led the Asian superpower to detain two Canadians. “We have an important trading relationship with China and there was a complete diplomatic mess-up over the last number of days,” she said. McLeod chastised the government for not getting a softwood lumber

PRICE

S IN EF

FE

F E B R U CT A 1 - 7 RY

A large police presence outside a shopping mall in North Kamloops on Monday night was the result of Mounties recovering a stolen vehicle. A KTW reporter saw six RCMP officers and as many police cars surrounding a vehicle in the parking lot between Mark’s Work Warehouse and Booster Juice off Fortune Drive at about 6:30 p.m. RCMP Cpl. Jodi Shelkie said an officer had pulled over the vehicle after determining it had been stolen. Shelkie said there were three people inside the vehicle, noting the officer, after conducting a risk assessment, called for backup. The driver of the vehicle — a 27-year-old man of no fixed address — was arrested and charges are pending. The two passengers were not taken into custody. No weapons were found.


A14

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS WINTER IS FINALLY COMING It’s not the Polar Vortex, but cold air will invade Kamloops this weekend, causing temperatures to plunge and bringing an end to an unusually balmy winter. The shift to the deep freeze is expected to start overnight Saturday, with Environment Canada calling for snow to begin amid a low of -12 C. On Sunday, expect a 60 per cent chance of flurries, with a high of only -11 C. The mercury is forecast to dip to -14. The frigid conditions are predicted to remain through the work week, with Monday’s high/ low set at -11 C/-17 C and Tuesday’s readings expected to be -9 C/-15 C. The Weather Network is calling for even colder temperatures this weekend — down to -20 C on Monday — with a long-range forecast that has Kamloops stuck in the cold spell through Feb. 13.

NDP wins byelection; Libs gain in vote JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

As the B.C. NDP and Green parties breathe a sigh of relief, Kamloops North-Thompson MLA Peter Milobar said his B.C. Liberal Party was optimistic, yet realistic, heading into Wednesday’s Nanaimo byelection. The Liberals failed to secure the Vancouver Island seat — thus upholding the minority government’s power — but managed to boost support by nine per cent from the 2017 election in a riding held by the NDP for nearly five decades. “We controlled what we could control in this and the NDP didn’t falter,” Milobar said, noting the result was not a “stunning shock.” Milobar called Liberal candidate Tony Harris, who lost by almost 1,900 votes, a “great candidate.” The businessman is widely known in the Nanaimo area by his father, who headed car dealerships and cellphone stores prior to his death. Former NDP MP Sheila Malcolmson, however, clinched the seat for the NDP, with 49 per cent of the vote (10,538 votes) over Harris’ 41 per cent (8,665 votes). Kamloops South-Thompson MLA Todd Stone was aboard a rainy ferry ride back to the mainland when reached by KTW, having been on Vancouver Island for a couple of days, helping with Harris’ campaign. Stone knocked on doors and helped get people to the polls. “We had a small army of about 300 people who had come from all over the province, but mostly from the Nanaimo and mid-Island areas,” Stone said. “I believe the NDP had an even larger army to get SPONSORED SPONSORED CONTENT CONTENT SPONSORED CONTENT

their vote out. I understand the NDP were talking about over 1,000 people they had mobilized with their union support, environmental organizations and so forth. The NDP are a formidable machine, particularly on Vancouver Island. We knew that going into this.” The byelection was called after former NDP MLA Leonard Krog resigned after successfully running for mayor of Nanaimo in the October civic election. Krog’s decision to step down was significant because the NDP-Green alliance had at the time 44 seats compared to the Liberals’ 42 seats. A Liberal win in the byelection would have resulted in an even split of 43 seats. In that case, Speaker Darryl Plecas would have had to vote to break ties, leading to a greater chance of government falling. With the NDP win, a fresh face will be in Victoria in mid-February when the legislature resumes, but B.C. politics essentially remains status quo, at least for now. Milobar said his party will continue to act in its role as Opposition, questioning taxation policies he called “flawed at best”, while preparing for the next general election. “If the premier suddenly said he wanted an election tomorrow, we would be ready,” Milobar said. As for the Green-NDP alliance going forward, Milobar said grassroots Green members are growing tired of the government’s support of LNG, BC Hydro’s Site C dam and the speculation tax. He said Greens are also dismayed by the failed electoral reform referendum. Milobar pointed to decreased Green support in Nanaimo. Candidate Michele Ney received only seven per cent of the vote (1,579 votes), with her

HOLMES IS WHERE THE As we close the door on what for some is the most depressing month of the year, we head into February, which for others can be just as disappointing if they are hoping to have a partner by Valentine’s Day. This may sound like a weird statement coming from a matchmake, but here it is: I am not a big fan of Feb. 14. February has long been designated the month of love and there are many different theories about St. Valentine. Valentine’s Day began to get popular in the 17th century. Since then, flower shops, chocolatiers and card shops have rejoiced. I remember distinctly in elementary school when we all had our decorated pink and red Valentine pouches put up across the classroom, in which the kids would secretly place cute warm and fuzzy Valentines. I think now about those few kids who received only about three cards from a classroom of 25 kids. For many students, the Day of Love was more like the Day of Doom. I am guessing schools have now incorporated a much more civilized approach to the day and that everyone gives each kid a card.

TARA HOLMES

Match Match Maker Maker EXTRAORDINAIRE EXTRAORDINAIRE

For many people, the angst of Valentine’s Day continues. We are inundated with social media posts, ads, commercials and messages of smitten couples. The day can also be hard on long-term couples as there can be big expectations followed by letdowns at the end of the day. I watch The Bachelor and enjoy following the totally unrealistic fantasy dates in which a helicopter picks up the lady in waiting and whisks her off to a mountaintop, where a pair of horses happen to be waiting, along with champagne and a rose. I am all for romance, but I don’t think it has to come with so much pressure. How about a hand-written note or a scavenger hunt leading to where you first

party’s support in that riding significantly down from the 20 per cent it received in the 2017 election. “I think that’s where the Greens are going to have a lot of self-reflection,” Milobar said. However, Green Leader Andrew Weaver explained his party’s dismal showing in another light, saying voters cast ballots strategically. “While disappointing, tonight’s [Wednesday’s] results were not unexpected, given the conversations we have had with Green voters over the past few weeks,” Weaver said. “I can say with absolute certainty that our support exceeds the votes cast for the party today. “I spent a lot of time in Nanaimo campaigning with Michele and many embers, donors and supporters of our party came up to us saying that while they continued to support our party, they felt they needed to vote for the NDP in this byelection so that the government and our agreement with them can continue.” Stone, however, noted Weaver’s confidence in Ney before the election. “I think there will be a lot of people that perhaps had taken some interest in the Green Party in recent years who will be scratching their heads, wondering why should I bother supporting the Green party?” Stone said. “If they vote with the NDP on everything, I might as well vote NDP. It will be one of the things to watch for in the upcoming legislative session, the ongoing dynamics between the NDP and the Green caucuses. How firmly committed to one another will they continue to be? Because [Premier] John Horgan’s minority government, its continued existence, depends entirely on the continued Green party capitulation for NDP priorities.”

IS Line Up A Great Date

met? How about arranging for a friend to take the kids while you enjoy a homemade dinner in peace and quiet? For those of you who are envious of couples on Valentine’s Day, you can take comfort because most of them will be doing on Feb. 14 exactly what they did the day before. I have exciting news for you, though. I am putting together a friends and family group night at the Kamloops Blazers-Victoria Royals game on Wednesday, Feb. 13. I am rounding up some amazing prizes and everyone who attends will be entered into the draws. Bring along your co-workers and friends, Make it a girls’ night out, a singles night, a couples night or a family night. This might be the night you meet that special someone. For only $21, you get a ticket to the game, a hot dog, a pop and a chance at winning some great door prizes. Email me at holmes@ wheretheheartis.ca and let me know how many tickets you want. Meanwhile, don’t forget to get those cute little Valentine messages done for every kid in the class.

We have a store full of perfect pairings, snacks & wine for the big game!

SAHALI 1210 Summit Dr 250.374.6685

www.saveonfoods.com


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A15

LOCAL NEWS Alison Sidow, superintendent of the Kamloops-Thompson school district, speaks at Wednesday night’s public consultation meeting at David Thompson elementary. The meeting was held to provide information and answer questions pertaining to the plan to re-open nearby Westsyde elementary. Residents have until Feb. 28 to give their input by emailing email Facilityinput@sd73.bc.ca. Comments will be posted on the district website at sd73.bc.ca. MICHAEL POTESTIO/KTW

S S I M R E V E N OUR

ewsle N l i a Em www

Parents praise district plan to re-open Westyde elementary MICHAEL POTESTIO

STAFF REPORTER

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

Splitting up Grade 7 classmates, traffic concerns and praise were among the sentiments expressed by the public during a consultation meeting on re-opening Westsyde elementary. The Kamloops-Thompson school board approved a motion to start a consultation process before deciding to re-open the school at 3550 Westsyde Road, which began Wednesday with district staff hearing from about 20 of the 60 people gathered in the gymnasium of David Thompson elementary. Multiple parents had concerns regarding students being split up from their friends. One woman asked if it would be possible to implement a soft start to the class splitting by moving all the students affected by the catchment change next year, except for those going into their final year of elementary school, which wouldn’t take effect until 2020-2021. “As a cohort, a lot of them have been together since kindergarten,” she said. There were about 10 people who indicated they were concerned about this issue and staff said they would take it under advisement. Parents also asked about parking congestion and speed zones once Westsyde elementary is opened, concerns district facilities director Art McDonald said would be raised with the City of Kamloops. “We share the same concerns,” district superintendent Alison Sidow told the crowd. Many in attendance gave positive feedback on the idea to re-open the school, with one man

noting the additional space will be a great help to his daughter who has special needs. The school district intends to re-open Westsyde elementary in time for the 2019-2020 school year in response to overcrowding at nearby David Thompson elementary — a decision the school board will make official on March 11. The student population at David Thompson is currently listed as 425, which is about 125 per cent of the school’s capacity as per the Ministry of Education’s formula for the number of students schools can accommodate. The school district estimates the number of students at David Thompson will be slashed to 250 next fall with the proposed catchment change, with Westsyde elementary housing 175. The proposed catchment change would see students living north of Pine Springs Road, starting from homes that border Sicamore Drive, Sumac Place and Seneca Place, attend Westsyde elementary. District assistant superintendent Rob Schoen said that line was based on a projection of 299 students attending David Thompson and 208 students attending Westsyde in the next five years. McDonald said the catchment area is similar to what it was for Westsyde before the school closed in 2006 due to declining enrolment. Transfer students at David Thompson elementary — students who live outside the catchment area — will not be moved to Westsyde elementary and those who live closer to Westsyde, but just missed the cutoff, are welcome to transfer if they wish. Amalgamating sports teams between the two schools in case participation is low was suggested

— an idea Schoen said he would bring up with the principals. Concern over the lack of fencing around the school was also raised, given that Westsyde elementary borders busy Westsyde Road. “It’s something we can look at. I know there is fencing along the entire field that separates the field from the parking lot,” McDonald said. On the issue of split classes, Schoen said about half of those in Westsyde would likely have that composition, which is consistent with David Thompson and the district as a whole. Rounding out the answers to the night’s questions: converting free space in David Thompson back into multi-purpose rooms will be at the discretion of the school’s principal and parent advisory council dollars would likely be split with Westsyde. The public is invited to email the school district their feedback until Feb. 28, at which time the public consultation phase will end. To do so, email Facilityinput@ sd73.bc.ca. Comments will be posted on the district website at sd73.bc.ca. About $1 million in capital costs will also be required to re-open Westsyde elementary — which will be offset by $480,000 in future years as portables at David Thompson will be moved to other schools and negate the need to buy portables for those facilities. Many of the classrooms will be renovated and the entire building will be painted inside and out. Renovations will also include upgrading the school’s Wi-Fi, lighting, flooring and handicap accessibility and adding furniture, playground equipment and library books.

S L A DEA G A I N ! N

tter

oduce r p f a e l .nu

ri - Subsc r e t t e l s ew

.com

be

instagramucemarket_

@nuleafp

rod

k o o b e c fa eaf Produce Market Nu L

- WEEKLY FLYERS - FRESH ON TUESDAY SAVINGS - FACEBOOK FRIDAY SPECIALS AND MORE...!

#2 - 740 Fortune Dr. Kamloops, BC

VACATION BABY CONTEST WIN A TRIP FOR 2 TO ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD

Compliments of Kamloops This Week and Nuleaf Produce Market

Name: Phone: Email: Must enter at above participating business. $1,500 travel voucher. No cash value prizes as awarded. No purchase necessary. Only 1 entry per person per business. Draw date March 29, noon. For contest rules see contests.kamloopsthisweek.com


A16

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

ClassyCuts MEET

NEW OWNER

Judy De Jong

VALENTINE’S SPECIAL 95 ROMANTIC UP-DO’S $ GEL NAILS

PLUS GEL POLISH

FREE

39 $ 49 95

($30 VALUE) 25 years Esthetician & Hair Stylist

#11 - 111 ORIOLE ROAD, KAMLOOPS | 250-374-1236 OPEN 9:30-5:00 • TUESDAY - SATURDAY

Closure Advisory

Pritchard Bridge Rehabilitation Project The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure notifies the public that the Pritchard Bridge will be closed to vehicles and pedestrians for up to seven days, from: Friday, February 8 at 6 a.m. up to Friday, February 15 at 6 a.m. The closure is required for rehabilitation work to keep the bridge in safe operating condition. Your patience during the project is appreciated.

For more information, please contact Project Manager Dave Shibata at 250 434-9514 or at dshibata@mcelhanney.com

PUBLIC BUDGET MEETING The City would like to update residents on the 2019–2023 Five-year Financial Plan and introduce staff and community-driven supplemental items along with potential funding sources.

Thursday, February 7, 2019 | 7:00–9:00 pm Valley First Lounge, Sandman Centre, 300 Lorne Street Stay Connected

LetsTalk.Kamloops.ca/Budget

LOCAL NEWS

Tourism Kamloops wants visitors to stay longer in city JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Visitors stay nearly four times longer in Kelowna than they do in Kamloops, council learned on Tuesday. The average stay in the River City is 1.6 days, compared to 6.2 days in the Little Apple. “Our priority and what is the driving force of our marketing activity is one more night,” Tourism Kamloops CAO Beverley DeSantis said. DeSantis said additional experiences and infrastructure would help to increase the duration of visitor stays and lead to more tourism dollars flowing into Kamloops. The city’s largest visitor type is leisure visitors. In 2018, they contributed $123.3 million to the economy — a number that could nearly double should visitors choose to stay one more night. “There’s a huge opportunity to grow our visitor economy,”

DeSantis said. Tourism Kamloops is also keenly interested in attracting business travellers. DeSantis noted the economic impact is quadruple that of leisure visitors, at about $620 per day, due to accommodations and meals primarily paid for by businesses. “This travel sector fits within our needs periods, levelling out our seasonal cycles, and drives big money into our hospitality, retail and secondary markets,” DeSantis said. She told council Tourism Kamloops supports the city in exploring the idea of a civic centre, which could allow for hosting of large conferences, trade shows and events. “Tourism Kamloops wants to continue this conversation with public stakeholders and local elected officials to better understand the scope and goals of projects of this scale,” DeSantis said. “We are also very committed to opening new opportuni-

ties for tourism within the city and believe this type of project could support a push to attract business tourism and other leisure travellers.” Tourism Kamloops conducted a one-day poll in the fall during the civic election campaign, reaching 480 residents via landline and cellphone. DeSantis said that poll determined almost 80 per cent of respondents were supportive of such an infrastructure project. In 2018, the tourism industry in Kamloops had a total economic impact of $467 million, up from $449 million in 2017. The industry accounts for more than 4,100 local jobs. DeSantis said accommodations, retail, food and beverage and transportation grew. In addition, Kamloops wineries last year became part of a new B.C. appellation called the Thompson Valley wine region and the Buskers Festival launched locally.

Expansion in NSBIA’s future? KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

The North Shore Business Improvement Association’s executive director said Batchelor Heights and Westsyde businesses could eventually have a seat at the organization’s table. “Our hope is in 2023, when we go back for our next levy renewal, to approach Batchelor and Westsyde,” Jeremy Heighton told Kamloops council on Tuesday. Every five years, the NSBIA approaches its members to contribute financially to keep the operation going. That agreement is then ratified by council.

Heighton said including the Westsyde and Batchelor neighbourhoods has been discussed, but the NSBIA’s priority continues to be change along the Tranquille Corridor. “We need our own house in order,” Heighton said. Council also heard the NSBIA expects a surplus at the end of 2019, compared to deficits in the previous two years. In 2016, the BIA had a deficit of $6,700. In 2017, that number nearly tripled to $16,100. Heighton said the NSBIA was revamped internally and operationally in 2018. “We tightened up some internal controls, financial reporting

processes, expanded our financial reporting to the board, we streamlined expense categories and, all in all, we are in a much better position,” Heighton said. At the end of 2018, the NSBIA had a $21,100 surplus, though that number is expected to be between $6,000 and $7,000 by the end of the year. Councillors Mike O’Reilly and Bill Sarai praised Heighton for his work since coming on board in January 2018. Since that time, significant investments in the area have been announced and plans were unveiled to transform the Tranquille Corridor.

RVs eyed as city money-maker KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

A city councillor wants improved RV parking in Kamloops. Following a presentation by Tourism Kamloops, Bill Sarai said the RVing demographic has significant disposable income, but only has two places to park: in Knutsford and in Dallas, next to the B.C. Wildlife Park. “We’re missing that economic generator,” Sarai said. “If they’re so far out, they might just do their grocery shopping out at the little grocery store out there. They don’t come

into town for much.” Sarai suggested partnering with Tk’emlups te Secwepemc for accommodations at the G&M Trailer Park, along the South Thompson River. “There’s so much opportunity there, to keep them closer to the city,” he said. Tourism Kamloops CEO Beverley DeSantis said discussions have taken place with Tk’emlups about development opportunities. “They seem to have a plan,” DeSantis said. “And I hope that we can work with them to help them move that plan forward.”

RVing is increasingly popular, DeSantis noted, with European and Asian visitors hopping in an RV to travel across the country. Mayor Ken Christian noted the city is working with Tk’emlups on a potential campground project at the Tournament Capital Ranch in Rayleigh, which is now home to eight softball fields, two soccer fields and a playground. The Rayleigh Correctional Centre closed in 2002 after nearly 40 years of operation and KTW has learned the centre could be knocked down this year — potentially for camp sites.


