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KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK FRIDAY |

CANADA’S TIE Learn all about our link to Honest Abes Abe’s assassination B16

kamloopsthisweek.com kamloopsthisweek kamthisweek

30 CENTS AT NEWSSTANDS

OCTOBER 17, 2014 | Volume ume 2 27 No. 124 4

FROM HOMELESS TO HOUSED

KTW reporter Adam Williams spent time with the city’s less fortunate to it’ss like to go from homeles homeless find fi nd out what it ss to housed A6

PLAYOFF FF TIME The Kamloops Broncos are underdogs facing Langley A15

WHAT’S WH HAT’S ON

Want to find out what’s happening this weekend? B1

should they

SHOW US THE MONEY?

A city council candidate says more donor transparency is needed — but his view is not shared by all STORY/A5

BEST QUALITY FURNACES BEST SERVICE COMPANY BEST INSTALLATION EXPERT BEST AFTER SERVICE

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www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

AL

LO

UT CLE A R

10,845

$

UP TO

O

IN CONSUMER CASH & DEALER REBATES(1)

UT

ANY T A E B LL WE WI ORS OFFER! TIT COMPE

1,500 BONUS CASH

$

»

IF YOU ARE A LICENSED TRADESMAN OR IF YOU CURRENTLY OWN ANY PICKUP TRUCK

$

EVENT

1,000

PULL AHEAD BONUS CASH

PULL-AHEAD INTO A NEW VEHICLE SOONER!(2)

BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND! FRI. & SAT. - OCT. 24 & 25 A Chrysler Affiliate will be on site with over $47,000 of unspent Chrysler Program Dollars. He has 2 days to give these dollars back to you - the consumer. Come in this weekend and take advantage of additional unadvertised savings on our entire new & pre-owned inventory.

$

(3)

OR

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16,888

$

‘14 Dodge Dart SE

(3)

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19,998

$

‘‘14 Dodge d Journey C CVP MB#JCDH49-22F,WFU

19,888

OR

47

(3)

OR

19,998

$

‘14 Dodge Grand Caravan CVP

MB#JKJL72-23B

$ OR

$

‘14 Jeep Wrangler Sport 4x4

MB#PFDH41-25A MB#PFDH4

$

$ OR

MB#RTKH53-29E

(3)

19,888

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‘14 Ram 1500 ST Regular Cab

23,888

$

MB#KLTL74-24A

YOUR BEST DEALS 2525 E. TRANS CANADA HWY, KAMLOOPS, BC

JOHN OSTROM GENERAL MANAGER

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ALBERT GROENESTEYN KARI WILLIAMS BUSINESS MANAGER LOT MANAGER

DAN BERGEN BUSINESS MANAGER

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OR

26,888

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‘14 Ram 1500 SXT Quad Cab 4x4 MB#DS6L41-25A,AGR,XFH

8 6 9 1 e c n Si NOW AT DODGE YESCREDIT KAMLOOPS

WWW.KAMLOOPSDODGE.COM

1-866-374-4477 1-866-374-4477

OR

‘15 Chrysler 200 LX $

OR

(3)

MB#UFCE41-28A

‘14 Jeep Cherokee Sport FWD

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49

$

The easy way to your new vehicle!

2525 E. TRANS CANADA HWY, KAMLOOPS, BC

GRANT DOLSON SALES

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JAMES NORRIS SALES

BRETT BUGA SALES

NICK PARR SALES

CHRIS MANSUS SALES

TARALYN MUSFELT SALES

 NO CREDIT  DIVORCE  BANKRUPT  SLOW CREDIT PAYER

All images are for display purposes only. No two offers can be combined. One offer per customer only, limit two vehicles per household. At time of printing all vehicles were available. Dealer retains all rebates, discounts and incentives in order to achieve prices and payments shown in this flyer. Rebates, Discounts, and incentives are subject to change or end October 25,30, 2014 without notice as new Retail Incentive Programs are announced. Some customers may not be eligible for all incentives included in price. Vehicle offers end on Saturday, Tuesday, September 2014. * A contest will be held with respect to the Grand Prize. Contest Begins Tuesday, September 2, 2014 and ends Tuesday, September 30, 2014. No invitation/flyer and/or direct mail piece presented after this time will be valid. In order to be entitled to claim your prize, you must be at the least the age of majority as of August 1, 2014 and attend in person at Kamloops Dodge, 2525 East Trans Canada Highway, Kamloops, BC (“Event Headquarters”) on or before Tuesday, September 30, 2014 and present/surrender your mailpiece, and answer a skill testing question. All winning prizes shall be determined by Kamloops Dodge, in their sole and absolute discretion. The grand prize is $10,000.00 cash (“Grand Prize”) OR a car (Valued at $10,000 or less). For full contest rules and regulation, see Kamloops Dodge or go on-line to www.KamloopsWinner.ca. Winner is responsible for all taxes, fees, and all registration, according to the rules of dealership and the Canada Revenue Service. **Discounts, Services or Products worth up to $1,000. Purchase may be required. Certain conditions may apply. Redemption is at sole discretion of dealer. Amounts may vary per product, service or discount. (») $1,500 Ram Truck Bonus Cash is available to qualified customers on the retail purchase/lease of any 2013/2014 Ram 2500/3500 models (excluding Cab & Chassis models) and 2014 Ram 1500 (excludes Reg. Cab models) and is deducted from the negotiated price after taxes. Eligible customers include current owners/lessees a pickup truck. The vehicle must have been owned/leased by the eligible customer and registered in their name on or before September 1, 2014. Proof of ownership/lease agreement will be required. Some conditions may apply. (1) Up to $10,845 in rebates and discounts. Example: Instock 2014 Ram Heavy Duty Trucks (2500/3500) models. Discount includes no charge Cummins Diesel and $1,500 loyalty bonus cash. Amount of discount varies by model/option package purchased. Plus taxes, on approved credit. (2) Finance Pull Ahead Bonus Cash and 1% Rate Reduction is available to eligible customers on the retail purchase/lease of select 2014 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram or Fiat models at participating dealers from September 1, 2014 to September 30, 2014 inclusive. Finance Pull Ahead Bonus Cash will be deducted from the negotiated price after taxes. 1% Rate Reduction applies on approved credit to most qualifying subvented financing transactions through RBC, TD Auto Finance & Scotiabank. 1% rate reduction can’t be used to reduce the final interest rate below 0%. Eligible customers include all original and current owners of a Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram or FIAT model with an eligible standard/subvented finance or lease contract maturing between January 1st, 2014 and December 31st, 2016. Trade-in not required. See dealer for complete details and exclusions. (3) VEHICLES MAY NOT BE EXACTLY AS ILLUSTRATED. All incentives and rebates are reflected on advertised vehicles including no charge options. Advertised lease prices and weekly payments are based on $0 down payment, plus $475 lease acquisition fee, plus GST. 60 months at 4.99% fixed rate, 18,000kms/yr., Over Mileage .18¢/km, with $475 registration fee, plus GST/HST/PST, on approved credit. All stock numbers are factory ordered, dealer will attempt to locate for purchase. MB#PFDH41-25A, Residual Value: $8,773 plus taxes, Total Lease Obligation: $10,715. MB#RTKH53-29E, Residual Value: $11,765 plus taxes, Total Lease Obligation: $12,818. MB#JKJL72-23B, Residual Value: $12,858 plus taxes, Total Lease Obligation: $11,677. MB#DS1L61-25A, Residual Value: $10,530 plus taxes, Total Lease Obligation: $13,829. MB#JCDH49-22F,WFU, Residual Value: $10,673 plus taxes, Total Lease Obligation: $13,827. MB#UFCE41-28a, Residual Value: $11,100 plus taxes, Total Lease Obligation: $13,434. MB#KLTL74-24A, Residual Value: $11,290 plus taxes, Total Lease Obligation: $16,684. MB#DS6L41-25A,AGR,XFH, Residual Value: $14,330 plus taxes, Total Lease Obligation: $18,611. MB#WKJH74-23E, Residual Value: $17,228 plus taxes, Total Lease Obligation: $27,188. Although every precaution is taken, errors in price and/or specifications may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors without prejudice or penalty to ourselves. We are not responsible for typographical errors, nor are we responsible for late receipt of mail. Contact dealerships knowledgeable and professional sales consultants for more information.


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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

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LOCAL NEWS

LOCAL NEWS

NEWS FLASH? CALL 778-471-7525 or email editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

KTTA PREZ FIGHTS FOR RIGHT TO SPEAK TO BOARD

INSIDE KTW Viewpoint/Your Opinion . . . . A8-9 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A15 Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A19 Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B1 National News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B15 Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B21

DALE BASS STAFF REPORTER dale@kamloopsthisweek.com

TODAY’S FLYERS *Selected distribution

Home Depot, Jysk, Sport Chek, Staples, Mark’s Work Wearhouse, KTW Report on Business*, Stihl Prairie Coast*

WEATHER ALMANAC

Today: Showers Hi: 14 C Low: 7 C One year ago Hi: 13.8 C Low: -0.9 C Record High 21.7 C (1973) Record Low -5 C (1969)

ONLINE

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Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/ kamloopsthisweek

Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/KamThisWeek

Watch our videos on YouTube: youtube.com/user/ KamloopsThisWeek/videos

HOW TO REACH US:

Switchboard 250-374-7467 Classifieds 250-371-4949 Classifieds Fax 250-374-1033 Circulation 250-374-0462 Emails: classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com publisher@kamloopsthisweek.com editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

ONE MORE WEEKEND OF WINTERLUDE

Anthony Varesi teaches three-year-old son Devin to skate at Valleyview Arena. Public-skating sessions at various city arenas are now in full swing. To view schedules, go online to kamloops.ca/arenas.

