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DECEMBER 5, 2018 | Volume 21 No. 97

WEATHER Sunny and cold High -3 C Low -10 C SNOW REPORT Sun Peaks Resort Mid-mountain: 72 cm Alpine: 89 cm Harper Mountain Not yet open

WEDNESDAY

THE NEW PRESIDENT

BACK IN ‘W’ COLUMN

Brett Fairbairn begins his term at helm of TRU

Kamloops Blazers riding a modest winning streak

SPORTS/A35

NEWS/A6

Lake says no mislabelled pot spray sold TIM PETRUK STAFF REPORTER tim@kamloopsthisweek.com

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

GREEN WITH ANGST

As the expression on the face of Moose the dog illustrates, The Grinch is indeed a mean one. Moose, a Newfioundland cross, visited Petland on the weekend with Shrek the orange tabby cat and owner Sara King. It is when the trio posed for a photo with the scourge of Whoville that Moose’s tru feelings for the thing in green became crystal clear. Petland, at Notre Dame Drive and Dalhousie Drive, is staging pet photos with The Grinch and Santa Claus on alternating Saturdays, with the $10 fee going to the Kamloops Humane Society.

A former Kamloops mayor and MLA who is now an executive at a Quebec-based cannabis supplier says his company is “extremely confident” a Thompson Rivers University student is incorrect in her claim to have used mislabelled pot spray — a product expected to undergo scientific testing to determine its contents. Terry Lake, vice-president of Hexo Corporation, said his company’s staffers noticed a discrepancy in their warehouse after sending a shipment of CBD spray to government-owned B.C. Cannabis. “We sent a shipment to the LDB (B.C. Liquor Distribution Branch, which also distributes cannabis) and, shortly thereafter, it was discovered there were six bottles in our processing area that should have gone out with that shipment,” Lake told KTW, noting the incorrect products were found at a Richmond warehouse and disposed of before any were shipped to stores. Hexo was concerned some of its high-THC oral spray had been mislabelled as being high in CBD. THC is the intoxicating cannabinoid in cannabis, while CBD use is commonly associated with relaxation rather than a high. B.C. Cannabis sent an email on Nov. 20 to anyone who purchased the CBD spray, informing them of the mixup. “No customer ever got any of the mislabelled product,” Lake said. “We are extremely confident in that statement.” B.C. Cannabis is standing by Hexo. See LAWYER, A4

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WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

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LOCAL NEWS

Singh met with MPs, senators in Ottawa

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Coun. Arjun Singh was among dozens of local government officials who were on Parliament Hill in Ottawa last week for the Federation of Canadian Municipalities’ annual advocacy days. About 80 local government officials met and discussed issues with MPs and senators over the course of about 150 meetings. Areas of focus included extreme weather, transit funding, universal broadband and local government engage-

ARJUN SINGH

ment. “It was a very productive thing,” Singh said. “They seemed like the federal government, the federal parties, are actually thinking a lot about our issues. “But, obviously, it will come out more in

the federal budget in 2019 — also when the platforms come out in the election in 2019, as well.” Singh said officials met with people from all parties. He met with the Green party’s Elizabeth May, Independent Sen. Larry Campbell and Liberal MP Stephen Fuhr of Kelowna. Singh was acclaimed president of the Union of BC Municipalities in September, during the annual convention. The four-term city councillor was previously vicepresident for the organization and had been on the executive for five years.

Board appointments for new city council photo: Caroline Slade Photography

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The city’s new councillors have been given more duties. Arjun Singh and Denis Walsh have been appointed to the Venture Kamloops board, while Mayor Ken Christian and councillors Kathy Sinclair and Bill Sarai are on the Kamloops Airport Authority. In addition, councillors have been appointed as liaisons to external

agencies: Kamloops Chamber of Commerce (Sadie Hunter), North Shore Business Improvement Association (Christian), Municipal Insurance Association (Dieter Dudy), Fraser Basin Council (Singh), Tourism Kamloops (Dudy), Kamloops Foundation (Mike O’Reilly) and Kamloops Art Gallery board (Dale Bass).

Lawyer says CBD spray is being tested From A1

“After having carried out a comprehensive examination of inventory, Hexo determined that no mislabelled product was sold to customers,” reads an emailed statement to KTW from the LDB. Last week, TRU student Kimberley Webster filed a notice of claim in B.C. Supreme Court, stating she purchased CBD spray and used it, then experienced the effects of THC. In an interview with KTW, she said she was, at one point, scared of a couch. Webster’s notice of claim states her use of cannabis also negatively impacted her performance as a student. Webster described herself as being largely unfamiliar with the effects of cannabis use, but she was co-author with TRU psychol-

ogy professor Chris Montoya of an article earlier this year about the dangers of marijuana on university campuses. The headline of the piece, which appeared online at theconversation. com, was Marijuana-friendly campuses? I don’t think so. Webster referred questions this week to her lawyer, Dustin Gagnon, who said he is working with Hexo to get the product Webster purchased tested in a lab. “I’ve been contacted by Hexo’s lawyer and we’re in the process of working through a feasible testing process,” Gagnon said. Webster’s notice of civil claim lists Hexo, B.C. Cannabis stores and the B.C. Liquor Distribution Branch, the arm of government responsible for distributing marijuana in the province, as defendants. None of Webster’s claims have been proven in court.


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

A5

DID YOU KNOW? Cooney Road and Cooney Bay are named for Charles Thomas Cooney, who settled in Kamloops in 1867 and moved to Tranquille in 1869. — Kamloops Museum and Archives

NEWS FLASH? Call 778-471-7525 or email tips@kamloopsthisweek.com

INSIDE KTW Viewpoint/Your Opinion . . . . A8-9 National News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A21 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A26 Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A27 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A35 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A43

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Kamloops Fire Rescue responded to a vehicle fire on Tuesday morning on West Seymour Street downtown. Crews were quick to extinguish the flames that destroyed the family van parked next to their home. There were no injuries reported and the flames were prevented from reaching the nearby home. Cause of the fire is under investigation.

youtube.com/user/ KamloopsThisWeek/videos Instagram: @kamloopsthisweek

Firefighters save house from flames SAYS RESIDENT: ‘IF WE’D BEEN INSIDE, WE MIGHT NOT HAVE NOTICED AND THAT WOULD HAVE BLOWN THE HOUSE UP’ TIM PETRUK STAFF REPORTER tim@kamloopsthisweek.com

HOW TO REACH US: Kamloops This Week 1365-B Dalhousie Dr . Kamloops, B .C ., V2C 5P6 Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Circulation 250-374-0462 classifieds@kamloopsthisweek .com publisher@kamloopsthisweek .com editor@kamloopsthisweek .com

A Kamloops woman who lost her vehicle in a fire Tuesday morning says she is grateful the flames were extinguished before reaching her home. Emergency crews were called to a report of a house fire in the 300-block of Seymour Street West downtown just before 11 a.m. and arrived to find a van on fire. “I came back home from a quick trip out and went inside,”

Anne Goddard told KTW. “My roommate was out walking the dog. He comes inside and says the van’s on fire. I started to panic a bit.” Goddard said she called 911. The van was parked adjacent to Goddard’s garage. Firefighters doused the blaze before it could spread to the structure. “If we’d been inside, we might not have noticed it and that would have blown the house up,” Goddard said. “I just told the fire-

fighters I just put a half tank of gas in there.” Goddard said she is now stranded without her vehicle. “I don’t know what I’m going to do,” she said. “We’re both disabled and my friend gave me that van so I could get to appointments and around town. “We don’t have kids, so if we don’t have a Christmas, that’s OK. We’ll have a turkey or a ham and we’ll be OK.” The investigation into the cause of the fire is ongoing.

Kamloops remains largely bereft of snow so far this fall and temperatures have been relatively mild, but one of those two scenarios will change this week. The first cold snap of the season is on its way, with sunshine and shivering in the forecast. Environment Canada said Wednesday through Friday will bring in cold weather, with highs reaching -3 C to -8 C on all three days and overnight lows dipping to -10 C on Wednesday and -12 C on Thursday and Friday. Sun and clouds are expected for the weekend, with a high of 0 C and a low of -2 C forecast for Sunday. The November that just passed was warm, with all 30 days recording a daily high above 0 C. The warmest day was Nov. 2 (14.5 C), with the lowest temperature occurring on Nov. 8 (-6.9 C).

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WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

New TRU president talks academic freedom MICHAEL POTESTIO

STAFF REPORTER

michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

The new president of Thompson Rivers University said it would still be illegal for him to disclose the reason for suspending an economics professor regardless of being given permission to do so by the suspended faculty member. Addressing reporters on Monday, his first

day on the job, Brett Fairbairn, who succeeds Alan Shaver, said the university isn’t at liberty to share personal information even if someone else has already shared that information in the public sphere as per B.C.’s freedom of information and protection of privacy legislation. Economics professor Derek Pyne was suspended by the university earlier this year.

He said he was banned from the campus in May and suspended in July due to his research into faculty at TRU and elsewhere paying to have papers published in dubious scholarly journals — also known as predatory journals. “I like transparency as much as the next person. I appreciate it when people call for transparency, but when people call for the reasons for a

personnel action to be shared, they’re really asking for the university to break the law and we’re not going to do that,” Fairbairn said. Fairbairn’s comments contradict what his predecessor — interim president Christine BovisCnossen — has said with respect to releasing information. On Nov. 19, Mark Mercer, president of the Society for

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Academic Freedom and Scholarship, emailed Bovis-Cnossen, urging transparency in the Pyne matter: “It is unfortunate that you cannot be more forthcoming about the reasons for Dr. Pyne’s suspension. You’ve made assurances that Dr. Pyne’s suspension has nothing to do with his exercising his academic freedom to involve himself in the affairs of his university and to make his criticisms known. “But until the accusations against Dr. Pyne and their grounds become public, I’m afraid independent observers must at least reserve judgment. Surely transparency in this matter would be to everyone’s benefit.” To which BovisCnossen responded on Nov. 21: “Under the relevant privacy legislation in British Columbia (the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act), the university is prohibited from disclosing personal information about Dr. Pyne without his prior written consent. “Accordingly, the uni-

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“I understand the university’s position is that the matters for which he may have experienced a discipline are not matters of academic freedom, so they’re not related to the content of his teaching, or his research, nor are they related to criticism of the university. “They are related to other matters I’d characterize as employment-related matters,” Fairbairn said. When contacted by KTW in mid-November, Pyne said he has indeed been suspended because of his research into so-called predatory journals. The research formed a paper, The Rewards of Predatory Publications at a Small Business School, which was published by University of Toronto Press Journal of Scholarly Publishing. Concerning the issue of predatory journals, Fairbairn said it’s a significant issue that needs to be discussed at the faculty committee and department head levels. “In some cases, page charges to authors is a good thing,” Fairbairn said.

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versity has no decision to make in this regard since the law is clear in its prohibition of disclosing personal information without the prior written consent of the person the information is about.” One hour after BovisCnossen sent that email to Mercer, Pyne contacted Bovis-Cnossen and consented to his personal information being disclosed to the Canadian Association of University Teachers, which is investigating his complaint. “I am also giving TRUFA the same written consent,” Pyne write. “Thus, when reporters ask you, you no longer have to give qualified answers about your cooperation with the CAUT investigation.” Fairbairn said he is familiar with the Pyne case from stories in the media, noting he has also been briefed “at a high level” by TRU officials. “I haven’t read the documentation. I haven’t read the file,” Fairbairn said. “That is certainly something I look forward to doing, depending how events progress in [the] future.”

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WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A7

LOCAL NEWS “As a non-specialist in any given field, I can’t say which journals are high quality, which are low quality, when page charges are justified,” he said. “It really is the faculty members in that field that need to judge that and I certainly would expect our [faculty] committees at TRU to be looking at hiring and tenure and promotion files with that in mind.” In some cases, Fairbairn said, page charges to an author are done in order to make the journal free to subscribers. “The term predatory journal, I don’t think, is self-explanatory,” he said. Pyne has asked the Ottawa-based Canadian Association of University Teachers to investigate his complaint that his academic freedom has been violated. TRU administration has said it will not take part in the probe, arguing CAUT does not have authority or jurisdiction to probe issues covered in the collective agreement — a sentiment Fairbairn echoed on Monday. As a former faculty member himself, Fairbairn said he views academic freedom as fundamental “to what a university’s about and fundamental to every faculty position. “I’ve criticized my administration and my union and I expect other faculty members to be

prepared to do the same, so I will support them to do so,” he said. Fairbairn comes to TRU with more than 30 years of experience as a teacher and researcher at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon. In 2014, Fairbairn was provost and vicepresident academic at the University of Saskatchewan when he fired a tenured professor, Robert Buckingham, for criticizing budget cuts at the university. Following protests by students and staff, and criticism from across Canada and outside of the country, Buckingham was reinstated as professor. Fairbairn resigned as provost, but continued teaching, and the university’s president, Ilene Bush-Vishniac, was fired, but kept on faculty in a teaching position. Fairbairn said he feels the Buckingham case and that of Pyne are “very different from each other.” “I don’t think those cases have anything much in common and they may or may not involve academic freedom,” he said. “That’s one of the issues under discussion in universities these days, is when is academic freedom at issue?” SETTING PRIORITIES Fairbairn’s first priority over the coming

months is about using his ears. “I’m interested in learning more about what makes TRU special,” he said. “I want to hear about people’s concerns and the opportunities they see for the university.” Fairbairn said he has had time since being announced as the next president in April to get to know people and discuss the university’s priorities for the future. “I’m not coming in to deliver answers on those kinds of questions,” he said, noting that listening and working hard will be his mantra. Fairbairn said his compensation will be approximately $287,000, with a one-time moving allowance. His predecessor, Alan Shaver, was paid $226,000 in the last fiscal year in salary, benefits and pension. Fairbairn is a Rhodes scholar and a fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. He completed a doctorate in philosophy in modern history at the University of Oxford and has a bachelor of arts from Oxford (honours first class) and from the University of Saskatchewan. Fairbairn and wife Norma, a ceramic artist, have three adult children, one of whom has special needs. His interests include hiking, photography, science fiction and cats.

Thompson Rivers University president and vice-chancellor Brett Fairbairn Fairbairn has held numerous grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. During his last five years at the University of Saskatchewan, Fairbairn was a professor at the Johnson Shoyama School of Public Policy, teaching about ethical leadership in democracy and public service, social economy and co-operatives in the new economy. He has more than 80 publications, a mix of scholarly and communityoriented writings, and a book he has authored, tentatively titled Risk and Relevance, will be published by the USask Centre for the Study of Co-operatives next spring. MICHAEL POTESTIO/KTW

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WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

Kamloops This Week is a politically independent newspaper, published Wednesdays and Fridays at 1365-B Dalhousie Dr., Kamloops, B.C., V2C 5P6 Phone: 250-374-7467 | Fax: 250-374-1033 email: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. Tim Shoults Operations manager Aberdeen Publishing Inc.

STUDENTS VOTED — BUT HAVE YOU?

D

eadline is nigh — have you filled out and returned your ballot in the province’s mail-in referendum on electoral reform? If you haven’t yet, you are in the majority. According to Elections BC, as of Tuesday morning, 39 per cent of all ballots mailed out had been returned, either via Canada Post or by being dropped off at a Service BC centre (the Kamloops location is in the Kamloops Law Courts building at Columbia Street and Fourth Avenue and is open weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.). The two Kamloops ridings continue to be among the more engaged, with 40.6 per cent of all ballots in Kamloops-South Thompson having been returned and 34.9 per cent of all ballots in Kamloops-North Thompson now in the hands of those at Elections BC. Voters in Parksville-Qualicum are seriously engaged — with 47.2 per cent of all ballots returned as of Tuesday morning — while voters in Surrey-Whalley might need a reminder as only 19.3 per cent of ballots in that riding have thus far been returned. The deadline to return ballots is this Friday (Dec. 7) at 4:30 p.m. You can vote to keep the current first-pastthe-post system or instead vote for B.C. to adopt one of three forms of proportional representation. There is no shortage of information out there, including a video at kamloopsthisweek.com explaining the three PR systems and a point/ counterpoint column debate. Interestingly, students at Westsyde secondary held a vote and have decided to stick with first past the post, with 53 per cent of ballots cast in favour of the status quo and 47 per cent siding with proportional representation. Of those who chose PR, the multi-member option was most popular, followed by dual-member and, finally, rural-urban. Make a choice and vote.

OUR

VIEW

Robert W. Doull President Aberdeen Publishing Inc. EDITORIAL Publisher: Robert W. Doull Editor: Christopher Foulds Newsroom staff: Dave Eagles Tim Petruk Marty Hastings Jessica Wallace Sean Brady Michael Potestio Todd Sullivan SALES STAFF: Don Levasseur Linda Skelly Kate Potter Jodi Lawrence Darlene Kawa Liz Spivey

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Dog-gone mad for Macy

E

verything is new for the nine-week-old west highland terrier puppy that recently moved into my laundry room: sights, sounds and bodily functions But it’s also new for us. The Bosch-Wallace household has its first dog after a year of indecision. She — our sweet girl, Macy — is healthy and happy and was quick to steal our hearts. Despite playing fetch with the idea of adding a dog to our family, reasons to do so prevailed. Man’s best friend would reduce screen time, run alongside my trail squad, provide hubby companionship working from home, improve mental health and curb this burgeoning curmudgeon. A little furball would also temporarily turn down the noisy tick, tick, ticking of my biological clock as we postpone growing our human family to the disappointment of our parents (sorry, mom). Needless to say, it has been quite the few days for these three cubs. Macy — or should I say Macy’s bladder — currently dictates the schedule for all three of us. If Spiderman has a spidey sense, this pooch has a potty sense and that tinkling tingling rules these humans’ lives. The bladder is boss. Take Monday, for example. This column and other stories were written from home to ensure a smooth and successful work week, following an eventful and dedicated first weekend with the new pup. Thankfully, the boss who pays the bills is more flexible than the bladder boss because Jeremy

JESSICA WALLACE Another

VIEW

(hubby) also had the unfortunate timing of a work trip this week. Mom and pup are getting wellacquainted. While typing these very words on my laundry room floor, Macy waddled over, jumped into my lap, hijacked my keyboard and pawed some prose of her own: klmijnihb. That’s computer-dog for: “Play with me, human.” She also managed to call on Siri and bite the corner of my shiny silver MacBook before perching her paws up on my leg and making it incredibly awkward to continue writing due to the obscene amount of space the five-pound pup somehow takes up. But it’s hard to be angry because it’s all just so darn cute — like little girls in pigtails with ice cream on their face cute. And at least she didn’t stumble on the “delete” key. This pup has stolen our hearts. She has also elicited from me an unknown baby voice. Imagine in a high-pitched tone, repeated over and over: “Good girl, Macy. Good girl. Good girl.” Her very presence, no matter how manic her mood, is calming.

Her affection and playfulness are endearing and her curiosity is endlessly entertaining. Macy is constantly learning and it is fun to see the world through her eyes and guide her through new environments and experiences. This week, she has already learned how to wear a collar, run up stairs (but not down), dig a hole in the backyard (grrr), walk through a door, chase a ball (but not return it), go in her kennel, pee on a towel (oops), eat kibbles out of a Kong toy and “go potty” outside. The Globe and Mail remains folded on my kitchen table, temporarily swapped for Cesar Millan books and Simpawtico YouTube training videos. Jer constantly reminds to establish dominance — become the alpha and lead the pack — but it’s hard to say no to that face. Instead, I lean on psychology 101. Positive reinforcement is key, which means there’s a party (and treats in every pocket) when she pees. While admittedly in the honeymoon phase with Macy, the experience for these two first-time dog parents has been positive so far. A friend warned the responsibility is similar to that of having a baby. My sleep schedule agrees. While that was no surprise, we were shocked by the price of dog supplies. I simply refuse to buy dog shampoo that costs far more than product used in my own hair. Gouging pet owners stinks more than the unexpected puddles discovered when I leave Macy alone in the laundry room. Bad dog store. Every day is a new adventure when owning a dog. Now, to check back with the boss. jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

OPINION

A9

[speak up] You can comment on any story you read at kamloopsthisweek.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

WORKERS’ RIGHTS ASSAULTED BY FEDERAL GRITS Editor: The federal government has spoken — the people’s right to shop has trumped the right to collective bargaining. EBay has a louder voice than the Charter of Rights. This is the lesson learned last week in Ottawa. Postal workers were conducting rotating strikes, legal strikes, that were meant to inconvenience the public and Canada Post. These strikes going on for five weeks did that, slightly inconvenience the public. Mail continued to move from coast to coast, if a little slower. Packages were being delivered from outside the country and from across town.