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A17

LOCAL NEWS

Massive search continues for missing Merritt cowboy Ben Tyner last seen Saturday; horse returned riderless Monday DARA HILL

MERRITT HERALD

The 32-year-old man missing in B.C.’s southern Interior area has been identified as Ben Tyner, a cowboy with the Nicola Ranch near Merritt. Officials with the ranch confirmed Tyner is the man missing and he is a manager at the cattle operation. Tyner was last seen on Saturday, Jan. 26, but a search was not launched until Monday, when loggers in the Nicola Valley found a horse in full gear, but no sign of its rider. Tyner is from Wyoming and his family is travelling from the U.S. state to help in the search. Tyner was still missing as of KTW’s Thursday afternoon press deadline. Updates will be posted online at kamloopsthisweek.com. Merritt RCMP Const. Tracy Dunsmore said other ranchers believe Tyner rode to an area known as Swakum ridge, northwest of Merritt, searching for cattle belonging to the ranch. Police say he wasn’t immediately reported missing because he was working on his days off and may not have told anyone about his plans. RCMP dog services and air support, along with members from nine southern B.C. search and rescue teams — including the Kamloops operation — continue to scour the area, but police say active logging and herds of wild horses have obscured possible tracks. Local hunter Kim Robinson, the man who tracked down child killer Allan Schoenborn when he was at large for nine days in 2008, said he found Tyner’s horse early Monday morning, around 5:30 a.m. “It took me about 20 minutes to get him because he was pretty jumpy — something happened to him. He only had one rein,” Robinson said. “But I caught him and tied him up to a tree.” Robinson called a few local cowboys at that time to notify them. “When they called me back at 12:30 p.m. — this really pissed me off — they told me that it was the manager of the Nicola Ranch’s horse, who had been missing since Saturday night. I don’t know why nobody knew.” Robinson’s frustration didn’t end there, howev-

er, as he said he was restricted from searching the mountain by search and rescue and RCMP crews. “I don’t need anyone to hold my hand up there,” he said, noting he had been out hunting on the ridge every morning for the past month. Anyone with information or who may have seen a man riding in the Swakum ridge area on Saturday or Sunday is asked to contact the Merritt RCMP at 250-378-4262.

Merritt cowboy Ben Tyner has not been seen since Saturday. He works as a manager at Nicola Ranch. Searchers are scouring an area north of Merritt between Highway 5 and Highway 5A.

5 Watch Battery

$ 00

Taxes and Installation included

We do watches, key fobs, garage door openers, scales, & small electronic devices. If it takes a battery; we do it! We Use Top Quality Swiss Made Renata watch batteries

www.danielles.ca

Monday - Saturday: 9:30 am-5:00 pm Closed Sunday Located in Sahali Mall Locally Owned and Operated Jewellery Repairs Done on Location

Aaron Derrickson, PhD candidate, Indigenous Studies Learn how we’re shaping the future at ourpotential.ca The potential is yours.


PG18 A18

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FAITH

EXAMINING THE WIDE VARIETY OF PRISONS

I

n the perfection of yoga, A. C. Bhaktivednta Prabhupad compares this material world to a prison. We are bound to this world by our networks of desires. Whether those bounds are made of iron, silver or gold makes no difference. We are still bound. A king, upon hearing of the sorry plight of his subjects in the state penitentiary, decided to personally remedy the situation. When he visited the prison, it was his birthday and he felt exceptionally charitable. To be equal, he told the prisoners that he would grant them each one request. The first inmate who approached the king said, “The food here is terrible. I would like to have my wife’s cooking.” “Granted,” the king replied. The next inmate approached and said, “There are too many

HAROLD MEIER

You Gotta Have

FAITH

rats here. I would like the rats exterminated.” “Granted,” the king replied. The next inmate asked for blankets to keep warm at night. Another inmate asked for better internet access. One by one, the king granted all of the prisoners’ requests. Finally, when the last prisoner came forward, he asked, “I would like to be set free.” “Granted,” the king replied. This material world is like a prison, with God as our king. We ask him for all kinds of benedictions to relieve our suffering, but don’t

ask Him for deliverance from this world. For the family man: “I’m short of money. I would like a promotion at work.” For the student: “I need to get into grad school. I would like an A+.” For the patient: “I have cancer. I would like a complete recovery.” It doesn’t matter whether we are a lowclass prisoner bound with iron shackles, a middle-class prisoner bound with silver shackles or a highclass prisoner bound with gold shackles. As long as the bounds remain, we are prisoners. Out of his causeless mercy, God grants us our desires even though they may increase our suffering. Upon getting his promotion, the family man finds he has to make business trips out of town and work longer hours. Thus, he can afford the larger home, but he becomes further removed from his family. Because of his

absorption in studies, the grad student suffers deterioration of health. The man who recovered from cancer no longer has his job or his wife. Prayers directed at removing the discomforts of this world are just like the requests of the inmates at the aforementioned prison. We’re more concerned with improving our material-conditioned way of life than transcending it. There are two ways to design a prison. The first is to make it so strong that no one can break out. The second is to make is so wonderful that no one wants to leave. In the Vedic cosmology, both heaven and hell are parts of this material world, with the earth in the middle. The heavenly destinations are first-class prisons and the hellish destinations are lastclass penitentiaries. Karma limits the time on both. By the good deeds

Community invited to TRU to explore questions of faith KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Thompson Rivers University students use the school’s Multi-Faith Chaplaincy to talk about their higher purpose, to seek a deeper connection with their spirituality — or anything in between. The chaplaincy is opening its doors to the entire Kamloops community. On Wednesday, Feb. 6, anyone is welcome to attend Spiritual Stability in Uncertain Times, a panel dialogue and question-and-answer session around multi-faith perspectives to mark World Interfaith Harmony Week. The event will take place from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in room 190 of the Brown Family House of Learning. Attendance is free and registration can be done online at tru.ca/chaplaincy. The first-of-its-kind event provides a chance to grow

spiritual understanding. After a series of brief introductions that will shed light on the Multi-Faith Chaplaincy, each panelist will have an opportunity to share their faith’s views. From there, the floor will be opened for a question-and-answer period. The panel will be moderated by David Lidster. An eclectic group of faith representatives will make up the panel: • Imam Abdurrahmann Murad, Kamloops Islamic Association; • Charles Hayes, Mindfulness; • Dr. Allyson Davey, Judaism; • Rev. Kristin Autio, United Church; • Dr. David Fields, Summit Baptist Church. “This event is an opportunity to hear dialogue from a wide variety of spiritual approaches to today’s life in uncertain times,” said Pat Davies of the Centre for

Spiritual Living and the Multifaith Chaplaincy. “Our individual faith is a cornerstone for coping with stress whether it be school, family, work or world conditions.” World Interfaith Harmony Week, which runs from Feb. 1 to Feb. 7, is “as a way to promote harmony between all people regardless of their faith,” according to the United Nations, which founded the observational week. The Multi-faith Chaplaincy is overseen by the university’s faculty of student development and gives religious and spiritual care to the TRU community’s students, faculty and staff. It provides an operating model of interfaith respect and co-operation. The chaplaincy acts as a religious and spiritual resource, encouraging thoughtful reflection and dialogue.

that follow from simple living and high thinking, as well as religious practices, one develops the necessary pious credits needed to ascend to heaven. The denizens of heaven remain bound there by the gratification of their desires. With golden shackles, the food is tastier, there is no sickness and no one grows old. Conversely, by the decadences of intoxication, illicit sex, insatiable greed and irreligiosity, one accumulates the sinful credits for the descent to hell. Residents of hell are too pre-occupied with combating the miseries of hunger, thirst, heat and varieties of vermin to cast off their iron shackles. Whether in heaven or hell, once the credits are expired, the living entity returns back to this middle planet Earth. Earth holds just the right balance between heaven and hell to motivate individuals to develop the consciousness needed to

transcend the material world and return to the spiritual world. Neither the suffering nor the pleasures here are so great that we completely forget about God. The motivating factor that breaks the shackles binding us to material life is love of God. Free will is a necessary component of that love. By our own free will, we can choose to absorb ourselves in that love or absorb ourselves in material life and thereby remain bound to conditioned life. By a choice of their own free will, everyone in the spiritual world is absorbed in love of God. If there were no choice, any devotional service rendered would be purely on a functional level. What we receive in return becomes the basis for the relationships. To give us a choice and render meaning to our love, God created this material world in which we can love him to whatever extent and in whatever form

we desire, even to the extent of total rejection. Having a prison house gives meaning to love in the spiritual world. It gives meaning to our freedom. Real freedom occurs once we develop a pure loving relationship with God. Our only desire should be to develop that love to the extent where we become eligible to leave this prison and return home to Godhead. Harold Meier lived in Taiwan for more than 20 years, during which he studied Eastern religions, primarily Vedantism, and became an active member of the Hare Krishna community. He holds a master’s degree in educational practices. KTW welcomes submissions to its Faith page. Columns should be between 600 and 800 words in length and can be emailed to editor@kamloops thisweek.com. Please include a very short bio and a photo.

KAMLOOPS

Places of Worship Kamloops

ALLIANCE CHURCH

200 Leigh Road (250) 376-6268 SERVICE TIMES: SAT: 6:30pm • SUN: 9 & 11am Online Live 11am SUNDAY www.kamloopsalliance.com

Simplicity in Worship

Clarity in Bible Teaching

Friendliness in Fellowship

Please Join Us

10:00am

Sunday Mornings

422 Tranquille Rd

(Inside the Stagehouse Theatre)

All are Welcome www.northshorecalvary.com

UKRAINIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH OF ALL SAINTS 1044- 8TH STREET ~ 250.376.9209

SUNDAY February 3, 2019 Divine Liturgy @ 10:00 am SATURDAY February 9, 2019 Divine Liturgy @ 10:00 am

SUNDAY February 17, 2019 Divine Liturgy @ 10:00 am The Parish Priest is Rev. Fr. Chad Pawlyshyn SERVICES ARE IN ENGLISH

COMMUNITY CHURCH 344 POPLAR A Place To Belong A Place To Worship A Place To Serve

Sunday Service - 11a.m. Children’s Church - 11:45 a.m.

250-554-1611

Visit us at www.kamsa.ca


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

A19

The game all of BC loves to play. Try it today. $WWLPHRISXUFKDVHVRPHRIWKHSUL]HVRƪHUHGPD\KDYHDOUHDG\EHHQFODLPHG3OHDVHVHH%&/&FRPIRULQIRUPDWLRQDERXWXQFODLPHGSUL]HV


A20

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

available at:

available at:

20% OFF

**Month of February

A21


PG22 A22

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

TRAVEL

250-374-7467 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

OSTIA ANTICA: ROME’S ANCIENT SEAPORT RICK MILLIKAN

SPECIAL TO KTW

travelwriterstales.com

D

eparting Civitavecchia, our Viking motor coach offers views of Italy’s scenic central coast and chaparral-covered foothills. Approaching the mouth of the Tiber River, excursion guide Sophia introduces our destination: ancient Ostia. “Beginning as a fort in the 7th century BC, Ostia evolved into Rome’s main seaport and flourished from the 1st to 3rd century.” Inside the archeological site, Sophia explains how citizens were obliged to bury their dead outside city walls. “This Necropolis reflects Ostia’s early prosperity. Those large redbrick columbariums stored urns of well-to-do families,” she says. “Ornate sarcophagi interred the most wealthy.” Standing beside the crumbled Porta Romana, Sophia points out a replicated statue of the winged goddess Victoria, once topping the city gate. We also see rutted chariot and wagon tracks on the paved marble roadway that led to Rome. Remnants of former shops line Decumanus Maximus. Ambling on, our tour group arrives at Baths of Neptune. From an elevated platform, we behold its spectacular black-and-white mosaic floors. Horse-like sea creatures, hippocampi pull Neptune’s chariot amid swirling dolphins, sea nymphs, armed tritons and freakish serpents. On an adjacent floor, wife Amphitrite rides another hippocampus. An adjacent gymnasium floor pictures naked wrestlers and boxers with spiked gloves. Just beyond, marble columns of a former portico embrace a sporting area. A side street’s wall

RICK MILLIKAN PHOTO LEFT: The seaside town of Ostia, located on the Tyrrhenian Sea is only a 30-minute drive by car or train from Rome’s centre. Here, you can explore ancient ruins, take a swim in the Mediterranean Sea and enjoy a delicious Italian seafood lunch or dinner. ABOVE: Ostia Cupid and Amor kissing statue has become the city’s icon.

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS PHOTO

mosaic shows a flask and Latin text encouraging thirsty customers to stop for a drink. “That thermidor served wine and hot food. Customers paid at this marble counter. That decorative food mosaic may have been an early menu. Served, many enjoyed their meals stretched out on stone benches lining the courtyard,” Sophia suggests. “The proprietor must have prospered, likely renting second story rooms.” At the amphitheatre, we pass through a tunnel corridor and emerge near centre stage. Three levels of seating rise behind us. Finished during the reign of Augustus, it was enlarged in the 2nd century to accommodate over 4,000 spectators. An awning

suspended from poles would have shaded their seats. Alongside the fragmented back wall of the stage, theatrical masks extol ancient productions. Exiting toward the Tiber’s former waterfront, we examine the floors of several warehouses. Their mosaics reflect maritime themes: triangular-sailed galleys, sea creatures, palm trees and Ostia’s famous lighthouse. “Grain, olive oil and other goods were unloaded and stored here,” Sophia says. “Slaves later reloaded these products onto barges towed by oxen to Rome.” Our group next heads to a bakery, one of several in Ostia. The laneway passes under Roman archways supporting high thick walls of former buildings.

House of the Millstone is clearly an industrial sized bakery, boasting 10 basalt millstones for grinding flour. Hoof prints still mark the stony floors where mules walked, rotating conical grinding caps. In an adjoining hall, we see lava bowls slotted for blades used in kneading the dough. Basins line the walls providing water needed for the dough. Behind these walls, we learn that a huge wood-fired oven daily baked bread for 2,000 people. A small adjoining room includes a shrine’s mural of gods. Perhaps bakers prayed here for divine culinary aid. Like other Roman cities, Ostia’s citizens met in the forum. Dedicated to Jupiter, Juno and Minerva, the lofty redbrick

Theatre on the Island Mar Mar 7 5 days Theatre on the Island 7 5 days $1575 $1575 Vancouver Island Getaways! Early Booking Discounts! Harrison Hot Springs Mar 12 3 days $570 Harrison Hot Springs Mar 12 3 days $570 Long Beach & Victoria Theatre Feb 21 6 days $1515 Sarah Brightman in Vancouver days $1295 Sarah Brightman in Mar 17 8 17 3 days $910$910 Theatre onVancouver the Island MarMar 53 days Cats & Marie in Seattle Filling Fast! Mar 28 4 days $1195 Victoria History Filling & Mystery Mar28 25 4 days 5 days $1135 Cats & Marie in Seattle Fast! Mar $1195 Skagit Tulip Festival Apr 9 4 days $995 Vancouver Island Gardens May9 9 4 days 6 days $1730 Skagit Tulip Festival Apr $995 Early Booking Discounts! Vancouver Island from Toe to Tip Jun 7 9 days $2655 Early Booking Discounts! Whistler Spring Getaway Apr 14 5 days $1490 Early Booking Discounts! Easter Getaway to Sun Mountain Lodge Apr 21 3 days $895 Getaway Apr 14 5 days $1490 250-374-0831 Whistler Spring Harrison Hot Springs Mar 6 3 days $515 Cruisingto the Lower Fraser River May 13 5 days $895$1595 Easter Getaway Sun Mountain Apr 250-374-0831 Whistler Spring Getaway Lodge Apr21 29 3 days 5 days $1425 250 Lansdowne Street San Francisco Best of the Bay Area May 23 6 days $1595 $3325 Cruising the Lower Fraser River May 13 5 days New England May 31 17 days $6180 250 Lansdowne800-667-9552 Street Whitehorse & Glacier Bay Cruise Jun 11 9 days from $2500 Rails,- Rivers & Roses Jun 235 6 days 7 days $2480 San Francisco Best of the Bay Area May $3325 800-667-9552 BC Reg #178 Tour 25! Early Booking Discounts! Ireland Jun 7 18 days $6985 Whitehorse & Glacier BaytoCruise 11 21 9 days from $2500 Ladies Getaway Echo Valley RanchJun May 4 days $1755 BC Reg #178 Les Misérables in Seattle Jun 15 4 days $1165 wellsgraytours.com Tour 25! Early Booking Discounts! Scenic Switzerland by Rail Jul 8 14 days New Orleans & Cajun Country Oct 22 10 days $3535 $11,285 Ladies Getaway to Echo Valley Ranch May 21 4 days $1755 wellsgraytours.com Scenic Switzerland by Rail Jul 8 14 days $11,285

Capitolium dominates the forum. At the opposite end of this large public space, Hadrian’s temple exalts Emperor Augustus and goddess Victoria. Dressed as a powerful warrior, her statue stands on top. Foundations of the city council’s hall and a courthouse basilica border the sides of the forum. Our map indicates further places of worship, including a synagogue and Christian chapel. Other temples revere Anatolians’ mother goddess Magma Mater and Attis, god of vegetation “For centuries, Ostia boasted many apartment buildings and guildhouses. After constructing a larger new port, these buildings were abandoned,” Sophia says. “Reusing structural materials, villas were enlarged and redecorated. Ostia thus became a resort for wealthy and aristocratic Romans.” The onsite museum displays some of this neighbourhood’s artwork, including several frescos, murals, coloured glass mosaics and portraits of distinguished citizens. One terracotta relief depicts the Persian god Mithras. Amid the statuary, a bronze Perseus grasps Medusa’s severed head, squirming with fearsome snakes. Portraying divine youths in a loving embrace, white marble Cupid and Amor wins us over as Ostia Antica’s favorite sculpture. A roadway takes us back past the warehouse district and amphitheatre toward our bus. This route also reveals another bathhouse displaying wonderful mosaics of mule-drawn cabs. Looking back, lofty umbrella pines frame the ancient site’s rosy brick and white marble structures. Ostia proves remarkable and beautiful. Travel Writers’ Tales is an independent travel article syndicate. For more, go online to travelwriterstales.com.