A battle is looming before next week’s school-board meeting, one that could see the revival of an old dispute between the Kamloops-Thompson school district and the union representing its teachers. Kamloops-Thompson Teachers’ Association (KTTA) president David Komljenovic said he’s been advised by board of education chairwoman Denise Harper that his request to speak to trustees on Monday, Oct. 21, will be denied — and he plans to challenge that decision. Komljenovic wants to speak to the board about why it should have paid striking teachers for the work they did at the end of the labour impasse, when they returned to classrooms on Sept. 19 to prepare for school’s resumption on Sept. 22. Harper said the issue Komljenovic wants to discuss is complicated due to differing language on pay in contracts between teachers and school districts. Some contracts have language that covers the day in question, while others don’t — and those that don’t are not funded by Victoria to make those payments. She said Komljenovic’s concern is a bargaining issue and outside an agreement between the district and the union on what it can bring to trustees at their public meetings. Komljenovic, however, said the issue stems from a return-to-work agreement and not the memorandum of agreement on what became the teachers’ new contract. “This relates to freedom of speech,” Komljenovic said, noting that was the subject of a grievance that went to an arbitration hearing in 2008 and was postponed. “It may be that we will re-initiate that arbitration.” Harper said because the issue involves several, but not all, districts in the province, the body that represents trustees has taken it on and brought it to government’s attention. Teresa Rezansoff, president of the B.C. School Trustees Association, sent a letter to Education Minister Peter Fassbender and Finance Minister Mike de Jong, pointing out “the government made a clear public statement using plain language that all teachers would be paid for Friday, Sept. 19, to prepare schools to be ready for students on Monday, Sept. 22. Subsequent to this announcement, boards were informed the number of paid days would instead be determined by local contract language. Harper said local contract language does not allow for payment for that day. Rezansoff told the ministers boards such as Kamloops-Thompson are in an “untenable position. “If they do not treat their teachers the same as those in other districts, they will further damage local relationships,” she wrote. A spokesman for Fassbender’s office said a reply to the association is being drafted, but he was not aware of when it would be sent.

Inside Superstore 910 Columbia St. West, Kamloops & Walmart 2991 10th Ave SW, Salmon Arm www.sussexinsurance.com


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www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

City of Kamloops

www.kamloops.ca

City Page

N E W S & N OT E S F R O M C I T Y H A L L

School Zones Get Lit Up With the onset of Fall weather, students are often walking to and from school during low light conditions. Low visibility in the school zones can result in unsafe conditions for pedestrians due to lack of awareness of the reduced speed zone on the part of motorists. This summer, more than 330 reflective panels were installed on school zone signs and school crosswalk signs at all Kamloops schools as part of the City’s Safer School Travel program. These reflective panels are designed to enhance driver awareness of the school zones and crosswalks, increasing the safety of students traveling to and from school. Pedestrians are reminded to take extra care and to always… • Wear reflective or light colored clothing when walking during low light conditions • Activate pedestrian crossing lights and use the crosswalk • Make eye contact with drivers and wait for vehicles to stop before stepping into the street Drivers are reminded to… • Adjust your speed for road and weather conditions • Yield to all pedestrians The reduced posted speed limit of 30 km/h in all school zones is in force from 8 am to 5 pm on all regular school days.

The reduced speed limit of 30km/hr is in effect from 8 am - 5 pm on school days.

Council Calendar

Budget Meetings

Contract Positions

Notice to Motorists

Coordinated Enforcement Task Force Oct 20, 10 am Corporate Boardroom, City Hall

It’s time to start 2015 budget discussions and consultation. This year we have 8 tables to address service levels. Each table will host a specific topic to discuss and you can rotate to other tables (and topics) every 15 minutes.

Please submit a resume and cover letter to:

For inquiries, please contact 250-828-3461. The City of Kamloops thanks you for your cooperation.

Police Committee Oct 20, 11:15 am Corporate Boardroom, City Hall Regular Council Meeting Oct 21, 1:30 pm Public Hearing Oct 21, 7 pm

Your feedback will be recorded and considered when Council makes its final decisions on the 2015 budget and tax rate. Oct 22:

Regular Council Meeting Nov 4, 1:30 pm

Interior Savings Centre 11:30 am - 2 pm

Public Hearing Nov 4, 7 pm

McArthur Island Sports Centre 7 pm - 10 pm

Heritage Commission Nov 12, 5:30 pm Kamloops Museum, 207 Seymour St.

Or follow the conversation on Twitter at #kamloopsbudget.

Urban Agriculture & Food Systems Advisory Committee Nov 13, 11 am DES Boardroom, 105 Seymour St. Arts Commission Nov 18, 4:45 pm Second Floor Boardroom, City Hall Social Planning Council Nov 19, 5 pm DES Boardroom, 105 Seymour St Regular City Council meetings are broadcast on Shaw Cable as follows: Thurs and Sat at 11 am and Sun at 7 pm. Council meetings can also be viewed online at: kamloops.ca/webcast. Meeting schedule is available at kamloops.ca/council

Visit www.kamloops.ca/2015budget.

Career Opportunities To see current job postings please contact: Human Resources at 250-828-3439 or visit kamloops.ca/careers.

Contract Positions The City is currently seeking part time instructors at various City facilities for the following positions: Personal Trainers Closing: Oct 24, 2014 Yoga Instructors Closing: Oct 24, 2014

Danielle Harkies Healthy Living & Wellness Coordinator Email: dharkies@kamloops.ca Phone: (250) 828-3698 Visit www.kamloops.ca/contracts for full job descriptions.

Notes Bear Bylaw Residents are reminded not to place their garbage out before 4 am on collection day between Apr 1 - Nov 30 and to not accumulate or improperly store bear attractants. Violators are subject to a $100 fine. Bear Prevention Tips • Freeze pungent waste and store garbage inside until pick up. • Rinse recyclables • Pick fruit daily as it ripens or before it ripens if you don't intend to use it • Do not put meat, oils, dairy or un-rinsed eggshells or cooked foods into the compost bin For more information please visit www.www.wildsafebc.com or email wildsafe@kamloops.ca.

Installation of Anti-Skid Materials The City Of Kamloops would like to advise motorists that it will be installing anti-skid material at four high accident locations. The following intersections will be affected: Oct. 18-19: Summit Dr. / McGill Rd. Oct. 20: 3rd Ave / Lorne St (Traffic Circle) Oct 21-23: 8 st / Fortune Dr. Work will take place during the hours of 7 pm - 6 am, with the exception of the 3rd Ave Roundabout, which will take place from 7 pm - 5 am.

Did you know... 160M litres per day is operated and maintained at the City water treatment centre, including: 611 km of water mains, 47 pump stations, 47 reservoirs treating 20 billion litres of water per day.

Notice to Motorists For the following project, when driving in the area, please slow down, use caution, note any temporary detours and obey all traffic control persons.

7 Victoria Street West, Kamloops, BC V2C 1A2 | Phone 250-828-3311 | Fax 250-828-3578 | Emergency only after hours phone 250-372-1710


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

A5

LOCAL NEWS

SHOULD ALL DONATIONS BE REVEALED AT COUNCIL? A CALL FOR FULL TRANSPARENCY GETS A LUKEWARM RESPONSE ANDREA KLASSEN

STAFF REPORTER

andrea@kamloopsthisweek.com

I

magine you’ve been just elected to Kamloops city council. On the agenda of the next council meeting, you see a rezoning application — but, there’s a hitch. The person asking to change the use for that piece of property gave you $500 in your election campaign. What do you do? The B.C. government, which sets out conflict-of-interest rules for mayors and councils, doesn’t require municipal politicians to recuse themselves from decisions involving their campaign donors. But, city council candidate Peter Kerek wants to see local politicians make it clearer where their money comes from. “If a person comes in and makes a presentation to city council, I should indicate this person has donated to me, you know, $50 or $20, whatever the amount may be,” he told KTW. “It just helps with making it transparent.” Kerek said the policy could be adopted voluntarily in Kamloops, but he would also like to see it taken up by the province and applied across B.C. In a post on his campaign Facebook page, Kerek said the current council’s decision to allow Gateway Casinos to move from the downtown to Aberdeen, against the recommendation of staff, is a case in which campaign donations

could have influenced voting. Kerek noted 7779 Ventures, which owns Chances Gaming Entertainment on the North Shore, donated $500 each to the 2008 campaigns of councillors Nelly Dever, Tina Lange and Pat Wallace, and $2,500 to Mayor Peter Milobar’s campaign that year. “Chances also happened to be one of the biggest benefactors of Lake City Casinos moving out of downtown

If a person “comes in and makes a presentation to city council, I should indicate this person has donated to me.