People will have you believe the very life essence of commerce was affected. It wasn’t. Many small businesses were still shipping packages, with the note it may be a day or two longer. There was no crisis. Management would have you believe there were 600 trailers of mail. Then, on Saturday morning there were 500 trailers of mail. Then, in the afternoon, there were only 395 trailers of mail. All of this was reported by Canada Post, yet workers from across the country were reporting no backlog, with one location even stating management was offering

time off without pay because there was no work for them. How strange. There’s more than a million packages backlogged, stated the CEO of Canada Post. Last year there were 41 days on which employees delivered more than a million parcels a day, with the top day being 1.8 million. So as the president of the Canadian Union of Postal Workers stated: “That’s our Monday.” The Charter of Rights states that people have the right to collective bargaining. It’s been upheld twice in court. This will be the third try for government. Most likely it will be

ruled as violating the Charter. That will come in the future, too late for the 300 or so workers who will probably get injured this holiday season, 300 workers who want to go home safe at the end of the day, but won’t because the right to shop outweighed the right to be safe. There was no backlog. There was no one named Jack who wasn’t getting his cheque. There was no need for legislation. Here’s one more truth for KTW readers — there will be no labour peace at Canada Post as long as legislation is possible. Michael Martin Kamloops

DAD HELPED SECURE MCARTHUR ISLAND FOR CITY’S FUTURE Editor: I read the Nov. 30 article on the history of McArthur Island with interest (‘From sewage lagoons to sporting mecca’). My father, Milner (Mil) Hardaker, opened his clothing store in 1949 on Tranquille Road and was elected chairman of the

DO NOT TRUST METERS

village commission for North Kamloops in 1954. He was then involved in the negotiations to purchase the island. The commission saw the need for sewage, as well as the need to move ball fields from McDonald Park.

Editor: I am not convinced of the accuracy of our water meters. One half of my duplex had the water shut off for the entire billing period. The water meter recorded a reduction in total consumption of less than five per cent. Last year, for one billing period, the

It was not an easy sell to the taxpayers when storm drains, dikes, pavement and firefighting equipment were also at the top of the list. Securing the island was a big step for the growth of North Kamloops as it led to construction of the sports centre in 1965.

meter recorded a total flow equal to a 45-gallon barrel being filled every hour for 22 hours of every day for the entire 90 days. That is a lot of water and not feasible. I phoned the city and nobody cared. Tom Kreutz Kamloops

Even when he served as an alderman for the City of Kamloops, Mil continued to express pride in the accomplishments of the village and town councils that sparked the North Shore growth we see today. Ted Hardaker Kamloops

Parking downtown on Saturdays is free in November and December. Has free parking been a factor in leading you to shop downtown?

Results:

YES: 124 votes NO: 196 votes 320 VOTES

31% YES

69% NO

RE: STORY: KAMLOOPS’ FIRST PUBLIC BUDGET MEETING IS ON MCARTHUR ISLAND:

“Would it be too difficult for the city to give the total impact of tax increases, along with anything else, including sewer increases, etc., so we can know exactly how much more we are going to get whacked for? “We never seem to get the full picture when discussion about increases start. It is very difficult for seniors to anticipate how much more of their limited income is going to get gouged from them without a full picture.” — posted by Saloon1

RE: STORY: ELECTORAL REFERENDUM VOTING DEADLINE EXTENDED BY A WEEK:

“My son and his significant other both got their ballots in the mailbox on Monday. “They were sent by express post at some cost to the taxpayer. Has this been extended again due to the strike? “If he mailed them on Tuesday, they only had three days to get back. — posted by Steve Bell

[web-extra]

Read more letters at kamloopsthisweek.com

TALK BACK Q&A: kamloopsthisweek.com We asked:

A selection of comments on KTW stories, culled online

What’s your take? Deadline to return electoral reform ballots is Friday, Dec. 7. Will you have voted by deadline day? Vote online: kamloopsthisweek.com

Kamloops This Week is a member of the National Newsmedia Council, which is an independent organization established to deal with acceptable journalistic practices and ethical behaviour. If you have concerns about editorial content, please email  editor@kamloopsthisweek.com or call 250-374-7467. If you are not satisfied with the response and wish to file a formal complaint, visit the website at mediacouncil.ca or call toll-free 1-844-877-1163.

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A10

WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

B.C. ups fines for snowmobiles, Council turns down bid ATVs driven in sensitive habitats CITY HALL

Violators could now face $575 fine or jail for offences CANADIAN PRESS

VICTORIA — Fines are going up for anyone who uses off-road vehicles and snowmobiles in environmentally sensitive areas of British Columbia. Anyone operating the vehicles in those areas will face a $575 fine, effectively immediately.

Previously, the fines were either $230 or $345, depending on the violation. As well, the provincial government said, court convictions for snowmobiling in southern mountain caribou habitats may result in a fine up to $200,000 and six months in jail. The government said it is spending $27 million over three

years on a program to help the recovery of caribou, which are considered a species at risk. The program is intended to reduce the effect of winter backcountry recreation, including snowmobiling on caribou habitats. The government said damage to those habitats can increase access to predators of caribou.

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to delay tax hike for snow-removal costs JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

A Kamloops councillor said the city should wait until next year to spend money on improved snow and streets services due to a lack of snow on the ground. “We had some serious snow events in the past two years, but we’re obviously in an El Nino stage,” Coun. Denis Walsh said during city council’s regular meeting on Tuesday. Walsh tried, but failed to amend a council recommendation that included a provisional 3.4 per cent tax increase in 2019 and 15 per cent increase to sewer services. Walsh’s amendment would have saved $400,000 — just shy of a half per cent tax increase. Staff requested additional staff and snow-clearing equipment following a significant spike in public complaints last winter and challenges as the city grows. The additional staff would work on potholes and other road-related work during the off-season, quelling further complaints regarding pothole repairs in the city. The motion was seconded by

Coun. Dale Bass for discussion, though she ultimately voted against it. Coun. Dieter Dudy said he had a problem with the motion due to public outcry over snow clearing and the fact it is still early on in the winter season. “Quite frankly, we could be hit with a three-foot snowfall,” Dudy said. Mayor Ken Christian said climate change is real and unpredictable and added the staff request was not just related to snow removal. He noted “countless concerns raised by community residents about the condition of roads.” Sarai said staff did a “wonderful job” identifying improvements and council should stay the course. O’Reilly added the staff would be productive and the city wouldn’t just be “putting an ad on Kijiji.” “These are quality staff that will be working hard year-round,” he said. Walsh was the lone person to vote in favour of deferring the additional city services until 2020, with Mayor Christian and councillors Arjun Singh, Dudy, Bass, Hunter, Walsh, Sinclair and Sarai voting against.


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A11

LOCAL NEWS

No answer yet to source of substance in river JESSICA WALLACE STAFF REPORTER jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Environment and Climate Change Canada continues to investigate a mysterious substance in the North Thompson River. In a recent update to this newspaper, the federal agency released this statement: “Environment and Climate Change Canada continues to gather information to determine if a violation of federal law has taken place. “As this matter is still under investigation, we cannot provide further information at this time.” The investigation followed reports of what appeared to be an oily sheen on the river’s surface and along the shoreline off of Overlander Drive and Harrington Road in Westsyde. A resident had brought it to the attention of KTW and said he had discovered the rainbow-coloured substance while walking his dog, noticing it daily since he moved to the area

in the summer. The existing Trans Mountain pipeline runs parallel to that stretch of river. Trans Mountain told KTW the substance did not originate from its pipeline. Following stories in Kamloops This Week, another resident contacted the newspaper and said he has also seen the substance. “I spent many hours playing and exploring along the North Thompson riverbank,” the Black Pines resident said. “One of my greatest fascinations was all the small pools and seeps along the bank with a rainbow-type sheen. This has been happening for a long time and I am sure it is a natural condition.” In an earlier update, Environment Canada said it continued to investigate the cause of the substance, including the possibility of natural sources. The cause to date remains unclear.

KTW FILE PHOTO This rainbow-coloured substance was found on the shoreline near Overlander Drive and Harrington Road in Westsyde.

Tentative deal reached The Facilities Bargaining Association (FBA) and the Health Employers’ Association of BC (HEABC) have reached a tentative agreement covering nearly 42,000 people

working as care aides, cleaners, lab assistants and nursing-unit assistants, as well as in food services. Further details about the agreement will be available once the ratifi-

cation process for the 10 FBA unions, HEABC and its member-employers is completed. More than 90 per cent of the workers covered are Hospital Employees’ Union members.

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A12

WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

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LOCAL NEWS

Kamloops No. 1 in B.C. after first weekend of Operation Red Nose Operation Red Nose in Kamloops has got off to a start that Rudolf would envy. The safe-ride-home program began on Nov. 30 and will run for 15 nights through New Year’s Eve. Operation Red Nose began on Friday night with the 88 volunteers helping to provide 67 rides. On Saturday, there were 121 rides given. More than $4,000 in donations was collected, with money going to fund PacificSport Interior BC. After the opening weekend, Kamloops ranks first in B.C. and fifth in Canada in the number of rides given. The 22nd annual event will continue to offer safe-ride service on Dec. 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, 29, 30 and 31. The program is again aided by ICBC and sees volunteers drive people and their vehicles home. Hours of operation will be from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Thursdays and from 8 p.m. to 3 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.

If you are out and about during those hours and need a driver to get you and your vehicle home, call 250372-5110. Volunteers are welcome to join. New volunteers must get a criminal record check through the RCMP, but volunteers returning from last year need only complete a Red Nose application form. Application forms can be found at the Tournament Capital Centre, ICBC claims centre, Volunteer Kamloops and Desert Gardens. They can also be found online at operationrednose.com. For more information on the process, and to volunteer, contact Shanon Guglielmini by phone at 250320-0650 or by email at kamloops@ operationrednose.com. Operation Red Nose is running in 102 communities across Canada, including 11 in B.C. Last year, Kamloops was again the No. 1 performer in the province, with volunteers completing 1,338 rides during 18 days of service.

Counter Attack takes 10 drivers off streets The RCMP’s Counter Attack program is out in force and, last weekend, a number of drivers were taken off the road. Police say weekend road blocks led to six 90-day immediate roadside suspensions, one three-day immediate roadside

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suspension and three 24-hour immediate roadside suspensions, with another 20 violation tickets issued. “The consequences of impaired driving are massive,” said Kamloops RCMP Insp. Insp. Steve McLeod. “You’re risking your life and the lives of others. You can be

Mounties once again seeking missing teen

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charged criminally and the ripple effect on you, your family and friends can be huge.” Police advise making a plan before going out to celebrate with some drinks. Book a designated driver, plan on taking a taxi or transit or call Operation Red Nose.

Kamloops Mounties are asking for the public’s help in finding a teenager who has been reported missing for the fifth time this year and the fourth time in the past month. Fifteen-year-old Annie Michel was last seen on Friday, Nov. 30, on the North Shore and police believe she is still north of the river. She is Indigenous, stands 5-foot-3 and

ANNIE MICHEL

weighs 120 pounds. She has short black hair styled in a bob and

was last seen wearing a plaid hoodie and a black pullover. Annie was also reported missing in January, October and twice in November. She was found safe in each instance. Anybody who has seen Annie or has information on her whereabouts is asked to contact the Kamloops RCMP at 250-828-3000.


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

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A13

LOCAL NEWS FULTON & COMPANY LLP

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8TH 12PM-6PM VICTORIA STREET BETWEEN 3RD & 4TH AVENUE WILL BE CLOSED TO VEHICLE TRAFFIC FROM 8AM-8PM

CHRISTMAS ON THE SHORE

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The North Shore Business Improvement Association hosted a Christmas-themed open house on the weekend. Among those dropping by were the Williams and Grant families (above), who are planning a Jamaican Christmas, and Aisha Puig, who was able to give Santa Claus her wish list for Dec. 25. ALLEN DOUGLAS PHOTOS/KTW

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City of Kamloops

2019 BUSINESS LICENCE RENEWAL The City of Kamloops 2019 Business Licence renewals have been mailed. Payments are due by January 1, 2019. Payments are recommended to be paid online using your MyCity account, by online banking services, mail, or in person at City Hall, 7 Victoria Street West, Kamloops, BC, V2C 1A2. Business Licence accounts outstanding after January 15, 2019, will have a $25 late payment charge added to the balance owing. If you have not received your renewal notice, or if there has been a change to your business, please contact the Business Licence Office prior to submitting the 2019 payment.

Business Licence Office 105 Seymour Street 250-828-3481

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A14

WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

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LOCAL NEWS

Rust Valley Restorers features cars and personality MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

Rust Valley Restorers will run on personality, horsepower, storytelling and nostalgia. The car restoration documentary series’ executive producers, Matt Shewchuk and Tyson Hepburn of Mayhem Entertainment, are about to find out how much gas it has in the tank, with the History Channel program — set in Tappen, about an hour east of Kamloops — set to debut at 7 p.m. this Thursday.

Avery Shoaf (left), Mike Hall and Connor Hall will make their TV debuts on Thursday, when Rust Valley Restorers premieres on History Channel. Showtime is 7 p.m. The show is filmed in Tappen, about an hour east of Kamloops.

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Vancouver-based Mayhem saw an opportunity when Mike Hall put Rust Brothers Restorations and about 400 classic cars up for sale. “It hit the Internet and kind of went nutso,” said Mike, a dreadlocked 62-year-old and selfproclaimed wingnut. “I had people from Switzerland come out and I thought they were actually going to buy the place. In the end, it was just a bunch of people blowing smoke up my you know what. “These guys from Mayhem actually came and did some filming and they got funding to do a show. I thought they were crazy.” Hepburn and Shewchuk must have detected a touch of crazy in Mike, a maniacal-butfriendly edge that would play well on TV. “After seeing Mike and all the colourful people in the valley, it made us think there are definitely enough assets there to make a series,” said Shewchuk, who has been a mainstay on series such as Highway Thru Hell and Heavy Rescue: 401. Further exploration into Mike’s life revealed a level-headed son, Connor Hall of Kamloops, and a charismatic, Ron-Jeremylookalike friend, Avery Shoaf, both of whom pull wrenches on the lot. “Avery, he’s the muscle-car MacGyver,” Mike quipped. “He’s pretty short-tempered and doesn’t have much patience, but the guy is very mechanically adept. And he’s hilarious.” Added Connor: “Usually the parents are the voice of reason behind the kids. “Here, it’s kind of the other way around. But my dad’s got a heart of gold. He’s loud and obnoxious, but he’d give anyone the shirt off his back.” Hepburn, creator of Discovery Channel’s Coldwater Cowboys, said Mike and Connor’s bond should touch a chord with viewers. “There’s a layered, interesting relationship there,” said Hepburn, noting the show’s trailer is performing well on history.ca. “Connor is so diametrically opposed

hi to all “ourSayfriends in Kamloops. I grew up there. I hope everybody tunes in and watches the show.

— MIKE HALL

to Mike, which makes them great. They’re a funloving father-son combo, where sometimes the son is kind of more the voice of reason.” Together, the Halls and Shoaf form the engine that will drive the show for the casual viewer. For gearheads, the characters might take a back seat to the cars. “If you’re a car junkie, there’s lots of stuff there,” Mike said. “When they do the drone shots of the field of dreams, I know damn well people are going to be freeze-framing it and trying to pick out which cars are there.” Mike and Connor listed a few of the vehicles that may feature in Season 1: 1941 Dodge Power Wagon, 1939 International truck, 1966 Chevrolet Nova, 1964 Ford Patina, 1966 Ford Mustang and 1970 Dodge Dart Swinger. “Most of my money is basically tied up in my obsession with cars,” Mike said. “Metallic hallucinations. I look at a piece of crap in a field and I see it running and driving down the road. It’s a bad sickness to have.” They race against time to restore cars for customers, all the while grappling with each other (almost literally, at times) and cash limitations. “My dad’s a hoarder,” Connor, whose inheritance is tied up on the lot, said in an episode released to media. “We’re supposed to be selling stuff, not buying stuff. This place isn’t going to survive.” The cameras took some getting used to, but the Halls assured KTW they felt little need to ham it up on filming days. “I’m basically the same loudmouth SOB I am all the time,”

Mike said. Heartfelt moments come during grand reveals. Mike Poulton, who was hurt in a skiing accident and left disabled, puts his trust in Mike to restore his dream car — a 1966 Lincoln Continental with suicide doors. “I can’t even begin to explain how happy I am,” Poulton says after seeing the finished product. “That was emotional,” Mike said. “It’s cool to be able to help people realize their dreams.” Neither the Halls nor Mayhem would comment on whether the show’s stars receive financial compensation, but publicity certainly stands to benefit Rust Brothers. “I’ve got 400 cars. I’m 62 years old. I’ve got to get rid of them,” Mike said. “What better way to do it than have a TV show that might end up being aired in 100 countries?” Word is out in Tappen and Kamloops — and razzing has begun. “Everywhere I go, people say, “Hey, how does it feel to be a superstar?’” Mike said. “I say, ‘I don’t even own a TV.’ I tell them I just tend to ignore the cameras because I’m focused on what I’m doing.” Interjected Connor: “Well, as focused as a guy with ADD can get.” Mike fired back: “I sign your paycheques, don’t I?” The first season of Rust Valley Restorers features eight, one-hour episodes. Another season can be green-lighted if the first does well. There is a lot on the line for Hepburn and Shewchuk. “Corus Entertainment went out of its way to support a young new, company,” Hepburn said. “It’s our first opportunity to run the whole thing. Doors were shut in other places. We’ve both invested a lot. We 100 per cent want another season. We hope it’s a big hit.” The Halls are hosting a viewing party at Boston Pizza in Salmon Arm at 7 p.m. on Thursday. “Say hi to all our friends in Kamloops,” Mike said. “I grew up there. I hope everybody tunes in and watches the show.”


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jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

STAFF REPORTER

In what is likely the mayor’s first meeting with a textile, Ken Christian met Ed the Sock early Monday afternoon.

Ed the Sock stopped by city hall to chat with Mayor Ken Christian about the recent civic election, cannabis and vacancy rates in advance of his show at the Blue Grotto on Monday night. The light-hearted photo-op also came riddled with cheeky comments, typical of the former Much Music personality. “You won by like 18,000 votes or something,” Ed said to the mayor, while congratulating him on his Oct. 20 victory. “Be honest with me. When you see those numbers, do you just feel like the Colossus of Rhodes? Do you just feel like giant and drunk with power, ever?” “Yeah, no,” the mayor replied. With an old stogie hanging off of his lip, the political sock puppet went after legal cannabis, asking Christian how he feels about Kamloops earning the moniker “Kamsterdam” following the recent opening of B.C.’s first legal recreational cannabis store. Christian said the city was ready in time for legalization and the novelty is likely only momentary. Ed followed up with a hard-hitting question

— well, hard-hitting for a sock puppet. “Now, have you noticed the corner stores reporting an increased sale of, like, Doritos?” Ed the Sock asked. “Yeah, everybody thought that was going to happen, but it hasn’t yet,” the mayor replied. “No shortage of Doritos, none of that? No shortage of like Ritz crackers, munchies? So far, no shortages? It hasn’t been like post-apocalypse, everybody running in to get their stuff before it runs out?” Ed the Sock queried. “Yeah, that sort of reefermadness thing didn’t happen,” Christian said. “So what happened was, the only thing they’re running out of is product because they’ve had, I think, 34,000 visits in three weeks to the legal cannabis store in Kamloops.” “I’m trying to process that,” Ed the Sock said. “How many people live in Kamloops?” “About 95,000, so …” “That’s a huge per cent of your population that are potheads,” Ed the Sock said. “Yeah, maybe it’s not all our population, though, Ed,” Christian said. “It could be

people coming from Vernon or Vancouver to enjoy recreational cannabis from a legal supplier. We’re the only game in town.” Ed the Sock said the city’s embrace of cannabis must be the reason for its low vacancy rates. Christian, however, said it is due to a combination of city growth and Thompson Rivers University students. “My wife and I have a couple of spare rooms,” Christian said. “And our kids have moved out and, yeah, sock in the basement? Maybe not a bad idea.” “I’m getting the idea of an amazing reality show,” Ed the Sock said. “The mayor, his wife and Ed the Sock. Can you imagine? It would be like half sitcom, half political drama. Um, and I can’t make it another half because there’s only two halves in any one thing.” In the end, Ed the Sock offered the mayor some advice: “The one thing I’d recommend to you politically,” he said. “You show way too much enthusiasm. Like, you need to button down a little more. You’re a little too wild.” With that, Christian hit his gavel.