Photo: New England

Photo: Echo Valley Ranch Photo: Echo Valley Ranch

The Wells Wells Gray The GrayTours ToursAdvantage Advantage

Early Booking Discounts (EB) Wells Gray Tours Advantage •The Early Booking Discounts (EB) Single Fares Available • Single Fares Available Early Booking Discounts (EB) • Pick points throughout Kamloops Pick upup points throughout Kamloops Single Fares Rewards Available • Experience Program Experience Rewards Program • Escorted Group Tours Pick up Group points throughout Kamloops Escorted Tours 25 • Tour 25- Limit is 25 travellers Experience Rewards Program Tour 25– Limit is 25 travellers 25

Escorted Group Tours Tour 25– Limit is 25 travellers 25


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A23

KTW’s Arts and Entertainment section is published on Fridays. A&E co-ordinator: Sean Brady Call 778-471-7521 or email sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

arts&entertainment

FRIDAY | FEB. 1, 2019

kamloopsthisweek.com

kamloopsthisweek

@kamthisweek

kamloopsthisweek

After music contest win, Arlene Smith needs to find a place to live SEAN BRADY STAFF REPORTER sbrady@kamloopsthisweek.com

W

hen Arlene Smith was 12 years old, she had two divergent experiences that set up how her life would unfold. After she started hanging out with members of an outlaw motorcycle club, she ended up in a relationship with a 19-year-old man. At the time, she didn’t realize how inappropriate the relationship was. What followed was a period of abuse and sexual assault that put her on a path of alcohol and drug abuse. Her horrific experiences led her to a suicide attempt, robbed her of opportunities, brought about serious mentalhealth issues and have repeatedly left her homeless to this day. It was also the year she got her first guitar. The first song she wrote was about breaking up with her motorcycle club boyfriend. “I relied on drugs and alcohol to survive the trauma of it all, not knowing how else to cope. It was the only escape I had,” she told KTW. Smith, 56, has had periods of sobriety lasting from months to years, but like many of those struggling with addiction, relapses often followed after failed rehabilitation attempts or further mistreatment by those she trusted. She also suffers from bipolar

disorder and intermittently seeks help from Interior Health, but she said past experiences there have led her to mistrust the system and some of those within it. Despite her hardships, Smith has managed to keep a positive attitude and is relying on her faith — even now, as she continues her search for a place to live. She was recently named winner of the Barnhartvale Coffee House open mic competition and said the experience was a joyous one during desperate times. Smith lives in her car in Salmon Arm, saving any money she can to make needed repairs and for housing. She is also struggling to find work. Without a fixed address, it has been difficult for her to put her past administrative experience to use. Instead, she performs as a busker in the Shuswap town. In the interim, Smith has turned to her faith, which has played an important role in her recent recovery. “When I turned my life over to Jesus, I had all obsession and desire removed from me. Before, when I was sober, I used to feel like I was missing something and wished I could go back to it, but this time I feel like a completely different person,” she said. At the church Smith was attending in 2017, she said she saw a plenty of prayer, but not a lot of action and wanted to change that, so she gave away

WRITE-A-THON WILL PUT INK TO GOOD USE Pen/A25

her belongings, including her jewelry and the contents of a storage locker with all of her possessions. Her relationship with the church has been a turbulent one, so Smith has largely kept her faith on her own over the years. She recalled an experience in Sunday school, where she hadn’t done some assigned work and was given a dunce cap to wear and told to sit in the corner. She said kids bullied her and she felt humiliated. “I don’t think my heavenly father would do this to me,” she said. “It’s just not loving. That’s not who I think God is.” Other changes Smith has made are even more drastic. Over seven months, she lost 75 pounds and stopped taking all of her medication. “I said, ‘I don’t want to live like this anymore.’ I meditated and prayed and asked Jesus to heal me, and since then I’ve had no desire to use drugs or alcohol or tobacco,” she said. Although her faith now plays a crucial role in her life, it’s music that has always been there for her. With her first guitar, Smith was also given a songbook of The Eagles’ greatest hits. She learned to play Lyin’ Eyes for her father, who was also a musician, playing stand-up bass during his time in the Canadian Armed Forces. But the song didn’t impress him. Smith said he told her not

LOCAL EVENTS THIS WEEKEND AND BEYOND

Local events/A24

As a prize for her win at the Barnhartvale Coffee House open mic contest, Arlene Smith won the chance to play as a paid feature act. Her performance is scheduled for Nov. 16 at the Barnhartvale Community Hall.

to bother because she would never make any money as a musician. “That kind of crushed me. I didn’t play much after that for a few years,” she said. But Smith later picked up the guitar once again and has played throughout her life, sometimes as part of small bands, but rarely on stage, she said, because of selfesteem and confidence issues. Smith allayed those fears at the third annual Barnhartvale Coffee House open mic contest on Jan. 19, where the audience voted her the winner. “What I get through music, especially with other musicians in a spontaneous jam, is so miraculously healing and uplift-

MAKER MOVEMENT:

MAKE IT ALL ABOUT LOVE Make/A26

ing,” she said. “That’s my reason to live, is music. It’s the most exciting and happy part of life for me.” Although recording her original songs is something Smith has always wanted to do, she is worried she’ll never have the money to make it happen. For now, she plans on returning to the coffee house series at the Barnhartvale Community Hall. “I will make it out there even if I have to hitchhike,” she said.

[video online]

See Smith perform at kamloopsthisweek.com

MADE IN ITALY RETURNS TO THE STAGE Made/A25

Receive $50 off

Your First Month!

250-374-7368

www.budgetstorage.ca 820 Notre Dame Dr. Kamloops, B.C.

...and use our truck to move in! Easy Access • All units are heated Monitored security Fenced compounds Open every day except Christmas & New Year’s Day

*conditions apply, cannot be combined with any other offer


A24

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

DL#C3287

NOW LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

KAMLOOPSDODGE.COM

778-761-5477

arts&entertainment

local events

kamloopsthisweek.com @kamthisweek

kamloopsthisweek kamloopsthisweek

FEB. 1 — FEB. 7

2525 E. TRANS CANADA HWY, K AMLOOPS, BC 2009 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE STK# 180191B

RETAIL VALUE $9,999 SALE

4,975

$

2007 DODGE RAM 1500 STK#U7824

RETAIL VALUE $14,999 SALE

7,975

$

2016 CHEV SONIC STK#180260A

RETAIL VALUE $13,999 SALE

9,755

$

2008 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT SUV STK#180299B

RETAIL VALUE $8,999

COMING UP: EXPERIMENTAL ROCK SHOW | FRIDAY

SALE

Experimental rockers The Houses (Where We Grew Up), who were recently featured in our Jan. 25 edition, have a show with Calgary-based Flowshine at the Kami Inn, 354 Victoria St., on Friday. Showtime is 8 p.m. and admission is $10.

7,995

$

2011 FORD ESCAPE XLT

CHAMBER MUSIC Saturday, 7:30 p.m., Kamloops United Church, 421 St. Paul St.

STK#U7901

RETAIL VALUE $10,999

Chamber Musicians of Kamloops presents Solos, Duos and Trios, Kamloops Friends in Music, a performance featuring Akena Kratka, Martin Kratky, Rhiannon Nachbaur, Lucas Olsen and Sandra Wilmot. They will be playing selections from Mozart, Tchaikovsky and Albinoni. Tickets are $25, or $20 for CMK members and youth under 19. Children under 12 are free.

SALE

7,975

$

2015 HYUNDAI ACCENT GLS STK#U7882

RETAIL VALUE $12,999

FIDDLE DANCE Saturday, 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., Brock Activity Centre, 9A-1800 Tranquille Rd.

SALE

9,995

$

The Old Time Fiddlers’ next dance is happening this weekend. Join them for a night of music and dancing. Admission is $10 or $6 for members.

2006 DODGE CHARGER R/T

MEET MY SISTER Friday and Saturday, various showtimes,

STK#170250B

RETAIL VALUE $15,999 SALE

The final two days have arrived for Western Canada Theatre’s latest production, sibling comedy Meet My Sister. Remaining shows are on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m., including a pay-what-you-can matinee on Saturday at 2 p.m. Tickets are available at the Kamloops Live Box office, 1025 Lorne St., 250-374-5483, and online at kamloopslive.ca.

8,975

$

2001 DODGE RAM 1500 VAN STK#U7805A

RETAIL VALUE $5,999

PRO SKIER TALK Wednesday, 7 p.m., Thompson Rivers University, 805 TRU Way, science building room 203

SALE

3,755

$

*EXCLUDES FEES AND TAXES.  

   

        

Paramount Theatre

503 Victoria Street • 250-372-7434

FortisBC and the TRUSU Fashion Club have teamed up to for a unique fashion show with a focus on sustainability. The Love and Layers fashion show features a collection of local, thrifted and responsibly sourced clothing that emphasizes dressing in layers. Tickets are free online at eventbrite.ca.

JAM AT THE CENTRAL Thursday, 8:30 p.m., Central Station Pub, 126 Fourth Ave.

The Central’s weekly Midtown Jam event is on every Thursday. The pub calls it a “weekly creative playground� put together to “spread culture, blend musicians, bands, improvisers and audiences.�

FAMILY MAGIC SHOW Friday, 7:30 p.m., John Tod Centre, 150 Wood St.

Magician Clinton W. Gray will present Fooled! A Family Magic Show to a crowd at the John Tod Centre as part of Unplug and Play Family Literacy Week. Seating is limited. Book tickets at eventbrite.ca.

WINTER FILM SERIES Thursday, 7 p.m., Paramount Theatre, 503 Victoria St.

This week’s film is The Happy Prince. Tickets are $11, $10 for seniors and $5 for students and children, available online at kamloopsfilmseries.ca and at Moviemart, 367 St. Paul St.

SINGER SONGWRITER Friday, 7 p.m., Tumbleweed Lounge at the Plaza Hotel, 405 Victoria St.

  

    

The TRUSU AdventureU Outdoor Club has invited pro skier Lynsey Dyer to talk about her experiences in the male-dominated ski industry. Admission is free and 60 seats are available. Register at truadventureu.com/booking.

SUSTAINABLE FASHION SHOW Wednesday, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Thompson Rivers University, 805 TRU Way, Campus Activity Centre Mountain Room

Singer-songwriter Scott Yvonne will stop by the Tumbleweed Lounge for an evening of music.

SUBMIT EVENTS FOR THE FRIDAY LISTINGS TO LISTINGS@KAMLOOPSTHISWEEK.COM AND FIND THEM EVERY WEEK IN FRIDAY’S B SECTION OR ONLINE AT

kamloopsthisweek.com

What’s Playing Downtown FEBRUARY 1 - FEBRUARY 7 Bohemian Rhapsody 135 minutes | PG

The Favourite 119 minutes | 14A

Friday: 6:50 pm Saturday: 3:50 pm, 6:50 pm Sunday: 3:50 pm, 6:50 pm Monday: 6:50 pm Tuesday: 6:50 pm

Friday: 7:00 pm Saturday: 4:00 pm, 7:00 pm Sunday: 4:00 pm, 7:00 pm Monday: 7:00 pm Tuesday: 7:00 pm Wednesday: 7:00 pm Thursday: 7:10 pm

Tickets & movie savings at

www.landmark cinemas.com General Child

Senior

(14-64)

(65+)

Regular $8.99 Matinee $6.00

(3-13)

$6.99 $6.99 $6.00 $6.00

Monday - Sunday before 6:00 p.m. Admission price includes applicable taxes, with the exception of admission and concession packages (e.g.: Kid’s Day, Movie Twosome, Movie 10-Pack); applicable taxes added with purchase.


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

arts&entertainment Pen will be put to paper for a good cause in upcoming write-a-thon KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

The Kamloops Society for the Written Arts is planning a fundraiser that will have local writers putting pen to paper. The first annual KSWA Spring Forward Write-a-Thon will be held in March and will host anyone who deals with words: creative writers, songwriters, essayists, storytellers, screen-

writers, journalists, students, note-takers, letter-writers or any others. Prior to the event, participants will seek pledges for the time they spend at the write-athon, which can be anywhere from one to twelve hours. Each hour, KSWA is planning an activity, like music, writing exercises, guest speakers or yoga.

When the writing stops at 8 p.m., an open mic begins where writers can read or sing their work aloud. Proceeds from the event will go toward KSWA, in part for their annual writers’ festival, Words Alive Kamloops. The marathon writing session begins at 8 a.m. on Saturday, March 9, at the Kamloops United Church, 421 St. Paul St.

kamloopsthisweek.com @kamthisweek

A25

kamloopsthisweek kamloopsthisweek

Farren Timoteo brings the experiences of his Italian immigrant family to the stage in Made in Italy, which first ran in 2016. KTW FILE PHOTO

B.C. duo, other Canadian artists, added to Roots and Blues festival KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Four acts have joined the roster for the 2019 Roots and Blues music festival in Salmon Arm. B.C.-based duo The Harpoonist and The Axe Murderer has been added to the lineup. Their 2014 album A Real Fine Mess was named blues album of the year and alternative album of the year at the Western Canadian Music Awards. The band followed that album with their latest release, Apocalipstick, in 2017. Andrew Collins Trio is an all-acoustic group from Toronto

that is capable of showcasing a number of styles and genres. The group has been nominated for or won a number of Canadian Folk Music, Juno and Central Canada Bluegrass awards. Danny Michel is a Canadian songwriter who relocated to Belize in 2011 to work with Garifuna Collective, a previously announced Roots and Blues act. Michel has also collaborated with astronaut Chris Hadfield and received positive feedback from the late David Bowie when he covered Young Americans. Edmonton-based group

Mercy Funk is led by bassist Angela Proulx and features the vocals of Crystal Eyo, who was featured as part of Mad Dogs Experience at the 2017 Roots and Blues festival. The band’s debut EP, Feel Good, came out last summer. The 2019 Salmon Arm Roots and Blues music festival will take place from Aug. 15 to Aug. 18. Early-bird passes are available for sale at the Roots and Blues office, 541 Southwest Third St., Salmon Arm, or online at rootsandblues.ca. Early-bird prices continue through May 31.

Award-winning local photographer to speak KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

The Kamloops Photo Arts Club is inviting the public to see Kamloops photographer Norm Dougan’s award-winning shots of owls, cougars, bears and other wildlife. On the national level, Dougan has collected a number of gold, silver and bronze medals for his work from the Canadian Association for Photographic Art, and on the international level, received an honourable mention from the Audubon Society Backyard Bird Count in 2012. Dougan is also a longtime member of the Kamloops Photo Arts Club. Topics up for discussion will include choosing background,

capturing motion, tips on processing images for best impact and picture quality. To hear from Dougan, join the

Kamloops Photo Arts Club at the Henry Grube Education Centre, 245 Kitchener Cres., in room 1B at 7 p.m. on Wednesday. Norm Dougan and a sampling of awards he has won over the years. KPAC PHOTO

KOOTENAY CONCERT CONNECTION & JELLY EVENTS PRESENT

SPECIAL THEATRE SHOW 7:30 P.M. | MONDAY, MARCH 18, 2019 SAGEBRUSH THEATRE, KAMLOOPS

Made in Italy returns KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Western Canada Theatre production Made in Italy will return to the stage in Kamloops. Farren Timoteo made his return to the WCT stage in 2016. It was personal for him, as the story of Made In Italy was heavily inspired by his Italian immigrant family. Now, he’s returned once more, for another run of the show , which will be at the Pavillion Theatre on

Wednesday for a limited run ending on Feb. 9. Made in Italy is set in 1970s Jasper, Alta., and follows teenager Francesco — inspired by Timoteo’s father — as he tries to make his mark on the world. He faces questions of identity, family and belonging, partly through the music of 1970s disco culture. Tickets are available in limited quantities through the Kamloops Live box office, 1025 Lorne St., 250-3745483 or online at kamloopslive.ca.

Mother Mother at CJs KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Limited tickets remain to see one of Canada’s top indie rock acts. Mother Mother has a brand new album and has taken to the road to show it off. Dance and Cry was released Nov. 2 and is the band’s seventh since it formed in 2005. Mother Mother has a long history of accolades, including a 2012 Juno nomination for new group of the year, a 2015 nomination for group of the year and nominations for video

of the year in 2012 and 2018. The indie rock group has also charted well throughout its career, cracking the top 10 on Canadian charts with three of its albums. The show will be at Cactus Jack’s Nightclub, 130 Fifth Ave., on Monday at 7 p.m. The group will be joined by Vancouver-based Juno winners Said the Whale, which has set Feb. 8 as the launch day of its latest fulllength album, Cascadia. Tickets are $33 and available online at kamtix.ca.

TICKETS NOW ON SALE! TICKETS AVAILABLE KAMLOOPS LIVE BOX OFFICE OR CALL 250-374-5483 OR ONLINE AT KAMLOOPSLIVE.CA


A26

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

arts&entertainment Singer Sarah McLachlan to host this year's Juno Awards kamloopsthisweek.com @kamthisweek

DAVID FRIEND

CANADIAN PRESS

TORONTO — Sarah McLachlan is feeling a sense of “thrill and terror in equal measures” as she prepares to step into the role of hosting this year’s Juno Awards. The Building a Mystery singer says she’s never hosted any event at all, so starting with Canada’s biggest night in music will be a considerable challenge.

“Up until very recently I’ve been terrified about public speaking,” McLachlan admitted on Tuesday as the Juno nominees were revealed in Toronto. “I’ve had to become used to getting up in front of people... which seems ridiculous because I stand in front of thousands of people and sing and talk — but that’s when I’m in my moment and play-

ing music.” McLachlan will be in good company when she takes the stage in London, Ont., on March 17. Leading the nominees is pop superstar Shawn Mendes with six nods, including for his self-titled third studio project, which is up for album of the year, and the song In My Blood, competing for single of the year. The Pickering,

A good old Fashioned Romantic

Valentine’s Day PRESENTED BY

Enter to Win a Romantic Prize Package $50 GIFTCARD to Nandis Flavours of India

DELICIOUS BOUQUET OF CUPCAKES from Chey can Bake ONE DOZEN ROSES from Safeway Floral

Ont.-raised singer is also nominated for the Juno fan choice award, as well as artist, songwriter and pop album of the year. Hitmaker the Weeknd pulled in five nominations, most of them in top categories including album of the year, which is determined by sales and streaming figures. However, despite his massive popularity Drake was missing from the Juno nominees list again this year. His 2018 album Scorpion didn’t receive any recognition, even though it broke streaming records with the help of viral hit In My Feelings last summer. Junos president Allan Reid said Drake chose not to submit his work for consideration. And while the Toronto rapper could have still qualified for the fan choice and best single awards, the organizers didn’t include him as he “opted not to participate.” Representatives for Drake did not respond to a request for comment.