— council candidate Peter Kerek

Kamloops as the move made Chances the only gaming centre still located in the valley,” Kerek said. “It seems odd to me that those members of council would not have realized the suspicious perception of having received substantial donations from Chances Bingo while also being integral to a decision that went against the recommendation of city administrators and against the KamPlan designs.” Many councillors named in the post said they found the suggestion donations were

“Committed to Integrity, Service, and Respect”

influencing their votes insulting. Wallace said she thought the logic behind the allegation was “not that well thought through,” a stance Milobar echoed. “I can’t understand how Chances would be feeling it’s a benefit to their business that a casino is now doubling their size,” he told KTW. “So I think it’s a very thin concept.” Lange and Dever both believe people donate to municipal campaigns because they like a candidate’s values and think they’re likely to make decisions the donor supports — not for favours down the line. “They have told me they know I was an entrepreneur and they knew I would understand how tough it is to run a business and be sustainable, and have your employees, and keep it good, and keep the upgrades happening, and make a living at the same time,” Lange said of her donation from 7999 Ventures. “They knew I understood that — and that was the basis of their contribution.” Dever said she worried about a similar issue at the start of her term. Many of the city’s business owners and developers, or their spouses and children, have at one point or another trained in her gym. “It comes down to if your business relies on monetary injections from that individual on a regular basis, you have to remove yourself,” Dever said. “Or, if they are related, you have to Ken Smedley presents THE

remove yourself,” she said. “And the policy is strong, the policy is good. If anything, I find that, sometimes, some of our councillors step out of the room too often because they don’t want to risk being in conflict of interest.” On the current council, Milobar steps out of the room on most liquor issues because he owns a liquor-primary licence, Councillors Lange and Arjun Singh sit out some decisions related to rental properties. Singh also sat out a decision involving his parents’ neighbours, while Coun. Donovan Cavers recused himself when the farmers’ market his sister manages was on the agenda. Former councillor and current candidate Nancy Bepple recused herself from all debates involving the proposed Ajax mine for most of her term because she owned shares in one of the companies involved. When contacted by KTW, candidates in the Nov. 15 election were split on the issue, with incumbents and some newcomers defending current practice. Other challengers suggested a large enough donation might make them think twice about voting on a donor’s proposal, though what the financial threshold would be is up for debate. Kerek also believes donor disclosure would level the playing field for candidates whose views don’t appeal to the business community and thus don’t attract their money. “It would actually be a deterrent for the wealthiest folks in town who are also making presentations to candidates to donate

CONTENDERS

Friday, November 7

X

"Committed to Integrity, Service, and Respect"

Vote Vote

PETER SHARP KAMLOOPS CITY COUNCIL NOV. 15, 2014

7:30 PM

Sage Brush Theatre, Kamloops

Valdy & Gary Fjellgaard in concert Tickets still only $20.00

Tickets @ Kamloops Live Box Office 250-374-5483

because the donor-client relationship would be exposed every time they went up to council,” he said. With fewer dona-

tions, Kerek said, candidates who appeal to the wealthy wouldn’t be able to outspend their competitors in advertising.

“I’d rather see people getting elected based on the quality of their ideas than the expense amounts of their various campaigns.”

EFFECT OF A SEPARATION ON SPOUSAL WILLS Have you and your spouse ever separated and then reconciled? If you answered “Yes”, then you may need to revise/update your Wills. In a typical spousal relationship, the husband and wife make Wills, appointing the other as Executor and bequeathing the estate to the surviving spouse. However, the law recently changed to say that separation invalidates/cancels the gift to the spouse and the appointment of the spouse as Executor. This is the case even if the spouses later reconcile and wish the gift to their spouse in their Will to still stand (unless there is evidence of a contrary intention in the Will). Not surprisingly this law is catching people off guard as they attempt to deal with their deceased spouse’s estate, only to find out that a temporary separation years ago has now excluded them from their spouse’s Will. Feel free to contact a member of our Estate Planning and Administration Team to determine how this law applies to your circumstances.

LEAH CARD

Wills & Estates Lawyer Fulton & Company LLP

CONTACT OUR WILLS & ESTATES TEAM

DONALD KNAPP

LYLE BACKMAN, QC

LEAH CARD

TYSON McNEIL-HAY

The expertise you need | The commitment you expect | The personal attention you deserve

Personal Injury Divorce / Family Law Collections Employment Law Contract Disputes

Civil Litigation Wills & Estates Real Estate Corporate Commercial Bankruptcy & Foreclosures

Aboriginal Law Municipal Law Trade-marks & Copyright

300-350 Lansdowne Street, Kamloops, BC Phone: 250-372-5542 Fax: 250-851-2300 w w w. f u l t o n c o . c o m


A6

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

LOCAL NEWS

‘You make your own little family’ ADAM WILLIAMS

STAFF REPORTER

T

adam@kamloopsthisweek.com

he Emerald Centre’s exterior is splattered with mud and dust, products of the heavy traffic flowing past its West Victoria Street front. The facade, the emerald green of its namesake, has a faded look, disappearing into the background of the street and buildings around it. It’s easy to overlook — like so many of those

2

KTW takes a trip on the road from homelessness to housing it houses. Its signs are small and humble. Hundreds of motorists whiz by every day without so much as giving it a passing glance. The building has a checkered past, which might seem fitting. It was once a strip club and bar, known as the Rendezvous Hotel, with what has been described by some as a “hotel” upstairs. The bar closed in

ATURDAY

CT

MAJOR HOT TUB SALE! OVER

120

DISPLAYS!

AM

PM

KAMLOOPS FALL HOME SHOW

COMPLIMENTARY “HEARING HEALTH CHECK” BY CANADIAN HEARING CARE “RENOVATE!

DECORATE! RECREATE!”

SUNDAY

SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKERS

11:00 AM “Perfect Paint Colour Tips for Your Home”

11:00 AM “Perfect Paint Colour Tips for Your Home”

Marlena features inspirational room shots and her “tips and tricks” to help you navigate through decorating myths and choose the perfect paint colour for your home!

Marlena features inspirational room shots and her “tips and tricks” to help you navigate through decorating myths and choose the perfect paint colour for your home!

Marlena Stocker of Benjamin Moore

Marlena Stocker of Benjamin Moore Sponsor: Kamloops Paint & Window Coverings Ltd.

Sponsor: Kamloops Paint & Window Coverings Ltd.

“How to Save Money Purchasing Drugs”

1:00 PM

Dave will talk about drug pricing and how to lower drug costs, health & dental, out of country travel medical & financial issues.

“Don’t Just Walk... WALK your FAT OFF!”

“Elements of Estate Planning” Ryan will focus on the elements of estate planning including the documents needed while you are still alive and once you have passed away, and some of the challenges people face when they pass away without any estate planning in place.

David J.A. Porteous (CAUS Financial & Insurance Services Inc.) Elder Planning Councilor (EPC)

2:30 PM

— helping Kamloops’ homeless undergo a similar revival. The Emerald Centre is one of the first stops for Kamloops’ homeless as they begin their journey on what is referred to as a “continuum of

SUNDAY OCT 19 10AM - 4PM INTERIOR SAVINGS CENTRE - FREE ADMISSION!

“PLAN YOUR RETIREMENT TODAY”

1:00 PM

The reality is homeless“ness hits all ages and all groups of people.” — Shelter manager Charlene Eden

SHOWS UNDER 1 ROOF S O 18 10 - 5

KAMLOOPS LIFE@55+ SHOW

SATURDAY

2008, following a string of drug, gang and liquor-related incidents. The Canadian Mental Health Association purchased the building in 2010, with the support of B.C. Housing, with plan to turn it into a co-ed emergency shelter. Now, beneath the mud and the dust, gutted and remodelled, the Emerald Centre has found a new purpose

Ryan Scorgie (Forward Law LLP), Partner

2:30 PM

“Cleansing and Detoxing Your Body”

Make Walking a lot more Fun & Easier! Turn a simple walk into a total-body workout! Double your benefits with less effort & time!

Pollutants in our bodies are an ongoing concern. Learn how you can cleanse and re balance your body with the six different blends in Shae’s Master Cleanse line for a thorough detox.

Sheri Simson (aka The Pole Lady) Owner, Keenfit, the Pole Walking Company

Shae Cook (Fiveblueheron Trading) Aromatherapy Instructor and Shamanic Healer

FREE COFFEE!