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LOCAL NEWS

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BRENNAN’S RUN WAS NO SWEAT(ER)

More than 260 people braved a chilly Sunday morning in Aberdeen to take part in the second annual Brennan’s Ugly Sweater Run. The event was created by Payton Comazzetto (right) in memory of her brother, Brennan, who was 10 years old when he was killed by a drunk driver in 1999. Proceeds from the run go to the Boys and Girls Club’s Power Start Program, which helps children get food they need and be at school on time. ALLEN DOUGLAS PHOTOS/KTW

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We are requesting that anyone who witnessed or has information regarding a motor vehicle accident that occurred on November 13, 2018 at about 5:30 p.m. at or near Highway 5 off ramp to Battle Street in Kamloops, B.C, to please contact our law firm. The accident involved a woman in a dark brown 2015 Honda CR-V motor vehicle who was struck and rear-ended by a motor vehicle that is believed to be a silver/gray 1994 Suzuki Swift or similar with a Licence Plate number bearing last three characters as D2T driven by a man with the following characteristics: • Tall • Balding/thinning hair • Muscular • Broad shoulders • Clean shaven He also has a male passenger with reddish hair and mustache who was travelling with him in the motor vehicle. If you witnessed this accident, or were present at the scene shortly before or after this accident occurred, or have any information about this accident, please contact Matthew Ford or his legal assistant at: Cates Ford Epp, Suite 300, 125 Fourth Avenue, Kamloops, B.C., V2C 3N3 Telephone: (250) 372-8811


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

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A17

LOCAL NEWS

Victim had 28 wounds, pathologist testifies Foster’s death. Foster sustained 17 michael@kamloopsthisweek.com wounds inflicted by a sharp edge, along Cody Foster suswith 11 lacerations, tained 28 blows to Stephen testified. his head and neck, The injuries including included a fatal stab blunt wound force that cut trauma to his carotid Foster’s artery, face, according to a stab the patholowound gist who below examined the right the body of ear about the 26-yearfive cenold days foltimetres CODY FOSTER lowing his in depth death. and mulFoster was killed tiple stab wounds to in his home in the the back of his neck. Kamloops RV Park Multiple metal in the 9000-block of fragments consistent Dallas Drive on Feb. with a knife were 11, 2017. His friend, found during the Stephen George autopsy, Stephen said. Fraser, who was 56 at He said one of the the time, is charged fragments was stuck with second-degree between two spinous murder in connection processes — a porwith the death. tion of the vertebrae Fraser’s jury trial where muscle and continued with Dr. ligaments attach. He James Stephen — an said all those fragexpert witness in the ments were found in Crown’s case who the same wound tract. specializes in forensic Stephen said he pathology — takbelieves the knife had ing the stand in B.C. been twisted when Supreme Court in inserted into the spiKamloops to describe nous process with the manner, mechaenough force to cause nism and cause of the blade to shatter. MICHAEL POTESTIO

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Foster also had a broken jaw — the mandible having been fractured on the left side. Stephen described the force that would have been required to break the bone as “moderate.” Foster’s nose and left eye socket were also broken and he sustained a fracture to his left cheekbone. “Do you think

one blow could have caused all these injuries?” Crown prosecutor Alex Janse asked . “The distance between the jaw, the nose and eye socket is so great that, most likely, multiple blows would have been required,” said Stephen. Janse asked if those injuries could have been inflicted by a glass bottle and

rendered the victim unconscious, to which Stephen replied that they could. Stephen also said Foster’s hands showed little to no defensive wounds — injuries that are usually found on parts of the body a person would naturally use to protect themselves, such as on the hands and forearms. He said there

were no injuries on Foster’s left hand, but a scratch on his right palm. Foster’s left leg had bruising — most likely occurring within 24 hours of his death. He also sustained three abrasions to the abdomen, which, Stephen said, were most likely inflicted recently. The Crown is calling 14 witnesses to

the stand in its case, which is expected to wrap up on Wednesday, at which time the defence may call evidence. Witnesses who were staying in the RV park on the night in question testified earlier in the trial that they discovered Foster’s body after the accused led them to the trailer when asking for help.

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HUGE CLEARANCE SALE % 80OFF WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

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LOCAL NEWS

UP TO

STOREWIDE! 250-374-1516 In the Heart of the Downtown

418 Victoria St.

ATTENTION KTW READERS Send us your favourite Christmas memory in the form of a short story or poem. We will share them in editions of the newspaper leading up to Christmas. If there is a photo that accompanies the memory, send that, too.

KIDS! Enter the KTW

CHRISTMAS

Drawings Contest We will publish drawings sent in by schoolaged children in editions of Kamloops This Week leading up to Christmas, with a random draw being held for sketching art cases. All you need to do is create a drawing about Christmas and send it to Kamloops This Week. Be sure to include lots of colours and add your name, age and phone number to the back of the drawing. (And, if your family celebrates Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Winter Solstice or other holidays in December, you can create a drawing about those, too!)

All drawings & submissions can be sent to editor@kamloopsthisweek.com or by mail/in person to 1365B Dalhousie Dr., Kamloops, B.C., V2C 5P6. We are open weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

DAVE EAGLES/KTW

DONOR DATE

Organ transplant recipient Abby Farnsworth (front) presents a gift of popcorn to B.C. Ambulance Service Centre staff on Tuesday afternoon. The group of organ transplant recipients, together with organ donor Glenn Ferro (far left) recognized staff at RIH earlier in the day and also the B.C. Ambulance Service staff as part of BC Transplant’s annual Operation Popcorn. The program provides an opportunity for those whose lives have been saved by organ donation to deliver festive packages of popcorn to staff in ICU, ER and OR rooms across the province. In the photo (second from left): B.C. Ambulance Service staffer Corinne Begg, organ transplant recipients Dorothy Drinnan, Mike Grandbois and Tony Maidment.

Community agencies, groups offering Christmas meals KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

A number of free community dinners will be offered to those in need through the holiday season: • An Interior Community Services Youth Outreach Meal will be held on Dec. 5 from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Mt. Paul Community Food Centre, 140 Laburnum St. in North Kamloops. It is for youth ages 13 to 24; • On Dec. 8, Kamloops Alliance Church will host a turkey dinner with all the trimmings at 200 Leigh Rd. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. and dinner is at 5 p.m. Free tickets are required in advance from the church; • Pit Stop will host its Christmas dinner, complete with turkey and trimmings on Dec. 9 at Kamloops United Church, 421 St. Paul St. Supper will also include a visit from santa, along with gift bags and

live music. The event begins at 3:30 p.m.; • Children and families are invited to the Christopher Seguin Rotary Family Dinner at NorKam secondary, 730 12th St. in North Kamloops, on Dec. 12. It begins at 5 p.m.; • Also on Dec. 12, Interior Community Services will again host its youth meal from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Mt. Paul Community Food Centre, 140 Laburnum St. A reminder that it is for youth ages 13 to 24 only; • On Dec. 16, Pit Stop returns with its regular dinner at Kamloops United Church, 421 St. Paul St. It starts at 3:30 p.m.; • Christmas ham dinner and trimmings will be served on Dec. 18 at Kamloops United Church by Infinite Expansion and Pit Stop on Dec. 18. It starts at 5 p.m.; • The Salvation Army Christmas dinner will be held at 344 Poplar St. on Dec. 19 at 5 p.m.. Free tickets are required in

advance from the Poplar Street location; • On Christmas Eve, Mustard Seed New Life Community will host a turkey dinner with trimmings at 181 West Victoria St. It will be served at 1 p.m.; • Turkey and trimmings will also be served by Jump and the Love Hard Kamloops Society on Christmas Day at a location to be determined; • Frenchie’s Poutinerie will offer meals on Christmas Day downtown at 340 Victoria St. The menu has yet to be determined, but food services will begin at 1 p.m.; • A Hope for the Holidays dinner will be served at the Odd Fellows and Rebekahs Hall, at 423 Tranquille Rd. in North Kamloops, on Dec. 28 at 2 p.m. If you know of additional community dinners held through the holidays, email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com. KTW will update this list should more become known.


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS COURTS

Police will have more power to get breath samples CANADIAN PRESS

KTW FILE PHOTO Approximately 550 pairs of shoes filled St. Andrews on the Square for 2014’s shoe memorial, shown here. The annual event aimed at growing awareness about violence directed at women takes place on Saturday at Heritage House in Riverside Park.

Red shoe memorial this weekend to mark violence KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Thursday marks the 29-year anniversary of the Ecole Polytechnique massacre, a sombre and violent day in Canadian history now remembered, in part, as the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. In Kamloops, that has

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meant a shoe memorial in recent years — and 2018 is no different. Volunteers create a public memorial consisting of hundreds of donated pairs of women’s shoes, each bearing the name of a murdered or missing woman. Organizers have said the shoes are meant to symbolize women’s ability to walk away from a bad relationship or

abusive situation. Following the event, the shoes will be donated to a local women’s shelter. The shoe memorial event will take place on Saturday at Heritage House in Riverside Park between noon and 4 p.m. Everyone is welcome and donations of cash and used shoes will be accepted at the door.

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Share your event with the community

L - R: Marleah Plesko, Senior Manager, Alex Rugolo, Senior Manager, Katelin McNichol, Manager, Seth Gehring, Manager and Carol Erikson, Senior Manager

KamloopsThisWeek.com /events © 2018 KPMG LLP, a Canadian limited liability partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. 22263

OTTAWA — Federal ministers are playing down the potential for racial profiling and civilrights violations as they tout strict new measures against drunk driving. Mandatory alcohol screening regulations taking effect Dec. 18 will allow police to demand a breath sample from any driver they lawfully stop — a lower bar than the current threshold, which requires suspicion the person has been drinking. The roadside test could justify further investigation including more elaborate testing at a police station. The government said the aim is to save lives by helping police catch drivers with more than the legal limit of alcohol in their bloodstreams. Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould said she is confident the measure is consistent with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Organized Crime Reduction Minister Bill Blair said if a police stop were motivated by bias, it would be unlawful and contrary to the charter — and therefore a breath test would be inadmissible in court.

A19

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WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

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LOCAL NEWS

$1 million to fight post-fire invasive plants JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

More than a year later, the ThompsonNicola Regional District is still cleaning up from

the Elephant Hill wildfire — and it will continue to do so for the next three years.

The TNRD has received $1 million from the Red Cross to help treat and prevent

the spread of invasive plants following the hugely destructive 2017 interface wildfire.

“With fires, as well as in the action of fighting fires, there’s a lot of disturbance that hap-

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pens on the ground,” TNRD manager of environmental health Jamie Vieira said. “One of the big risks is the invasion of invasive weeds.” Invasive plants are not native to an area and typically spread aggressively, with the potential for snuffing out native species upon which wildlife feed and causing other negative impacts on the environment. Vieira said hound’stongue, hoary alyssum and spotted knapweed were in the Elephant Hill area prior to the fire, which started on July 6, 2017, and burned more than 192,000 hectares before it was contained in the fall. The TNRD applied for funding from the Red Cross, which provides emergency assistance. The money will go toward a three-year invasive plants treatment and prevention program, which will begin after a recovery manager is hired in early 2019. Private landowners will be helped by the money, which will also be used to treat highways and other routes. Vieira said the TNRD has heard concerns primarily from the ranching sector. Once the program manager is in place, the TNRD will be reaching out to the public with more information and will hold community meetings. Asked if $1 million is enough to combat the weeds, Vieira said the financial request to the Red Cross was based on best estimates. “We don’t know how much [invasive plants] is out there,” he said. The Elephant Hill wildfire prompted mass evacuations, with many of the residents finding weeks-long refuge in Kamloops. The fire was determined to be humancaused and is being investigated by the RCMP, but no additional details have been released. The blaze tore through about 120 homes in the Boston Flats trailer park, Loon Lake and Pressy Lake.


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

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A21

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LOCAL NEWS

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CATHERINE HICKSON PHOTO The entrance to the massive cave that was spotted earlier this year in British Columbia’s Wells Gray Provincial Park.

Cave discovery in Wells Gray Park is largest known of its type HINA ALAM

CANADIAN PRESS

A newly discovered cave in a remote valley in Wells Gray Provincial Park might just be the country’s largest. The feature was spotted by a helicopter crew from the province’s Ministry of Environment and Climate Change in March, when they were conducting a caribou census through the northeastern part of the park. Wells Gray Park is massive, at 5,250 square kilometres (1.3 million acres). It’s southern entrance is 90 minutes north of Kamloops, at Clearwater. Geologist Catherine Hickson, who first went to the cave in September, said the discovery promises a dramatic new chapter in the story of Canadian cave exploration. “It was absolutely amazing,” she said. “I immediately recognized that this was very significant.” Before making the trip, Hickson and fellow researchers — including John Pollack, a cave expert — spent months studying satellite imagery and rocks in the area, she said. The entrance pit to the cave is about 100 metres long and 60 metres wide. While its depth is hard to measure because of

the mist from a waterfall, initial examinations show it is at least 135 metres deep. “It’s about the size of a soccer field,” Hickson said. “So, if you think of a soccer field and you put that soccer field on its end so you have this pit going down. Think about this giant circular or oval hole that just goes down and down and down. It is truly amazing.” The cave is the largest known of its type, a variety of striped karst, which is marble interspersed with other types of ancient ocean rock, she said. “It’s in an area where this size of a cave is unusual,” Hickson said. “It’s an important landmark — an important feature for Canadians to be proud about.” The people who first spotted the cave from the helicopter named it Sarlacc’s Pit because of its similarity to the lair of Sarlacc, a creature from Star Wars: Return of the Jedi. But a formal naming of the cave will happen after consultations with First Nations, Hickson said. The feature was formed underneath glaciers for potentially tens of thousands of years, she said, so there is no way of immediately knowing the real age of the cave “Right now, because of the

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recession of the glaciers, it is open to the sky,” she said, adding that as ice retreats from the landscape due to climate change, more such features might be discovered. Caves support a very unique ecosystem because they are dark, so the flora and fauna living in such areas are acclimatized to those conditions, Hickson said. With this cave, she said, the flowing water is at such a rapid rate that it may not allow many creatures to call the area home, but further research is needed. Although the cave is in a remote, rugged valley covered with snow and ice for a greater part of the year, Hickson said researchers are keeping the exact location a secret so as to preserve the unique area. Hickson said further investigations and research of the cave and its unique geography will likely be carried out in 2020, depending on funding. “We think everything is known and everything has been discovered, but here’s a major discovery that is made in today’s world and likely has never been seen before and certainly not explored before,” she said. “It’s just a message that there is still stuff out there yet to do and yet to be discovered.”

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WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

NATIONAL NEWS

Get set to pay more for food in 2019 ALEKSANDRA SAGAN

CANADIAN PRESS

The average Canadian family will pay about $400 more for groceries and roughly $150 more for dining out next year, an annual food price report predicts. Food prices will rise between 1.5 to 3.5 per cent in 2019, according to the report from researchers at the University of Guelph and Dalhousie University. That means the average family of four will spend $12,157 next year — up $411 from 2018. Vegetables will see the biggest price jumps — between four and six per cent for the category, according to the report.

Meanwhile, meat and seafood prices are expected to fall, with the meat category to decline by one to three per cent and seafood costs to remain the same or fall up to two per cent. Since 2015, the team has predicted prices in those two categories would rise as high as six per cent each year. “This is a bit of a risk for us ... We’ve never done that,’’ said Sylvain Charlebois, one of the lead researchers and a professor at Dalhousie University, referring to anticipating a decline. But the team is confident in its prediction. They believe there’s an oversupply of meat, he said, and Canadians are eating less animal protein. Instead, they’re

showing more interest in alternative proteins, like quinoa and lentils. The plant-based protein trend is also evident in recent manufacturer and restaurant moves. Meat processors Maple Leaf Foods Inc., for example, acquired two companies in that niche in recent years, Lightlife Foods and Field Roast GrainMeat Co. At the same time, fast-food chains have started adding vegan and vegetarian options to their menus. A&W Food Services of Canada Inc. even temporarily sold out of its Beyond Meat patties shortly after adding them to its menu. Industry watchers have attributed the

demand for plant-based protein to millennials, health-conscious baby boomers and concerns around antibiotic use in agriculture. A turning point for animal protein, though, was 2014, when beef prices started to rise dramatically, said Charlebois. Between December 2013 and December 2014, the monthly average retail price for one kilogram of ground beef rose more than 26 per cent, according to Statistics Canada data. For comparison, the price advanced about 3.5 per cent from December 2012 to December 2013. It reached a record high of $13.23 in October 2015. “It really spooked consumers,’’ said

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Charlebois, adding they started substituting plant-based protein into their diet. Butchers and grocers will likely take it easy on beef prices next year in an effort to bring people back to the red meat, he said. Consumers’ embrace of plant proteins will help push vegetable prices higher next year, as will the weather, according to the report. “Fruit and vegetables are some of the most perishable, fragile food products that are on the grocery shelf,’’ said Simon Somogyi, a lead researcher on the report and a University of Guelph professor. They’re particularly influenced by climactic events, like the El Nino expected to occur this

winter, he said, which can result in warmer and drier conditions and create shortages in the supply chain. As far as which vegetables may see the biggest increases, it’s difficult to know what produce item will become the next cauliflower, Charlebois said. The cruciferous vegetable saw soaring prices per head in 2016. Charlebois points to lettuce and tomatoes as possible candidates for big price fluctuations. Meanwhile, Somogyi said produce imported into Canada is more susceptible to weather events and the corresponding price changes. The report predicts more modest increases for bakery (one to three

per cent), dairy (zero to two per cent), fruit (one to three per cent) and other food items, such as non-perishables, not covered by the other categories (zero to two per cent). Restaurant prices will rise between two and four per cent, according to the report, mainly because operators’ labour costs increased as several provinces and territories boosted their mandated minimum hourly wage recently. The researchers’ predictions for 2018 were fairly accurate. Fruit prices, which they estimated would rise between one to three per cent, stayed stagnant — the only category in which they missed the mark.

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HISTORY 778-471-7533 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Many pithomes were dug up and looted for artifacts, ploughed over or filled in. Today, there are only handful of sites that contain more than a few depressions, as most have been destroyed — often illegally — to make way for urban development. JOANNE HAMMOND PHOTO

DIG IT: THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE A (PIT)HOME JOANNE HAMMOND

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N

ovember is “Pellc7ell7ú7llcwten (pronounced pehlehl-ULC-ten)” in Secwépemcúl’ecw. It means “entering the winter home,” the time of year when the food stores were put up, firewood was gathered and families settled into pithomes for the long winter months. The wood and earth pithome, a “c7ístkten (pronounced h-east-kn, with the 7 being a a quick sharp pause)” in Secwepemctsin, is one of the hallmarks of pre-contact life on the Interior Plateau. It’s an Indigenous architectural tradition that began millennia ago. Today, only traces remain of these round, half-buried dwellings so perfectly suited to our cold Interior winters. When the first white men arrived in Secwépemcúl’ecw in the early 19th century, pithomes were the dominant type of residential structure. Villages of these houses dotted the major river valleys, ranging from a handful of pithomes belonging to closely related families to hundreds of dwellings mak-

Interior pithome architectural tradition back nearly 5,000 years. The earliest recorded pithomes on the Interior Plateau are near Monte Creek, on the South Thompson River east of Kamloops. Occupation of pithomes here is the first good evidence archeologists have of people settling into a pattern of sedentary winter living, where pithome villages became the anchor for a strategic kind of huntingfishing-gathering that continued to exploit seasonally available resources all over the territory. Pithome sizes varAn illustration showing how a pithome was constructed. ied over time as social and economic patterns ing up bigger centres. shifted, but the basics remained At the mouth of the Tranquille unchanged. Most pithomes were River, Brocklehurst, Sun Rivers, circular, though a few square and Monte Creek and Heffley Creek oval ones are known. and elsewhere, pithome villages Inside, pithomes were often were occupied for thousands of divided into four room areas that winters. corresponded to the four cardinal Picture smoke rising from directions. Sleeping platforms lined a crowd of conical roofs, snow the walls, storage pits were dug packed down on winding trails into floors and one or more hearths connecting neighbours and kin. were found near the centre. Archeologists have traced the Pithomes could be single-

family dwellings measuring a few metres across or be large enough to house large extended families. Some very large pithomes, measuring 20 metres or more across, are known to have been used as gathering places, like community centres or feast halls. Constructing a pithome was labourious and began with hand excavation of a large, bowl-shaped pit (earth was loosened with waist-high digging sticks and removed by the basketload). A group of adults and children working together could dig a big one in a day. Over the pit, heavy timbers installed in the centre supported a superstructure of rigid poles. Additional thinner poles were lashed on to form the roof, which was then covered with strips of bark, then packed with earth. The strong frame and thick earth insulation was so effective that homes could maintain comfortable temperatures from only very small fires and body heat. This feature made the homes all the more well suited to sparsely forested places like Kamloops, where fuelwood could be a limited resource. The primary construction material for pithomes was the

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aptly named lodgepole pine, which were harvested from nearby uplands by the dozen. Smaller timbers and insulation needed replacement every few years and, occasionally, the whole thing was burnt, cleansed and rebuilt. By about 1858, log cabins modeled on fur traders’ dwellings had become main housing in the Kamloops area. Some were built over old housepit depressions, which were repurposed as root cellars. Other pithomes decayed in place, leaving characteristic rimmed, bowl-shaped depressions. Many were dug up and looted for artifacts, ploughed over or filled in. Today, there are only a handful of sites that contain more than a few depressions, as most have been destroyed (often illegally) to make way for urban development. These ancient pithomes are protected archeological sites, silently holding age-old stories of home. Joanne Hammond is a Kamloops archeologist. Interested in more? Go online to republicofarchaeology.ca.