Drake has chosen to skip major awards shows before. He caused a stir in the music industry after boycotting last year’s Grammy Awards by not submitting anything from his previous release More Life. He changed his mind this year for Scorpion and is now among the leading Grammy contenders. The CARAS organization, which runs the Junos, has struggled to win favour with Drake after he hosted the 2011 show but was shut out of all of his five nominations. Two years ago they resurrected the international achievement award after 17 years to hand it to the rapper, though he didn’t show up to accept. “We would love to see him back and hopefully will someday,” Reid says. Among the other highlights this year are DJ duo Loud Luxury who scored four nominations helped by their breakout hit Body. They’re contending for single of the year alongside

BRIANNE SHEPPARD Maker

MOVEMENT

W

Valentine’s Day

Name: ______________________________________________________ Email: ______________________________________________________ Phone: ______________________________________________________ Enter at Kamloops This Week 1365B Dalhousie Drive. No Photocopies will be accepted. No cash value - prizes as awarded. No purchase necessary. Draw date Wednesday February 13 - 4:00pm.

watched categories — engineer and producer of the year — lacked a single female nominee. The Junos have faced criticism for repeatedly failing to recognize women in both fields. Five women have won the producer award in the 44 years that it’s been handed out, including Diana Krall last year. The engineer prize has never gone to a woman. Reid said he recognizes the ongoing conversation around gender diversity, and pointed out the Junos saw more submissions in the production category by women, helped by outreach by organizers. “It takes time for those things to change,” he said. “We don’t have any genderbased categories so it’s about going out, being discovered, and it was nice to see the increase in submissions.” “But those eventually have to turn into nominations at some point,” he added. The Juno Awards air March 17 on CBC.

Make Valentine’s about love

A SPECIAL SERENADE from Slow No Tempo A Capella Quartet

A good old Fashioned Romantic

Alessia Cara’s Growing Pains, Mendes’ In My Blood, the Weeknd and Kendrick Lamar’s Pray for Me and GermanCanadian newcomer Bulow’s This is Not a Love Song. Bulow was recognized in four categories, which also included fan choice, breakthrough artist and pop album of the year. Buzzworthy Quebecois singer Hubert Lenoir proved his crossover appeal in English Canada by grabbing three Juno nominations for his concept album Darlene. It’s in the running for francophone album, pop album and the coveted best album of the year categories. Joining Lenior in the best album category is Mendes, the Weeknd for My Dear Melancholy, Three Days Grace with Outsider, and Jann Arden’s These Are the Days. About one third of the Juno nominees were female this year, Reid said, which is “pretty much almost the same as last year.” But two closely

kamloopsthisweek kamloopsthisweek

hat the world needs now, is love, sweet love. With a news cycle full of depressing headlines and warnings about the future, perhaps a polarizing holiday celebrating love can help remind us that there really is good in the world. Whether you love the day or love to hate it because of its over-commercialization and how expensive it makes roses, let’s think about taking it back to basics and reclaiming Valentine’s Day as a day about

love and acceptance. At its core, Valentine’s Day should be about celebrating the person or people that you love. Whether you focus on a romantic partner, a best friend or a child, it’s a great time to break out the construction paper and craft a card worthy of fifth grade art class. These can be as simple or elaborate as you like, but it’s a great time to try a new

technique, like carving your own rubber stamp and creating a one-of-a-kind print or using an electronic cutter to craft a pop-up card worthy of Hallmark. Slide in a haiku or poorly rhymed poem and you can hardly go wrong. I am never of the opinion that one must spend money to show their love, but I stand very firmly on the fact that you can not assume that someone knows how you feel. You have to tell them, or at least spell it out for them on paper at least a few times a year, if not every day. We all receive and give love in different ways. There is, after all, an entire book empire built on love languages, but I have never met anyone who doesn’t like having a physical memento of affection. How much glitter you add is your choice. Brianne Sheppard is co-owner of Makeshift Kamloops and Far and Wide. For more, go online to farandwidekamloops.com.


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

INSIDE: WolfPack hosting nation’s best this weekend | A29

A27

SPORTS: MARTY HASTINGS Phone: 250-374-7467 Email: sports@kamloopsthisweek.com Twitter: @MarTheReporter

Stankoven ready for major-junior hockey MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

L

ogan Stankoven paused before answering the question, seemingly tempted in those silent seconds to admit there is letdown involved in having to return to the B.C. Major Midget League after playing for the major-junior Kamloops Blazers. The 15-year-old St. Ann’s Academy student would surely have been granted forgiveness by his Thompson Blazers’ teammates if his answer was, “Yes, I feel like I belong in the WHL and these rules that keep me from staying here really suck.” If he would have uttered those words, which he didn’t, Stankoven’s Thompson teammates would have probably said something like, “Hey, Logan — no need to apologize. We know you love us. But we also know you’re ready for the next level.” And he is ready — now. Stankoven began on the fourth line against the B.C. Divisionleading Vancouver Giants on Wednesday, was promoted to the second line and tapped by head coach Serge Lajoie to start threeon-three overtime. That first OT shift ended in a minus for Stankoven, Connor Zary and Luke Zazula. Giants’ defenceman Bowen Byram, pegged as a top-10 selection for June’s NHL Draft, waltzed by Zary, who otherwise had a strong night at Sandman Centre, and beat Blazers’ netminder Dylan Ferguson 33 seconds into the extra frame to secure a 3-2 victory. Lajoie raved about his team’s effort, noting it erased a two-goal third-period deficit to secure what may prove a valuable point against one of the nation’s best junior hockey teams. The first-year WHL head coach’s most-glowing words were spared for Stankoven.

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW Logan Stankoven shoots on Vancouver Giants’ netminder Trent Miner at Sandman Centre on Wednesday. The 15-year-old Kamloops Blazers’ and Thompson Blazers’ forward seems WHL-ready. Kamloops will play host to Prince George on Friday, when it will be WHL Suits Up with Don Cherry to Promote Organ Donation Night at Sandman Centre. Game time is 7 p.m. Find out more about the promotion at blazerhockey.com.

“There was a lot of contributors, but, in particular, Logan just provided a spark, that youthful exuberance we needed tonight,” Lajoie said. “To me, Logan’s not 15. He’s earned my trust. There’s no doubt about it. He provided the spark we needed against the divisionleading team.” Crisp passes and quick feet on Stankoven’s first shift, spent alongside Travis Walton and Jerzy Orchard, indicated nerves were a non-factor. The line was deployed sparingly in the first period, but Stankoven’s ice time increased in the second period and by the third period he had usurped Martin Lang to join captain Jermaine Loewen and Zary on the second unit. “Langer hasn’t started on time,” Lajoie said of the 17-yearold Czech Republic import. “He’s

searching himself. He’s had the luxury of a patient coaching staff and teammates. “I had the opportunity to put Logan in. I tried him once and I could see right away he was going. I’m not going to pass that up.” Stankoven is destroying the BCMML. He leads the under-18 league in scoring with 72 points, including 38 goals, after 30 games. The second-leading scorer, 16-year-old Tyler Cristall of North Vancouver, has 24 fewer points than the Kamloops wunderkind. Stankoven racked up six assists in two games for Thompson last weekend to become the club’s all-time leading scorer, surpassing Alex Rodgers of Salmon Arm, who had 67 points in 2005-2006. There are 10 games remaining on Thompson’s schedule.

KTW/Cain’s Kids Page

We started it — you continue it. If you are in school, between kindergarten and Grade 7, here is your chance to add to our story featured every 2nd and 4th Friday of the month. If your tale is added you will win a movie pass for two! Email to editor@kamloopsthisweek.com - Limit your submission to 150 words.

“He’s a phenomenal player,” Loewen said. “You can just see the growth that’s going to happen to him. “It’s pretty cool playing with a guy like him. He makes really good plays. I noticed that with me. He made some really good plays that helped us get opportunities in front of the net. In the corners, he’s really good with his hands.” Equally impressive was his work rate when the puck wasn’t on his stick. Vancouver held a 2-0 lead at the halfway point of the third period and was seconds away from going on the power play, with Blazers’ leading scorer Zane Franklin in the box for hooking and Justin Sourdif’s high-sticking penalty about to expire. Stankoven pressured a Giants’ puck carrier and poked the puck free to give himself a clear path

to the net, forcing Dylan Plouffe to take a hooking penalty, negating Vancouver’s man advantage. Franklin jumped out of the sin bin when his penalty was over, corralled a pass from Kyrell Sopotyk and beat Vancouver netminder Trent Miner to cut the lead in half at 11:28 of the third period. Franklin has a team-leading 50 points and 24 goals. Orrin Centazzo’s power-play marker less than five minutes later forced overtime. “That one play sticks out to me,” Lajoie said of the Stankoven-forced turnover. “That’s all we needed.” Stankoven can only play five major-junior games while his Thompson Blazers remain alive in the BCMML, but there is wiggle room with that rule.

BE A PART OF

THE STORY Cain’s

See STANKOVEN, A30


A28

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

Brynn Applegath is one of three Sun Peaks Racers who qualified for the Canada Winter Games, which will be held later this month in the Red Deer area.

Sun Peaks skiers going to Canada Winter Games

MICHAEL JACOBY PHOTO

MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

35 DYLAN FERGUSON

FEBRUARY 1

PRINCE GEORGE HOME GAME SPONSOR

DON CHERRY JERSEY NIGHT Jersey’s will be auctioned off to benefit the Kidney Foundation

UPCOMING GAMES FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8 VANCOUVER SANDMAN CENTRE 7:00 PM HOME GAME SPONSOR

VALENTINE’S SALVATION ARMY FOOD DRIVE

Bring 6 non-perishable food items to enter a draw for a chance to win fabulous prizes

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9

SANDMAN CENTRE

FRIDAY

KELOWNA SANDMAN CENTRE 7:00 PM HEART & STROKE FOUNDATION FUNDRAISER HOME GAME SPONSOR

FEBRUARY 1 7:00PM

VS

Brynn Applegath, Noa Hooton and Ben Jacoby will carry the torch for the Sun Peaks Alpine Club Racers at the Canada Winter Games, which will run from Feb. 15 to March 3 in the Red Deer area. Each of the three Sun Peaks skiers won an event at the first round of BC Teck Open races, held last month at Sun Peaks Resort. Those victories secured their places on Team B.C. for the Canada Winter Games, the major multi-sport event held once every four years. Bill Rublee, a self-proclaimed Sun Peaks lifer, has been coaching the under16 Racers for about a decade. “They’re right up there with the best skiers we’ve had and, as a whole, the group is the strongest and deepest I’ve ever coached,” Rublee said. Montana Molyneux, formerly the Sun Peaks Alpine Club program director, moved to Fernie, but Rublee credited her for establishing a strong foundation before she left. Wade Rettie has taken over as program director and brings a wealth of experience after spending 38 years coaching in Alberta, most recently as a FIS coach in Banff. BC Alpine coaches will accompany the under-16 Team B.C. skiing team to Red Deer, where it will compete in super-G, giant slalom, slalom

and ski-cross events. There are seven boys and seven girls on the team. Sun Peaks skiers account for more than 20 per cent of the team, second only to Whistler Mountain Ski Club, which makes up 50 per cent of the squad. Applegath and Hooton, the local girls to crack the team, and Jacoby, the lone boy, are truly Sun Peaks Alpine Club products, having joined the group when they were about eight years old. “We’ve had a good program being built over the years,” Rublee said. “After this stage, ski racing tends to get even more serious. “They move into FIS skiing. That leads them on as far as they can make it, right up to B.C. team and national team.” Applegath, Hooton and Jacoby have what it takes to reach those heights, Rublee said. “It’s a decision they have to make. They’re certainly of quality that should they want to do that, they could do very well through that system,” Rublee said. Canyon Ski Resort and Nakiska Ski Resort will play host to the alpine and para-alpine events at the Games, which will feature 19 sports and about 3,600 athletes, managers and coaches. “This is pretty much their top event of the year,” Rublee said. “It’s kind of a big deal. You have to be lucky to be the right age at the right time. “I’m really proud of the showing of the Sun Peaks Alpine Club.”

FOR TICKETS CALL

250-828-3339 *Ticket restrictions may apply

BLAZERHOCKEY.COM

MICHAEL JACOBY PHOTO Ben Jacoby in action for the Sun Peaks Racers.


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

A29

MUG

Kamloops & District

CRIMES OF THE WEEK SHOTS Help deflate bike thief’s ill-gotten gain On the night of Friday, Jan. 25, a bicycle was stolen from the Country View Motor Inn, at 176 Comazzetto Rd. in Valleyview. The suspect is described as wearing a light blue hoodie, jeans and a white ball cap. The thief was carrying a distinctive handbag. The bicycle is an older model, maroon in colour. Call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPD (8477) if you can help retrieve the bike.

Help row these thieves into a cell It is not boating weather, but thieves don’t adhere to seasons. In the early-morning hours of Sunday, Jan. 20, thieves entered a North Shore property and stole the resident’s boat — a 12-foot aluminum, 40-year-old Harborcraft that is painted burgundy. The boat has a broken front handle and “R BEECKMAN” stencilled on the side. There was no motor attached to it. If you know who is behind the theft, call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPD (8477)

GERBRANDT, Caleb Guy

B: 1982-01-30 | Age 37 Caucasian male 183 cm (6’00”) 86 kg (190 lbs) Brown Hair | Brown Eyes Wanted For: Breach of Undertaking, Possession of ID Documents and Fail to Comply with Release Conditions

Follow these tips to stay safe online Crime Stoppers presents the Top 10 Cyber Crime Prevention Tips:

KTW FILE PHOTO Landon Currie of the TRU WolfPack gets low to dig in Canada West men’s volleyball action earlier this season at the TCC. TRU will host the Brandon Bobcats this weekend.

Best-in-country Bobcats preying on WolfPack MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

There is a divide between the top four teams and the rest of the Canada West men’s volleyball competition. The TRU WolfPack are on the lower tier, fifth in the conference and yet to post a victory over a top-four club, with two losses apiece to second-place Mount Royal (13-3), third-place Alberta (13-5) and fourth-place Trinity (12-4). They may even be a preferred Round 1 playoff opponent for any one of the top-four outfits, but the WolfPack could change that with a victory over the best team in the nation this weekend. The Brandon Bobcats, the No. 1-ranked U Sports men’s volleyball team, will play TRU on Friday and Saturday at the TCC. Match time is 6:45 p.m. both nights. “We really haven’t done a good job against top teams,” WolfPack head coach Pat Hennelly said. “That’s why this weekend it’s so important for us to focus on our side.” Elliott Viles, a member of Australia’s senior

national team, leads the Bobcats’ attack, but Brandon boasts five players with at least 145 points this season and a setter, Reece Dixon, who leads the conference with 11.55 assists per set. “They have some elite players,” Hennelly said. “Their setter is doing a good job and they have five guys who can attack the ball. “You’re not going to see one guy get 25 kills. You’re going to maybe see three guys getting 15 to 18 kills every night.” Tim Dobbert leads TRU with 315 points and the Canada West with 283 kills, but Charlie Bringloe is the only other WolfPack member with at least 145 points. TRU (9-7) snapped a six-match losing streak last weekend with two victories over the Manitoba Bisons (7-11) in Winnipeg, wins that gave them breathing room in the race for a playoff spot. “We had a sense of comfort coming into the second semester, but a little bit of panic when we rolled into Manitoba knowing we needed some wins and other teams are closing in,” Hennelly said. “We had lost six in a

row. That kind of wears on guys.” The top eight teams in the conference qualify for the postseason. The Pack are four points clear of UBC and Manitoba, which are tied for eighth. TRU will wrap the regular season with two matches each against visiting Saskatchewan (9-9) and hometown UBC Okanagan (0-18) in Kelowna. “We would like to play Mount Royal [in Round 1 of the playoffs],” Hennelly said. “Alberta would be your second choice of picking your poison of the top four teams, but we can’t be thinking about that. “We’re still in a good spot, with Sask and Kelowna on the docket, to get some wins, but we are not guaranteed anything. We could drop to ninth.” THE WOMEN’S SIDE TRU will host Brandon in women’s Canada West volleyball action this weekend at the TCC. Game time is 5 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. The WolfPack (8-10) are 6-2 on home court this season. The Bobcats are 4-16 on the campaign.

1. Use strong passwords: Use different user ID/password combinations for different accounts and avoid writing them down. Make the passwords more complicated by combining letters, numbers, special characters (minimum 10 characters in total) or a phrase and change them on a regular basis. 2. Secure your computer: Activate your firewall, use anti-virus/malware software and block spyware attacks. 3. Be social-media savvy: Make sure your social networking profiles are set to private and check your security settings. 4. Secure your mobile devices: Download applications only from trusted sources. 5. Install the latest operating system updates: Turn on automatic updates to prevent potential attacks on older software. 6. Protect your data: Use encryption for your most sensitive files, make regular back-ups of all your important data, and store it in another location.

7. Secure your wireless network: Wi-Fi networks at home are vulnerable to intrusion if they are not properly secured. Review and modify default settings. Public Wi-Fi is also vulnerable. Avoid conducting financial or corporate transactions on these networks. 8. Protect your e-identity: Be cautious when giving out personal information such as your name, address, phone number or financial information on the internet. 9. Avoid being scammed: Always think before you click on a link or file of unknown origin. Check the source of the message. When in doubt, verify the source. Never reply to emails that ask you to verify your information or confirm your user ID or password.

MCCONAGHY, Kevin Adair

B: 1997-01-29 | Age 28 Caucasian male 183 cm (6’00”) 73 kg (161 lbs) Brown Hair | Brown Eyes Wanted For: Fail to Comply with Release Conditions

10. Call the right person for help: If you suspect a computer crime, identity theft or a commercial scam, report this to your local police. If you need help with maintenance or software installation on your computer, consult your service provider or a certified computer technician.

www.kamloopsCrimeStoppers.ca If you know where any of these people are, call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). The tip line pays up to $2,000 for information leading to the arrest of fugitives. Remember, Crime Stoppers just wants your information, not your name. Crime doesn’t pay, but Crime Stoppers does.

This program is jointly sponsored by Kamloops Crime Stoppers & Kamloops This Week. People featured are wanted on arrest warrants not vacated as of 3 p.m. on January 30, 2019

NOBLE, Eric Andy Conrad

B: 1980-12-05 | Age 38 Caucasian male 160 cm (5’03”) 59 kg (130 lbs) Brown Hair | Brown Eyes Wanted For: Fail to Comply with Release Conditions X 2 and Breach of Undertaking

CRIME STOPPERS IS SUPPORTED BY

Your Security, Patrol and Guard Service.

BIGHORN

SECURITY INC (250) 819-1812

bighornsecurity.ca Like us on facebook!