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housing.” It’s where those on the street can go to get started on the road to finding a permanent home. Emerald provides low-barrier housing — it’s a “damp shelter,” which means those using it may have addictions or mentalhealth issues. The centre doesn’t force its goals on clients, but helps them reach their own goals. There are 23 beds on the men’s hostel side and 12 on the women’s side. Upstairs, 11 single-occupancy rooms are rented as a part of the Phoenix Centre’s Supported Transitional Living in Recovery program. Inside, there are no remnants of the building’s former life. It’s warm, the people are welcoming, it has the feeling a place where one could begin to get on his or her feet, where friendly and understanding faces can help one get a start, regardless of the past. “I’d like to say there is a demographic,” says shelter manager Charlene Eden. “The

reality is, homelessness hits all ages and all groups of people.” Francine Aleck is in the Emerald Centre on this morning. She says she comes to the shelter “every once in a while,” in between stints with friends, surfing on couches. She’s thankful to be able “to let everybody from my family know that I’m OK, out of the cold and staying in a warm bed. “You meet a lot of people, other ladies, that are homeless, too. You make your own little family with them,” says an emotional Aleck. While residents can stay as long as they want, the hope is Emerald can help people get out of shelter system and into some form of permanent housing. A short bus ride away lies the Crossroads Inn, often the next stop for clients from Emerald looking for a home. The downtown building at Seymour Street and Sixth Avenue looks a hotel from the outside. Inside, it has an energy bordering on frenetic. Voices carry around the floors, some doors sit open and tenants wander the halls. Other rooms are closed to the outside, sounds escaping from behind doors. There’s a general din to the building, a feeling that indicates some

of its residents are still trying to pull things together. It has an anxious quality. It’s understandable — residents are placed in the building’s 50 rooms based on a vulnerability-assessment tool. The most vulnerable are given priority. The building’s stairs are worn, the grey concrete peeking out from beneath red paint. Hundreds of men and women have climbed these steps, inching ever closer to finding a permanent home. The rooms are small, about 400 square feet, but include kitchenettes and private bathrooms. Some have televisions. The stories of those in Crossroads are as different as the decorations adorning their walls. One room on the women’s floor — home to Katherine Pothier — is homey and stunning in its aura. Pothier is a former French-immersion teacher. An illness forced her to go on disability and she fell on hard times. For eight years, she says she was lost. Now, she’s getting things together with the help and support of those at Crossroads. “A lot of bad things happened to me, so I kind of gave up on life and now I want to live again,” Pothier says. “I’m ready to face

Still here after 44 years The Bamboo Inn located in The Brock Shopping Centre has been a fixture in Brocklehurst and Kamloops for that matter since 1972. The longest serving restaurant in Kamloops has been dishing some of the tastiest Chinese food to their customers and it's no fluke they've been around so long. Cosmo Li, owner operator and his brother Wilson started their venture in the restaurant business with the idea that North Kamloops needed a Chinese eatery and it proved correct. Cosmo, a Psych nurse at the Tranquille Institution in 1972 and his brother Wilson, a chef from Hong Kong developed a take out only store front that quickly grew into a full service restaurant.

The current location at 1800 Tranquille road is the original location and as Cosmos says "We never mess with success". Bamboo Inn is a 100 seat facility that can also host business, staff, or any function and they have a liquor license. They also cater to large parties with any dietary requirements. Stop in or call and see what you may have been missing. "After 42 years, our food and customer service is proof enough that we're doing something right" Cosmo says. See you soon at 1800 Tranquille Road Brock Shopping Centre 250-376-3386 or visit bambooinnrestaurant.ca


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

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LOCAL NEWS

Katherine Pothier has made a home of her room in the Crossroads Inn. Crossroads is one of a number of supported-housing facilities in the Tournament Capital. ADAM WILLIAMS/KTW

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the pain, learn and grow up. Figure out what I want to be now when I grow up again.� Across the hall is Tara Brenning, one of the leaders of the women’s floor. Crossroads has also helped her get on her feet. When she first came to the building, the goals she set seemed unattainable but, just a month later, she had reached all of them. She said the impact of having a home is “unbelievable. “I think people see you in a different light when you’re living on the street compared to when you have a home,� Brenning says. “There’s no way you can get yourself together [on the street]. You can’t.� Just down the street, at the corner of St. Paul Street and Fifth Avenue, Henry Leland House beckons to many of those who leave Crossroads. What appears simi-

lar to the Inn from the outside is anything but on the inside. A wave of calm washes over the lobby, a night-and-day difference from the excited energy down the street. The building has a comfortable vibe. It’s calm. The hallways are quiet and the common spaces warm and inviting. Henry Leland House is considered secondstage housing. It has 19 bachelor and nine onebedroom suites. More than half of the building’s residents are employed. Randy, who has been at Henry Leland for 18 months, isn’t yet working, but is volunteering in the kitchen at Crossroads. He’s acting as a peermentor to many of the people who come through the Inn’s doors. Randy came through the Emerald Centre and made a stop at Tina Baptiste Suites downtown before coming to Henry Leland.

“This is home,� Randy says with a smile, noting he has a few friends in other units in the building, people who have gone through Kamloops’ programs with him. Randy’s room is orderly and clean, a combination of items he has picked up from thrift stores and garage sales. The walls are lined with sporting memorabilia, his shelves hold model cars. In a corner, over his kitchen table, hang certificates from the courses he’s completed — drug-recovery, cognitive-behavioural and trauma and chronicpain programs. As he talks about his road to recovery, Randy looks out the window, recalling the people he has seen stumble by his apartment at all hours. “Nope, I don’t want to be there,� he says. Like most at Henry Leland, Randy is by no means finished recovering.

He probably never will be. He says his brain still feels like it’s rebooting. But, he’s on the right track. A short while ago he was hitchhiking across the country. If he hadn’t heard about Henry Leland House and the programs available in Kamloops, he would probably still be lost — constantly moving, but without direction. Getting clean and finding housing has also allowed him to deal with health issues. He caught cancer in his leg early and is being treated for sleep apnea. His courses have helped him work through some of his depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. Randy is a success story of the continuum of housing, the example of the person Kamloops’ programs and buildings, shelters

and low-cost housing give an opportunity to recover. It seems like not long ago that he walked through the dusty doors of the Emerald Centre. Randy has come a long way and he knows it. “From where I was to where I am,� he says. “So far, so good.� *&-,3&."#-**,

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VIEWPOINT

KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK is a politically independent newspaper, published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at 1365B Dalhousie Dr. in Kamloops, B.C. V2C 5P6 Ph: 250-374-7467 | Fax: 250-374-1033 e-mail: editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

Kamloops This Week is owned by Thompson River Publications Partnership Limited

PROMISE NOT TO OVER-PROMISE

H

ere’s a simple request for candidates seeking election in the upcoming school board and municipal election: Only promise what you can deliver. That might seem an obvious request but, all too often, candidates vow to achieve things they clearly cannot. They either fail to provide the true cost of their promise or they promise something outside the legal mandate of the office they seek. Call it enthusiasm. Call it lack of experience. Either way, it doesn’t serve the voter. For example, there are some fairly severe limits on what a city can and cannot do. It must work within the provincial legislation that governs its existence. A promise to silence every train whistle within the city boundaries might sound attractive, but trains are a federal responsibility. City council can’t make them do anything. Likewise, a promise by a school-board candidate to hire more teachers won’t happen without an explanation of where the money to pay for those new employees will come from. And school districts cannot, by provincial law, run a deficit. None of this is to suggest candidates can’t have ideas or voice creative and imaginative solutions. But, they have an obligation to voters to ensure that what they promise is practical — or, more particularly, possible. And, we as voters have the responsibility to do the research and ask the tough questions to ensure these lofty ideas have some grounding in reality.

OUR

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KAMLOOPS THIS WEEK

Publisher: Kelly Hall

Editor: Christopher Foulds

EDITORIAL Associate editor: Dale Bass Dave Eagles Tim Petruk Marty Hastings Andrea Klassen Cam Fortems Adam Williams Jessica Wallace Jessica Klymchuk ADVERTISING Manager: Linda Bolton Ray Jolicoeur Don Levasseur Randy Schroeder Erin Thompson Danielle Noordam Holly Roshinsky Brittany Bailey Nevin Webster Linda Skelly

CIRCULATION Manager: Anne-Marie John Serena Platzer FRONT OFFICE Manager: Cindi Hamoline Nancy Graham Lorraine Dickinson Angela Wilson Marilyn Emery PRODUCTION Manager: Lee Malbeuf Fernanda Fisher Nancy Wahn Mike Eng Sean Graham Malisa Lazzinnaro Jackson Vander Wal Dayana Rescigno Kaitlin Moore

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Time for truth in treaty talks

T

hree years ago, longtime chief and band administrator Sophie Pierre sought an extension of her term leading the B.C. Treaty Commission — and gave a warning. The federal and provincial governments should start taking this long and costly effort seriously or “shut ’er down.” Last week, Pierre wound up her sixth and final year as chief commissioner on a slightly more hopeful note. This year, the Tla’amin Nation in the Powell River area and the Yale First Nation in the Fraser Canyon had their treaties proclaimed by Ottawa. They join the Maa-nulth First Nation on Vancouver Island and the Tsawwassen First Nation in leaving behind the Indian Act and the courts to get on with selfgovernment. Tsawwassen in particular has moved ahead aggressively. Its shopping-centre development near the ferry terminal is one of the largest commercial projects in the province right now. All of these treaties were negotiated despite multiple overlapping territorial claims around them — and similar progress has been made with the Tsimshian First Nation on the North Coast and elsewhere. The need for aboriginal people to work out their overlapping claim issues between themselves was the focus of the commission’s 22nd annual report. In it, former chief commissioners Miles Richardson of the Haida Nation and Steven Point of the Sto:lo Nation added their