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COMMUNITY 250-374-7467 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Remembering Georgia Peach with focus on neonatal care STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

T

hree-yearold Griffin Ovenden handed peach-shaped ornaments to Royal Inland Hospital staff on Monday and was met with tears and hugs. The moment was shared over the loss last year of an infant baby — Griffin’s late sister — fondly known during her short time alive as “Georgia Peach.” “It means a lot to us to have this day together,” mom Brittany Ovenden told KTW. Georgia Ovenden was born nearly one year ago on Jan. 7, but died from a rare fetal maternal hemorrhage while in the uterus. It was a heartbreaking loss for the family, a loss shared by compassionate hospital staff. It was the reason the Ovenden family joined the Royal Inland Hospital Foundation this week to give thanks and launch its annual holiday campaign, which this year will help purchase equipment for the neonatal intensive care and labour delivery units at the hospital. The nurses who deliver babies and deal too often with the tragedy of losing a child say compassion is part of the job. “I think it’s just the time spent with them, to be sitting and listening to them, talking with them,”

labour and delivery nurse Lori Wells said. “It’s not all about the physical care, which also is important, but it’s the emotion time that we spend during a tragic loss.” Nurse Tanis Hubberstey said when a parent loses a child, that family becomes priority. She said staff “revamp” their whole system in order to ensure families receive that emotional support. That support will come again in two weeks, when the Ovendens return to the hospital to have another baby. Brittany is carrying a baby boy and the nurses ensured her they would be on shift. Hubberstey changed her shift. “If you lose a child and you have a miscarriage, you hold your breath for 12 weeks and then you can relax and enjoy the rest of the pregnancy,” Hubberstey said. “Brittany and Kevin, even though they are enjoying this pregnancy, part of their heart is holding a beat until this baby is in their arms …. It was an honour that they trusted me and remembered me and I can’t imagine what they’re going through, so of course I’m going to accommodate a need.” So far, the baby is healthy and Brittany is ready to give Griffin a new little brother. “We’ve been monitored very closely, so we have actually got to spend a lot more time with the lovely

Griffin Ovenden hugs labour and delivery nurse Tanis Hubberstey on Monday in the clinical services building, as nurse Lori Wells (left) and pediatrician Melissa Paquette (right) look on with dad Kevin Ovenden. Griffin gave hospital staff Georgia Peach ornaments in honour of his late sister, who died at the hospital earlier this year of fetal maternal hemorrhage. JESSICA WALLACE/KTW

nurses in labour and delivery,” she said. “But, yeah, everything’s looking really good.” RIH Foundation CEO Heidi Coleman said the foundation aims to raise $100,000 for the neonatal intensive care and labour and delivery units at the hospital. “We’re buying equipment that’s on the major equipment list, so we desperately need it,” Coleman said, noting government funding covers only about 10 per cent of what the hospital needs. “We have to

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the ornament dedicated to a loved one or in memory or honour of someone. The ornaments will be hung on a Christmas tree on the second floor of the clinical services building. “It’s really nice,” Coleman said. “We love to read them and people come to read them.” The Ovendens have also

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A28

WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

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COMMUNITY

Taking the 12 steps to find peace and calm

W

hat are the 12 steps referenced in the 12-step programs in which addicts enrol? Step 1: We admitted we were powerless over alcohol. Alcohol is mentioned in only one of the 12 steps. It is not mentioned after this. My problem is a spiritual one and I didn’t get that at first. I thought my problem was you, me, my work, others and my issues. This is why I drank and took drugs. You were to blame. Then alcohol and drugs became my problem. These chemicals, once they entered my system, were my issue. They changed who I was. Step 2: Life was unmanageable. Step 3: Came to

ASK AN ADDICT Ask an Addict is a column penned by a Kamloops scholar with expertise in addiction issues and who is also an addict. The column is meant to inform and help, which is particularly important as we remain mired in an opioid crisis that continues to claim thousands of lives each year. If you have a question you would like answered, email it to editor@kamloopsthisweek.com. Anonymity is guaranteed.

believe that a power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity. I make a decision to turn my will and life over to the care of God as I understood Him. I would add Her as Mother Earth is my higher power. She guides me in grace and her gravity is fierce as it keeps me from flying high into the skies. When turned

upside down, she empties booze from my glass and licks it clean from all chemicals. It’s easy — I can’t drink, I need help and it has to be something stronger than me. It has to be a god of my understanding, one of good, orderly direction given my life was a mess. Step 4: Made a searching and fearless moral inventory.

I am not evil, only unwell. I do bad things when I drink or take drugs. Nothing is beyond me once chemicals enter my system. Like fire, alcohol burns. I examine who I become when I drink, who I am angry with and who has wronged me in life. I examine the darkest, deepest parts of me and my soul. Step 5: Admitted to God, to ourselves and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs. Our wrongs are the key words here, not the wrongs of others. Blaming others is my addiction on fire. I point the finger while three point back at me. Step 6: Becoming ready to have my defects removed. Step 7: Ask to have our shortcomings removed.

Step 8: I make a list of at least 19 people who have hurt or wronged me in some way and ask where I was wrong, what I did. I examine my actions when under the influence of external, now internal, chemicals. Step 9: I make direct amends except when to do so would injure them or others. I don’t want to hurt others as I have already done so in my past. If I had an affair, I don’t want to hurt the other person so I keep that between my sponsor, God and myself. Step 10: On a daily basis, I continue to look at my behaviour and conduct. Where was I wrong? Do I owe anyone an apology? Can I do any better? Often I am happy to find out I am wrong.

I share this with you and tell you how my conduct was off. It is powerful to take responsibility. I, not alcohol, am now in control. Step 11 (most important): I pray and meditate to improve my conscious contact with God, praying only for knowledge of His/ Her will for us and the power to carry that out. Prayer and meditation are difficult. I distract myself through work, driving, shopping, buying, eating or running. Step 12: I have a spiritual awakening and carry this message to others. I practise these principles in all my affairs: love, tolerance, patience and understanding. Helping others is the only way I get out of my drinking hell. My own thinking is

out to kill and destroy me. I help others by sharing my experience, strength and hope. I give freely back that which was so freely given to me. Like dragonfly wings, the 12 steps are strong and fierce in their opposition to me. I fly free when I know who I am. I wish you all had this beautiful program. It is a recipe for life, which tells me what to do when I am wrong and confused. I live a full life when following these simple steps. There is nothing more complicated than me. I like only trouble, so I go to the source, a loving kind god, one of my own understanding. He/She finds me peace, calm and is the source of my loving kind soul.

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A29

COMMUNITY

A Movember to remember in Tournament Capital MORE THAN $5,500 WAS RAISED LAST MONTH IN CAMPAIGN FOR MEN’S HEALTH INITIATIVES RIGHT: Derek Strokon from Sun Life Financial has his Movember moustache removed by Francesca Lucia of radio station Country 103 during last week’s celebration of the annual month-long event. More than $5,500 was raised for men’s health issues, including cancer and mental health. BELOW: Lise from the Continental Barber Shop (left) and Lucia present a clean-shaven Strokon. KATE POTTER PHOTOS/KTW

Sun Life Financial’s Movember movement raised more than $5,500 for men’s health initiatives. Movember is an annual month-long event, held in November, that sees men grow moustaches and more as they raise awareness of men’s health issues, including cancer and mental health. While they grow ‘staches and beards and all sorts of hairstyles, they seek donations to men’s-

health causes. On Thursday night at the Shark Club, after 30 razor-less days, the participants gathered at a fundraiser to celebrate the Movember that was and shave off their four-week-long effort. Helping out were emcee and “barber” Francesca Lucia from radio station Country 103, whose work was overseen by Lise from the Continental Barber Shop in downtown Kamloops.

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HELP KEEP KAMLOOPS SAFE THIS HOLIDAY SEASON BY VOLUNTEERING JUST SIX HOURS OF YOUR TIME. If you or someone you know is interested in volunteering this Holiday season, Please call 250-320-0650, or visit us online at www.pacificsportinteriorbc.com/operationrednose Volunteer forms can be picked up at the Tournament Capital Centre, ICBC Claim Centre, Desert Gardens Community Centre or Volunteer Kamloops

Please Don’t Drink & Drive!

Happy Holidays!

If you drink, don’t drive.

Do the right thing for your family and friends.

Thompson Inc.

Know Before you go!

www.ShiftIntoWinter.ca

Plan for a safe ride home this holiday season. Don’t Drink & Drive! Cathy McLeod, MP 6-275 Seymour Street Kamloops, BC cathy.mcleod.c1@parl.gc.ca 250-851-4991 www.cathymcleod.ca

Please Don’t Drink & Drive!

This holiday season, plan for a safe ride home.

Peter Milobar, MLA

DON’S Auto Towing Ltd. DON’S

671 Athabasca Street West Auto Towing Kamloops, BCLtd. 250-374-6281 • 1-877-374-6281 Athabasca Street West 671671 Athabasca Street West Kamloops, BC Kamloops, BC 250-374-6281 • 1-877-374-6281

250-374-6281 • 1-877-374-6281

Kamloops This Week wishes you and your family a safe and happy holiday!

Todd Stone, MLA

Kamloops – North Thompson

Kamloops – South Thompson

618B Tranquille Road Kamloops, BC Phone: 250.554.5413 Toll Free: 1.888.299.0805 peter.milobar.mla@leg.bc.ca

446 Victoria Street Kamloops, BC Phone: 250.374.2880 Toll Free: 1.888.474.2880 todd.stone.mla@leg.bc.ca

IF YOU DRINK, DON’T DRIVE. Help Support Local Charities

GIVING TOGETHER to build a stronger community

Donate Online at Kamloopsthisweek.com/Cheer

Women’s shelter

Kamloops

Out of the Cold


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

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BUSINESS 250-374-7467 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Rotating strike arrived at Heffley mill MICHAEL POTESTIO STAFF REPORTER michael@kamloopsthisweek.com

DAVE EAGLES/KTW Ken Scurt, president of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, stands outside the service club’s former home at Tranquille Road and Sydney Avenue on the North Shore. The recent sale of the building meant a rise in rent and the Eagles had to fly the coop. They are now looking for a new home. The other half of the building is home to Moon Wok restaurant.

Eagles searching for a new nest CHRISTOPHER FOULDS KTW EDITOR editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

The Eagles have been hanging their hats at the Moose Lodge, but the birds are anxious to regain a perch of their own. The Fraternal Order of Eagles is a service club that has operated in Kamloops for about 45 years. They originally gathered at their club at the corner of Tranquille Road and Desmond Street in Brocklehurst. Since 2002, the Eagles held court at the club-owned building at Tranquille Road and Sydney Avenue on the North Shore. A few years ago, the club sold the 30,000-square-foot property, which also houses the Moon Wok restaurant. This past summer, the property was sold again, with club president

Ken Scurt saying the ensuing rent hike — from $5,500 to more than $6,000 a month — proving too pricey. With 390 male members and 90 female members paying annual dues of $35 and $30, respectively, Scurt said the club needs a home it can afford, a place somewhere in the monthly rent range of no more than $3,500. The new Eagles nest would preferably be on the North Shore. The Eagles cover rent and pay for community projects via bar sales, meat draws and a gaming grant. But, with the liquor licence in limbo — as it is tied to the location from which the Eagles just flew — Scurt said the priority is to find a home soon. “We’re just holding our breath and hoping we may get something, but I just don’t know,” he said. “Now that we’re been so long away

from our own club, most of the members have gone to other places, like the Anavets and the Moose. “But we have a diehard cast of people — they are Eagles members and they just don’t want to give it up. We are going to get people back, but it will just take time.” The Eagles are similar to other service clubs in Kamloops, including the Lions, Kiwanis and Rotary. “Our motto is people helping people,” Scurt said. “All that we do, from gaming grants and meat draws, is turned back to the people in need of things.” Scurt said the Eagles have reached out to the city to determine if any property might fit the bill, but thus far without luck. Anybody with a lead on a new home for the Eagles can call Scurt at 778-4704402.

It’s your money and our reputation. We take both seriously.

Forestry workers from the Tolko sawmill in Heffley Creek were on the picket line Monday as the United Steelworkers, representing union shops in the southern Interior, began rotating strikes. The picket line went up at midnight and is scheduled to come down at 11 p.m. USW Local 1-405 members at Interfor Castlegar, along with Local 1-423 members at Interfor Grand Forks, initiated 24-hour strikes on Nov. 26 — the first planned job action among the southern Interior locals after mediated talks broke off with the Interior Forest Labour Relations Association the previous week. Workers at the southern Interior mills have been without a new contract since the end of June. Issues raised by the union include being locked into a long-term contract with small wage increases. The gap between the two sides has the union proposing a three per cent per year wage increase over four years, compared to the IFLRA’s offer of two per cent per year over five years, according to a bargaining update from USW 1-417 president Marty Gibbons. Gibbons told KTW he doesn’t view that as a “huge gap,” but said the employers have been “inflexible” and left the union with no choice but to strike. IFLRA president Jeff Roos said in an emailed statement that it was unfortunate the union “did not see value in continuing discussions,” adding the employers remain open to returning to the bargaining table. The strike at the Heffley Creek mill is being done in co-ordination with USW 1-423 in Kelowna. Most rotating strikes planned by USW are scheduled to last for a 24-hour period.

FACEBOOK PHOTO United Steelworkers members at Tolko’s Heffley Creek plywood and veneer plant took part in a one-day strike on Monday.

Eric Davis, BBA, CIWM, PFP Vice-President, Portfolio Manager and Investment Advisor Keith Davis, BBA, CFP®, RRC Investment Advisor

TD Wealth Private Investment Advice T: 250 314 5124 | 1 866 377 1511 eric.davis@td.com | keith.davis@td.com | daviswealth.ca Davis Wealth Management Team consists of Eric Davis, Vice President, Portfolio Manager & Investment Advisor and Keith Davis, Investment Advisor. Davis Wealth Management Team is part of TD Wealth Private Investment Advice, a division of TD Waterhouse Canada Inc. TD Waterhouse Canada Inc. is a subsidiary of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. TD Waterhouse Canada Inc. – Member of the Canadian Investor Protection Fund. ® The TD logo and other trade-marks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank. 17022873MC


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WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

BUSINESS A CRAFTY BUSINESS

Monique Cudbertson works with acrylics between customers during the past weekend’s craft fair at Mastermind Studios on Laval Crescent in Southgate. ‘Tis the season for craft fairs and they are being held at various locales in and around Kamloops this month. To find out where the next fairs will pop up, go online to kamloops thisweek.com and click on the Events calendar down the right side of the home page. ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

Kamloops’ vacancy rate at 1.3 per cent ACCORDING TO THE CANADA MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION, THE AVERAGE RENT IN THE TOURNAMENT CAPITAL IN OCTOBER WAS $988 TIM PETRUK

STAFF REPORTER

tim@kamloopsthisweek.com

While Kamloops’ vacancy rate was largely flat in October compared to the same time last year, analysts say a number of new rental projects under construction could have an impact on data in 2019. The city’s vacancy rate last month was 1.3 per cent, up slightly from 1.2 per cent in October 2017. Vacancies are higher on the North Shore than on the South Shore. There are 319 rental units under construction in Kamloops, apartments that will push the total

number of rental units in the city — not including private rentals like basement suites and condos or homes rented by owners — to 3,800. It will be the first significant spike in supply in more than five years. Taylor Pardy, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation’s regional economist for B.C., said the new apartments could bump up the city’s vacancy rate. “It really depends on future rental demand,” he said. “If we continue to see modest population growth with these new rentals, we might see vacancy rates start to move up.”

The increase in supply could also mean a drop in rental rates, which have been rising consistently in recent years. Last month, renters in Kamloops paid an average of $988 — up from $874 the same month a year earlier. In October, Kamloops bachelor suites rented for an average of $763, one-bedrooms for $935, two-bedrooms for $1,084 and three-bedrooms or more for $1,252 — each about $100 more than 12 months earlier. “In terms of rent, when you get to a place where supply starts to catch up with demand, you might see that moderate a little bit,” Pardy said.

Wells Gray Tours’ Neave elected to NTA board A Kamloops tour operator has been elected to the board of directors of the National Tour Association (NTA), a worldwide organization of travel professionals. Fraser Neave is director of

product development for Wells Gray Tours, based in Kamloops. He is responsible for planning about 95 tours each year that visit destinations in Canada, the U.S. and dozens of countries around the world.

Neave was elected by about 500 tour operator members of the NTA. He will serve a three-year term. The NTA board consists of 17 members representing tour operators, destination marketing organizations and tour suppliers, includ-

ing hotels, cruise lines, theatres and restaurants. In 2017, Neave was honoured twice by the NTA when he received the Young Professionals Award in February (at age 25) and the Certified Tour Professional Award

in December. Wells Gray Tours was founded in Kamloops in 1972 by Roland Neave. The company now has five retail offices around B.C. and is the largest outbound tour operator in the province.


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

BUSINESS

A33

Holiday

Economist says city should have moderate growth Giveaway over next half-decade Enter to Win

Bear

BY THE NUMBERS

JESSICA WALLACE

STAFF REPORTER

jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

Kamloops’ economy is strong and will likely continue to grow moderately over the next five years, according to a local economist. “We do find that Kamloops does have a diverse industry mix and it’s quite healthy,” Ernst and Young economist Mauricio Zelaya said. Venture Kamloops commissioned Ernst and Young to conduct a comprehensive study of the city’s economy, including the future as cannabis and high-tech industries emerge. Venture Kamloops — the city’s economic-development arm — previously conducted “what-if-scenario” studies and the new study will act as a baseline. “We have known for some time that we enjoy a fairly stable economy in Kamloops,” Venture Kamloops executive director Jim Anderson said. “This tells us why and, further, it tells us how. It tells us what sectors contribute to the economic diversity and what sectors are heavily weighted in the employment share and the total number of employees.” The report notes the city has a “well-educated population coupled with a healthy average household income.” Close to two-thirds of the city’s working population holds a post-secondary degree, including in engineering (14

2011: Population: 85,678 Total employment: 45,850 Unemployment rate: 8.5 per cent Average income per household: $77,000 Real GDP: $3.8 billion 2018: Population: 92,600 Total employment: 49,357 Unemployment rate: 6.1 per cent Average income per household: $100,000 Real GDP: $4.4 billion 2022: Population: 96,518 Total employment: 50,844 Unemployment rate: 7 per cent Average income per household: $112,000 Real GDP: $4.8 billion per cent), business (12 per cent), health (11 per cent), sciences (nine per cent) and humanities (eight per cent). “Kamloops is reasonably diverse and appears to be more diverse than cities such as Kelowna, but less diverse than major metropolitan areas,” Zelaya said. Real GDP dollars are expected to grow by about two per cent through 2022 and the average income per household is expected to rise to $112,000. That compares to $77,000 in 2011 and $100,000 in 2018.

The population, meanwhile, is expected to grow about one per cent each year. Anderson cited that growth as one surprise in the report, noting multi-family dwellings on the rise and constant construction around town. “But you have to look historically,” he said. “We’ve had booms and we’ve had minor busts.” Meanwhile, burgeoning industries are expected to have an impact. Kamloops is home to the province’s first recreational cannabis shop — and more are on the way. Assuming 10 recreational cannabis stores open in Kamloops, with about three full-time positions each, Ernst and Young estimates the industry could result in 36 jobs (when also including spinoff jobs resulting from those stores) and about $4.8 million in operational spending from the businesses. “But we expect, based on our analysis, that some of that would be leakages based on using businesses outside of the City of Kamloops to support their activities,” Zelaya said. The tech sector, meanwhile, produces jobs that have “knowledge spillover effects,” Zelaya said, meaning employees with tech experience can jump to other businesses and benefit them. “It would help the city going forward,” he said.

1st PRIZE A get-a-way for 2 at Sun Peaks* *4 adult lift tickets & one night stay

2 $1,000 in groceries • 3rd $500 in gas nd

Plus each location is drawing for a limited edition bear! Enter at these locations:

• All Aboard Games • Brock Liquor Store • BC Wildlife Park • Classic FX • Danielle’s Silver and Gold • First Choice Hair Cutters • Halston Neighbourhood Pub • Heathers Fabric Shelf • Jump 360 • Kamloops Gymnastics and Trampoline Centre

• Lansdowne Central Liquor Store • Lensmakers Optical • Market Fresh Foods • Minos • The Residents at Orchards Walk • Penny Pinchers • Plaza • Safeway (North Kamloops & Sahali)

Draw will take place on December 17th

PHOTO CONTEST

NOVEMBER WINNER

$700K handed out at TRU The Thompson Rivers University handed out more than $700,000 at its annual awards ceremony on Thursday — the most it has ever presented at the event — recognizing 622 students with scholarships and bursaries. Fourth-year business student Kennedy Aberdeen, an award recipient, said financial support motivates students. “It’s very gratifying to receive recognition for our efforts and achievements,” she

said. “Knowing there are people who believe in our hard work and TRU as an institution further motivates us to excel. To the donors, thank you again for your commitment to and belief in us as students and also in Thompson Rivers University.” Awards totalled $716,552, an increase of $43,949 from last year. That brings the

amount dispersed by the foundation since April 1 to $1.1 million and the number of students recognized this year to 817. The foundation has also created 28 new annual awards and seven new endowments since last year. “We are delighted today to award the largest amount ever to the students present at this ceremony,” said TRU

Foundation board president Greg Garrish. The TRU Foundation has been supporting students for 36 years and has built an endowment portfolio for student assistance exceeding $25 million. Last year, the foundation raised $9.7 million for the university and welcomed its single largest donation ever of $5 million from Dr. Sherman Jen. That gift, in part, created six new scholarships that were awarded for the first time Thursday.