A30

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

W A D E D

E V I T E

B L A B

A I D E

B A S S F I D D L E

A P P T A R T R E S O C T I L E D C E D S E E D D I I B V N E E D E G R P U T S E R T R U S L S C O R A D E R E V E I L L U S T O P E A N

B B C E R A D I S G E D A Y I N K E T A D I S O N E N E M

A S S A M

T H E L A W

S O M A

P L E D

U T A H A N S

N E V N E I L S

T H A T E E S H D H A I B E N I C U A G H O M A A T C H D A R I L E D T E M I S S A P D B A N E A T B A A G E D C R A O N E D A S S I N A P A

R A R E G E M

A C R O S S

A D M I R E D

T A A C A C H M E O T K E R N E S A T T R I A M A G E E T S

S I M O V T F I V E E S S E R N S R I T P E T S E X Y C U L P A I L O R P T E S T L D E E E R T E T R A S C H E D E P A W S B O Y I T A L E M A N L B W I I C I A N A R N I T M O O T H

At provincials

ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD FOUND ON A33

City of Kamloops

CURL BC PHOTO Tyler Klymchuk of Kamloops needed a win on Thursday after KTW’s press deadline to stay alive at the B.C. Curling Championships in Quesnel.

ACTIVITY PROGRAMS

Kamloops Sunrays to host nationals

For registration please call 250-828-3500 and please quote program number provided. For online registration please visit

WWW.KAMLOOPS.CA/EZREG

Programs are cancelled if the minimum numbers are not met.

Winter Walking

$5

Get your boots on and stay active outside this winter. Join our knowledgeable Parks staff to learn about the trails that are great for winter walks in the snowy months.

Aviation Way » Feb 7 Thu

10:00 AM-12:00 PM 293450

Starting Seeds

$15

Get a jump start on your veggie garden and save money on bedding plants by learning to start your own seeds indoors and outside. Join a Master Gardener for this hands-on class and learn how to germinate seeds in trays and milk jugs! Some supplies required.

Parkview Activity Centre » Feb 9 Sat

10:00-11:00 AM 295785

Pottery Workshop for Children

$125 (6-13 years)

In this 5-week after school program, your child will learn handbuilding techniques, how to use the potter’s wheel, and glazing and decorating techniques to finish their work. Clay and related firing costs are included in the class fee.

Redemption Pottery Studio » Feb 13-Mar 13 Wed

3:30-5:00 PM 295283

Improve Your Photography

$100

Enter a whole new world of photography by becoming more creative with your camera and moving beyond the manufacturer’s settings. In this five-part series, you will learn how to take photos you want to display, including photos where the background is purposely blurred and the subject is sharp or where motion is accentuated or frozen. Learn to capture images when flash is not allowed or is impractical. You can register for individual sessions.

Heritage House » Feb 13-Mar 13 Wed

FAST Tennis

9:30-11:30 AM 295882

$75 ($65 for repeat players)

Fun Adult Starter Tennis (FAST) is in partnership with the Kamloops Tennis Centre. This four-week program provides an introduction to tennis fundamentals, including basic tactics and techniques, rules, and scoring.

Kamloops Tennis Centre

» Mar 7-28 Thu » Mar 9-30 Sat

9:00-10:30 AM 293984 10:00-11:30 AM 293985

www.Kamloops.ca

The B.C. Men’s and Women’s Curling Championships are underway in Quesnel. Kamloops skips Corryn Brown and Karla Thompson are leading teams on the women’s side, while Tournament Capital resident Tyler Klymchuk is skipping a men’s team. Brown and Thompson had matching 2-2 records and were tied for fourth in event standings heading into action that took place after KTW’s press deadline on Thursday. Thompson squared off against the Abbotsfordbased Sarah Wark rink and Brown locked horns with Lindsay Hudyma of Vancouver on Thursday night. Klymchuk was 0-2 and down to his last life in the C Event on the men’s side, engaged with the Daniel Wenzek rink in a must-win affair when KTW went to press on Thursday. Jared Kolomaya of Kamloops belongs to the Wenzek rink. Kamloops product Jim Cotter led his Vernonbased team to victory in the A Event on the men’s side, booking a spot in the semifinal round. Wark led women’s standings at 4-1.

The Kamloops Sunrays will play host to the Canada Artistic Swimming Championships, which will run from May 6 to May 12 at the Canada Games Aquatic Centre. The lead-up to nationals is underway. Kamloops athletes were in action earlier this month in Richmond at a qualifying event for the provincial championships, which will run from March 8 to March 10 in Surrey. Karina Aujla placed third in the 13- to 15-year-old solo category. Kate Liebe and Keira Fawcett were third and Nadia Curtis and Rosina FraserBowden placed fourth in the 13- to 15-year-old duet division. Norah Mallett joined Aujla, Liebe, Fawcett, Curtis and Fraser-Bowden to compete in the 13- to 15-year-old team

event, in which the Sunrays won silver. Charlotte Ribalkin placed second in the senior technical solo and free solo categories. Each of the swimmers qualified for the B.C. championships. The Sunrays won big at last year’s Synchro BC awards night. Curtis was named national athlete

of the year in the 11- and 12-year-old division; Abby Bucher was named adaptive athlete of the year; Ribalkin earned senior athlete of the year honours; Naomi Woolverton was named adaptive coach of the year; and Tina Naveri was named coach of the year. The Sunrays will play host to a routine competition at the Canada Games Aquatic Centre on March 2. Action gets underway at 12:30 p.m. FINA made a name change in 2017. No longer does it use synchronized swimming. The sport has been named artistic swimming, at the suggestion of the International Olympic Committee. The Canadian national governing body followed suit in 2018, making the change to Canada Artistic Swimming from Synchro Canada.

STANKOVEN COULD PLAY MORE THAN FIVE GAMES FOR BLAZERS From A27

The Blazers were short players for their Wednesday game, with only 19 available skaters. The same was the case when Stankoven played his second WHL contest, against Moose Jaw on Jan. 15. Kamloops can ask the league to discount those games, meaning they wouldn’t count against his allotted five. The WHL will not consider discounting Stankoven’s debut on Oct.10, as the Blazers scratched healthy roster players that night. The major midget Blazers’ last regularseason contest is slated for March 10 and fifth-place Thompson (17-13) will reach the post-season, in which teams play best-ofthree series. Stankoven will be available to play full-

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW Zane Franklin (left) and Dallas Hines, both of Marwayne, Alta., square off at Sandman Centre on Wednesday.

time for the majorjunior Blazers should they still be among the WHL’s living when Thompson’s season is over. Don’t expect him to be eased into the fray if that happens. He’s ready now. “I was really surprised to get out there [in overtime]. It means a lot,” Stankoven said. “Coming in as a 15-year-old, you don’t expect a lot.

“You’re just there and if your name is called, you’re out there, but you’ve got to keep that in perspective. You’ve got to work for it.” CANADA WINTER GAMES-BOUND Stankoven and Thompson teammate Tyson Galloway, a defenceman from Kamloops, will play for under-16 Team B.C. at the Canada

Winter Games, which will run from Feb. 15 to March 3 in Red Deer. Meanwhile, Thompson forward Hibiki Miyamoto, 16, has been asked to attend Japan’s under18 camp this month. UP NEXT The Blazers (1925-3-1) will play host to the Prince George Cougars (16-27-3-2) on Friday.

Game time is 7 p.m. at Sandman Centre. B.C. Division standings: Vancouver (67 points), Victoria (50 points), Kelowna (45 points), Kamloops (42 points) and Prince George (37 points). The Seattle Thunderbirds are in the Western Conference’s second and final wild card playoff position, two points ahead of the Blazers.


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A31

SPORTS

Dunstone remains perfect at World Cup JONKOPING, Sweden — Matt Dunstone, who lives in Kamloops, improved to 2-0 after the second day of the third World Cup curling stop of the season. The Saskatchewan-based rink beat Xiuyue Ma of China 6-3 in Thursday’s second draw. The Manitoba mixed doubles team of Kadriana Sahaidak and Colton Lott (2-1) split a pair of games of Thursday, losing 10-9 to Camilla Noreen and Per Noreen of Sweden before beating Korea’s Hyeri Jang and Chiwon Choi 7-2 Darcy Robertson’s Manitoba women’s team (0-3) lost 8-5 to Anna Sidorova of Russia and 6-5 to Yilun Jiang of China. Finals in each of the three divisions go on Sunday. The grand final of the inaugural World Cup takes place in May in Beijing. — Canadian Press

Brady, Goff talk Super Bowl matchup DENNIS WASZAK

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ATLANTA — Tom Brady vividly remembers the first time he experienced all the hype, hoopla and heightened expectations of playing in the Super Bowl. The New England Patriots’ quarterback was just a wide-eyed, yet supremely confident second-year player who was on the verge of jumpstarting what has become one of the most dominant dynasties in sports history. That was 2002 — 17 years ago — which counts as a few career lifetimes for most NFL players. Brady is 41 now and insists the years haven’t changed him much from that first Super Sunday against the then-St. Louis Rams. “In many ways, I’m similar,’’ Brady said this week while preparing for his ninth appearance on the NFL’s biggest stage. “I don’t think in the end that things are that different for me.’’ Except, of course, they very much are. Brady still has the boyish good looks and flashy smile that made him a media darling back then, but he also has five Super Bowl rings and a ridiculously lengthy list of team and NFL records to go along with lots and lots of wins. And, here he is in the days leading up to this year’s game with things having come full circle. He’s again facing the Rams, who are now in their third year back in Los Angeles. But this time, it’s against a quarterback in Jared Goff who was only seven when Brady started his history-making run. At 24 years and 112 days old, Goff will be the

fourth-youngest quarterback to start a Super Bowl game — and the first millennial. Brady is actually fifth on that list, at 24 years, 184 days old. The 17-year age gap is the largest between starting quarterbacks in Super Bowl history. And, if you want to feel really old, make a pop culture reference from about 20 years ago or so, and Goff will shake his head and shrug his shoulders because he’ll probably have no clue what you’re talking about. “I’ll get asked about stuff all the time,’’ Goff said. “If it’s from any time in the ‘90s, I probably don’t remember it. I was, you know, born in 94, so.’’ Goff doesn’t recall anything about the first time Brady hoisted the Lombardi Trophy. In fact, his first Super Bowl memory didn’t come until two years later, when the Patriots beat the Carolina Panthers. “It’s a guy that you’ve looked up to for so long,’’ Goff said, “and now I get a chance to play in one with him.’’ Grizzled veteran vs. inexperienced youngster. Old school vs. new school. But the overwhelming passion to win at all costs is clearly ingrained in both — no matter the age difference. “I loved playing then. I still love playing now,’’ said Brady, who stands firm in his desire to play until he’s 45. “I don’t take anything for granted, I really don’t. I enjoy it. I think we all work hard at it, but to get to this point is really exceptional. I’m proud of the guys for making the commitment and it’s certainly not easy. I

Coyne Schofield defends McGuire after awkward interaction

think everyone at this point is tired and worn down but at the same time, you have one of the great opportunities in your life. “This is a memory you’ll have forever and I really hope we can go out and take advantage of it.’’ Brady sees some of himself in Goff and not just the fact that they were California kids who grew up in Bay Area cities — Brady in San Mateo, Goff in Novato — located less than 50 miles from each other. He knows Goff represents hope for a franchise on the upswing that yearns for success after several subpar seasons. Unlike Brady, who was a sixth-round pick in 2000, Goff was the No. 1 overall selection in 2016. Leading up to the draft, there were even comparisons of Goff to Brady for the youngster’s footwork, pocket presence and accuracy. Goff showed flashes during a shaky rookie season of what everyone is seeing now on a regular basis. Just three seasons in, Goff is in his first Super Bowl — and many think this could be the first of several with him as the face of the Rams franchise. Neither can stand to lose. And they didn’t get this far by accepting defeat at any level. But just one will walk off the field Sunday feeling satisfied, having won a Super Bowl for the ages. “I think loving the game and trying to improve and be the best I can be for the team is great motivation for me and I’ve just always spoke about winning and that’s what I love to do,’’ Brady said. “That’s why I’m here.’’

PHOTO CONTEST

JANUARY WINNER

STEPHEN WHYNO

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Women’s hockey star Kendall Coyne Schofield said Thursday she doesn’t believe NBC Sports analyst Pierre McGuire questioned her knowledge of the sport during an awkward pregame interaction this week. McGuire was criticized on social media for the situation that occurred during Wednesday night’s game in Pittsburgh between the Penguins and the Tampa Bay Lightning. During the broadcast on NBC Sports Network, the two were near the ice and he told Coyne Schofield which benches the teams were on and noted the network was paying her to be an analyst, not a fan. In a statement provided by NBC Sports to The Associated Press, McGuire said: “We were all thrilled to have her join our coverage

Kendall Coyne Schofield flying on NHL All-Star Weekend.

last night, but at times my excitement got the better of me and I should have chosen my words better. I have the utmost respect for Kendall as a worldclass player, analyst of the game and role model.’’ McGuire has been calling women’s hockey games for more than 15 years, including several Olympics. In a statement posted to her Twitter account, Coyne Schofield said she has known McGuire for years and she knows he respects her “as a hockey player, a woman and a friend’’ and she didn’t think twice about the situa-

tion when it happened. After watching the segment on video, Coyne Schofield said she understands why people would think it was inappropriate and would have been offended if she saw a man say that to a female athlete. “While I wish it came out differently, I know Pierre doesn’t question my hockey knowledge,’’ she wrote. Coyne Schofield also said she knows McGuire was excited for her. “What IS important is for every young girl reading this to know it doesn’t matter what anyone thinks of my hockey knowledge —

because I do not doubt my hockey knowledge,’’ she wrote. Coyne Schofield, an Illinois native who is on the Minnesota Whitecaps’ roster in the NWHL, won a gold medal playing for the U.S. at the 2018 Olympics and a silver medal four years earlier. She was one of the biggest stars of NHL All-Star Weekend as she wowed in replacing Colorado’s Nathan MacKinnon in the fastest skater competition. Agent Ken Magnuson said Coyne Schofield wanted her statement to stand without further comment.

CONGRATULATIONS Jim Motokado

for submitting this month’s winning photo For a chance to win a prize valued at $50 submit your photos here:

contests.kamloopsthisweek.com Submission Deadline: 12:00 pm on Feb 27 Photos must as high quality as possible. One winner selected at the end of each month from all acceptable entries. Physical copies not accepted. Read terms and conditions online for details.


A32

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEEKLY COMICS

FRANK & ERNEST by Bob Thaves

ARCTIC CIRCLE by Alex Hallatt

THE BORN LOSER

BABY BLUES

BIG NATE

by Art & Chip Samsom

by Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

by Lincoln Peirce

by Chris Browne

THE GRIZZWELLS by Bill Schorr

SHOE by Gary Brookins & Susie Macnelly

PARDON MY PLANET by Vic Lee

ZITS by Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman

GUESS WHO?

HERMAN

by Jim Unger

KIT ’N’ CARLYLE

by Larry Wright

FAMILY CIRCUS

by Bil & Jeff Keane

I am a rock singer born in Indiana on February 6, 1962. My real first name is William, but I took on a new name that sounds like the part of a machine or truck. My appetite for success and talents as a lead singer and frontman helped propel my band to enormous heights in the 1980s. ANSWERS

Axl Rose

JOIN OUR PROGRAM & RECEIVE

100 BONUS POINTS!

OUR PROGRAM IS SIMPLE - FOR EVERY 1000 POINTS YOU COLLECT A $10 IN-STORE CREDIT

#1-1800 TRANQUILLE RD • 250-554-3317 • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • 9AM-11PM

BROCKCENTRELIQUORSTORE.COM


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD UNEMPLOYMENT LINES

A33

By Randolph Ross

ACROSS 1. Google Calendar, e.g. 7. In addition 13. “Foundation” author 19. Hit 2009 movie set in the 22nd century 20. Cry of exasperation 21. When Hamlet dies 22. Unemployed salon worker? 25. Venusians, e.g., informally 26. In base 8 27. Bob ____, 1968 recordsetting long jumper 28. Foreign title that’s an anagram of its English equivalent 29. Unemployed nail polisher? 33. Most preferred 34. Coffee order 35. Jokester 36. Some TV drama settings, for short 37. Hot 38. Troublemaker since birth 41. Something paid to a hero 44. Cosby’s “I Spy” co-star 45. Jack-in-the-box part 46. Unemployed men’s clothier? 51. Wing it 54. Remote figure: Abbr. 55. Hydro-plant locale 56. Exam scored on a scale of 1 to 5, informally 57. Designer Geoffrey 58. “____ Live” (onetime cooking show) 61. ____ tear (sports injury) 62. Jay preceder 63. Unemployed educator? 68. Media inits. before One, Two or Four 71. Wall Street order 72. Question after “I’m back” 73. Fish in a tank 77. Rubber 79. Article in La Repubblica 81. Kitty 82. Port Authority posting: Abbr.

83. Unemployed loan officer? 88. Watchdog org. established by Nixon 89. Salon supply 90. “No returns,” e.g. 91. “Extra! Extra!” shouter 94. Repeated word in a 1957 Harry Belafonte hit 95. Fan noise 96. Cote call 98. ____ spell 99. It’s kept in a pen 100. Unemployed rancher? 107. Capt.’s guess 108. More balanced 109. Popular font 110. Airport near D.C. 111. Unemployed prestidigitator? 116. Efficient kind of shopping 117. Iconic 1950s-’70s female TV role played by a male 118. Achieve something by merit 119. Like the lion slain by Hercules 120. Be short with 121. Peanut-butter choice

DOWN 1. Tested the waters, say 2. Request for an online R.S.V.P. 3. Bluegrass instrument 4. ____.com, site with the category “Cellphones & tablets” 5. One out? 6. Came before 7. ____ tea 8. Sheriffs, marshals, etc. 9. “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” character 10. Short snicker 11. Easy ____ 12. President during the Vietnam War 13. Straddling 14. Surgical tube 15. Suppositions 16. Like Feburary 17. Advertise excessively 18. It’s the truth 21. Used as a role model 23. Part of S.O.P.: Abbr. 24. Beauty that’s seldom seen 30. Suffix with linguist 31. Okinawa port 32. “____ Rhythm” 37. Exec 38. Spill the beans 39. Second 40. Send in a different direction 42. Fast-food sandwiches introduced in 1985 43. “Bingo!” 44. They go down easily 47. “Brave New World” drug 48. Responded in court 49. Dash gauge 50. AAA suggestion: Abbr. 52. It borders Ky. 53. You can page through them 59. Like “A Star Is Born,” several times 60. A mean Amin 61. Blackjack combo

1

64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 74. 75. 76. 78. 79. 80. 84. 85. 86. 87. 92.