TOM FLETCHER

Our Man In VICTORIA

influential voices, urging aboriginal communities to consider them shared territories, rather than clinging to ancient tribal rivalries. Another hopeful sign is that, after seven years of commissions and studies, the federal government has finally given its negotiators a mandate to negotiate fisheries. This is the main reason why the Tla’amin waited five long years for Ottawa’s blessing after their treaty had been hammered out. This year’s landmark decision of the Supreme Court of Canada, recognizing Tsilhqot’in Nation title in the remote Nemiah Valley, has also got the attention of Victoria and Ottawa. Pierre noted the “flurry of activity” by Premier Christy Clark in seeking reconciliation, which will culminate this month with a formal apology for the hanging of Tsilhqot’in chiefs 150 years ago. Pierre said the court ruling “should destroy any lingering thoughts that this issue is not of the utmost importance and provide the necessary investment, both financial and time commitment, to reach satisfactory con-

clusions.” That’s the good news for B.C.’s thorniest historical problem — the lack of treaties across most of the province. It’s also becoming clearer the Tsilhqot’in ruling is unique. It’s unlikely to be repeated by most other First Nations, even if they are willing and able to spend the years and millions to enrich lawyers in pursuit of it. Here’s the bad news. As of this year, the B.C. Treaty Commission has paid out $627 million to First Nations to support treaty negotiations. Most of that is in the form of loans, which are to be repaid out of cash settlements Ottawa contributes to settle modern treaties. Pierre acknowledges some communities are close to completing treaties, but their debt has climbed to near what Ottawa is offering. This would leave them free, but broke. Others are just “spinning their wheels” with no real hope of achieving a treaty, Pierre said. The commission is calling for an “exit strategy” for these communities, starting with loan forgiveness that would allow them to pursue economic activity. There are First Nations, Westbank and Osoyoos prominent among them, that are thriving without treaties. Haida and Klahoose have developed successful forest products businesses as they move toward self-government. Federal and provincial governments must recognize the successes — and the failures.

tfletcher@blackpress.ca


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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

YOUR OPINION

[speak up] You can comment on any story you read @ kamloopsthisweek.com

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

BOORISH DRIVER NEEDS TO BE EXPOSED TO ALL Editor: I was recently issued a parking permit because I have arthritis. I know very personally how important those designated parking spaces are to me as I go through my daily life. I very much appreciate that I have the convenience to park in a preferred location. It spares me a great deal of pain some days. This month, I was shopping in Fortune Center on the North Shore. As I drove in, I managed to get the last handicapped parking space in front of the Dollarama store. To my surprise, a black late-model Lincoln pickup was straddling two handicapped parking spaces and did not have a permit displayed. I asked the manager of Dollarama if they could do something about the situation. She tried calling the administration and security for the mall, but neither answered her call.

She suggested I call the RCMP non-emergency number, which I did. The lady I spoke to said to call the city’s bylaw-enforcement division. I did and left a message and information about the truck with the lady who answered the phone. While I was doing all that, the owner of the truck returned and began to walk into Dollarama, passing me by its entrance. I asked him why he was taking two handicapped parking spaces when he didn’t even have a permit to use one parking space. He told me to “f--- off.” He then returned to his truck, followed by two other people, very able-bodied and much younger than me. I don’t believe for a moment any of them were entitled to a handicapped parking permit. It seems we have a big problem here. This is something I have observed before and I also see it in other places I visit.

We need to have a quick and easy way to deal with these parking violations. These parking spaces are essential for many people. No one should think they have the right to deny access to those who have permits. Violators shouldn’t think they can get away with it. So, be on the lookout for a black, near-new Lincoln pickup Mark LT with a Butler Motors sticker on the tailgate and a Butler Motors frame around the truck plate. The self-important male driver sports a bluetooth in his ear. He needs to get the message he is committing an offence under the Motor Vehicle Act of B.C., besides demonstrating his foul mouth and his arrogant disregard for those deserving of those designated parking spaces. Claire Johnson Kamloops

LOVES HER FORD RANGER, BUT WANTS TO FIND ANSWER Editor: I have a 2009 Black (with silver trim along the bottom) Ford Ranger truck. It has developed huge cracks on the hood and the roof. I have never had this happen on any of the 4 Ford Ranger trucks I have owned. The Ford-Lincoln dealer sent me to the

nearby collision place since it is past its warranty date. While there, I was informed another customer had come in about three months ago with the same problem — with the same truck, same colour, same year and same paint job. It seems to me this is quite coincidental.

A9

It made me wonder if there are more Ranger trucks of this year and colour that have developed the same problem and maybe their owners have just not bothered to report it. Perhaps if more people reported this problem, we might get something done about it. Sylvia Weedmark Kamloops

A selection of comments on KTW stories, culled online RE: LETTER: THIS LAND SHOULD BE ALL OUR LAND TO CROSS: “I have come across many mountain-bike trails on Crown land that look like motocross routes. “Mountain bikes, or the greater numbers of mountain bikes, are not as environmentally friendly as they use to be. “Frolek Cattle Company is very open to permitting access to their lands if you ask for permission. “They are also very committed to preserving grasslands as much as they possibly can. “It appears that the writer expects to be able to ride roughshod over private lands as he pleases. “How would he like it if someone took an ATV and burned a few donuts on his lawn with or without permission?” — posted by Glenn

HUMAN-RIGHTS COMPLAINT A CASE OF POT MEETING KETTLE Editor: Re: (‘City woman at centre of human-rights complaint,’ Oct. 9): Let me see if I have this right. Bethany Paquette, who supported discrimination against gay people by attending Trinity Western University in Langley, is now claiming a prospective employer is discriminating against her by

calling her on her bigotry. Interesting. P. Nelson Kamloops

TALK BACK Q&A: kamloopsthisweek.com We asked:

Results:

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Should Canada become involved in the fight against the ISIL army in Iraq and Syria?

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What is your No. 1 issue as a voter in the Nov. 15 civic election?

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COMMUNITY

Kamloops This Week is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 1-888-6872213 or go to bcpresscouncil.org.

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

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www.kamloopsthisweek.com

LOCAL NEWS

Faculty president cites ‘atmosphere of mistrust’

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DALE BASS

STAFF REPORTER

IFFERENT

dale@kamloopsthisweek.com

The president of the faculty union at Thompson Rivers University has released a scathing

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letter on how effective Alan Shaver has been as university president — essentially calling Shaver an absentee leader who has contributed to an atmosphere among faculty members of suspicion

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OWNTOWN IS

RAMATIC

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and cynicism. Tom Friedman sent the letter to the university’s board of governors and members of the presidential-review advisory committee, as well as to his union members. In it, Friedman said it does not reflect an official stand by the TRU Faculty Association, but comes from his own

views and those of people who have spoken with him. Shaver was appointed president in 2010 and his first contract is coming to a close, expiring next year. The review committee is gathering feedback before deciding if he should be re-appointed for another five years. Friedman said

Shaver is “perceived as someone who does not engage effectively with students, faculty or staff,” although the union president said he recognizes all university presidents have their own style. Friedman notes in his letter, sent to faculty on Thursday, Oct. 16, he has found Shaver to be “warm and personable” in one-on-one occasions,

but that he is not recognized “internally as a strong and consistent institutional presence.” Friedman said there is “a disconcerting mood of disillusionment” among faculty members that has led many, some in tears, to tell him “they no longer feel respected in their professional capacity despite many years of service.” Friedman has spent 21 years at the school, when it was the University College of the Cariboo and now, under the Thompson Rivers University name. “I have not witnessed this level of despair and detachment among faculty,” Freidman said. “This situation, I fear, speaks to a fundamental defect in the structure and operations of the university. “Rather than welcoming faculty participation in academic governance . . . the university leadership has created an atmosphere of mistrust.” Friedman said the academic-administration structure at the university was created by Shaver and has weakened the role of deans and associate deans, who he said no longer have regular, direct contact with Ulrich Scheck, the school’s vice-president academic. Friedman said Shaver and the uni-

ALAN SHAVER: Thompson Rivers University president

TOM FRIEDMAN: TRU Faculty Association president

versity provost — also Scheck — “must do a far better job in solving problems locally and preventing issues from being adjudicated only through expensive and timeconsuming third-party arbitrations.” Shaver has a duty “to be more than just the public face of TRU outside the university,” Friedman wrote, saying a university president “should be recognized internally as a strong and consistent institutional presence.” A spokesman for the university said Shaver would not discuss the letter while the review process is proceeding.