CONGRATULATIONS Diana Hauser

for submitting this month’s winning photo For a chance to win a prize valued at $100 submit your photos here:

contests.kamloopsthisweek.com Submission Deadline: 12:00 pm on Dec 21 Photos must as high quality as possible. One winner selected at the end of each month from all acceptable entries. Physical copies not accepted. Read terms and conditions online for details.


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WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

month of the

Bonnie McBride What piece of art did you buy? I have successfully bid twice. I have 2 beautiful and vibrant paintings by local artists that hang in my home.

What do you like best about your artwork?

Both of my pieces are vibrant works with lots of feeling. I love the texture both artists were able to achieve with their techniques. I can’t wait to add to my collection in subsequent auctions!

What organization(s) did you volunteer with to pay for your art? I volunteered with Project X Theatre, The BC SPCA, Four Paws Food Bank and my children’s PAC to complete my hours over the two years.What ‘s best about the organization? I met a lot of new people and developed some great friendships volunteering over the last few years. The fires in 2017 were particularly intense and the other volunteers I met during that time have become very important to me and my family. I’ve always gotten so much out of volunteering that it’s hard to feel like I am giving back. I’ve also learned a lot about our community and some of the projects and programs I didn’t know existed. Even just connecting with the groups that attend the evening is an eye opener.

What do you like about the Timeraiser event? I’ve attend the Timeraiser both as a bidder and a community partner. I love seeing all the people interested in giving back to our community. The people that attend range in age and background and belief systems greatly. With Four Paws Food Bank, it’s been great to be able to connect with people and have a real opportunity to talk to them about what it is we do and how they can be part of it. Some of our most engaged volunteers have come to us from the Timeraiser!

HOW TIME RAISER WORKS

Local artwork is selected and purchased for auction

Non-profit agencies gather at the time raiser event

SPONSOR of the MONTH

Participants bid volunteer hours on works of art they are interested in

Volunteer Kamloops

Current Hot Opportunities Volunteer Kamloops Snow Angels Canadian Mental Health Association Clubhouse Certified Yoga Instructor

400-970 McMaster Way 250-374-3831 1805 Mission Flats Road 250-374-6715

The winning bidders complete their volunteer pledge over a year

Bidders bring their artwork home!

The next KTW COMMUNITY

TIMERAISER NOVEMBER 2019

MS Society Friendly Visiting Program

7:00 - 11:00 pm

Salvation Army Bell Ringer

The Rex Hall 417 Seymour St.

Kamloops Hospice Assocaition Snow Removal

FOR DETAILS VISIT

www.volunteerkamloops.org or call 250-372-8313

Live Music ~ Appies ~ Art

EVERYONE WELCOME No obligation to volunteer


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A35

SPORTS kamloopsthisweek.com | 778-471-7536

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW Connor Zary, a 17-year-old forward from Saskatoon, scored a game-tying goal against his hometown team, the Saskatoon Blades, at Sandman Centre on Friday. His Kamloops Blazers won 3-2 in overtime.

New-look Blazers aiming for third straight win MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

I

f Matt Bardsley was strutting around Mark Recchi Way on Monday morning, looking like Vince McMahon powerstriding toward a ring at Wrestlemania, there was a reason for the confident gait. The Kamloops Blazers’ general manager made two trades last Monday, shipping out two of the team’s top four scorers and receiving very little firepower in return. He assured fans the deals, which brought two depth players and four draft picks to Kamloops, did not indicate the team is throwing in the towel for the second half of this season. Instead, he said the trades that sent 19-year-old defenceman Nolan Kneen to Saskatoon and 20-year-old forward Luc Smith to

WHL FACEOFF GAME #25

13-10

11-11-1-1

Wednesday, Dec. 5 Victoria @ Kamloops 7 p.m. Sandman Centre Spokane are designed to open up opportunity for current players who may benefit from increased ice time, while also acquiring draft capital. Quinn Schmiemann, a 17-year-old defenceman who was behind Kneen on the depth chart,

You are Invited to Preview the New 2019 Lincoln Navigator, Nautilus and MKC

had a breakout weekend. The Wilcox, Sask., product scored the overtime winner in a 3-2 victory over Saskatoon (17-9-3-0) on Friday and racked up three points, including one goal, in a 6-3 win over the Seattle Thunderbirds (9-13-3-0) on Saturday. Brodi Stuart, an 18-year-old forward who has struggled to find his stride this season, was moved up to centre the first line, playing between left-wing Orrin Centazzo and right-wing Zane Franklin. The Langley product only registered one assist on the weekend, but the line combined for seven points and Stuart — who was 22-for-43 in the face-off circle — received praise from 20-year-old captain Jermaine Loewen and head coach Serge Lajoie. “I like Brodi Stuart in the middle,” Lajoie said. “Brodi is a no-nonsense guy. He

works hard. It was a good weekend for those three.” Added Loewen: “Stuey going up with the top line, I thought he filled in quite nicely. I think he was one of the guys who provided a lot of energy and played hard.” Franklin, who was acquired by Bardsley in summer swap with Lethbridge, scored the Teddy Bear-toss marker on Saturday and leads Kamloops (11-11-1-1) with 16 goals. Connor Zary, a 17-year-old forward from Saskatoon who is off to a slower-than-expected start, could have ran the Broadway Bridge eight times with the energy he expended celebrating his game-tying goal in the third period on Friday. His primal yell was perhaps heard on the shores of the South Saskatchewan River and his leap into the glass was a window into a snakebitten player’s relief and jubilation. Relief and jubilation were felt

You are invited to join us for a special preview event. Enjoy food, beverages and live music performed by The River City Duo at this festive event.

RESERVE NOW AS SPACE IS LIMITED Thursday December 6 • 5:00-8:00pm Please RSVP to Holly at hneros@kamloopsford.ca or 250.376.7266

by all the Blazers, who entered the weekend with a record of 2-60-1 at Sandman Centre — and with some fans questioning the GM’s intentions for 2018-2019. Bardsley, of course, was almost certainly not parading around Blazers’ headquarters like the WWE’s billionaire owner. He is aware of recent inconsistent tendencies and there is no reason to get too high after two wins. A four-game losing skid silenced the Blazers’ pop after their only four-game winning streak of the season. Kamloops was powerbombed to seven straight defeats, including a pair of falls to the Victoria Royals on Vancouver Island, after posting back-to-back victories over the Kelowna Rockets to open the season. Those same Royals will be looking to clothesline the Blazers back to earth again on Wednesday at Sandman Centre.


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WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

WANDLER BIDS ADIEU TO RIVERDOGS MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

KTW FILE PHOTO Sean Wandler (left) has stepped down as head coach of the midget AAA Kamloops RiverDogs after nearly 20 years on the job.

32 JERMAINE LOEWEN

DEC 5

VICTORIA

HOME GAME SPONSOR

COUNTRY NIGHT

Fans are encouraged to dress in their best western attire to win prizes! One lucky fan will go home with a CAR courtesy of the Kamloops Auto Mall

SALVATION ARMY KETTLE CAMPAIGN

Bring spare change to make your contribution to the annual Salvation Army Kettle Campaign SEASON TICKET HOLDERS

Hot Chocolate or Coffee Giveaway (Bring voucher from Season Ticket Booklet)

UPCOMING GAME

ROAD TO WORLD JUNIORS USA VS RUSSIA

SANDMAN CENTRE

WEDNESDAY

DEC. 20 • 7 PM

SPECIAL TICKET PRICING FOR SEASONS TICKET HOLDERS ENDS TOMORROW

DECEMBER 5 7:00PM

VS

FOR TICKETS CALL

250-828-3339 *Ticket restrictions may apply

BLAZERHOCKEY.COM

Sean Wandler is going to Mexico next week, a trip that will mark his first non-baseball-related holiday since 2000. Wandler’s excursion is possible because he is no longer head coach of the midget AAA Kamloops RiverDogs. “These are the type of things I couldn’t do because I was on the indoor field or in the gym,” said Wandler, a chartered accountant who has coached the Dogs on a volunteer basis for 18 years. “It’s an onerous schedule, the commitment, with all the travel and the weekends. But I’ve loved every minute of it, with the relationships and contacts I’ve made.” Mark Orr, who coached the bantam AAA RiverDogs in 2018, is taking over midget AAA head coaching duties from Wandler, who is the KMBA’s executive director and will remain in that position. Wandler was 23 and had recently graduated from university when he began coaching the midget AA Dogs in 2000. The team transitioned to midget AAA in 2001. Kamloops reached three provincial finals between 2011 and 2015, winning gold once. In 2008, the Dogs were regular-season champions with a franchisebest record of 31-9. The club won a B.C. title in 2007, becoming the first Kamloops outfit to raise a midget provincial baseball banner. In 2002, the Dogs won provincial and western silver. A change in 2016 to BC Baseball division formatting led to the creation of the College Prep League, essentially the tier 1 division of midget AAA in the province. Kamloops made the jump, along with seven other teams, while 11 teams

dropped down to form a tier 2 division. BC Baseball did away with catchment areas in 2016, making the tier 1 league more attractive to some of the province’s highestcalibre players, many who might previously have chosen to play in B.C.’s top development system, the Premier Baseball League. That free-for-all catchment system can be great for Lower Mainland teams, with better players and improved coaching contributing to superior programs, but it doesn’t help the Dogs, who rely almost solely on KMBA products. The RiverDogs have struggled to compete with the league’s top teams since the switch and posted a 10-30 record this year before making their third-consecutive first-round exit from the post-season. Kamloops was 17-23 last year, improving on a 9-30 mark in 2016. Wandler plans to help Orr learn the ropes, using contacts and knowledge gained over the last two decades. “Sean has put a lot into that program to get it where it is, in terms of its success and being a mainstay in the provincial top tier,” KMBA president Chris Balison said. “Two years ago, Sean moved into a role as KMBA executive director. When you’re a fulltime coach, you can’t really give 100 per cent to either.” Wandler has been involved in improving tournament programming and establishing girls’ baseball within the KMBA ranks. “I’m still heavily involved,” Wandler said. “I told all the returning players as soon as I made the decision at the end of the season. “I wanted to tell them face to face. I just let them know it’s nothing against the program or them. “I’m just looking forward to a new chapter in life.”


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

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A37

SPORTS

Patterson traded to surging Silvertips from bad-news Broncos

Max Patterson won the WHL championship last season with the Swift Current Broncos. He is in position to make a run for another league banner with the Everett Silvertips. ROBERT MURRAY/WHL

Kamloops product Max Patterson is on the move. The 18-year-old forward was traded to the Everett Silvertips from the Swift Current Broncos on Tuesday. Swift Current, which knocked off Everett to win the 2018 WHL championship, received a fourth-round selection in the 2020 WHL Bantam Draft and 16-year-old prospect Dawson Springer. Patterson, who stands 6-foot-4 and weighs about 202 pounds, was the Broncos’ leading scorer this season, with 19 points, including eight goals, in 27 games. He recorded seven

TITANS OVERACHIEVE AT PROVINCIALS The South Kamloops Titans exceeded expectations at the B.C. High School Senior AAA Girls Volleyball Championship in Powell River last weekend. South Kam was ranked 12th at the tournament, but placed sixth after falling to Magee of Vancouver in the fifth-place game. Crofton House of Vancouver knocked off Carihi of Campbell River to win gold. The Titans placed second in their pool before losing to Carihi in the quarter-final round in a marathon match that lasted about two hours and thirty minutes. South Kam middle Megan Bubela was named to the tournament’s second all-star team. The Titans won the championship’s Most Sportsmanlike Team Award. CHAIRLIFT COMING SOON Skiers and riders watched on the weekend as towers for the Orient chairlift were flown by helicopter into Sun Peaks Resort. The four-passenger, fixedgrip lift, located in the East Village area of the resort, is expected to be open in time for Christmas. The addition will improve access to the main village core and to some of the most underutilized ski terrain in the resort through family-friendly blue runs and fantastic pockets of glade skiing, according to a Tourism Sun Peaks press release. PROVINCIALS-BOUND Team McGillivray, composed of curlers from Vernon and Kamloops, has qualified for the 2019 BC Junior Curling

points during last season’s playoffs and two penalty minutes in three Memorial Cup games. The Broncos were 0-3 at the national championship tournament. Patterson is the third

former Swift Current player acquired by Everett via trade in recent months. The Silvertips added overage defenceman Sahvan Khaira before the season and 20-yearold import blue-liner

Artyom Minulin on Oct. 31. Everett (22-7-1-0) is atop the Western Conference and gearing up for a playoff run, while Swift Current is in the league basement at 4-21-1-1.

THANK YOU KTW DIGITAL

“I am so happy with my new website that Kamloops This Week designed for me. I spoke with the KTW Digital Team about what I wanted it to look like, and they included me during the process for my feedback. They really listened to me! I think they really captured my personality. If you need a website you should give them a call! My website is www.madmadworld.ca.”

— Madi Lowe

1365B Dalhousie Drive • 250-374-7467 • kamloopsthisweek.com

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW The Kamloops Blazers brought stuffed animals to patients at Royal Inland Hospital on Monday. Teddy Bear Toss night was held on Saturday at Sandman Centre, where more than 5,000 fans hurled fuzzy creatures to the ice when Zane Franklin (left) scored the Blazers’ first goal. Kamloops doubled Seattle 6-3.

Tournament Capital Sports

BRIEFS Championships, which will be held from Dec. 27 to Jan. 1 at the Vernon Curling Club. Megan McGillivray, Jaelyn Cotter, Katelyn McGillivray and Cassidy Schwaerzle earned a berth at the women’s provincial championship by winning the Thompson-Okanagan playdown in Osoyoos last weekend. CRACKING THE SQUAD Seven Kamloops Canoe and Kayak Club members have been named to Canoe Kayak BC provincial teams for the 2018-2019 season. Matao Buist (Level 3), Michael Lanyon (Level 3), Stanley Netherton (Level 3), Spencer Robinson (Level 3), Abigail Donaldson (Level 4), Aiden Tabata (Level 4) and

Emma Guertin (Level 5) will paddle for B.C. Athletes were selected based on results from this past season, including through nationalteam selection, B.C. performance standards or nomination by the coach’s technical committee. Stan Marek coaches the Kamloops athletes. HARRISON RELEASED Devan Harrison was released from the Kamloops Blazers’ active roster on Tuesday. The 18-year-old defenceman has joined the Estevan Bruins of the junior A Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League. Harrison had one assist in eight games with Kamloops this season. The Blazers have 23 players on their roster, including three goaltenders, 14 forwards and six defencemen. Jeff Faith, a 20-year-old forward, can play both ways as he started his career on the back end with the Spokane Chiefs.

PLATINUM IS THE WORD A DUNES PLATINUM MEMBERSHIP

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JOIN BEFORE MARCH 1ST, 2019 AND RECEIVE A DOZEN SRIXON BALLS* * A $50 DOLLAR VALUE

FREE PLEASE ENQUIRE IN THE PRO SHOP 250.579.3300 EXT. 1 GOLFTHEDUNES.COM


A38

WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

SPORTS

Bears maul Wolves

KTW FILE PHOTO

FIRING THEM UP

Head coach Pat Hennelly and the TRU WolfPack found out on the weekend they are not quite ready to beat the country’s best. The Alberta Golden Bears swept a two-match set against the Pack in Canada West men’s volleyball action in Edmonton, winning 3-0 on Friday and 3-2 on Saturday. TRU (7-3) enters the holiday break ranked ninth in the nation, down one spot from last week. Alberta (11-1) is ranked third in U Sports. Meanwhile, the WolfPack volleyball women made program history in Edmonton with their first-ever victory over the Alberta Pandas. TRU (5-7) bounced back from a 3-0 loss on Friday to win 3-0 on Saturday. Alberta (9-3) is tied for fourth in U Sports women’s rankings.

The University of Alberta had its way with TRU’s basketball teams in Canada West action at the TCC on the weekend. In women’s play, the Pandas (8-2) topped the Pack 76-54 on Friday and 83-67 on Saturday. TRU dropped to 3-7 and sits 14th in league standings. “Overall, I thought the girls put up a hell of a fight. I was really proud of them,” WolfPack assistant coach Chuck Ferguson told TRU Sports Information on Saturday. “They are still a little better team than us on the inside.” The Golden Bears (7-3) bested the WolfPack 107-81 on Friday and 86-79 on Saturday. The Wolves sit tied for 11th in Canada West men’s basketball standings. “Our level of compete was better,” WolfPack head coach Scott Clark said of his team’s play on Saturday. “They are the No. 6-ranked team in the country and they deserve that ranking. “They have good

Enter to win 4 Tickets ROAD TO THE

WORLD JUNIORS

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW Kamloops product Emily Vilac dishes inside against the Alberta Pandas at the Tournament Capital Centre on the weekend. Vilac and her TRU WolfPack lost twice to the Pandas and sit 14th in Canada West standings at the holiday break.

players and they are well-coached. They play hard and they play the right way, sharing the basketball. And they execute.” Regular-season play will resume in the new

year after the holiday break. The top 12 teams in the 17-team men’s and women’s conferences will advance to the post-season. Teams will be

seeded in the playoffs according to the Canada West’s ratings performance index. TRU’s women are 14th in RPI standings, while the WolfPack men are 10th.

Heather’s

Fabric Shelf FREE STOCKING & TRAVEL BAG CLASS DEC. 4 & 8 - TRAVEL BAG DEC. 11 & 15 - STOCKING

USA

Limited Space.

WE ENCOURAGE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR CREATION BEHIND SO WE CAN FILL WITH ITEMS TO GIVE TO WOMEN IN NEED.

VS

RUSSIA

S! O M

Thursday, December 20 7 pm | Sandman Centre Don’t miss your chance to see the best junior players in the world!

DE

Name Phone email

Closes Dec 18 at 4 pm Mail or drop off to Kamloops This Week 1365B Dalhousie Drive, Kamloops BC V2C 5P6 • 1 entry per person per day. Entrants who enter multiple times per day will be disqualified.

WE ALSO HAVE GREAT GIFT ID EAS

JEWELERY, SEW ING TABLES, HANDMADE WAL LETS, QUILTING KITS, NOTIONS, GIFT CERTIFICATES & MORE

#15-1800 Tranquille Rd Brock Shopping Centre

250-376-7630

Holiday Bear Giveaway 1st prize: A get-a-way for 2 at Sun Peaks* *4 adult lift tickets & one night stay

2nd Prize: $1,000 in groceries • 3rd Prize: $500 in gas Draw Date Dec 17 • See in store for details

Plus each location is a r drawing fo

limited edition bear!