Maven Locker-room shower? Every which way ____ center Hospital unit Two-masted sailing vessel Longtime host of “American Top 40” Source of a Boston “curse” Defaulter’s comeuppance Every 24 hours Normandy invasion town Marie and Donny Osmond, e.g. It borders Ida. Find with difficulty Hon Not very much Produces a revival of Royal Charlotte’s father

93. Abbr. in many an office address 94. Failed, as a cellphone or car to its user 95. Estée Lauder competitor 97. “Evangeline” setting 100. Symbol of change 101. Young and Simon 102. Preceder of “Do I have to?” 103. Headgear for a knight 104. Padre’s hermana 105. Look for 106. Beethoven’s “Choral” Symphony 112. Suffix with expert 113. Code-cracking org. 114. Special gift 115. ____-Magnon

2

3

4

5

6

7

19

10

11

12

13

27

30

31

34 39

40 46

51

52

53

63 70

77

47

36 43

44 49

55 59

60

61 65

79

66

85

86

100

107

108

96 101

74

87

97

102

92

105

106

93

98 103

113

76

88

104

109

112

75

82

91

95

99

67

81

90

94

62

73

80

84

50

56

72

89

18

37

48

71

83

111

42

64

78

17

33

41

58

69

32

54

57

16

28

35

45

15

24

26

29

14

21

23

25

68

9

20

22

38

8

110 115

114

116

117

118

119

120

121

CROSSWORD ANSWERS FOUND ON A30

WORD SEARCH

GAMEPLAY WORD SEARCH

SUDOKU FUN BY THE NUMBERS

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

ANSWERS

Find the words hidden vertically, horizontally & diagonally throughout the puzzle ABANDONWARE ACTION AGGRO ALPHA ANALOG BALANCE BIT BOARD BUFF CAMPAIGN CHECKPOINT CLONE

CONSOLE CONTENT CONTROLLER DAMAGE DEVELOPMENT DISPLAY EFFECTS ELECTRONIC FARMING FREE GAMEPLAY GHOST

GRAPHICS HEALTH INVENTORY LIFE MAP MOD MODE PLAYING PORT RELEASE ROLE SHOW

ANSWERS

BOOGIE TRAINING BEGINS SOON!

LOCATED AT THE SANDMAN SIGNATURE HOTEL

Starts: Sunday, March 10 - 8 AM • Tuesday, March 12 - 6 PM All levels: Train for boogie Sunday, April 28 TO REGISTER VISIT WWW.RUNCLUB.CA • FOR MORE INFO: JOBERRY@TELUS.NET OR 250-852-9906


A34

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM In Loving Memory of

Barbara Glennie

Shirleyann Louise Life

1940 - 2019

May 5, 1950 – February 3, 2018

Barbara “Barbie” Glennie (née Flodstrom) was born in Kamloops, BC on August 12, 1940 and passed away peacefully in the early hours of January 23, 2019.

Wife, Mother, Grandmother and Friend. I thought of you with love today, but that is nothing new, I thought about you yesterday and days before that too. I think of you in silence, I often speak your name, All I have are memories and your picture in a frame. Your memory is my keepsake, with which I’ll never part God has you in His keeping, I have you in my heart.

A year without you has passed! It feels like only yesterday that God called YOU to Heaven. For 10 months you fought an uphill battle and always remained positive. You did not waiver. You showed us strength and the power to believe. You did not exhibit any fear. No matter the prognosis, your faith kept you strong. You persevered to fight back with the little hope that was offered. Though the ALS spread quickly and took your body, it did not hinder your spirit. Your eyes may be closed, but We know that YOU will continue to watch over us.

Forever in our hearts. Much Love Wayne and Family Daughters Lia and Nanette Son Michael Grandchildren Christopher, Shelby and Samantha

A Division of Service Corporation International (Canada) ULC.

Leona Maxine “Peggy” Bentley It is with heavy hearts that the family of Leona Maxine “Peggy” Bentley announces her peaceful passing on January 12, 2019 at the age of 89 years after challenges with cancer. Peggy, a Nova Scotia girl and her late husband Jim moved to Yellowknife, N.W.T. in 1958 where Jim took up duties as a new civil engineer. They then moved briefly to Fredericton, New Brunswick in 1964. The lure of the north had them return after seven months to reside in Fort Smith, N.W.T. where they lived until their return to Yellowknife in 1968. In 1987, Peggy and Jim retired to Victoria, BC and then moved on to Kamloops, BC in 2015 to be near their daughter. Peggy was an avid curler who made an indelible impact through her participation in the sport she loved and with the many friends she made along the way. She is lovingly remembered by her children Craig (Ingrid), Cathy (John) and grandchildren Dylan and Madison. Peggy was the eldest daughter of the late Percy and Gladys Boyd of Three Mile Plains, Nova Scotia and was dearly loved by her siblings the late Jean Starratt, Vivian “Bidy” Stephens, Lawrence Boyd, Marguerite McDermott, Karen Thompson, Donnie Boyd and Sheila Elliott, brother-in-law David Bentley and her many nieces and nephews. The family would like to thank Dr. Alina Cribb for her care and compassion and mom’s supportive friends at Berwick on the Park retirement home.

Growing up she lived in many different mining towns throughout BC and Saskatchewan, living her later years in Hope, Chilliwack and finally returning to Kamloops in 2016. Barb is survived by her daughter Susan Glennie of Kamloops, daughter Dawn (Ron) Woodland of Kamloops, son Brian (Rhonda) Glennie of Chilliwack and daughter Donna Wiebe (Barry) of Calgary, AB, as well as seven grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. Also survived by her sister Cheryl (Garry) Klassen of Chilliwack, sister Wendy Flodstrom of Chilliwack and brother Don (Pat) Flodstrom of Kamloops, along with numerous nieces, nephews, cousins, aunts and uncles. Predeceased by her parents Sigurd (1984) and Eileen (2003). Barb worked at many different jobs throughout her life but was most proud of her last job as cake decorator at Dairy Queen in Chilliwack. She loved spending time with family and friends and was especially proud of all her grandchildren. They were the sparkle in her eyes. Barb enjoyed going to the casino and

loved the bus trips across the border with Auntie Gwen always hoping for the jackpot! Her hobbies included sewing, knitting, crocheting and reading. Barb’s drink of choice was white rum and Coke, please have one in her honour with a smile on your face. The last two years of her life were spent at Pinegrove Care Home in Kamloops, where she kept the staff on their toes always helping out with ‘reorganizing’ their paperwork. Barbie was an amazing mom, grandma, sister, aunt and friend. She will be missed by all who knew her. The family would like to thank the doctors and nurses on 5 South of Royal Inland Hospital, but most of all the wonderful staff at Pinegrove Care Home who made Barbie feel at home from the day she moved in until her final day. We will be forever grateful. A celebration of Barbie’s life will be held in Kamloops in the spring of 2019, date to be determined. In lieu of flowers, please donate to Pinegrove Care Home, Parkinson’s Society of BC or the Alzheimer’s Association in Barbie’s memory. Condolences may be sent to the family at DrakeCremation.com

Douglas Eugene Chambers November 2, 1946 – January 28, 2019

An amazing, adventurous husband, Doug passed away at Royal Inland Hospital with his wife and children by his side. Doug is survived by his wife Elaine, children Elaine (Gerry), Jim, Raelle (Mitch) and Maxine. His constant companion Aussie, 15 grandchildren and 3 ¾ greatgrandchildren. He is also survived by his brothers Mel (Kathy), Si and sisters Lillie (Bruce) and Jenny (Vic). Doug worked for the Kamloops School District for many years developing lifelong friendships. He lived a full and exciting life trapping, fishing, hunting and camping all over the country developing even more lifelong friendships. Doug used up all his nine lives and then some. He always said, if you’re not living on the edge you’re taking up to much space. A Celebration of Life will be announced at a later date.

March 5, 1958 January 31, 2017

You are not forgotten, my love nor will you ever be – As long as life and memory last your soul will live in me. I miss you now my heart is sore – As time goes by I’ll miss you more. Your loving smile your gentle face – No one can fill your vacant place.

Until we meet again, Forever Loved and missed

(250) 377-8225

At Schoening we believe a life should be remembered. By having a service at our home, you can do whatever you want, play tribute videos or favourite music or decorate the celebration centre in a manner that will give closure to family and friends.

In Loving Memory of Terry Sayers

Your loving wife Kelly

Schoening Funeral Service 250-374-1454

First Memorial Funeral Service 250-554-2429

schoeningfuneralservice.com

Graham Noble Graham Noble, The Lord of Kelby, died on Saturday, January 26, 2019 at the age of 75. Beloved husband of 54 years of Sharon and father to Colin and Michael. Graham was born on July 3, 1943 in Bradford, Yorkshire England to proud parents Arthur and Edith Noble. In 1963, he met the love of his life Sharon and was married in 1964. He will be lovingly missed by his two sons Colin (Dianne) and Michael, his grandchildren Blake, Kent and Laura and his sister-in-law Anne. Looking for a better life, he emigrated to Victoria in 1966 to run his own barber shop. Unfortunately, due to the sudden death of his father Arthur, he returned to the UK in 1970, subsequently living on the Isle of Man for six years until 1976, when he again returned to the UK to become a financial consultant. In 1979, he returned to Canada and settled in Kamloops where he established a successful company and helped many people plan for their retirement. While in Kamloops, Graham was instrumental in the creation of the Kamloops Foundation, now referred to as the BC Interior Community Foundation. In 1999, he took early retirement and moved to Canora, where he was the property manager of over 30 homes and where he could enjoy small town living. Always a world traveller, with a continual desire to expand his mind, he travelled extensively across the Americas, Europe, Asia and has now moved on to his next adventure. Graham is predeceased by his parents Arthur and Edith Noble, his brother Kevin Noble and his grandson Alex. He will always be remembered fondly and greatly missed by his wife and family, his friends and all that knew him. The Funeral Service will be held at 2:00 pm on Tuesday, February 5, 2019 in the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 2165 Parkcrest Avenue. Internment to follow at Hillside Cemetery. All are welcome and your support and messages of condolences have been greatly appreciated. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to BC Interior Community Foundation,

2-219 Victoria Street, Kamloops, BC.

Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home 250-554-2577 Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com 250-554-2577


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A35

OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM Jill Suzanne Iadarola (née Ryder)

Reg Mitchell

July 4, 1958 – January 26, 2019

(Reginald James Mitchell) July 16, 1934 – January 22, 2019

It is with very heavy hearts that we announce the passing of a beautiful woman, wife, mother, sister, daughter and friend to many.

Reg was born in Nelson, BC to Alexander and Dorothy Mitchell and was the youngest of three children. He grew up in Trail, BC and in his youth was active in sports and got into as much mischief as he possibly could.

Jill was born in Burnaby, BC on July 4, 1958. She then moved with her family to Delta, BC where she was raised until moving with her mother and two brothers to Kamloops in 1973. It was here where she met her lifelong love and husband Tony. Together, they had three children, renovated three homes, created beautiful gardens, traveled and held memorable celebrations with friends. Jill had a rich career, holding a handful of jobs focused in customer service and management, all while raising her children. In her words, she was a “Jill” of all trades. Her true passion was crafting, “picking” treasures, thrifting and making beautiful things. In retirement, her and her husband lived in the Shuswap, Victoria, BC and Yuma, Arizona and traveled to various spots throughout the United States and Mexico. Our Jilly-Bean fiercely loved her family and friends and would do anything for them. She loved the ocean; she loved coffee and Motown music; she loved humour and human connection. She was strong, hilarious, witty, smiley and thoughtful. The thing is, there aren’t enough words to express just how special Jill was and how much joy and beauty she put into this world. She will be greatly missed by the many lives she touched.

In 1955, Reg met the love of his life Anita and they married the following year. Together they raised four children in Kamloops. Reg was proud of his family and was supportive of all of their activities. He was involved in sports throughout his life including fishing, swimming, hockey, lacrosse, softball, curling, skiing, golfing and camping and he was also a loyal Kamloops Blazers fan.

Drake Smith, MSW

Reg joined Kamloops Pulp and Paper in 1964 and continued working for Weyerhaeuser until his retirement. Community involvement was important and he was always quick to volunteer.

Q. I’m thinking of prepaying for cremation. Good idea?

Reg was predeceased by Anita in 2013 and son-in-law Joe in 2018. He is survived by his children Colleen (Miles) of Edmonton, Marcy (Rand) of Ottawa, Mike (Myrna and granddaughter Amanda) of Kamloops and Sue (Joe and grandson Jarod) of Kelowna.

A. Pre-paying always benefits the funeral home and the insurance agent. It might benefit you, but once people know all the facts they usually put their cheque book away. Give me a call and I’ll explain why. Then you decide.

Ask DRAKE Funeral Director

Every Friday in KTW!

Dad made it very clear in his later years that the most important thing to him was his loyal dog Lacey, who is missing him dearly.

Jill leaves behind her husband and “babe” Tony “Antonio” Iadarola, son Shane Landon Iadarola (Kristin), daughter Michelle Suzanne Iadarola and daughter Taryn Breanne Iadarola (Dan Fifer). She will be missed by her younger brother Jeffrey “Jeff” Ryder (Allison) and nieces and nephews Mike, Rick, Steve, Kate, Jaime-Lyn, Matt and Simon. She will also be missed by numerous, cousins, aunts and uncles whom she loved and appreciated, as well as her dear, amazing friends. She is predeceased by her older brother Steve, her mother Winnifred “Freddie” and her beloved grandmother Kathleen.

Reg passed away peacefully after a courageous battle with cancer. Special thanks go out to Dr. Mekhail, all the teams at Royal Inland Hospital and staff and friends at Chartwell. ! !

Drake DrakeCremation Cremation

A Celebration of Life will be held at Schoenings, 513 Seymour Street, Kamloops on Saturday, February 2, 2019 at 1:00 pm with a reception to follow.

In lieu of flowers or donations, Jill wanted everyone only to be nice to one another. Pay it forward, smile and ENJOY life!

!

!

Donations in his memory can be made to the Kamloops Hospice Association, 72 Whiteshield Crescent South, Kamloops, BC, V2E 2S9. (250)372-1336 www.kamloopshospice.com.

A celebration of life will be held in the Spring of 2019, date and location to be determined.

On-line condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com

Many thanks to all of the staff at the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Memorial Hospice Home for their care and attention. Special thanks to Dr. Vlahos and Dr. Farren who are truly angels on Earth.

& Funeral Services

& Funeral Services

210 Lansdowne 425 Tranquille Rd. 250-377-8225 DrakeCremation.com AFFORDABLE & NO BLACK SUITS

210 Lansdowne Street, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1X7 4638 Town Road, Box 859, Barriere, BC, V0E 1E0

73 Taren Drive, Clearwater, BC, V0E 1N2 Toll free: 1-877-674-3030

www.DrakeCremation.com

Proud to be born in, to serve in and support Kamloops

& CREMATION SERVICES

Natasha Schrader

• Family owned & operated •

J. Brent Olsen It is with heavy hearts that we announce the sudden passing of Brent on January 26, 2019. Brent was a loving husband and father, an avid outdoorsman and a wonderful friend to all who knew him. He was predeceased by his parents Floyd and Georgena, two older sisters Marjorie and Myrna and infant son Chad. Brent is survived by his loving wife Karen, his children Jeff (Vanessa), Brian (Kathalina), Emily and Eric, seven grandchildren Tayla, Josh, Claira, Emma, Xyla, Alexander and Zachary, his sisters Lorraine and Mary and his brother George (Susanna), as well as numerous nieces and nephews. Brent was born in Cardston, Alberta in 1952 and grew up in Levitt, Alberta. In 1974, he earned his Bachelor of Science degree in the first Forestry program offered by the University of Alberta. Brent began his 40 year career as a Forester with the BC Provincial government in Victoria and it was there that he met his wife Karen. After they were married, Brent and Karen moved to Kamloops and lived there happily for 40 years as they raised their family and became part of the community. Brent loved the outdoors and considered himself fortunate to spend his career enjoying all of God’s beautiful creations. His favourite past time was fishing, which he did year round. He was also an avid bird watcher and nature photographer. Brent loved to share his enthusiasm of the outdoors with youth through his involvement in Scouts Canada for over 30 years. He spent many years taking school classes on nature walks where he affectionately earned the title “Mr. Forestry Man.” Brent’s service extended from his involvement with the Kamloops Square Dancers, where he served as president for two years, to his devotion to his faith through his membership in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He was always looking for ways to help others and through his thoughtfulness, he blessed countless lives. Funeral services will be held for Brent on Saturday, February 2, 2019 at 11:00 am at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 2165 Parkcrest Avenue, Kamloops. All are welcome to attend. Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home 250-554-2577 Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

250-554-2577

Barbara L. MacKinnon

(née Hemphill) Barbara L. MacKinnon (née Hemphill) passed away at the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Hospice Home in Kamloops, BC on January 17, 2019 at 90 years of age after a brief illness. Barbara is survived by her three sons and their wives, David (Heather) of Squamish, Bruce (Alison) of Kamloops, Mark (Chris) of Victoria and her grandchildren Sean, Milo, Cole, Craig, Ethan and Kirsten. She is predeceased by her husband Grant, brother David Hemphill and sister Pat Zondag (née Hemphill). Born in Edmonton, Alberta in 1928, Barbara moved to Vancouver with her family at the age of 12. It was there that she met her beloved husband and partner in all things. They married on Christmas Eve of 1951 and moved to Regina to build their first home and welcome sons David and Bruce. In 1957, they moved to Kamloops. There Grant designed and built the home where Barbara resided for the rest of her life. She was proud to be a full time Mom and homemaker, cherishing family life with her husband and children which now included their third son Mark. Following Grant’s passing in 1992, she maintained a resolutely independent life, determined to spend the rest of her days in her own home. Thoughts of her dear Grant were never far from her mind. Barbara loved children. She was never too busy to read to a small child or play interminable games of “Who’s the Thief”. Equally passionate about her crafts, she spent countless hours crocheting, quilting, sewing, and knitting. Over the years she donated many outfits to the Royal Inland Hospital Auxiliary.