Correction A story on page A13 of the Oct. 14 edition of Kamloops This Week (‘Ajax’s open pit to act as emergency-retention area?’) incorrectly identified the origin of Jacko Lake. The body of water existed as a natural lake and the level was raised through the use of a dam for irrigation purposes.

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A11

LOCAL NEWS

Visions for Kamloops ANDREA KLASSEN

STAFF REPORTER

andrea@kamloopsthisweek.com

Vision Kamloops’ election platform came into clearer focus yesterday (Oct. 16.) The five-member alliance running for city council released a set of “core values and principles” at a press conference spelling out their goals, if elected. Members Denis Walsh, Dieter Dudy, Daphane Nelson, Jenny Green and Brad Harrison said they plan to focus their campaigns on managing spending, diversifying the city’s economy, improving community health and improving transparency at city hall. Walsh said the latter point could mean overhauling the way citizens vote when Kamloops goes back to the polls in four years’ time, with the introduction of councillor term limits and a hybrid ward system. “We’d have possibly two representatives dedicated to the North Shore, two on the South Shore and four at large,” Walsh said. As well, the group said it would look at moving city-council meetings to the evenings to make them more accessible to the public. The group also wants council to take a more activist role on economic development, bringing busi-

nesses and city institutions like Interior Health and Thompson Rivers University together. Though Vision Kamloops’ platform identified a number of broad goals, members said they will use their own, individual campaigns to advance ideas on how those goals can be made reality. “What we want to bring to the public is essentially we’re a team who is essentially in agreement on certain things,” Dudy said. Members said they hope the platform can combat early assessments that the group is simply an anti-Ajax slate. “You can’t run the city on one issue, especially Ajax, where there’s the big debate on whether we even have a say on it,” Walsh said. “There’s more important issues like, say, the performingarts centre.” Walsh said Vision Kamloops has “concerns” about the way the city has approached a potential arts centre and

believes the process so far has not been transparent for residents. The group plans to

roll out a website this weekend at visionkamloops.ca and will host mixers for its five candidates, Dudy said.

ANDREA KLASSEN/KTW Five politicians are running as an alliance in the upcoming municipal election.

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

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LOCAL NEWS ELICIOUS

ISARMING

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Incumbent Kamloops-Thompson board of education trustee Gerald Watson is holding a forum for trustee candidates on Thursday, Nov. 6, at St. Andrews on the Square in downtown Kamloops. Watson, who is seeking his fifth term, first OWNTOWN IS job action hosted the event in 2005, when teacher precluded the Kamloops-Thompson Teachers ‘Association — which had traditionally held a forum — from doing so. Since then, Watson has organized a forum during each municipal election. The forum, to which all board of education candidates have been invited, will begin at 7 p.m. Kamloops This Week editor Christopher Foulds will moderate.

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D Small brings big resume to board OWNTOWN IS

IFFERENT

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D D DID YOU KNOW... DALE BASS

STAFF REPORTER

OWNTOWN IS

dale@kamloopsthisweek.com

ESIRABLE

# dtk

THAT FURNACE DUCT CLEANING WILL MAKE YOUR FURNACE LAST LONGER?

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OWNTOWN IS

Joe Small wanted to run for school board in 2011. The problem was, he was a principal in a Kamloops school and the rules preclude a teacher, principal or vice-principal from running for that office. “So, I’ve been waiting my time,” Small said of his decision to run now, a year after he retired. His resume boasts a 35-year educational

OWNTOWN IS

RAMATIC

JOE SMALL Running for school board.

background that started in Snow Lake, Man., with stops in Morden, the Fraser Valley and Kamloops, where he was in classrooms

and administration offices in Pinantan, Pacific Way, Summit and Arthur Stevenson elementaries. Small said he brings four strong attributes to the job: Experience, enthusiasm, dedication and time. “When I look back on my life, I’ve been getting up, having breakfast and going to school since I was five years old,” he said. “I have the time to continue to do that as a trustee.” Small sees this as a great time to get

# dtk

involved in the way education is run in the city; with contracts in place covering teachers and support staff for the next five years, he sees an opportunity “to unite and work as a team” with the KamloopsThompson school district and its many employees “to provide the best education possible.” He sees plenty of strengths within the district that can be built upon, including creation of the trades

school at NorKam secondary, which is coming on-stream next year at a time when the province continues with a labour shortage and is looking at building the work pool. Small praised the district for balancing its budget and having a surplus at a time when other school districts are continuing to struggle to stay out of the red ink. He said he wants to “continue to be part of the team that keeps our district strong.”

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

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LOCAL NEWS

Local nominee applauds day care policy CAM FORTEMS

STAFF REPORTER

cam@kamloopsthisweek.com

Federal New Democrat Bill Sundhu called the party’s pledge to implement $15-a-day child care “the most significant social policy in Canada in a generation.” Party leader Thomas Mulcair announced a national child care policy this week that

NDP candidate Bill Sundhu calls $15-a-day plan ‘most significant social policy’ in Canada will form a cornerstone of the NDP’s platform in next fall’s federal election. Sundhu, acclaimed as the party’s candidate earlier this year, said the average family pays more than $1,000 a month for daycare for each child.

“Some families pay as much as $2,000 per child,” said Sundhu. Mulcair forecast the program would cost $290 million to create 60,000 spaces in the first year of an eightyear rollout, with an eventual price tag of $5 billion over eight

years to create 370,000 spaces. “It will involve the provinces and have national standards,” he said. Parents in Quebec pay $7 a day for childcare under a provincial program. Citing a TD Bank

study, Sundhu said the government spending would be offset by $1.49 to $2.78 for every dollar of subsidy. That will come in part through increased income tax

that will result from more women entering the workforce. Sundhu, a city lawyer, is travelling to Tunisia, where he will spend the next 12

days helping the North African country craft a constitution and assist with establishment of an independent judiciary. The federal election is set for next fall.

CSIS wants to expand powers JIM BRONSKILL

THE CANADIAN PRESS

OTTAWA — The Conservative government plans to amend the law governing the Canadian Security Intelligence Service to give the spy agency more authority to track terrorists overseas. Public Safety Minister Steven Blaney says the terrorist threat has become more complex since the law was passed 30 years ago, adding it does not stop at Canada’s border.

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Canada’s spy agency might be given authority to track terrorists overseas As expected, Blaney says the government will also take steps to ensure CSIS can protect the identity of its sources. Canada and other Western nations fear that citizens who travel overseas to take part in the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant’s guerrilla-style battles could come home with intent to do harm. The federal plan to bolster

security powers follows a recent statement from the RCMP that the national police force has about 63 active investigations on 90 suspected extremists who intend to join fights abroad or who have returned to Canada. Blaney was joined at a news conference in Banff by Andy Ellis, CSIS assistant director of operations, and RCMP deputy commissioner Janice Armstrong.

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

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www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

SPORTS

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OCTOBER O OC CTO TOBE BER 17 1 17, 7, 2 20 2014 01 14 4

INSIDE: Blazers trade goalie, Hewitt retires | A16, A17

SPORTS: OR RTS: MARTY Y HASTINGS, HA H AST STIN NGS, GSS, ADAM G AD DAM WILLIAMS WILLLI LIAM AMS 746 67 or ema aiill sports@kamloopsthisweek.com sspo porrtts@ po port @ka kam mlloo oopsthiswe weeek.c ek.c ek .com om 250-374-7467 email Twit tter: @ MaarrTThe M heRe Repo port rter er, @AdamWilliams87 @AdamW Wiilllliiam ams87 ss8 87 Twitter: @MarTheReporter,

Rising to the occasion Broncos enter BCFC playoffs as underdogs, but they’re not rolling over MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

O

ften recounted are underdog stories featuring the

improbable. Rarely chronicled are tragedies in which the disfavoured, the outmatched, run directly into a buzzsaw. The hometown Langley Rams (7-3) are expected to make woodchips out of the Kamloops Broncos (6-4) in B.C. Football Conference semifinal action tomorrow (Oct. 18), but Hillside Stadium’s stallions aren’t buying into the status quo. “With the underdog role, it’s great for us,” Broncos’ head coach Duncan Olthuis said. “We had the underdog role against Kelowna [Okanagan Sun] and we came out and performed in the first half. “We’ve got to continue that through the whole game and it can be a close game if we do that.” In the other BCFC semifinal, the Vancouver Island Raiders (5-5) of Nanaimo will play the Sun at the Apple Bowl in Kelowna on Sunday, Oct. 19. Kamloops kept the scoreline respectable against

Kamloops Broncos’ receiver Devin Csincsa catches a TD pass in BCFC action against the Westshore Rebels. Csincsa and the Broncos (6-4) will face the hometown Langley Rams (7-3) in a first-round playoff showdown tomorrow (Oct. 18). KTW FILE PHOTO

Okanagan at Hillside on Aug. 23, but the Sun, who finished atop league standings at 9-1, still rolled to a 54-16 victory. One week later, the Broncos travelled to Langley and found themselves on the end of a 70-24 thrashing at McLeod Stadium, the venue for Saturday’s tilt. The Rams have BCFC all-stars all over the field, with a league-high eight players having cracked the squad — offensive linemen Spencer Lang and Jamie Wandell, receiver Daniel English, defensive linemen Dylan Roper and Alex Agnoletto, defensive back John Beckerleg and place kicker Steve Thomas. The Broncos boast three all-stars in receiver

Derek Yachison, running back Jacob Palmarin and offensive lineman Cameron Brown. Yachison was by far Kamloops’ most dangerous weapon in the loss to the Rams earlier this season, catching eight passes for 135 yards and one touchdown. “Offensively, it’s a good matchup for us,” Yachison said. “The big test will be on defence, if we can make a couple stops. When we do make stops, the offence needs to take advantage of it.” If the Rams decide to key on Yachison, that might allow Devin Csincsa, an impressive receiver in his own right, to see

more of the ball. “They’ll give me a bit more attention this time around,” Yachison said. “I don’t mind being a decoy. The whole offence is going to have to play well.” Olthuis said his squad would have to play a perfect game to beat the Sun and it might take a similar effort to upset the Rams. When the teams met in August, Langley rumbled for a whopping 313 rushing yards, with the doubleheaded-monster duo of Ryan MacDonald and Mario Narte doing most of the damage. Olthuis is well aware of the opposition’s ground attack, but he said Langley’s passing game cannot be overlooked.