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A39

SPORTS

Canucks to have NHL rival in Seattle? GEMMA KARSTENS-SMITH

THE CANADIAN PRESS

VANCOUVER — Seattle’s new NHL team may seem a natural foe for the Vancouver Canucks, but some in the hockey world say building a rivalry between the regional neighbours will take time. Canucks’ owner Francesco Aquilini welcomed Tuesday’s news that the NHL board of governors unanimously approved a yet-to-benamed franchise in Seattle, set to start play in the 2021-2022 season. “Great to welcome Seattle to the NHL!’’ he tweeted. “I’ve got a feeling this will become a classic rivalry.’’ But while the Emerald City is located just more than 200 kilometres south of Vancouver, Canucks’ head coach Travis Green said rivalries aren’t solely based on where teams are located. “They come from hard playoff series, going through battles and being battle tested against each other,’’ he said. Vancouver defenceman Troy Stecher, from Richmond, also believes creating a grudge

Elias Pettersson and the Vancouver Canucks were 11-15-3 ahead of a game against Minnesota played on Tuesday after KTW’s press deadline.

between teams requires some history. “I definitely think it could become something, but it’s going to take time,’’ he said, noting there’s already intense competition in Major League Soccer between the Vancouver Whitecaps and their regional adversaries, the Seattle Sounders. “You can’t just say it’s a rivalry. You’ve got to go through games, you’ve got to build that personality, you’ve got to have battles with guys on their teams. And I think that’s what creates it.’’ Giving both Vancouver and Seattle fans an opportunity to drive to games in another market will be huge, Stecher said. “I played at a college that had really

good fans that would travel a ways,’’ said the University of North Dakota alum. “So maybe this is a good step for the Canucks.’’ Creating a new rivalry could be a boon for the Canucks’ business side, said Peter Tingling, a professor with Simon Fraser University’s Beedie School of Business in Burnaby. “You want engaged fans and it will certainly be good from that perspective,’’ he said, noting it has been a long time since Vancouver’s Rogers Arena was regularly sold out for hockey games. Having a new team in the Pacific Division could also put pressure on the Canucks to perform both on and off the ice, Tingling added. The NHL’s last

expansion team, the Vegas Golden Knights, upped the ante for competition and entertainment, making the Stanley Cup final in their first year in the league and quickly gaining a reputation for over-the-top in-game experiences and fan engagement. “There’s nothing like footprints behind you to make you up your game,’’ Tingling said. “It’s not just winning in the arena, although that’s always a good thing. If you start to see some innovation in how they engage with fans, for example, that’s going to put pressure on Vancouver.’’ The Canucks are currently in rebuild mode after finishing second-last in the Pacific Division last year. The club had a hot start to the season, thanks in part to rookie sensation Elias Pettersson, but the team has since cooled, winning just one of its last 12 games. A continued slump could be dangerous if another franchise enters the market and performs well, Tingling said. “Fans can be fickle,’’ he said. “They will only put up with a poor per-

formance for so long. And if they can look a few hours south to a winning team, that’s going to create some resentment, I would expect.’’ While a new rivalry with Seattle could capture attention shortterm, it’s not the best way to create and retain fans, Tingling said. “Quite simply, there’s nothing like winning to fill an arena,’’ he said. “And, if you’re not winning, then what else are you doing?’’ While some say animosity between the Pacific Northwest teams could take time to boil over, politicians were already trading barbs Tuesday. “I’m excited to see Seattle’s #ReturnToHockey today,’’ Washington Gov. Jay Inslee tweeted. “I look forward to seeing the goalie sunburned by the goal light as the new @ NHLSeattle_ team beats the Vancouver @ Canucks in 2021.’’ “Won’t be as bad as the sunburn your goalie’s going to get from playing golf after the regular season’s over,’’ responded B.C. Premier John Horgan. “Congratulations City of Seattle. Go @ Canucks go!’’

BC Hydro Hillside Drive Construction Project

ANSWERS TO CROSSWORD FOUND ON A40

City of Kamloops

ACTIVITY PROGRAMS

For registration please call 250-828-3500 and please quote program number provided. For online registration please visit

WWW.KAMLOOPS.CA/EZREG

Programs are cancelled if the minimum numbers are not met.

Baking: Christmas Desserts $47 Get a jump on your Christmas baking by learning some simple but impressive and delicious recipes for cookies, squares, and other sweets. You’ll get to sample your goodies and take home enough uncooked portions to bake up later. Some supplies required. South Kamloops Sec. School » Dec 5 6:30-9:30 PM Wed 287933 Seniors Light Tour FREE Catch the bus at Sandman Centre for a tour of our city’s spectacular Christmas lights. After the tour, join us for hot beverages, festive treats, and holiday entertainment. Registration is required. Sandman Centre » Dec 6 7:00-10:00 PM Thu 287934 Beeswax Wraps $20 Did you know that Kamloops is a Bee City? Local pollinators create beeswax, which can be used in so many different ways! Come hear about some of the benefits of beeswax and create ecofriendly beeswax wraps (that can be used instead of plastic wrap) for yourself or someone special. Kamloops Museum & Archive » Dec 8 1:30 PM-3:00 PM Mon 295833

Kamloops Did you Know? We’re working to connect our new substation on Bunker Road in Kamloops to the Downtown West End. Where:

Kamloops - along Hillside Drive from Summit Drive to Bunker Road

When:

Starting December 3, 2018

Time:

Work crews will be on site 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Monday through Friday

Physical Literacy develops basic motor skills that your preschooler needs to move with competence. When they are successful in their movements this leads to self-confidence and ultimately motivates them to move in all environments (snow/ice, land, air, water, wheels).

Traffic speeds will be reduced and flaggers will be on site. Although all work along Hillside Drive will be adjacent to the road, periodic lane closures will be needed to allow heavy equipment access and deliveries. Please ensure the safety of yourself and others and follow all posted signage and direction from flaggers. Thanks for your patience while we complete this important work. For more information contact Jen Walker-Larsen at 250.814.6645 or Jennifer.walker-larsen@bchydro.com.

5561

www.Kamloops.ca


A40

WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

WEEKLY CROSSWORDS

CLUES ACROSS

1. Doctor’s clothes 7. NYC ballplayer 10. Flying vessels 12. Created 13. Convert 14. WWII battle 15. A cravat with wide square ends 16. Month in the Jewish calendar 17. Value 18. Brews 19. Child’s eating accessory 21. Arrived extinct 22. Of the sea 27. Potato state 28. Leading man 33. Blood type 34. Oppressed

CLUES DOWN

36. “Much __ about nothing” 37. World’s longest river 38. DeGrom and Sale are two 39. Crafty 40. At all times 41. Twins great Hunter 44. Volcanic craters 45. Outpouring 48. Where a baby sleeps 49. Dancing a Brazilian dance 50. Unhealthy 51. Manufacturers

1. Prevents harm to young 2. The Muse of history 3. Fascinated by 4. Unnilhexium 5. Honey maker 6. Soviet Socialist Republic 7. They hang out with papas 8. German river 9. Domain name 10. Type of chair 11. Fill someone with an urge 12. Sorceress 14. Unpleasant smell 17. Leg (slang) 18. Farewell 20. A life summary 23. Merchants 24. Southeastern Nigerians

25. Of I 26. Electronic countermeasures 29. Atomic #3 (abbr.) 30. A type of sister 31. Omission of a sound 32. Screaming 35. Ottoman title 36. Sour 38. Take advantage of 40. Nobleman 41. Cathode ray was one 42. Long, winding ridge 43. Muckraking journalist 44. Defunct phone company 45. Military telecommunications term (abbr.) 46. Supervises flying 47. Firearms manufacturer

MATH MIND BENDER

CROSSWORD ANSWERS FOUND ON A39

SUDOKU FUN BY THE NUMBERS

Taxicab Geometry 2

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

You and three friends live at the four corners of an area that is three blocks north-south by five blocks east-west. All of you are pushing for a one-square-block park to be established somewhere in the three-by-five-block area. Before making your presentation, you have to decide exactly where you want the park. (How you are going to get what is already in that square block demolished is another problem.) You all decide that the total distance from each of your homes to the respective nearest corner of the park should be the shortest possible.

ANSWERS

Where should the park be located to minimize that distance?

Answer to last week’s TAXICAB GEOMETRY PUZZLE: There are 35 different routes. THIS PUZZLE IS BY GENE WIRCHENKO Find more puzzles, articles, and full solutions online at genew.ca

WEEKLY HOROSCOPES

ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

Take a few extra moments to think things through before making any important decisions, Aries. Knee-jerk reactions are not the way to go at this time. Careful planning is the key.

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21

Others are eager to hear some of your words of wisdom, Cancer. You usually know just what to say in a given situation. Prepare your thoughts carefully.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

Taurus, direct all of your attention toward a certain project. Even as you worry about other things being forgotten, you realize the importance of prioritizing.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

Leo, you may need to brush up on certain skills if you want to sail through a particular task that comes your way late in the week. Get some help if need be.

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

Gemini, you are juggling so many things right now, and you may feel like you’re being pulled in 100 directions. Slow down and figure out what takes precedence.

Virgo, once you set your mind to something, there is nothing you cannot accomplish. Your attention to detail is top notch, but don’t let perfection distract you.

NOVEMBER 5 - DECEMBER 11, 2018 LIBRA

- Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, putting family first has always been your priority and that will continue in the weeks ahead. Others notice your efforts and appreciate them.

SCORPIO

- Oct 24/Nov 22 Multitasking can be your undoing, Scorpio. You want to accomplish so much, but you must try to balance your time instead. Clean the clutter from your schedule.

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan20 Things have started to settle down a bit for you. Capricorn. That’s a welcome change from the harried pace you’ve been keeping of late. Enjoy the respite.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, it’s taken a few months for you to find your groove, but you are in a zone and standing on solid ground. Enjoy the smooth sailing that’s ahead.

PISCES

Family affairs move to the forefront this week, Sagittarius. A spouse or a child is in need of assistance, and you must set aside the time to help amid your other responsibilities.

- Feb 19/Mar 20 Listen to what others are telling you, Pisces. You have always been good at accepting advice and now is the time to heed others’ wisdom.

Help Support Local Charities

GIVING TOGETHER to build a stronger community

Donate Online at Kamloopsthisweek.com/Cheer

Women’s shelter

Kamloops

Out of the Cold


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A41

KamloopsThisWeek.com

CLASSIFIEDS Phone: 250-371-4949

INDEX

LISTINGS

Announcements . . . . 001-099 Employment . . . . . . . . .100-165 Service Guide . . . . . . . 170-399 Pets/Farm . . . . . . . . . . .450-499 For Sale/Wanted. . . . .500-599 Real Estate . . . . . . . . . .600-699 Rentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 700-799 Automotive . . . . . . . . . . 800-915 Legal Notices . . . . . . 920-1000

10:00am Tuesday for Wednesday’s Paper.

10:00am Thursday for Friday’s Paper.

Advertisements should be read on the first publication day. We are not responsible for errors appearing beyond the first insertion. It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event that errors occur in the publishing of any advertising shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only and there will be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement.

If you have an

upcoming event for our

COMMUNITY CALENDAR go to

kamloopsthisweek.com and click on the menu and go to events to submit your event.

RUN UNTIL SOLD

RUN UNTIL RENTED

GARAGE SALE

WEDNESDAY ISSUES • 10:00 am Tuesday

1 Week . . . . . . . . . $2500

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Houses, condos, duplexes, suites, etc. (3 months max) $ 5300 Add an extra line to your ad for $10

$

FRIDAY ISSUES • 10:00 am Thursday

No Businesses, Based on 3 lines Merchandise, vehicles, trailers, RV’s, boats, ATV’s, furniture, etc.

1 Issue . . . . . . . . . $1300 1 Month . . . . . . . .

ALL ADS MUST BE PREPAID. No refunds on classified ads.

80

$

00

ADD COLOUR . . $2500 to your classified add

35

$

00

Tax not included Some restrictions apply

Tax not included

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

8948589

.

JOIN THE AXIS TEAM IN KAMLOOPS!

PERFECT Part-Time

Axis Family Resources Ltd. has been in operation since 1992, with offices throughout the Interior and Northern Regions of BC. Currently, we are recruiting caregivers in a contract capacity:

2 Days Per Week call 250-374-0462

Personals Try your luck with 1x1 boxed ad $35 plus tax for 2 weeks. Price includes box number. Call 250-371-4949 to place your ad and for more details.

Travel

• Therapeutic Caregiver Contractor Supporting a youth at risk in your own home as a professional caregiver. Respite and training provided. ($4000/month + per diem for a 1 bed and $6000/month + per diems for a 2 bed) This is considered full time position and therefore requires one person in the home to be available. The successful applicants must be a positive role model, teach life skills, participate in recreational activities, maintain the home and maintain documentation. For further information, please refer to our website www.axis.bc.ca under jobs. Email resumes with cover letters to hr@axis.bc.ca or fax to 250-851-2977.

Housesitting

Employment Business Opportunities

Nixon Wenger is one of the largest, fastest growing law firms in the Okanagan Valley, based in Vernon, British Columbia, and currently has openings for a Conveyancer, and Paralegal/Legal Assistant within our Personal Injury department.

Conveyancer As a Conveyancer you must have experience and the ability to complete residential and commercial deals from start to finish. You will have strong communication skills, very detail-oriented, and must be organized.

Paralegal/Legal Assistant The ideal candidate will have 2-4 years experience, enjoys working in a fast paced, deadline driven environment, while being able to deliver consistent and exceptional customer service Nixon Wenger offers a positive working environment with competitive salaries, a comprehensive benefits package including matching RRSP program. Please submit your resume to HumanResources@nixonwenger.com www.tourismvernon.com/en/index.aspx

SOLD

3500

250-371-4949

Based on 3 lines 1 Issue. . . . . . . $1638

BONUS (pick up only):

1 Week . . . . . . $3150 1 Month . . . $10460

Tax not included

Tax not included

• 2 large Garage Sale Signs • Instructions • FREE 6” Sub compliments of

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

The daily workload consists of monitoring and managing all the maintenance of the property including: • Maintenance repairs, both mechanical and carpentry jobs for buildings and units, overseeing tenders for contract work as required. • Maintaining complete daily work reports and record keeping, with communication to the Board of Directors. • Knowledge and operation of underground irrigation system • Ground maintenance of a 3.5 acre property in common areas • Snow shovelling for assigned units including sanding and de-icing • Unit inspections on a yearly basis and with unit turnover Preference will be given to a candidate who has the following: • Minimum 3 years building maintenance related experience • Carpentry skills and attention to detail • Class 5 BC drivers licence (Abstract required) • Pick-up truck and/or trailer is required to haul yard waste and construction materials • Basic computer skills with the ability to use e-mail and Microsoft Office effectively • Criminal record check (vulnerable sector) will be required • Must be bondable This position requires you to enjoy physical work, the ability to organize and prioritize daily tasks, have strong communication skills and work with a minimum of supervision.

Please submit cover letter and resume with wage expectations by e-mail to: committeehiring@gmail.com APPLICATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED UNTIL DECEMBER 7, 2018

8951214

Peace of mind house sitting and pet care. Keep your house and pets safe while your away. 374-6007.

RUN TILL $

Career Opportunities

$

EMPLOYMENT

We are currently accepting resumes for the position of a maintenance caretaker. The property is a 60 unit townhouse complex located in the City of Kamloops.

Information

Opportunity

Scheduled for one month at a time. Customer must call to reschedule. Tax not included. Some restrictions apply

12 Friday - 3 lines or less 1750 Wed/Fri - 3 lines or less 50

CARETAKER / MAINTENANCE POSITION AVAILABLE

  

~ Caution ~ While we try to ensure all advertisements appearing in Kamloops This Week are placed by reputable businesses with legitimate offers, we do caution our readers to undertake due diligence when answering any advertisement, particularly when the advertiser is asking for monies up front.

LET’S DANCE Saturday, December 8, 2018 @ Brock Activity Centre, 1800 Tranquille. Live music: Strange Brew. Tickets $10 @ the door. 7:30-11:30pm. Kamloops Social Club also has appie nights, potlucks, hikes, snow-shoeing, X-country skiing & other social activities. Meet & Greet Potluck: 3rd Tues/month, 6pm. Meetings: 1st Wed/month, 7pm. Odd Fellows Hall, 423 Tranquille. January 19 Ukrainian New Years. Dinner Dance: $35 non-members, $25 members. Call 250-319-8510 for information & tickets.

Email: classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com

REGULAR RATES

Looking For Love?

Coming Events

|

Based on 3 lines

Word Classified Deadlines •

Fax: 250-374-1033

DEADLINES

Happy Thoughts

Anniversaries

|

PLUS TAX

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 58 (NICOLA-SIMILKAMEEN) ASSISTANT SECRETARY TREASURER Applications are invited for the position of an Assistant Secretary Treasurer with School District No. 58 (Nicola-Similkameen) in Merritt. This is a 12-month per year, 7.5 hours per day, excluded position. For a complete listing of the job description and qualifications please visit the district’s website at www.sd58.bc.ca click on Employment/Job Positions (Job Code 2624721). Applications will be accepted until December 14, 2018. Please apply online or forward your detailed resume with a minimum of three references to: Attention: Secretary Treasurer School District No. 58 (Nicola-Similkameen) P.O. Box 4100, 1550 Chapman Street Merritt, BC V1K 1B8 Only those applicants selected for an interview will be contacted

RUN TILL SOLD turn your stuff INTO CA$H $ 00 250-371-4949 PACKAGES STARTING AT

35

1365 DALHOUSIE DRIVE

PLUS TAX

Non-business ads only. Some restrictions apply.


A42

WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

Career Opportunities

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Career Opportunities

Help Wanted

We are a well established, growing plywood and veneer manufacturer. If you have your own transportation, can work shift work, are fit and have a good work ethic, then we need you.

We offer a great benefits package after a satisfactory probation period. Please submit your resume in person, Monday to Friday 8:00 - 4:30 pm.

DOWNTOWN

If you cannot apply in person you can fax a full resume with references to 250-573-6052

DRIVER TRAINING

Funding available for those who qualify!

CERTIFIED ICBC AIR BRAKE COURSE

Rte 504 – 2146-2294 Sifton Ave, Sifton Lane. – 49 p. Rte 506 – Gloaming Dr, Heatherton Crt, Laurel Pl, Stirling Dr. – 84 p. Rte 509 - 459-551 Laurier Dr, 2101-2197 Shaughnessy Hill 46 p. Rte 519 – Regent Cres & Pl. – 50 p. Rte 538 – Talbot Dr, Willowbrae Crt, Dr & Pl. - 53 p.

Class 1, 2, & 3 B-Train

DALLAS/ BARNHARTVALE

Rte 701 – Freda Ave, Klahanie Dr, Morris Pl, Shelly Dr, 901-935 Todd Rd. – 91 p. Rte 706 – 1078-1298 Lamar Dr, Molin Pl, - 29 p. Rte 751 – 5310 Barnhartvale Rd, Bogetti Pl, 5300-5599 Dallas Dr, 5485-5497 ETC Hwy, Viking Dr, Wade Pl. – 64 p. Rte 752 – 5600-5998 Dallas Dr, Harper Pl & Rd. – 63 p. Rte 754 – Hillview Dr, Mountview Dr. – 39 p. Rte 755 – 6159-6596 Dallas Dr, McAuley, Melrose, Yarrow. – 72 p. Rte 759 – Beverly Pl, 6724-7250 Furrer Rd, McIver Pl, Pat Rd, Stockton Rd. – 40 p.

JUNIPER

Rte 655 – 1685 Finlay Ave, 22022385+2416-2458 Skeena Dr. – 36 p. Rte 664 – 2920-3099 Kickinghorse Dr, 1500-1599 Kickinghorse Way. – 30 p. Rte 670 – Galore Cres, Crt & Pl. – 108 p.

SAHALI

Rte 464 – 1775 McKinley Crt. – 47 p. Rte 470 – Farnham Wynd, 102-298 Waddington Dr. – 67 p.

Less than 10 minutes

remains the most popular method of reading

22%

10%

30 minutes +

17%

10 - 20 minutes

courses every Monday and/or Tuesdays or by request plus on Weekends. Gift Certificates and details at www.pal-core-ed.com or 778-470-3030

91%

PRINTED NEWSPAPER

17%

4%

3%

ONLINE

TABLET

SMARTPHONE

RUN TILL

RENTED

RUN TILL SOLD Turn your stuff

INTO CA$H * RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Career Opportunities

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Career Opportunities

NORTH SHORE

Rte 103 – 1167-1201 8th St, 1179-1229 10th St, 1182-1185 11th St, 1188-1294 12th St, 823-1166 Sudbury Ave. – 70 p. Rte 107 - 1117 8th St, 1109-1139 10th St, 1110-1140 11th St. Rte 127 - 110-111 Dee St, 125-154 Knox St, 209-288 Royal Ave Rte 142 - 215-297 Alder Ave, 219-293 Cypress Ave, 300-348 & 430 Fortune Dr, 225-298 Juniper Ave, 325-439 Schubert Dr, 225-289 Spruce Ave. Rte 144 - 526-548 Fortune Dr, 210-346 Oak Rd, 575-615 Schubert Dr, 223-3380 Walnut Ave,

WESTSYDE

Rte 213 – 2564-2582 Sandpiper Dr. – 61 p. Rte 214 – 2511-2553 Partridge Cres, 2502-2597 Partridge Dr, 2554-2590 Partridge Pl. – 46 p. Rte 215 – 2501-2583 Sandpiper Dr (Odd Side), 2586-2627 Sandpiper Dr. – 40 p. Rte 239 - 1006 Sicamore Dr, 807-996 Pine Springs Rd,- 55p.

Career Opportunities

8951207 SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 58 (NICOLA-SIMILKAMEEN) HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER Applications are invited for the position of a Human Resources Manager with School District No. 58 (Nicola-Similkameen) in Merritt. This is a 12-month per year, 7.5 hours per day, excluded position.

For a complete listing of the job description and qualifications please visit the district’s website at www.sd58.bc.ca click on Employment/Job Positions (Job Code 2514176). Applications, including a detailed resume with a minimum of three references, will be accepted until April 11, 2018. Please forward to: Attn: Secretary Treasurer School District No. 58 (Nicola-Similkameen) P.O. Box 4100, 1550 Chapman St. Merritt, BC V1K 1B8 Fax: (250) 378-6263

Only those applicants selected for an interview will be contacted.