285 Fortune Drive, Kamloops

250-554-2577

See more at: www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com 210 Lansdowne Street, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1X7 4638 Town Road, Box 859, Barriere, BC, V0E 1E0

73 Taren Drive, Clearwater, BC, V0E 1N2 Toll free: 1-877-674-3030

www.DrakeCremation.com

She also loved to bake and putter in her garden which she did both at home and at their cabin at Shuswap Lake. It became her precious summer retreat, where she and Mark spent most of their summers while he was growing up. Through the years Barbara and Grant, along with their family and friends, enjoyed many good times “at the lake”. In later years as Barbara required increasing assistance with life’s little challenges, her daughter-in-law Alison became a trusted and much appreciated friend, personal assistant and caregiver. The family wishes to thank Dr. Anders and his receptionist Tammy for their many years of service and compassion. Barbara was uncertain about leaving her longtime home near the end of her life, but once settled into her room at the Hospice, she frequently commented on how wonderful and caring all the amazing nurses and volunteers were and couldn’t stop saying thank you. At Barbara’s request there will be no service. Cremation will take place and interment will follow at a later date at Hillside Cemetery beside her cherished husband Grant. For those who wish to make a memorial donation, the family requests they be made to the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Hospice Home. On-line condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com


A36

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM Simon Hubertus Stryk Simon Hubertus Stryk of Kamloops, BC passed away peacefully on January 23, 2019 at 80 years of age. He is survived by his loving wife Ria Stryk, his children Eric Stryk, Joanne Lappin, Yvonne (Dan) Trarup and Michelle Stryk, his grandchildren Angela Kiesman, Kody (Trish) LaFleur, Logan Stryk, Hannah (Anthony) Cavacece, Mathew Lappin, Nick (Desiree) Trarup, Jen (Josh) Trarup and Taylor Ross and six great-grandchildren. Sim (Simon) Stryk was born on September 18, 1938 in the Netherlands where he lived until coming to Canada by boat in 1958 upon the successful completion of an Architecture and Structural Engineering Degree, Sim started out working in sawmills and logging in northern BC before marrying the love of his life Ria and settling in Vancouver at H.A. Simons Engineering for 13 ½ years. In 1974, he moved his family up to Kamloops where he started S.H.S Design & Drafting Inc. After semi-retirement in 2004, Sim enjoyed raising livestock at his hobby farm on Monte Creek Hill. Sim was a volunteer for the Heart & Stroke Foundation for 10 years where he canvassed and coordinated for the February door-to-door campaign where he really enjoyed chatting with the locals. He will be remembered for his friendly banter and his larger-than-life spirit for the great outdoors! A Memorial Service will take place at 1:00 pm on Saturday, February 9, 2019 in Monte Creek at St. Peter’s Anglican Church with The Reverend Canon Sandra Sugden officiating. Special thanks to Kim Nobert at Alternatives Funeral & Cremation Services. Arrangements entrusted to Alternatives Funeral & Cremation Services 250-554-2324 Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

Bob Slater

Johnny Ronnie Belanger

(Robert Thomas Slater)

Johnny Ronnie Belanger passed away peacefully on Thursday, January 24, 2019 at the age of 68 with his wife by his side in Kamloops, British Columbia. John was born on August 30, 1950 in Toronto, Ontario to Leah and Wilfred (stepfather). He is survived by his wife Cheryl, sons Jamie and Jeffrey, daughter Joanna, granddaughters Jazlyn, Jaida, Cora and Gia, sister Barbara and many other family members. John met Cheryl (née Gardiner) in June 1970. In 1986, John’s dream to move his family to British Columbia was fulfilled. John loved the outdoors and spent countless hours fishing with his friends and family. John loved animals, fast cars and enjoyed spending time with his granddaughters. Family, friends and others whose lives John touched are invited to celebrate his life at the Generation Victory Center, 1110 Tranquille Rd., from 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm on Saturday, February 2, 2019. In lieu of flowers, the family request donations are made to the Generation Victory Center or the SPCA in John’s honour.

November 10, 1947 – January 26, 2019

It is with heavy hearts and profound sadness that we announce the passing of our beloved Papa Robert Thomas Slater born on November 10, 1947. Bob is survived by his brother Gordon, daughter Donna and grandchildren Michael and Nevaya. He was predeceased by his parents Thomas and Christine and granddaughter Jessica. Many of us will remember Bob from his more than 40 years managing the Kami Inn. He was an incredible family man who loved his daughter and grandchildren deeply. A Celebration of Life will be held on Saturday, February 2, 2019 at 1:00 pm at Valleyview Bible Church, 2386 E. Trans Canada Hwy Frontage Road, Kamloops, BC with refreshments to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations in memory of Bob can be made to Valleyview Bible Church

Her Journey’s Just Begun by E. Brenneman

Don’t think of her as gone away, Her journey’s just begun. Life holds so many facets, This earth is only one. Just think of her as resting, From the sorrows and the tears, In a place of warmth and comfort, Where there are no days and years. Think how she must be wishing, That we could know today, How nothing but our sadness, Can really pass away. And think of her as living, In the hearts of those she touched, For nothing loved is ever lost; And she was loved so much.

Condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A37

KamloopsThisWeek.com

CLASSIFIEDS Phone: 250-371-4949

INDEX

LISTINGS

DEADLINES

Announcements . . . . 001-099 Employment . . . . . . . . .100-165 Service Guide . . . . . . . 170-399 Pets/Farm . . . . . . . . . . .450-499 For Sale/Wanted. . . . .500-599 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . .600-699 Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700-799 Automotive . . . . . . . . . . 800-915 Legal Notices . . . . . . 920-1000

Anniversaries

WEDNESDAY ISSUES • 10:00 am Tuesday

Based on 3 lines

FRIDAY ISSUES • 10:00 am Thursday

1 Week . . . . . . . . . $2500

Information

10:00am Tuesday for Wednesday’s Paper.

PERFECT Part-Time

10:00am Thursday for Friday’s Paper.

2 Days Per Week

RUN TILL

RENTED * RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Coming Events

If you have an

upcoming event for our

COMMUNITY CALENDAR go to

kamloopsthisweek.com and click on the menu and go to events to submit your event.

Career Opportunities

1 Month . . . . . . . . $8000 ADD COLOUR . . $2500 to your classified add Tax not included

Career Opportunities

Fax: 250-374-1033

RUN UNTIL SOLD

call 250-374-0462

Personals

SALES PROFESSIONAL REQUIRED

Looking For Love? Try your luck with 1x1 boxed ad $35 plus tax for 2 weeks. Price includes box number. Call 250-371-4949 to place your ad and for more details.

Lost & Found Lost: Sentimental necklace. Chain with a circle pendant. Reward. Call 250-573-1298.

Travel

Housesitting Peace of mind house sitting and pet care. Keep your house and pets safe while your away. 374-6007.

Employment Business Opportunities ~ Caution ~ While we try to ensure all advertisements appearing in Kamloops This Week are placed by reputable businesses with legitimate offers, we do caution our readers to undertake due diligence when answering any advertisement, particularly when the advertiser is asking for monies up front.

Are you driven? Can you solve problems & take on unique challenges? We are seeking a Sales Professional to join our Kamloops team. For more details & to apply, visit: eaglehomes.ca/careers Only successful candidates will receive contact to establish immediate next steps. No phone calls please.

GARAGE SALE

$

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Houses, condos, duplexes, suites, etc. (3 months max) $ 5300 Add an extra line to your ad for $10

Tax not included Some restrictions apply

Scheduled for one month at a time. Customer must call to reschedule. Tax not included. Some restrictions apply

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Merchandise, vehicles, trailers, RV’s, boats, ATV’s, furniture, etc.

3500

Education/Trade Schools

stuff into

CA$H 250-371-4949

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Career Opportunities

Courses. A Great Gift. Next C.O.R.E. February 23rd and 24th. Saturday and Sunday. P.A.L. February 17th Sunday. Professional outdoorsman & Master Instructor:

Bill

Help Wanted Activation Laboratories We are looking to fill positions for Laboratory Technician (BSc required) and Sample Prep Technician. No experience necessary. Email resumes to: nolangoddard@actlabs.com or apply in person at 9989 Dallas Drive. Competitive wages and benefits. I PAY Cash $$$ For All Scrap Vehicles! and $5 for auto batteries Call or Text Brendan 250-574-4679

is looking for substitute distributors for door-to-door deliveries. Vehicle is required. For more information please call the Circulation Department at

250-374-0462

Career Opportunities

TRUCK DRIVER TRAINING Funding available for those who qualify!

February 9-10, 2019

Courses start every week!

Class 1, 2, & 3 B-Train

Call 250.828.5104 or visit tru.ca/trades

Mario’s Towing Is Expanding! Our Kamloops Office is Growing Fast! Looking for Heavy Tow Truck operator. Must Pass Criminal Records Check. Experience an asset but will train the successful candidate. Must be available for all shifts. Please forward Resumes & Current Drivers Abstract to:

Join our award winning team at the Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott Kamloops. We are looking for individuals with a passion for hospitality and customer service excellence. Immediate opportunities are available for: • Front Desk • Housekeeping • Breakfast Host Apply in person with your resume to: 1475 Hugh Allan Drive Or by email to

steve.earl@marriott.com

EMPLOYMENT

12 Friday - 3 lines or less 1750 Wed/Fri - 3 lines or less 50

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue. . . . . . . $1638

$

BONUS (pick up only):

1 Week . . . . . . $3150

• 2 large Garage Sale Signs • Instructions • FREE 6” Sub compliments of

1 Month . . . $10460

Tax not included

Tax not included

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

GENERAL LABORERS We are a well established, growing plywood and veneer manufacturer. If you have your own transportation, can work shift work, are fit and have a good work ethic, then we need you.

ndimambro@marios-towing.com

We are located east of the City of Kamloops, on Dallas Drive and are requiring full time General Laborers.

CLASSIFIEDS

We offer a great benefits package after a satisfactory probation period. Please submit your resume in person, Monday to Friday 8:00 - 4:30 pm.

THOMPSON RIVER VENEER PRODUCTS LTD. If you cannot apply in person you can fax a full resume with references to 250-573-6052

250-376-7970

8982148

CERTIFIED ICBC AIR BRAKE COURSE

Help Wanted

No Phone Calls Please!

HUNTER & FIREARMS

RUN TILL

SOLD Turn your

Email: classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com $

courses mid-week & weekends. NEW - Intro to Reloading & Bear Aware courses on demand. For schedules see www.pal-core-ed.com or 778-470-3030

Opportunity

|

RUN UNTIL RENTED

AAA - Pal & Core

It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event that errors occur in the publishing of any advertising shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only and there will be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement.

1 Issue . . . . . . . . . $1300

ALL ADS MUST BE PREPAID. No refunds on classified ads.

Word Classified Deadlines

Advertisements should be read on the first publication day. We are not responsible for errors appearing beyond the first insertion.

REGULAR RATES

|

250-371-4949

Career Opportunities

RUN TILL SOLD turn your stuff INTO CA$H $ 00 250-371-4949 PACKAGES STARTING AT

35

1365 DALHOUSIE DRIVE

PLUS TAX

Career Opportunities

Non-business ads only. Some restrictions apply.

Career Opportunities

OPEN ROUTE CREW WANTED Kamloops This Week is looking for a driver and crew to deliver open routes Wednesday and Friday mornings (approx. 4 hours per delivery day). A delivery vehicle will be provided. Pay is $14 per hour. Candidates must have a Class 5 drivers licence and be physically able to deliver newspapers (up to 60 addresses per hour). Apply to: ";u;m-Ѵ-|Œ;uķbu1†Ѵ-ঞom ;r-u|l;m| Kamloops This Week 1365B Dalhousie Drive, V2C 5P6 Ph: 250-374-0462, Fax: 250-374-1033 1bu1†Ѵ-ঞomŠh-lѴoorv|_bv‰;;hĺ1ol


A38

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

Help Wanted

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

LOOKING FOR DOOR TO DOOR CARRIERS

Kids & Adults needed! DOWNTOWN

Rte 308 - 355 9thAve, 703977 St. Paul St. – 40 p Rte 311- 423-676 1st Ave, 440-533 2nd Ave, 107-237 Battle St, 135-137 St Paul St. – 30 p. Rte 317 - 535-649 7th Ave. 702-794 Columbia St,(evenside)702-799 Nicola St.-46 p Rte 319 - 545 6th Ave, 609-690 Columbia St,(evenside), 604-692 Nicola St.-16 p Rte 320 – 483-587 9th Ave, 801-991 Battle St, 804-992 Columbia St (Even Side), 803-995 Nicola St. - 51 p. Rte 322 - 694 11th Ave, 575-694 13th Ave, 1003-1091 Battle St, 1008-1286 Columbia St, 1004- 1314 Nicola St. – 61 p Rte 324 – 606-795 Pine St. – 29 p. Rte 325 - 764-825 9th Ave, 805-979 Columbia St(odd side), 804-987 Dominion St, 805-986 Pine St.-65p Rte 327 – 1003 Columbia St, 1203-1296 Dominion St. – 38 p. Rte 328 – 935 13th Ave, Cloverleaf Cres, Dominion Cres, Pine Cres, Park Cres. – 62 p. Rte 331 – 984-987 9th Ave, 1125 10th Ave, 901-981 Dominion St, 902-999 Munro St, 806-990 Pleasant St. – 37 p. Rte 333 – 1005-1090 Pine St, 1003-1176 Pleasant St. -39 p. Rte 339 - 1265-1401 9TH Ave, 916-1095 Fraser St. – 49 p Rte 372 - 22-255 W. Battle St, 660 Lee Rd, 11-179 W. Nicola St. – 53 papers Rte 380 - Arbutus St, Chaparral Pl, Powers Rd, Sequoia Pl. – 71 p Rte 385 – 350-390 W. Battle St, Strathcona Terr. – 30 p. Rte 387 – 643-670 McBeth Pl. – 22 p.

Rte 389 – Bluff Pl, 390 Centre Ave, 242-416 W. Columbia St, Dufferin Terr, Garden Terr, Grandview Terr. – 61 p. Rte 390 – Fernie Crt, 158-400 Fernie Pl, Guerin Creek Way. – 49 p.

Rte 603 – Chickadee Rd, Comazzetto Rd, Strom Rd, 1625-1648 & 1652-1769 Valleyview Dr.- 44 Rte 605 – 1770-1919 Glenwood Dr, Knollwood Dr, Vicars Rd. – 64 p. Rte 606 – Orchard Dr, Russet Wynd, 1815-1899 Valleyview Dr. – 41 p. Rte 608 – Curlew Rd & Pl, 1925-1980 Glenwood Dr. - 73 p. Rte 612 – 2079 Falcon Rd, Flamingo Rd, 2040-2177 Glenwood Dr. – 64 p. Rte 613 - 2210-2291 Crescent Dr, 115-155 Highland Rd, 2244-2296 Park Dr,2207-2385 E TCH-64 p Rte 620 – MacAdam Rd, McKay Pl, Pyper Way, 25162580 Valleyview Dr. – 70 p. Rte 621 – Duck Rd, Skelly Rd, 96 Tanager Dr, 2606-2876 Thompson Dr. – 50 p.

LOWER SAHALI/SAHALI Rte 401 - 250-395 Pemberton Terrace, 395-425 Pemberton Terrace – 84 p. Rte 403 – 405-482 Greenstone Dr, Tod Cres. – 28 p. Rte 405 – Anvil Cres, 98-279 Bestwick Dr, Bestwick Crt E. & W, Morrisey Pl. – 49 p. Rte 453 - 1575-1580 Springhill Drive – 73 p. Rte 470 – Farnham Wynd, 102-298 Waddington Dr. – 67 p. Rte 472 - 1750-1795 Summit Dr. – 34 p Rte 474 – Coppertree Ct, Trophy Crt. – 20 p. Rte 482 - 101-403 Robson Dr. – 67 p Rte 484 - 1923-2069 Gladstone Dr, 1869-1888 Gladstone Pl,611-680 Robson Dr,695 Robson Dr-64p Rte 492 – 2000-2099 Monteith Dr, Sentinel Crt. – 38 p.

RAYLEIGH

Rte 830 – Chetwynd Dr, Stevens Dr. – 56 p. Rte 833 – Cameron Rd, Davie Rd. – 44 p. Rte 836 – 133-197 Cahilty Cres, 150-187 Hyas Pl, 4551-4648 Spurraway Rd. – 36 p. Rte 837 – 103-190 Helmcken Dr, 4654-4802 Spurraway Rd. – 22 p. Rte 842 – 3945-4691 Yellowhead Hwy. – 35 p.

ABERDEEN

Rte 510 - 372-586 Aberdeen Dr, 402-455 Laurier Dr. – 42 p

DALLAS/ BARNHARTVALE

JUNIPER

Rte 655 – 1685 Finlay Ave, 2202-2385, 2416-2458 (Even Side) Skeena Dr. – 36 p. Rte 670 - 1900-2099 Galore Cres, 1600-1647 Galore Crt, 1712-1799 Galore Pl. - 107 p.

Rte 701 – Freda Ave, Klahanie Dr, Morris Pl, Shelly Dr, 901-935 Todd Rd. – 91 p. Rte 706 – 1078-1298 Lamar Dr, Molin Pl, - 29 p. Rte 750 - 5101-5299 Dallas Dr, Mary Pl, Nina Pl, Rachel Pl-31p Rte 751 – 5310 Barnhartvale Rd, Bogetti Pl, 5300-5599 Dallas Dr, 5485-5497 ETC Hwy, Viking Dr,

VALLEYVIEW

Rte 602 – Apple Lane, Knollwood Cres, Parkhill Dr, 1783 Valleyview Dr. – 47 p.

Wade Pl. – 64 p. Rte 754 – Hillview Dr, Mountview Dr. – 39 p. Rte 755 – 6159-6596 Dallas Dr, McAuley, Melrose, Yarrow. – 72 p. Rte 759 – Beverly Pl, 6724-7250 Furrer Rd, McIver Pl, Pat Rd, Stockton Rd. – 40 p. Rte 760 – Beaver Cres, Chukar Dr. – 64 p. Rte 761 – 6022-6686 Furrer Rd, Houston Pl, Parlow Rd, Pearse Pl, Urban Rd. – 57 p.