“If you want to stop the run and commit people in the box, they have those two big receivers, with [Malcolm] Williams and English, and [Tore] Corrado in the slot who can slice and dice,” Olthuis said. “It’s a tough one for our defence. They’ve got to step up.” Yachison suggested the Broncos’ D should key on the run and let their athletic defensive backs deal with the Rams’ receivers. Under centre for Kamloops will be Stephen Schuweiler, who completed 16 of 32 passes for 294 yards, two touchdowns and one interception against Langley in the summer. “Their defensive backs

are a little young and their linebackers are good, but young,” Olthuis said of the Rams. “If we can get a good push from our O-line, we can get some great yards on the ground and I have all the confidence in Steve and our receivers to put the ball in the air.” Tomorrow’s game will mark the second postseason appearance in Broncos’ history, the first being a 63-7 loss to the Raiders in Nanaimo on Oct. 12, 2013. An unlikely victory would most certainly go down their most-famous triumph to date. “We’re gunning for this,” Olthuis said. “We’ve been working hard.”

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D POULIOT TRADED TO PORTLAND

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

OWNTOWN IS

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played in 51 games with the Blue and Orange over the past two seasons, posting a record of 12-32-0-2. There are 24 players on the Blazers’ roster — two goaltenders, eight defencemen and 14 forwards.

MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

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The Kamloops Blazers traded 20-yearold goaltender Bolton OWNTOWN IS Pouliot to the Portland Winterhawks yesterday (Oct. 16). Kamloops did not “This has been a tworeceive anything in month process,� Bonner return. Pouliot was shopped, told KTW. “We spent a lot of but Blazers’ general time — the coaching manager Craig Bonner staff, our goalie coach didn’t find a deal he [Dan De Palma] and thought made sense for everyone consulting on the team. IS this. The tradeOWNTOWN frees up a “We’re comfortable 20-year-old spot, which with Cole Kehler and is likely to be filled with Connor Ingram. I like the acquisition of an overage forward, with an the way we’re playing, but the opportunity # to announcement anticipotentially add another pated as early as this player to our roster is morning. what intrigued us.� Instead of placing Kehler, who turns 17 Pouliot on waivers, on Dec. 17, and Ingram, where it was expected 17, had strong trainhe would be picked up ing camps, but so did by the Winterhawks, OWNTOWN Pouliot. IS Bonner traded him to The pre-season and Portland as a favour to early part of the WHL the netminder. campaign were used to The waiver-wire projudge whether the young cess can take time and would likely have seen netminders are capable Pouliot miss action this of handling regularweekend, with the Rose season heat. City squad set to play in Carrying two 17-yearMoose Jaw tonight and old goaltenders comes Brandon tomorrow. with obvious risks, but

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Bonner and the Blazers feel they’re up for the task. Kehler (2-1-1-0) has appeared in four games this season, posting a .906 save percentage and a 2.99 goals against average. Ingram (0-1-0-0) has seen action in two games, registering a .884 save percentage and a 4.40 GAA. “Those two guys can battle for that No. 1 spot,� Bonner said. Kehler likely has an edge on the starting job, but Ingram will get plenty of opportunities to prove himself. Ingram’s only start came against the hometown Medicine Hat Tigers and he was called into action against the Rockets in Kelowna on Sept. 20, when Pouliot was chased after allowing three goals in the first period. Pouliot (4-2-0-0) featured in six games for the Blazers this season, recording a .899 save percentage and a 3.04 GAA. The Calgary product

Rockets prevail

There was no quit in the Blazers (6-4-1-0) but, in the end, a valiant comeback effort fell short against the Kelowna Rockets (9-0) at Interior Savings Centre on Wednesday. The visitors from the Little Apple won 6-4. For a complete game story, go online to kamloopsthisweek.com.

Hay’s return

Blazers’ head coach Don Hay makes his return to Vancouver tonight. He spent 10 seasons coaching the Giants before he was hired by the Blazers in May. Hay was asked after Wednesday’s game about returning to Pacific Coliseum for the first time since taking the job with the Blazers. “I know the first time I came back to Kamloops, it was a pretty emotional feeling for me, at that time with Tri-City,� Hay said. “I’m sure there will be a lot of good feelings.�

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www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

A17

SPORTS

Olympic silver medallist Hewitt retires, gets engaged MARTY HASTINGS

STAFF REPORTER

sports@kamloopsthisweek.com

Kamloops speedskating fans can blame Madagascar. It was there where Olympic silver medallist Jessica Hewitt realized her career on ice was over. “It’s a good time for me now, because thoughts of having freedom and experiencing different things had been lingering and, now that I’ve achieved everything that I want, I can go out with happiness and peace,” the 28-year-old Kamloops product told KTW from her home in Montreal. “I hadn’t made the decision to stop before the trip, but I think it kind of just solidified what I wanted to do.” Hewitt, along with Canadian teammates Valerie Maltais, Marianne St. Gelais and Marie-Eve Drolet, won silver in the women’s 3,000-metre relay at the Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, on Feb. 18. It was the culmination of a career that hit rock-bottom in 2009, when Hewitt failed to qualify for the Vancouver Olympics, forcing her to think long and hard about hanging up the skates. After touring the Tournament Capital with her medal and visiting with family and friends, Hewitt and her boyfriend, Pasan Chandraweera, embarked in April on a five-and-a-half-month trip which began in Australia and finished in Madagascar. Chandraweera, who is from Australia, proposed to the former South Kamloops secondary student on the last night of their stay in his home country. She accepted. “I’m just ready to move on to something else,” said Hewitt, who attended Westmount and RL Clemitson elementary schools. “I’ve been really motivated the past four years, especially the past two, and focused on the goal of

going to the Olympics. I achieved that goal and I guess I want to do other things.” Hewitt has already turned the page and is pursuing a degree in human environment at Concordia University in Montreal, living in part off the $10,000 she received for winning silver in Sochi. “It’s taxable, too,” Hewitt said with a laugh. “I don’t even know how long it will last. I don’t want to get a [crappy] job, but I will if I have to.” As for her career, Hewitt isn’t quite sure what she will end up doing, but working a nine-to-five job for “some company” is not in the cards. “That’s why I think, if I do well at school, I will have more opportunities and, because of my background with skating, will be able to find something else,” said Hewitt, who plans on volunteering and sharing her story with underprivileged youth in Montreal. “I’m interested in environmental and social issues and aboriginal rights,” Hewitt continued. “I’m not exactly sure what I want to do, but I think that’s partly why I stopped skating. I want to figure that out.” Hewitt became the second Kamloopsian to win a medal at the Olympics, an obvious career highlight — but there is more to cherish. “It’s not so much about the results, but more about the experiences that I gained from skating, what I learned about myself and what I learned about persevering and following your dreams,” said Hewitt, who grew up skating with the Kamloops Long Blades. The sport brought her all over the world, travels that produced life-long friends and memories. Hewitt will miss competition, but she is relishing the freedom of her new life and looking forward to the future, much

ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

Jessica Hewitt and her fiancee Pasan Chandraweera.

to the displeasure of local fans who hoped

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she would make a run at South Korea in 2018. They can always blame Madagascar. “That was sort of my escape after the Olympics,” Hewitt said. “It was nice to just be with my boyfriend and meet his family and have time away. “I want to be challenged in other ways now.”

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A18

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

K A M LO O P S C r i m e S to p p e r s WA N T E D

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SPORTS

MUG SHOTS CRIMES OF THE WEEK WHO IS THIS THIEF On Friday September 19th at 6:20 pm, a lone male entered the Shoppers Drug Mart on Summit dr., this male wondered around the store for a brief time. The male had been watching the staff before the theft, when the staff was busy he picked up a foot massager and headed towards the exit. The male made no attempt to pay for the item and walked quickly pass the cash register into the parking lot, the staff did not follow the male and his direction of travel was unknown. The male is described as Caucasian, early 30’s, 5 foot 10 inches tall, thin build, short dark hair, wearing dark clothes. If you know this person, please contact Crime Stoppers, you will remain anonymous and will never have to go to court or give a statement.