90% of our readers will spend at least 10-20 minutes reading the paper Q: How much time do our readers spend reading the newspaper

50%

250-374-7467

1365B Dalhousie Drive, Kamloops, BC V2C5P6

HUNTER & FIREARMS

Courses. A Great Christmas Gift. Next C.O.R.E. January 5th and 6th. Saturday and Sunday. P.A.L. December 9th Sunday. Professional outdoorsman & Master Instructor:

Bill

Help Wanted Halston Bridge Esso are hiring for varied shift patterns. Please bring a resume in person to the store, 1271 Salish Rd. and ask for the manager Evelyn.

PHARMACY TECHNICIAN TRAINING Online-based 43 wk program incls 8 wk practicum. Regulated Pharmacy Technicians earn $25 -$28/hr in hospitals & $20-$27/hr in community pharmacies. Accredited by the Canadian Council for the Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs (CCAPP).

www.stenbergcollege.com Toll-Free: 1-866-580-2772

Help Wanted Activation Laboratories We are looking to fill positions in our Sample Prep department. Day and Afternoon available. No experience necessary. Email resumes to: nolangoddard@actlabs.com or apply in person at 9989 Dallas Drive. Competitive wages and benefits. I PAY Cash $$$ For All Scrap Vehicles! and $5 for auto batteries Call or Text Brendan 250-574-4679

Help Wanted

$500 & Under

RN’s and LPN’s

Do you have an item for sale under $750?

Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses needed for in home 1:1 pediatric respite care for medically fragile children in your area. Offering union wages, paid training and full support. E-mail resume to: Carley LeBoldus, cleboldus@western.ca or fax: 1.250.762.9898

Did you know that you can place your item in our classifieds for one week for FREE?

Call our Classified Department for details!

250-371-4949 *some restrictions apply

Temporary/ PT/Seasonal

Free Items

Work Wanted HOME & YARD HANDYMAN If you need it done, Give us a call ! Steve 250-320-7774. Job wanted by Computer Programmer-Analyst /Office Worker/Tutor Detail oriented, organized, problem-solver, extremely computer literate. Strong proofreading, editing, technical writing, public speaking skills. Can teach practically anything I know. IT work preferred but any job using problem-solving skills could be a good match. Gene Wirchenko at 250-8281474. genew@telus.net

Pets

Firewood/Fuel ALL SEASON FIREWOOD. For delivery birch, fir & pine. Stock up now. Campfire wood. (250) 377-3457.

Furniture 8ft Antique Couch $900. Round dining room table w/4chairs & 2 bar stools. $700. Couch & matching chairs $149. 250-374-1541. Diningroom table w/8-chairs, c/w Buffet and Hutch. Med Colour. $850. 250-374-8933.

Misc. for Sale 1 Sofa & loveseat $500 250-374-7096.

set

5pc bedroom suite. $225. Men’s LH golf clubs. $80. 374-3962. 5th wheel hitch $300. Ford air flow tailgate w/lock black $160. 250-374-8285. Carboys 23L. $30. 11.5L $20. 1-gal jugs $3/each. Bottle dry rack $15. 250-376-0313.

Pets

250-376-7970

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! In-demand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get online training you need from an employer-trusted program. Visit: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-768-3362 to start training for your work-at-home career today!

250-260-0110

Need extra $ $ $ Kamloops This Week is currently hiring Substitute Carriers for door-to-door deliveries. Call 250-374-0462 for more information.

21- 30 minutes

Education/Trade Schools

BARK MULCH FIR OR CEDAR

Free: Kenmore range, oven works, ceramic top needs mother board. 250-828-1151

For more information call the Circulation department 250-374-0462

The printed paper Q: How do you generally read the newspaper?

Rte 5 – 2606-2697 Young Pl. – 61 p. Rte 14 – 2305-2399 Briarwood Ave, McInnes Pl, Richards Pl, Wallace Pl. – 39 p. Rte 24 - 2053-2086 Dale Pl, 2058-2089 Lisa Pl, 806-999 Windbreak St. – 49 p. Rte 39 - 840 – 975 Desmond St, 1814-1897 Gellrich Ave, 1739-1796 Sunnycrest Ave, - 51 p.

INTERESTED IN A ROUTE?

Call 250.828.5104 or visit tru.ca/trades

SHAVINGS & SAWDUST 10 TO 150 YARD LOADS REIMER’S FARM SERVICES

BROCKLEHURTS

Rte 175 – 1800-1899 Norfolk Crt, Norview Pl, 821-991 Norview Rd. – 38 p. Rte 183 – 2003-2074 Saddleback Dr, 2003-2085 Grasslands Blvd. – 74 p. Rte 184 – 2077-2097 Saddleback Dr, 2001-2071 Stagecoach Dr. – 31 p. Rte 187 – 2100-2130 Doubletree Cres, 1050-1100 Latigo Dr, 21002169 Saddleback Dr. – 56 p,

Rte 602 – Apple Lane, Knollwood Cres, Parkhill Dr, 1783 Valleyview Dr. – 47 p. Rte 603 – Chickadee Rd, Comazzetto Rd, Strom Rd, 1625-1648 & 1652-1769 Valleyview Dr. – 44 Rte 605 – 1770-1919 Glenwood Dr, Knollwood Dr, Vicars Rd. – 64 p. Rte 606 – Orchard Dr, Russet Wynd, 1815-1899 Valleyview Dr. – 41 p. Rte 608 – Curlew Rd & Pl, 19251980 Glenwood Dr. - 73 p. Rte 613 - 2210-2291 Crescent Dr, 115-155 Highland Rd, 2244-2296 Park Dr,2207-2385 E TCH-64 p Rte 612 – 2079 Falcon Rd, Flamingo Rd, 2040-2177 Glenwood Dr. – 64 p. Rte 620 – MacAdam Rd, McKay Pl, Pyper Way, 2516-2580 Valleyview Dr. – 70 p. Rte 621 – Duck Rd, Skelly Rd, 96 Tanager Dr, 2606-2876 Thompson Dr. – 50 p.

Rte 403 – 405-482 Greenstone Dr, Tod Cres. – 28 p. Rte 404 – Chapperon Dr, 108-395 Greenstone Dr, Pyramid Crt. – 57 p. Rte 405 – Anvil Cres, 98-279 Bestwick Dr, Bestwick Crt E. & W, Morrisey Pl. – 49 p. Rte 406 – 109-492 McGill Rd. – 63 p. Rte 411 – 206-384 Arrowstone Dr, Eagle Pl, Gibraltar Crt & Wynd. – 49 p.

Courses start every week!

BATCHELOR

VALLEYVIEW

Livestock

- Regular & Screened Sizes -

Rte 760 – Beaver Cres, Chukar Dr. – 64 p. Rte 761 – 6022-6686 Furrer Rd, Houston Pl, Parlow Rd, Pearse Pl, Urban Rd. – 57 p.

Rte 830 – Chetwynd Dr, Stevens Dr. – 56 p. Rte 833 – Cameron Rd, Davie Rd. – 44 p. Rte 835 – Mattoch-McKeague Rd, Sabiston Crt & Rd – 30 p. Rte 836 – 133-197 Cahilty Cres, 150-187 Hyas Pl, 4551-4648 Spurraway Rd. – 36 p. Rte 837 – 103-190 Helmcken Dr, 4654-4802 Spurraway Rd. – 22 p. Rte 842 – 3945-4691 Yellowhead Hwy. – 35 p.

ABERDEEN

LOWER SAHALI

December 15-16, 2018

RAYLEIGH

Rte 474 – Coppertree Ct, Trophy Crt. – 20 p. Rte 492 – 2000-2099 Monteith Dr, Sentinel Crt. – 38 p.

Rte 311- 423-676 1st Ave, 440-533 2nd Ave, 107-237 Battle St, 135-137 St Paul St. – 30 p. Rte 323 – 755-783 6th Ave. 763-884 7th Ave, 744-878 8th Ave. 603-783 Columbia St (Odd Side), 605-793 Dominion St. – 51 p. Rte 332 – 1010-1160 Douglas St, 1025-1079 11th Ave, 1070-1085 12th Ave. – 45 p. Rte 333 – 1005-1090 Pine St, 1003-1176 Pleasant St. -39 p. Rte 373 – 25-150 Clarke St, 24-60 W. Columbia St. (Even Side) – 19 p. Rte 381 – 20-128 Centre Ave, 517-782 Hemlock St, 605-800 Lombard St. – 58 p. Rte 382 – 114-150 Fernie Pl, 889-1024 Fernie Rd, 860-895 Lombard St. – 28 p. Rte 384 – 407-775 W. Battle St, 260-284 Centre Ave. – 46 p. Rte 385 – 350-390 W. Battle St, Strathcona Terr. – 30 p. Rte 387 – 643-670 McBeth Pl. – 22 p. Rte 389 – Bluff Pl, 390 Centre Av,e 242-416 W. Columbia St, Dufferin Terr, Garden Terr, Grandview Terr. – 61 p. Rte 390 – Fernie Crt, 158-400 Fernie Pl, Guerin Creek Way. – 49 p.

THOMPSON RIVER VENEER PRODUCTS LTD.

AAA Courses PAL & CORE

Livestock

Kids & Adults needed!

We are located east of the City of Kamloops, on Dallas Drive and are requiring full time General Laborers.

Education/Trade Schools

Help Wanted

LOOKING FOR DOOR TO DOOR CARRIERS

GENERAL LABORERS

8777925 TRUCK

Help Wanted

is looking for substitute distributors for door-to-door deliveries. Vehicle is required. For more information please call the Circulation Department at

Animals sold as “purebred stock” must be registrable in compliance with the Canadian Pedigree Act.

PETS For Sale?

TRI-CITY SPECIAL!

250-374-0462

for only $46.81/week, we will place your classified ad into Kamloops, Vernon & Salmon Arm.

Looking to hire experienced chainsaw workers for firewood business. 250-377-3457.

classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com *some restrictions apply.

Fortress 1700 DT Scooter. C/W charger/new batteries. Good cond. $1600. 318-2030.

Free Items

Free Items

Free Items

(250)371-4949

Fishing Kayak 10ft. $450. IGO Titan 36 Electric Bike w/battery. $900. 778-4711096.

TIME TO DECLUTTER? ask us about our

RUN TILL SOLD SPECIAL

Packages start at $35 Non-business ads only • Some restrictions apply

1365 DALHOUSIE DRIVE

250-371-4949


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Misc. for Sale

Misc. for Sale

Motorcycles

Motorcycles

TARPS! TARPS!

8898333

Mobile Homes & Parks 8784110

ATTENTION HOME BUYERS!

“BEST PRICES IN TOWN!”

BLUE TARPS 10X8 weave (Medium Duty) STARTING AT $$2.69 2.19

HOME & LOTS AVAILABLE

WHITE TARPS 10X10 weave (Heavy Duty)

STARTING AT $$3.99 4.49

Scrap Car Removal

Scrap Car Removal

New mortgage rules stressing you out? Call Eagle Homes today!

14X14 weave (Industrial Duty)

CALL TODAY

STARTING AT 5.49 6.79

250-573-2278

$ $

TOLL FREE

1-866-573-2276

Please recycle this newspaper.

Misc. for Sale

MATTRESS REPLACEMENTS

RENTED

SINGLE TO KING SIZE 2” TO 6” THICK - CUSTOM CUT OR CUSTOM ORDER MEMORY FOAM TOPPER PADS - 3LB DENSITY SINGLE TO KING SIZE - 2” & 3” THICK

ROLL ENDS AVAILABLE $5-$10/ ROLL

CUSHION REPLACEMENTS TORN OR TATTERED? SOFAS, CHAIRS, OTTOMANS, SNOWMOBILES SEATS, TRACTORS

YOU NEED IT - WE WILL CUT IT!

CAMPING FOAM, MEDICAL WEDGES & BOLSTERS, PILLOWS

“ A CUT ABOVE THE REST”

EARN EXTRA $$$

Hockey Gear fits 5’4” 120 lbs, brand new. Serious inquires only $650 for all. Call 9-6pm 250-374-7992.

www.surplusherbys.com

La Sportiva Nepal Cube GTX climbing boots, men size 43. New. $500. 2-161cm Snowboards. Never used $375. Gently used. $325. 578-7776. MISC4Sale: Oak Table Chairs-$400, Call 250-8511346 after 6pm or leave msg. Universal Running boards for SUV or mid size truck $100. Sportrack locking roof rack like new $100. Call or text Bill 778220-2762.

35

RUN TILL $

SOLD

Kenmore 27 sewing machine button hole maker, scissors, 3 baskets of thread etc $250 (250) 554-0234

00

250-371-4949

PLUS TAX

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

000 Able buyer of all your old

coins, collections, RC MINT COINS, all silver, gold, rare, common, old money.+ Todd The Coin Guy (250)-864-3521

RENTED

$53

00 Plus Tax

3 Lines - 12 Weeks

Add an extra line to your ad for $10 Must be pre-paid Scheduled for 4 weeks at a time Private parties only - no businesses Some Restrictions Apply

Bed & Breakfast BC Best Buy Classifieds Place your classified ad in over 71 Papers across BC. Call 250-371-4949 for more information

1Bdrm in all male rooming house downtown. Shared bath. $400. 250-372-5550. Downtown for quiet N.S. Male, student or working male. $500/mo. 236-425-1499.

Suites, Lower 1bdrm Juniper prvt ent, prk, w/d util incl n/s, n/p .Ref’s. $950 250-299-4005/250-8190141. 1bdrm suite, full bathroom. Suitable for senior. Avail Immed. $700. 250-372-5765. North Shore 1bdrm. N/S, N/P. No laundry, $750 utils incld. DD, Ref’s. Jan 1st. 554-6798. Vacant!! 2bdrms, sep entr, patio, nice yard. $950/mo. Ref’s required. 250-376-0633.

RUN TILL SOLD

INTO CA$H

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Legal Notices

1965 Mercury 4dr., hardtop. 55,000 miles. 390-330HP. $4,000. 250-574-3794.

1989 Mercedes 560 SEC. 61,000kms. Hagerty Appraisals #2 car $10,000USD. Selling $10,000 CDN 250-574-3794

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Legal Notices

Auto Accessories/Parts 4-Avalanche X-treme winters on rims 275/60/R20 fits 1/2T Dodge truck 5-stud. $1450. 4-Yokohama winters on rims 215/60/R15 fits Chev Malibu 5-stud. $450. 573-5635. 4 Bridgestone Blizzak 245/45 R20 less than 5000km asking $600 (250) 376-6482 4 General Grabbers Used 1 month like new LT 245/75 R16 $800obo (250) 376-4163 4-Goodyear Noridc winter tires. P215/65/R17 on winter rims. $400/obo. 250-375-2375. 4 - Goodyear Winter tires with rims. 215/75/R15. off GMC Sonoma $200. 250-377-3002.

Cars - Domestic

Transportation

1992 Cadillac Allante Convertible. 77,000kms. Mint cond. $9,500. 250-371-4801.

Antiques / Classics

2001 Pontiac Grand Am. 4 winters on rims. 215,000kms. Good cond. $2000. 374-1556.

1978 Ford T. Bird hardtop. 160,000kms. One owner, like new. $2695. 250-374-8285.

2003 Grand Am. 4dr, auto. Perfectly mechanical. $3,600. Winters/summers. 554-1512.

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

8950572

#011 Actual Coin Collector Buying Coins, Collections, Olympics, All Silver & Gold Call Chad 250-863-3082 The Coin Expert

Christine is Buying Vintage Jewellery, Gold, Silver, Coins, Sterling, China, Estates, Emailetc. 1-778-281-0030 rlambright@loganlake. Housecalls.

ca

Musical Instruments 2-3/4 French and German Violins c/w case/bows. $100$200. 3-Full size violins. $200. Fax 250-434-6738.

(250) 523-6678

Real Estate

RUN TILL

Rentals

Turn your stuff

248 TRANQUILLE RD, NORTH SHORE - KAMLOOPS 250376-2714 • OUT OF TOWN CALL 1-800-665-4533

KTW requires door to door substitute carriers for all areas in the city. Vehicle is an asset Call 250-374-0462

CLASSIFIEDS 250-374-7467

1365 B Dalhousie Drive Kamloops BC call for availability 250-374-7467

Misc. Wanted FIND US ON FACEBOOK

RUN TILL

Antiques / Classics

Shared Accommodation

BLACK TARPS

FOAM SHOP

Recreation **BOOK NOW FOR BEST WEEKS IN 2018** Shuswap Lake! 5 Star Resort in Scotch Creek BC. REST & RELAX ON THIS PRIVATE CORNER LOT. Newer 1bdrm, 1-bath park model sleeps 4 . Tastefully decorated guest cabin for 2 more. One of only 15 lots on the beautiful sandy beach with a wharf for your boat. Provincial park, Golf, Grocery/Liquor store & Marina all minutes away. Resort has 2 pools, 2 hot tubs, Adult & Family Clubhouse, Park, Playground. Only $1,300 week. BOOK NOW! Rental options available for 3 & 4 day, 1 week, 2 week & monthly. Call for more information. 1-250-371-1333.

A43

For Sale By Owner For Sale By Owner $55.00 Special!

Website: www.loganlake.ca

NOTICE OF TEMPORARY USE PERMIT Council of the District of Logan Lake hereby gives notice that it will consider issuance of the following Temporary Use Permit (TUP) on December 11, 2018, at 7:00 p.m. at the District of Logan Lake Fire Hall at 120 Chartrand Place, Logan Lake, BC: TUP #02-18 will temporarily permit Retail Sale use within the M1 – Light Industrial zone for 1 year at 115 Apex Drive, Logan Lake, BC (Lot 6, Plan KAP31523, DL 2217 KDYD), as shown in bold on the map at right.

FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that copies of the proposed TUP may be inspected from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday to Friday, except Statutory Holidays, at the District of Logan Lake, #1 The special includes a 1x1.5 ad (inOpal Drive, Logan Lake, BC V0K 1W0 from December 5, 2018 until 1:00 p.m., December 11, cluding photo) that will run for one week (two editions) in Kamloops This 2018, the day of the hearing. Week. Our award winning paper is delivered to over 30,000 homes in Kamloops every Wednesday and FriEmail day. Call or email us for more info: AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that anyone who believes theirrlambright@loganlake. interest in property may be 250-374-7467 affected by the proposed Permit and wishes to comment on the proposed Use classifieds@ ca Temporary Council of kamloopsthisweek.com Permit may do so by making a written submission to the Council via the adjacent options. All gives notic written submissions must be received prior to 1:00 p.m. on December 11, 2018. The entire the followin Houses For Sale content of all submissions will be made public and form a part of the public record for on thisDecemb matter. Fax District of (250) 523-6678 Chartrand P Randy Lambright, Chief Administrative Officer District of Logan Lake TUP #02-1 Sale use w zone for 1 Lake, BC ( Kamloops This Week KDYD), as Ad to Run: December 5 & 7 Email: rlambright@loganlake.ca Fax: (250) 523-6678 Website: www.loganlake.ca right. Website:

NO

CHECK US OUT

1365 DALHOUSIE DRIVE

250-371-4949

ONLINE

www.kamloopsthisweek.com Under the Real Estate Tab

Email rlambright@loganlake. ca

NOTICE OF TEMPORARY USE www.loganlake.ca

Council of the District of Logan Lake hereby

FURTHER to 4:00 p.m


A44

WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

Cars - Domestic

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Cars - Sports & Imports

Recreational/Sale

Sport Utility Vehicle

Businesses&SERVICES

Run until sold

New Price $56.00+tax

1996 Cadillac Eldorado needs head gaskets, otherwise in good condition $875 obo (250) 573-4680

2010 Dodge Charger SXT Sedan. 4dr., AWD, V-6, auto. 50,001 kms. Excellent condition. $14,900. 250-374-1541.

Silver 2006 Mazda RX8 136,000km. Auto or Manual, Sunroof, A/C, leather heated seats, great body, tires and interior, Suicide style back doors. $7900. 250-376-7672 Financing avail 855-600-7750

Do you have a vehicle, boat, rv, or trailer to sell? With our Run til sold specials you pay one at rate and we will run your ad until your vehicle sells.* • $56.00 (boxed ad with photo) • $35.00 (regular 3 line ad)

2013 Hyundai Tucson Black, Low kms, summers on rims, clean title, A/C, Heated seats. $11,900/obo 250-319-8292 for info.

*Some conditions & restrictions apply. Private party only (no businesses).

Trucks & Vans

Call: 250-371-4949

Motorcycles

Recreational/Sale

Sport Utility Vehicle

(250)371-4949 *some restrictions apply call for details

RUN TILL

RENTED * RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Deliver Kamloops This Week

2005, 38’ RV trailer 2 slides, sleeps 6, appl incld, fully loaded, $16,900. 236-421-2251

SOLD

Get up to $50,000 from the Government of Canada. Do you or someone you know have any of these Conditions? ADHD, Anxiety, Arthritis, Asthma, Cancer, COPD, Depression, Diabetes, Difficulty Walking, Fibromyalgia, Irritable Bowels, Overweight, Trouble Dressing...and Hundreds more. ALL Ages & Medical Conditions Qualify. CALL BRITISH COLUMBIA BENEFITS 1-(800)-211-3550 For Your Free No Obligation Information Package TODAY.