Rte 30 – 1810-1897 Fleetwood Ave, 995-1085 Southill St. – 33 p. Rte 121 - 103-105 Dot St, 501-556 McKenzie Ave, 290-381 Maple St, 102-196 Yew St. – 55 p. Rte 123 - 301-599 Royal Ave. – 37 p Rte 151 - 1020-1132 7th St, 1024-1112 8th St, Berkley Pl, Dundas St, Richmond Ave-72 p

BATCHELOR

Rte 175 – 1800-1899 Norfolk Crt, Norview Pl, 821-991 Norview Rd. – 38 p. Rte 183 – 2003-2074 Saddleback Dr, 2003-2085 Grasslands Blvd. – 74 p. Rte 187 – 2100-2130 Doubletree Cres, 1050-1100 Latigo Dr, 21002169 Saddleback Dr. – 56 p, Rte 246 - 806-970 Mcarthur Dr, 819-931 McConnell Cres. – 56 p. Rte 253 - Irving P, 2401-2477 Parkview Dr, Rhonmohe Cres, 2380&2416 Westsyde Rd.-54p Rte 258 - 806-879 McQueen Dr, 2136-2199 Perryville P. – 36p Rte 260 - 2040 – 2185 Westsyde Rd. – 24 p.

Pets PETS For Sale? TRI-CITY SPECIAL!

9029288

for only $46.81/week, we will place your classified ad into Kamloops, Vernon & Salmon Arm. (250)371-4949

classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com *some restrictions apply.

TRU invites applications for the following positions:

Merchandise for Sale $500 & Under

FACULTY School of Trades & Technology (3 positions): Instrumentation & Control Technician Piping Trades (Gasfitter-Class A) Trade Sampler Program

Call our Classified Department for details!

250-371-4949 *some restrictions apply

We wish to thank all applicants; however, only those under consideration will be contacted.

Work Wanted Experienced caregiver looking for full time live in position caring for elderly person or couple. (250) 299-8582 HOME & YARD HANDYMAN If you need it done, Give us a call ! Steve 250-320-7774.

RUN TILL

RENTED * RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Work Wanted Job wanted by Computer Programmer-Analyst /Office Worker/Tutor Detail oriented, organized, problem-solver, extremely computer literate. Strong proofreading, editing, technical writing, public speaking skills. Can teach practically anything I know. IT work preferred but any job using problem-solving skills could be a good match. Gene Wirchenko at 250-8281474. genew@telus.net

Pets

Animals sold as “purebred stock” must be registrable in compliance with the Canadian Pedigree Act.

SOLD

3500

250-371-4949

Firewood/Fuel ALL SEASON FIREWOOD. For delivery birch, fir & pine. Stock up now. Campfire wood. (250) 377-3457.

Furniture 8ft Antique Couch $900. Round dining room table w/4chairs & 2 bar stools. $700. Couch & matching chairs $200. 250-374-1541. Diningroom table w/8-chairs, c/w Buffet and Hutch. Med Colour. $850. 250-374-8933.

Misc. for Sale

Pets

RUN TILL $

250-260-0110 Misc. for Sale

Apt/Condos for Sale

EARN EXTRA $$$

RiverBend 2bdrms, full kitchen. W/D, 920 sq/ft. $349,000. 780-904-3551 or 250-6721946 or 778-470-8338. The Willows 55+ condos across from Northills Mall. 2bdrms, 5appl. $210,000$269,000. 250-376-6637 or 250-376-8824.

KTW requires door to door substitute carriers for all areas in the city. Vehicle is an asset Call 250-374-0462 Fishing Kayak 10ft. $450. IGO Titan 36 Electric Bike w/battery. $900. 778-4711096.

Misc. Wanted

PLUS TAX

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

5th wheel hitch $300. Ford air flow tailgate w/lock black $160. 250-374-8285. Butcher-Boy commercial meat grinder 3-hp. 220 volt. c/w attachments. $1800. 250318-2030. Carboys 23L. $30. 11.5L $20. 1-gal jugs $3/each. Bottle dry rack $15. 250-376-0313. Drywall Lifter to install drywall asking $140 (250) 851-6195

RENTED

$5300 Plus Tax

3 Lines - 12 Weeks

Add an extra line to your ad for $10 Must be pre-paid Scheduled for 4 weeks at a time Private parties only - no businesses Some Restrictions Apply

RUN TILL

RENTED * RESTRICTIONS APPLY

1365 DALHOUSIE DRIVE

250-371-4949

Misc. Wanted Scrap Car Removal

Scrap Car Removal

100 Mile House, B.C.

WANTED: PULPWOOD Dead, Alive or Scorched 1JOFt4QSVDFt'JSt"TQFO

Please recycle this newspaper.

For Sale By Owner

Please contact us at

250-395-6218

For Sale By Owner $55.00 Special!

Misc. for Sale

For Sale By Owner

Hockey Gear fits 5’4” 120 lbs, brand new + skates 6.5 size. Serious inquires only $650/obo. for all. Call 9-6pm 250-374-7992.

2018 - 16x58 Mobile Home. 2bdrms, 2bths. Pad $400. Patio, shed, gas heat. $165,000/obo. 250-819-0227.

La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX climbing boots, men size 10. New. $500. 2-161cm Snowboards. Never used $375. Gently used. $325. 578-7776. MISC4Sale: Oak Table Chairs-$400, Call 250-8511346 after 6pm or leave msg.

Mobile Homes & Parks

OSPREY The special includes a 1x1.5 ad (including photo) that will run for one week (two editions) in Kamloops This Week. Our award winning paper is delivered to over 30,000 homes in Kamloops every Wednesday and Friday.

HOME & LAND PACKAGES Starting as low as $603.07 bi-weekly

Call or email us for more info:

BY OWNER

250-374-7467

classifieds@ kamloopsthisweek.com

Houses For Sale

$55.00 Special!

Includes Free 1 Year Home Insurance

Call or email for more info:

your item in our classifieds for

tru.ca/careers

Need extra $ $ $ Kamloops This Week is currently hiring Substitute Carriers for door-to-door deliveries. Call 250-374-0462 for more information.

REIMER’S FARM SERVICES

Did you know that you can place

For further information, please visit:

RUN TILL

- Regular & Screened Sizes -

Do you have an item for sale under $750?

one week for FREE?

Temporary/ PT/Seasonal

BARK MULCH FIR OR CEDAR

WESTSYDE

INTERESTED IN A ROUTE? Career Opportunities

Livestock

SHAVINGS & SAWDUST 10 TO 150 YARD LOADS

BROCKLEHURSTS/ NORTH SHORE

For more information call the Circulation department 250-374-0462

Career Opportunities

Livestock

ROLL ENDS AVAILABLE $5-$10/ ROLL 1365 B Dalhousie Drive Kamloops BC call for availability 250-374-7467

Misc. Wanted

250-374-7467 classifieds@

1.866.573.1288 or

kamloopsthisweek.com

RUN TILL SOLD Turn your stuff

INTO CA$H

eaglehomes.ca

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

RENTED

ONLINE Under the Real Estate Tab

SOLD

Free Items

RUN TILL

3500

RUN TILL $

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

250.573.2278

CHECK US OUT

PLUS TAX

250-371-4949

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Free Items

Free Items

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

001 Able buyer of all your old coins,coin collections,R.C. MINT COINS, all silver, gold, rare, common, old money.+ Todd The Coin Guy (250)-864-3521

BUYING gold dust,gold nuggets,coins, jewelry, scrap gold+, antique silver, all sterling, silverware, bullion, bars, collections of coins+. (250)-864-3521 Christine is Buying Vintage Jewellery, Gold, Silver, Coins, Sterling, China, Estates, etc. 1-778-281-0030 Housecalls.

Musical Instruments 2-3/4 French and German Violins c/w case/bows. $150$250. 250-434-6738.

TIME TO DECLUTTER? ask us about our

RUN TILL SOLD SPECIAL

Packages start at $35 Non-business ads only • Some restrictions apply

1365 DALHOUSIE DRIVE

250-371-4949


FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Mobile Homes & Parks

HOME & LAND PACKAGE STARTING AT

5% Down

$615 Bi-Weekly Custom Floor Plan Call us at

250.573.2278 or toll free at

Recreation **BOOK NOW FOR BEST WEEKS IN 2019** Shuswap Lake! 5 Star Resort in Scotch Creek BC. REST & RELAX ON THIS PRIVATE CORNER LOT. Newer 1bdrm, 1-bath park model sleeps 4 . Tastefully decorated guest cabin for 2 more. One of only 15 lots on the beautiful sandy beach with a wharf for your boat. Provincial park, Golf, Grocery/Liquor store & Marina all minutes away. Resort has 2 pools, 2 hot tubs, Adult & Family Clubhouse, Park, Playground. Only $1,400 week. BOOK NOW! Rental options available for 3 & 4 day, 1 week, 2 week & monthly. Call for more information. 1-250-371-1333.

Shared Accommodation

866.573.1288

Downtown for quiet N.S. Male, student or working male. $500/mo. 236-425-1499.

eaglehomes.ca

Suites, Lower

RUN TILL

1BDRM Sep. Entr. Shared Lndry. N/S N/P $900/mo+DD+ ref’s, util. incl. Brock 554-2228

SOLD

3500

$

PLUS TAX

250-371-4949 * RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Rentals

Avail. w/ref. 2bdrm Kit/liv, sep ent, patio, nice yrd $950 376-0633

Suites, Upper Brand New Westsyde 3bdrm 2bth w/garage $2500 plus util n/s, n/p (250) 682-5338

Want to Rent

Apt/Condo for Rent

Senior Citizen looking for rental $825 per mth, very quiet, long term rental 250-299-5114

Northland Apartments

Transportation

Renovated Bachelor Suites $975. Renovated 1&2 Bedroom Suites with New Fixtures; SS Appliances; Luxury Plank Flooring. Adult Oriented, No Pets, No Smoking Elevators / Common Laundry $1,050 - 1,750 per month. North Shore 250-376-1427 South Shore 250-314-1135 nnkamloops@northland.ca nskamloops@northland.ca

Bed & Breakfast BC Best Buy Classifieds

Antiques / Classics

for more information

4-Avalanche X-treme winters on rims 275/60/R20 fits 1/2T Dodge truck 5-stud. $1450. 250-573-5635.

1989 Mercedes 560 SEC. 61,000kms. Hagerty Appraisals #2 car $10,000USD. Selling $10,000 CDN 250-574-3794

Homes for Rent

Auto Accessories/Parts

N/Shore 3bdrms, 2bath, W/D, DW. Garage, fenced yard. $1900/mo +util. 778-471-1740

4-Goodyear Noridc winter tires. P215/65/R17 on winter rims. $400/obo. 250-375-2375.

1994 Fleetwood Cobra 37.5 ft. 5th Wheel. $6000 trade for 1 ton diesel p/up 250-299-9342.

Cars - Domestic 1999 - 32ft. Southwind. Slide, V-10, Jacks, Solar, Generator, Dual-air, TV’s, Vacuum, Inverter etc. Low kms. $31,500 250-828-0466

2010 Dodge Charger SXT Sedan. 4dr., AWD, V-6, auto. 50,001 kms. Excellent condition. $12,900. 250-374-1541.

2005, 38’ RV trailer 2 slides, sleeps 6, appl incld, fully loaded, $16,900. 236-421-2251

BUSINESSES & SERVICES Financial Services

Handypersons

Home Improvements

GET BACK ON TRACK!

RICKS’S SMALL HAUL

Renovations, finishing sundecks, framing hourly or contract. 604-240-1920.

Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

For all Deliveries & Dump Runs. Extra large dump trailers for rent. Dump Truck Long and Short Hauls!!

Fitness/Exercise

Home Improvements

250-377-3457

WE will pay you to exercise!

Only 2 issues a week!

2015 CHRYSLER 200 Like new only 15000 km, white exterior, & interior leather $27,500 obo call 250-819-0918 or 250-5543331 Absolute gorgeous 03 Cadillac Deville one owner low kms $3,800.00/obo 250-554-0580

RUN UNTIL SOLD

New Price $56.00+tax

Do you have a vehicle, boat, rv, or trailer to sell? With our Run til sold specials you pay one flat rate and we will run your ad until your vehicle sells.* • $56.00 (boxed ad with photo) • $35.00 (regular 3 line ad)

PETER’S YARD SERVICE

Time to Prune Your Fruit Trees Tree Pruning or Removal Licensed & Certied

250-572-0753

call 250-374-0462 for a route near you!

Run until sold

Landscaping

Yard clean-up, Hedge trimming

Deliver Kamloops This Week

2013 Keystone Fusion Toy Hauler slps 9, 41ft 12ft garage asking $65,000 250-374-4723

Misc Services

Cleaning Services

JA ENTERPRISES Furniture Moving and Rubbish Removal jaenterpriseskam@gmail.com 778-257-4943

Springs Home Cleaning Services

Call for your free estimate today Call Spring at (250) 574-5482

Home Improvements

Home Improvements .

Call: 250-371-4949

*Some conditions & restrictions apply. Private party only (no businesses).

Scrap Car Removal

ONLY $35.00(plus Tax) (250)371-4949 *some restrictions apply call for details

Cars - Sports & Imports

1965 Mercury 4dr., hardtop. 55,000 miles. 390-330HP. $4,000. 250-574-3794. 1978 Ford T. Bird hardtop. 160,000kms. One owner, like new. $2695. 250-374-8285.

Recreational/Sale

4 - Goodyear Winter tires with rims. 215/75/R15. off GMC Sonoma $200. 250-377-3002.

2007 one owner 207 Type S Acura T/L 210,000km Exc cond. $8500 (250) 828-2331

Place your classified ad in over 71 Papers across BC. Call 250-371-4949

Auto Accessories/Parts

Snowmobiles 2003 Arctic Cat 600 EFI - 1M Mountain Cat 144” track, 1582 miles as new cond trailer avail $2900/obo. (250)376-3881 or 250-371-7605

Sport Utility Vehicle Silver 2006 Mazda RX8 136,000km. Auto or Manual, Sunroof, A/C, leather heated seats, great body, tires and interior, Suicide style back doors. $7900. 250-376-7672 Financing avail 855-600-7750

Motorcycles Wanted: HARLEY GEAR. Chaps, Jacket, Vest and Gloves. Ladies Medium and Mens Xlg. Send pics to: rajol@telus.net

Off Road Vehicles Yamaha Grizzly ATV. KMS 011031 $4,500 250-579-3252

1997 Ford Expedition. 200,000+kms. New brakes. Runs well. $3,700. 372-5033.

Transportation

Transportation

Trucks & Vans

Trucks & Vans

2004 Toyota Tundra Double Cab 4WD, 4.7L, $2500. deborahbkly@gmail.com

2013 Hyundai Tucson BLACK. Clean title, FWD, 108,000km, 2 sets of tires. $10,400/obo 250-319-8292 for info.

RUN TILL SOLD Turn your stuff

INTO CA$H

Trucks & Vans

RUN TILL

RENTED CLASSIFIEDS 250-374-7467

2014 Ford Platinum 4x4 Immaculate F150 Supercrew, 3.5 Ecoboost, Sun Roof, white, brown leather, Fully Loaded Only $36,800 250-319-8784

RUN TILL

RENTED

1996 GMC Suburban 4x4 good shape runs great $2900obo Call (250) 571-2107

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY * RESTRICTIONS APPLY

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

RUN TILL RENTED

$53

00

1365 DALHOUSIE DRIVE

250-371-4949

A39

Plus Tax

3 Lines - 12 Weeks

Add an extra line to your ad for $10 Must be pre-paid Scheduled for 4 weeks at a time Restrictions Apply. Call for details.


A40

FRIDAY, February 1, 2019

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

THE LITTLE DODGE STORE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY!

DL#C3287

2018 RAM 1500

25%

GET

#180183

FINANCE FOR*

282/bi-weekly

$

OFF MSRP! +NO PAYMENT FOR 90 DAYS ON SELECT MODELS AT 4.99% OAC. WITH 0 DOWN PAYMENT FOR 96 MONTHS.

2019 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

15%

GET

FINANCE FOR*

OFF MSRP! +NO PAYMENT FOR 90 DAYS ON SELECT MODELS

323/bi-weekly

$

AT 4.99% OAC. WITH 0 DOWN PAYMENT FOR 96 MONTHS.

#190185

2019 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

30%

GET

FINANCE FOR* #190171

OFF MSRP! +NO PAYMENT FOR 90 DAYS ON SELECT MODELS

188/bi-weekly

$

AT 4.99% OAC. WITH 0 DOWN PAYMENT FOR 96 MONTHS.

2019 JEEP CHEROKEE

15%

GET

FINANCE FOR*

OFF MSRP!

74/WK

$

+NO PAYMENT FOR 90 DAYS ON SELECT MODELS AT 4.79% OAC. WITH 0 DOWN PAYMENT FOR 96 MONTHS.

2018 DODGE JOURNEY

GET

6,200

$

FINANCE FOR*

221/bi-weekly

$

IN TOTAL DISCOUNTS +NO PAYMENT FOR 90 DAYS ON SELECT MODELS AT 4.99% OAC. WITH 0 DOWN PAYMENT FOR 84 MONTHS.

#180290

2525 E. TRANS CANADA HWY, KAMLOOPS, BC | 778-761-5477 | WWW.KAMLOOPSDODGE.COM *Estimated Loan Payments: 4.99% purchase financing for up to 96 months on approved credit: #190185 Selling Price of $55,389.00 with a $0.00 down payment, financed at 4.99% for 96 months with a cost of borrowing of $11,840.76 and a total obligation of $67,229.76, #190171 Selling Price of $32,210.00 with a $0.00 down payment, financed at 4.99% for 96 months with a cost of borrowing of $6,885.68 and a total obligation of $39,095.68, #190025 Selling Price of $52,550.00 with a $0.00 down payment, financed at 4.99% for 96 months with a cost of borrowing of $11,235.28 and a total obligation of $63,785.28, #180183 Selling Price of $48,327.00 with a $0.00 down payment, financed at 4.99% for 96 months with a cost of borrowing of $10,331.08 and a total obligation of $58,658.08. 4.99% purchase financing for up to 84 months on approved credit: #180290 Selling Price of $33,905.00 with a $0.00 down payment, financed at 4.99% for 84 months with a cost of borrowing of $6,296.98 and a total obligation of $40,201.98. In ON/BC/SASK/ALTA/MAN and QC, total obligation includes freight, A/C, OMVIC/AMVIC fee, tire levy, administration charges and all other retailer charges and excludes taxes, licence, insurance, and new tire duties (in QC). In the Maritimes and the Territories, "Total Obligation" may NOT include freight ($1,795), A/C, tire levy, administration and other dealer charges, taxes, licence and insurance. Financing details are representative of what you may have to pay. See your retailer for complete details. Offers are subject to change without notice. Offer Expires Jan 31, 2019.

Profile for KamloopsThisWeek

Kamloops This Week Feburary 1, 2019  

Kamloops This Week Feburary 1, 2019

Kamloops This Week Feburary 1, 2019  

Kamloops This Week Feburary 1, 2019

Advertisement