2013 Keystone Fusion Toy Hauler slps 9, 41ft 12ft garage asking $65,000 250-374-4723

CRIMINAL RECORD?

PLUS TAX

250-371-4949

* RESTRICTIONS APPLY

Home Improvements 

Misc Services

Medical Health

Legal Notices

3500

RUN TILL $

250-377-3457

for a route near you!

Legal

Why suffer Employment/ Licensing loss? Travel/ Business opportunities? Be embarrassed? Think: Criminal Pardon. US Entry Waiver. Record Purge. File Destruction. Free Consultation 1-800-347-2540 accesslegalmjf.com

For all Deliveries & Dump Runs. Extra large dump trailers for rent. Dump Truck Long and Short Hauls!!

call 250-374-0462

14ft. Runabout boat. 40hp Johnson motor on trailer. $1500/obo. 778-469-5434. 25FT Carver Cabin Cruiser, slps 4-6 clw everything. Recent engine work. 9.9 kicker. C/W Calkin trailer, new bearings, tires, brakes. $12,500. 250-376-4163.

1999 GMC 2500 Suburban 1 Owner 454 (6.2 Litres) Vortec V8 267,000kms (Gas) 4wd a/c, leather winter tires. Lots of upgrades $4500obo (250) 828-1943

Home Improvements

Only 2 issues a week!

Boats

.

RUN UNTIL SOLD 1999 - 32ft. Southwind. Slide, V-10, Jacks, Solar, Generator, Dual-air, TV’s, Vacuum, Inverter etc. Low kms. $32,500 250-828-0466

RICKS’S SMALL HAUL

WE will pay you to exercise!

2014 Ford Platinum 4x4 Immaculate F150 Supercrew, 3.5 Ecoboost, Sun Roof, white, brown leather, Fully Loaded Only $37,800 250-319-8784

Absolute gorgeous 03 Cadillac Deville one owner low kms $3,800.00/obo 250-554-0580

ONLY $35.00(plus Tax)

GET BACK ON TRACK!

Fitness/Exercise

Wanted: HARLEY GEAR. Chaps, Jacket, Vest and Gloves. Ladies Medium and Mens Xlg. Send pics to: rajol@telus.net

Off Road Vehicles

2010 Ford Fusion SEL, auto, 4dr., 4cyl, 133,800kms. 4-summers. Fully loaded. $7,200. 250-573-7687

Handypersons

Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

Scrap Car Removal

Yamaha Grizzly ATV. KMS 011031 $4,500 250-579-3252

Financial Services

Cleaning Services Springs Home Cleaning Services

Call for your free estimate today Call Spring at (250) 574-5482



      



%'     •     •   •   •   •  !

JA ENTERPRISES Furniture Moving and Rubbish Removal jaenterpriseskam@gmail.com 778-257-4943

Snowclearing





 

%'#($)&''%

   

, 1  , 1-  , 9  Sheila Trautman

The printed paper

GIVING TOGETHER

August 1, 1959 – November 23, 2018

remains the most popular method of reading

90% of our readers will spend at least 10-20 minutes reading the paper Q: How much time do our readers spend reading the newspaper Less than 10 minutes

22%

10%

Q: How do you generally read the newspaper? *check all that apply.

to build a stronger community 91%

PRINTED NEWSPAPER

17%

4%

ONLINE

TABLET

17% LOCAL CHARITIES HELP SUPPORT 30 minutes +

10 - 20 minutes

50%

Women’s shelter

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Sheila Trautman (Thompson) on November 23, 2018 after three years of battling ovarian cancer.

3%

SMARTPHONE Sheila leaves behind

Tom, her husband and best friend of 36 years, her son Brian (Stefanie), daughter Kamloops Jackie (Jaden) and dog Gus, as well as many friends and family. Every Wednesday and Friday over 65,690 readers in over

Out of BIGGER circulation, BETTER value the Cold

30,000 homes and businesses receive Kamloops This To view a more in and it fullat of Kamloops relevant, local news. Communicating depth obituary, go to Donate online at www.kamloopsthisweek.com/cheer, by Week mail or in find person This Week www.drakecremation.com with customers must be cost-effective. Our large 1365B Dalhousie Drive, Kamloops BC, V2C 5P6 circulation and reasonable ad rates mean your cost per reader is exceptionally affordable. Your ROI is high! Please make cheques payable to United Way, Christmas Cheer. Tax receipts for donations of $20 or greater will be issued. (250) 377-8225 21- 30 minutes

250-374-7467

1365B Dalhousie Drive, Kamloops, BC V2C5P6


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

A45

OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM In Loving Memory of Tuula Irene Helin

August 16, 1956 ~ December 5, 2017

In Loving Memory of

Margaret (Margie) Lilian Edgar

Clive Allison deBretton Giolma

Born: October 31, 1945 - Passed away: November 28, 2018 With heavy hearts we announce the passing of our dear brother, father, uncle and great-uncle Clive Allison deBretton Giolma. He leaves behind his beloved sons Kevin Giolma (Toronto) and Brett Giolma (Kamloops), brothers William Giolma and Alan Giolma (Marlene) and sister Julie-Anne Slade (Dave), nephews Grady Gordon and Brad Gordon (Nicole) and great-nephews Barrett and Luca Gordon.

“Unable to perceive the shape of You, I find You all around me. Your presence fills my eyes with Your love, It humbles my heart, For You are everywhere.” Guillermo del Toro, Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water

It was only yesterday we said goodnight, I shall carry you in my heart, until the day I die.

Love Always Chris & Furli

A Division of Service Corporation International (Canada) ULC.

Marjorie Foster The family of Marjorie Foster wishes to announce her peaceful passing on November 12, 2018. Marjorie was predeceased by her husband Bert, brothers Bud and Lloyd Smith and brother-in-law Tom Campbell. Left to remember Mom are her children Cam (Liz), Vicki (Randy), Susanne (Kevin) and Sandy (Mark), grandchildren Tressa (Terry), Blair (Erin), Jeff (Kristina), Riley (Adrienne), Brock (Andrea) and her great-grandchildren Olivia and Cooper. Marge is also survived by her sister Betty Campbell. Marjorie was born and raised in Langley, BC. As a young girl, she won many trophies for her highland dancing. In high school, she met Bert and they married In 1947. In 1959, the family moved to Kamloops where they established the family business of Bert Foster Realty. Mom was a lifelong learner and behind her diminutive and sweet presence, hid a steely determination. In our childhood, she was always taking correspondence courses or going to night school. Little did we know she was planning to enter into nursing. When we reached an independent age, she returned to the school hallways at the age of 48 and later graduated in the first class of the Cariboo College School of Nursing. Nursing was her passion. After graduation, mom worked in the nursery at RIH, followed by many years in Labour & Delivery where she helped welcome many babies into the world. She loved her career and her co-workers and rarely missed a retiree luncheon or potluck. Her caring ways extended to her fur babies; whose company she enjoyed throughout her life. Mom loved her desserts, so family dinners always concluded with a delectable homemade treat.

Clive devoted his life to helping others spending 29 years with the Kamloops Fire Department. In retirement, he became an active member of Kamloops Search and Rescue (ground) and the Civil Aviation Search and Rescue (air) as a spotter and navigator. He was a devoted father to Kevin and Brett fully supporting and encouraging their endeavours and was immensely proud to see them both enter family medicine. He was always there to help Grady and Brad and they loved time spent with him. Friends referred to Clive as a “cheerleader” for others. His passion for the wilderness and nature led him to his happiest times with good friends in the Kamloops Hiking and Outdoor Club where he embraced the beauty of the environment. He belonged to many community groups including the Kamloops Social Club and volunteer roles included driving for the “Operation Red Nose” get home safely program, teaching outdoor safety to children as part of the BC AdventureSmart program and ushering for live community theatre. With a “can do” attitude he was a master problem solver willingly taking on the tough jobs in any situation from a “sixer” in Cub Scouts to a Captain in the Fire Department. There wasn’t a thing Clive couldn’t fix! His long time hobbies included woodworking and building and collecting vintage toys particularly pedal cars and model airplanes. Clive was born on Halloween and loved the festivities especially when his boys were young. He loved life and we will miss him terribly. Close friends will be contacted in the new year regarding a gathering to celebrate his life. Along with heartfelt thanks to the Kamloops Hospice staff, the family would like to thank Janet Pangman and the many good friends who supported and cared for him brightening his days throughout his life.

While the price difference for a cremation with NO Service is similar at most funeral homes in Kamloops, First Memorial is proud to have facilities to accommodate all of your needs, whether you choose a Celebration of Life or a full Traditional service. We can do it all at First Memorial. Come talk to us and have a look around. You will be pleasantly surprised. She honed her pie making skills in the 50s at the family restaurant, Foster’s Fine Foods in Langley, BC. She tried to pass those pastry talents onto her daughters, but despite her valiant efforts, her pastry was never matched by any of her three girls. Marge’s other interests included weekly bridge sessions, golfing and cruises with friends or family. Holland America was top shelf in her book. Mom also loved knitting and crafted many beautiful sweaters for herself and family. Christmas often included a hand knit masterpiece under the tree. Her sweaters were almost as famous as her pies - Cam even risked his life once to save his favourite Cowichan sweater. Marge had a great sense of humour and a large circle of friends. She loved spending time with her loved ones and family dinners were the highlight of her days. She will be missed. The family would like to extend a thank you to the staff at Kamloops Seniors Village for the care, kindness and compassion given to Marge and family. Also a hug to Pam Newman for the loving support she gave our Mom. A private celebration of life is being planned by the family. Service arrangements entrusted to Schoening Funeral Service. Online condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com

(née Ferrier) Margaret (Margie) Lilian Edgar (née Ferrier) passed away peacefully at Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops on November 22, 2018 at the age of 82 years. She was born in Prince George, BC on September 3, 1936 to parents William and Betty Ferrier. Margie married John Edgar on September 5, 1958. Margie was known for her talented knitting, weaving, bobbin lace and an assortment of other crafts. She was a lifetime member of the Kamloops Arts and Crafts Club. She always looked forward to the North Thompson Fall Fair in Barriere, BC where her colourful creations consistently placed. Margie’s vast knowledge will be greatly missed by all her friends. During Margie and John’s loving marriage they fostered many children. Margaret’s love and patience will be lovingly remembered by son Steven Edgar, daughters Patricia Edgar and Phyllis Camille of Calgary, Alberta, grandchildren Angela Edgar, Eli and Jesse Wilson, great-grandchild Boedi. She was predeceased by her parents, brother Jim Ferrier and husband John Edgar. A Memorial Service will be held in the Schoening Funeral Chapel on Friday, December 7, 2018 at 11:00 am with a reception. Interment to follow at Kamloops Hillside Cemetery at 2:00 pm. Condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com

Schoening Funeral Service 250-374-1454

First Memorial Funeral Service 250-554-2429

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James Wilson Moffat July 19, 1935 - November 28, 2018

A Beautiful Soul Has Left Us

Jim was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba and moved to BC in 1967 with his wife Joan and their children. Educated in Winnipeg, Jim worked with Westcoast Transmission as an Electrical Instrument Technician for 27 years. He leaves in deep sorrow his wife of 63 years Joan, his daughters Laureen and Carol (Mike), his son Brad (Paula) and his six heartbroken grandchildren Carly (Mike) and Alexis (Taylor), Kenrick and Kelsey, Kaleb and Hailey (Gordon). Jim was, first and foremost, a committed and loving family man who was securely grounded in reality. He was a loyal friend and a respected colleague. He was an avid golfer and enjoyed skiing, cycling, curling and travel. After retiring, Jim was honoured to be a volunteer driver for the Freemasons’ Cancer Van Program for several years. His brilliant, ever present wit was unique and enjoyed by all who loved him. He will be sadly missed by many extended family members and long-time dear friends. Jim had an extremely positive attitude, particularly during his long struggle with mesothelioma. We will miss his wisdom and subtle guidance in our daily lives. A special thanks to all the doctors, nurses, care aids and volunteers that supported Jim over the last several years. Jim was predeceased by his parents Mary and John Moffat, his brother Jack (Marg) and his sister Doreen Bryan (Les). In lieu of flowers, the family encourages donations to Kamloops Hospice or the RIH Cancer Clinic. There will be a celebration of Jim’s life in the New Year. On-line condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com


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WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

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OBITUARIES & IN MEMORIAM David Simmons MacKinlay January 13, 1947 − November 19, 2018

David left us unexpectedly on November 19, 2018, sitting in his beach chair at his favourite spot on Wailea Beach in Maui, with his beloved dog Maggie by his side. Born John David MacKinlay on January 13, 1947 in New Westminster, BC to Kala and Jock MacKinlay, Dave grew up in the family home on Pine St. in Kamloops, BC. He moved to Vancouver in 1965 to study at UBC, where he attained a BA in English, followed by an MA from Stony Brook University, where he wrote his thesis on Samuel Beckett. Dave studied Law at UBC and was called to the bar in 1976, beginning a successful 41−year law practice. Dave was well−suited to the practice of law due to his propensity for hard work, his attention to detail, his deep sense of fairness and his devotion to his clients, which persisted after his retirement. He also benefited from sublime competence of his longtime legal assistant, Mary Ho. Dave was a fanatical tennis player and long− standing member of the Jericho Tennis Club. In his last 25 days of life, Dave played tennis 25 times, including a doubles match on his final morning. Let the record reflect that Dave’s side won. Dave was equally fanatical about skiing and will be missed by the members of Club Linc in Whistler. Even in Maui, he checked the Whistler snow report daily and would have been outraged to know that he would miss this year’s ski season. He will be missed by his long−running (20 years) monthly book club, of which he was a founding member, the group’s primary organizer and record keeper. Dave also

604 Tranquille Road, Kamloops | 250-554-2324

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loved golf, swimming, theatre, travel, history, old stone churches and spending time at the MacKinlay family summer house on Shuswap Lake. In 1988, Dave met his future wife Tracey Simmons on the day she arrived in Vancouver for what was supposed to to be a three-week vacation. They quickly fell in love and were inseparable for the next 30 years, throughout which Dave’s adoration never diminished. Since his semi−retirement in 2013, Dave and Tracey spent much of their time in Maui, Whistler, Palm Desert and Salt Spring Island. A devoted father, Dave was proud of all of his sons, even though not one ever learned to play a decent game of tennis. Dave passed on his intellectual curiosity and appreciation for literature to his boys and they have fond memories of his reading to them when they were children. Dave’s philosophy on personal growth was that it is good to be able to look back a short distance into the past and say, “Jeez, I really had my head up my ***”. Dave was unfailingly grateful for the life he had and would often stop to look around, hands outstretched and say “my cup runneth over”. For those of us who knew and loved him, our world is diminished by his absence, but enriched by his memory. Dave is survived by his wife Tracey, his sons Devon, Tristan, Corin (Lianne) and John, his granddaughter Emilie, his brothers Ken (Mo) and Don (Cammi) and their children and grandchildren, his sister Carmen and his beautiful dog Maggie. Donations to Queen Alexandra Elementary for the literacy program would be appreciated. A Memorial Service will be held from 10:00 am to 11:30 am on Saturday, December 15, 2018 at West Point Grey United Church, 4595 West 8th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

www.myalternatives.ca

Glen Elliott Christopherson February 27, 1933 – November 26, 2018

Glen passed away at Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops on Monday, November 26, 2018 after a stroke at the age of 85. He was predeceased by his wife Anne, his parents Chester and Jennie, his sisters Irene, Verna and Gail. He is survived by his four children Michael, John, Stephen and Caryn, his sister Pauline, many grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Glen enjoyed a long career as a Hydro Lineman, from working all over the Interior of BC to the Arctic to New Jersey to California and Oregon. Except for the Arctic, Anne was always with him. His hobbies included fishing with Anne and being a prankster to his friends. In his later years he enjoyed the time he spent with his dog Misty watching game shows and the comings and goings of the family. Glen liked to celebrate life and it was his wish there be no service, so please take a moment and remember his life and wish him well on rejoining his beloved Anne.

Joan Lilian Mae Pearse On Thursday, July 12, 2018 Joan Lilian Mae Pearse at 82 years of age passed away at the Kamloops Hospice.

Dean Anthony Chabot

Joan was born in Chilliwack on July 4, 1936 to parents Albert Groves and Florence Larsen (Groves). Joan was predeceased by her husband Gerald Pearse, her brothers Ron Groves, Gordon Groves and sister Jeanie Larsen.

Dean Anthony Chabot of Kamloops passed away on November 23, 2018 at 66 years of age.

She is survived by her brother Jack Larsen, sister Judy Vanstone and sister-in-law Doreen Groves, children Gerry, Larry (Lynnet), Ken, Brenda (Brian), Bill, Barbara (Ray), grandchildren Trevor, Kassia, Kailie, Tyler, Cole, Krista, Morgan and James, also great-grandchildren Jade, Navy, Liam, Beckett, Bennett, Trace, Abby, Sydney, Kendall and Luca, also many nieces and nephews.

He is survived by his uncle Wally Churchill, his aunt Kay Donnelly and his aunt (Mar) Sobolewski as well as numerous cousins in the Vancouver area and Oshawa, Ontario area.

She went on to get a degree in Psychiatric Nursing. She moved to Kamloops with Gerry, raised her family and continued nursing.

Dean was a member of the SIMPCW First Nations. He loved his family, the outdoors and was an avid fisherman.

Joan had a great passion for gardening, enjoyed her family and her beloved dog G.G. Joan and Gerry spent many years travelling in their motorhome to Alaska and many fishing lakes around BC.

The family would like to give a special thanks to Bob and Marlene Crowther. There will be no service by request.

Joan fought a courageous battle with a lengthy illness but always kept her spirits up. Many thanks to all the amazing people who played a part in her care over the years.

Those we love don’t go away, they walk beside us everyday. Unseen, unheard, but always near. Still loved, still missed and very dear.

RIP DEANO Arrangements entrusted to Alternatives Funeral & Cremation Services 250-554-2324 Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.myalternatives.ca

We provide in-home arrangements personally tailored for each individual. Different. On purpose. Nettie Makortoff It is with great sadness that the family of Nettie Makortoff announces her passing after a brief hospitalization on Thursday, November 22, 2018 at the age of 76.

Nettie will be especially missed by the love of her life Fred, her children Wendy and Harvey (Deanna), her brother Harry (Elsa), sister Marilyn, her four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. After many hard working years of caring for her family, she generously volunteered at the RIH Afternoon Auxiliary for 20+ years. Fred and his family greatly appreciate the hard work and care from the RIH, ICU staff. We thank you very much, you were all wonderful. A celebration of life will be planned for the springtime when family is able to travel. In lieu of flowers, family would appreciate a donation made to The Heart & Stroke Foundation in her memory.

Margaret (Peggy) Gurr

January 19, 1954 – November 26, 2018

It is with immense grief and sadness that we announce the sudden passing of Peggy Gurr of Logan Lake. Peggy was a kind person who always made people feel welcome. She will be dearly missed by her family, friends and co-workers. She was predeceased by her parents Harvey and Marg Eggen. Peggy is survived by her sisters Linda (Steve) McBride and Debbie (Brian) Quast and brother Gary (Joy) Eggen, her two sons John (Lynn) Coray and Joe (Laura) Coray, grandchildren Jennifer (Luke), Krysten (Corey), David, Dylan (Bailey), Nakayla (Leon), Arianna and Emma and great-grandchildren Jameson, Payten, Finn, Lauren, Curtis and Taylor as well as nieces and nephews Jeremy (Tammy), Sandie (Stuart), Chrissy (Kyle), Tammy (Steve), Karrie and Austin and great-nieces and nephews Brady, Carter, Corrine, Declan and Quinn. Peggy has been a member of the Logan Lake community since 1972 and worked at Highland Valley Copper for nearly 40 years. She enjoyed spending time with her family and friends. One of her favourite pastimes was camping – especially on May long weekend at Tunkwa Lake. Whenever possible Peggy would challenge friends and family to a game of cards. For the past 10 years, Peggy enjoyed the annual girls’ shopping trip to Tulalip with her sister Debbie and numerous friends.

You will be forever loved and missed Baba.

A Celebration of Peggy’s Life will be held on Saturday, December 8, 2018 at 1:00 pm at The Church On the Hill, 237 Jasper Drive in Logan Lake.

Arrangements entrusted to Kamloops Funeral Home 250-554-2577

In lieu of flowers, should you desire donations can be made in Peggy’s memory to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

Condolences may be sent to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

Condolences may be expressed at www.schoeningfuneralservice.com

250-554-2577


WEDNESDAY, December 5, 2018

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Kamloops This Week December 5, 2018  

Kamloops This Week December 5, 2018

Kamloops This Week December 5, 2018  

Kamloops This Week December 5, 2018

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