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If you know where any of these people are, call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). The tip line pays up to $2,000 for information leading to the arrest of fugitives. Remember, Crime Stoppers just wants your information, not your name. Crime doesn’t pay, but Crime Stoppers does. This program is jointly sponsored by Kamloops Crime Stoppers & Kamloops This Week. People featured are wanted on arrest warrants not vacated as of 3 p.m. on October 16, 2014.

UNSUCCESSFUL BREAK AND ENTER Early in the morning of October 5th at a approximately 5:00 am an alarm was reported at the Walco Radio Shop on Sarcees rd., right near the Red Bridge. The suspects had gone to the east side of the building away from traffic, and smashed a window using a large 4 x4 piece of wood. The suspect could be not get into the building,

as the windows had bars on then. Patrols were made immediately but the suspects could not be located. This company used good crime prevention techniques to prevent the a break into the building, this is a good reminder to all businesses to stop these thieves from stealing your property. Although this building is in a

Sometime over night on Friday October 3rd, suspects stolen a Polaris Razor side by side from Foort rd. in Pritchard area. These suspects entered into the backyard, cut the lock that was securing the ATV, move a unity trailer, pushed the ATV out of the yard and drove off. The ATV is described as a Blue Polaris razor 4, that seats 4 people with a roll cage

on it, the machine is in very good condition and can be easily identified. The vehicle Identification numbers have been recorded by the police and will remain on the police computer system until recovered. There was a an older, blue mid 80’s Chevy pickup truck with a loud exhaust seen in the area, leaving very quickly, it is possibility this truck could have been

light industrial area, there is always vehicle traffic in the area, someone may have noticed some suspicious activity at or near the building. If you have any information on this attempted break and enter, please contact Crime Stoppers, you will receive a cash reward upon the arrest of the suspects.

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BASKETBALL, VOLLEYBALL ON THE ROAD

The TRU WolfPack’s men’s and women’s basketball teams will be on the road this weekend, with the women facing a trio of teams in Edmonton and the men heading to the Lower Mainland. The WolfPack’s volleyball teams continue the regular season on the road in Calgary to face the University of Calgary Dinos.

Spike Pink v-ball tourney raisies more than $1,600 Teams participating in the Gillespie and Company Spike Pink Volleyball Challenge last weekend at Sa-Hali secondary helped raise more than $1,600 for the fight against breast cancer. The Sa-Hali Sabres won both the junior and senior divisions at the girls’ tournament, which also featured teams from South Kamloops, NorKam and Westsyde secondary schools. The senior-division tournament all stars were Hayley Tremblay (WSS), Danika Hart (SKSS), Cassie Morris (NorKam) and Katie Dobrovlny (Sa-Hali). Rachelle Duckworth was the senior MVP. Earning all-star honours in the junior division were Sydney Dempster (WSS), Maya Mathews (SKSS), Ashton Stephens (NorKam) and Caet McCorkell (Sa-Hali). Sawyer Hawgood was the junior MVP.

Long Blades return from Oktoberfest

Sylvie Lloyd and Kris Pynten of the Kamloops Long Blades were in action at the Oktoberfest short-track speed skating single distance event in Calgary on the weekend. Lloyd was first overall in the 500-

metre and 11th in the 1,500-m Division 6 races on Friday, Oct. 10. Pynten was third overall in the 500-m and seventh in the 1,500-m Division 3 events. On Saturday, Oct. 11, Lloyd was second overall in the 1,000-m Division 6 race and ninth overall in the 1,500-m Division 4 event. Pynten was third in the 1,000-m Division 4 event and sixth in the 1,500-m Division 3 race. Lloyd was fourth overall in the 1,000-m and sixth in the 500-m Division 5 races on Sunday, Oct. 12. Pynten was fifth in the 500-m and eighth in the 1,500-m Division 3 events.

Blazers raising money for breast cancer

The Kamloops Blazers are raising money and awareness for the fight against breast cancer by auctioning off jerseys. For information on how to bid on the jerseys, go online to blazerhockey.com and click on the breastcancer auction tab. Safeway Breast Cancer Night will be held at Interior Savings Centre on Oct. 24, when Brandon is in town to play Kamloops. The money raised will be donated to the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation.


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

A19

SPORTS

Brotherly love in the Tournament Capital

Edouard, Felix and David Larouche (from left to right) following a Kamloops Storm game earlier this year. ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

LAROUCHES ENJOYING SEASON WITH STORM ADAM WILLIAMS

STAFF REPORTER

adam@kamloopsthisweek.com

When Felix Larouche scored against the Chase Heat on Friday, Oct. 10, it didn’t strike him as anything special. But, when he skated back to the Kamloops Storm bench to celebrate the marker, he learned it was a goal he’d remember for quite some time. The eventual gamewinner in the Storm’s 6-2 victory that night was the first time all three Larouche brothers had ever been in on the same marker. “It was something I never though I’d see,” Felix, the Storm’s captain, told KTW. “I didn’t even know until Ed [brother Edouard] told me when I arrived at the bench.” Felix picked up the goal, his twin younger brothers, Edouard and David, the assists. “It’s something to remember — I’m definitely going to remember that the rest of my life,” Edouard said with a big smile. It wasn’t the only special moment the brothers shared on that weekend. The Storm played to a 5-2 victory against the Summerland Steam and a 4-3 loss to the Princeton Posse, with the Larouches combining to score 15 points. Felix led the way with nine, including three goals, while David had four, including two goals, and Edouard added a pair of assists.

The Larouches will see if they can keep the points coming this weekend as they get out on the road to face the North Okanagan Knights (2-6-0-2) and the Kelowna Chiefs (4-6-1-1). With Felix, 19, nearly two years older than his 18-year-old twin brothers, the 2014-2015 Kamloops Storm season is the first in his life that has seen all three brothers play on the same team. “It’s really something special, especially when I get to play on a line with him [David],” Felix said. “It’s my last year in junior, so it’s pretty special to get to share that with them.” The twins started their junior careers in Golden, with the Rockets, where Felix also made his Kootenay International Junior Hockey League debut. They came to Kamloops this season, returning to the familiarity of home and an education at Thompson Rivers University. Edouard and David have always been a package deal in hockey. When the family first came to Kamloops from Montreal seven years ago, the sport helped them adjust to life in B.C. Unable to speak English, Edouard said it was always easier to play because his brother was sitting beside him. Though they play different positions — David is a forward, while Edouard is a

defenceman — the twins remind one of another set of hockey siblings: Daniel and Henrik Sedin. Like the Sedins, the Larouche twins acknowledged there’s a special connection when they’re on the ice together. “A little bit with David because we grew up together and we’ve always done the same thing, so we always think the same,” said Edouard, the older brother by 10 minutes. “We know where we are on the ice and stuff. It’s pretty cool,” David said. With all three boys in the same city, their parents — mother Marie-Claire and father Andre — are enjoying watching their sons play a little more, too. The boys have been spared the lectures they used to get about hurting one another in head-to-head matchups and mom and dad

are no longer travelling back and forth between Golden and Kamloops. Everyone is happier now that the twins are back in the Tournament Capital, though the family reunion probably means the most to Felix, who has always been the odd man out when it comes to hockey. “It’s special,” Felix said. “Obviously, I know it’s my brothers. When he scores a goal, I get pretty excited for him, stuff like that.” Just as Felix’s goal last weekend became more exciting when he heard who picked up the assists, playing hockey with family has made the Storm season a little more special for all the Larouches. “That makes it even better,” Edouard said. “Being able to play with both of my brothers is a gift because I never thought it would happen.”

WOLFPACK SOCCER CLOSES SEASON THIS WEEKEND The TRU WolfPack will close out its first season in the ranks of Canada West soccer this weekend, with a home-andhome series against the UBCOkanagan Heat.

Both the men’s and women’s WolfPack will be at Hillside Stadium tomorrow (Oct. 18), before heading to Kelowna on Sunday, Oct. 19, for their final regular-season games.

TRU’s women’s team is 0-9, while its men’s team is 1-7-1. Both are in last place in their divisions. UBC-Okanagan’s men are 4-5-1, while its women are 0-7-3.

Y Obituaries Z JEANNE DUARTE SUTTIS

SHUTTLEWORTH

May 6, 1922 ~ October 15, 2014

Jeanne Suttis passed away on Wednesday, October 15, 2014 in the Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops, BC at the age of 92. She was born and raised in California before arriving in British Columbia in 1972. She was predeceased by first husband, Ray Duarte, second husband George Suttis in May 2012, parents Blanche and Eugene Foster and sister, Eileen Bogert. She will be lovingly remembered by her five children, Elaine (Roger) Torres and Butch (Charlene) Duarte of California, Kathy (Don) Vallerga and Tammy (Gerald Koehler) Duarte of Williams Lake, BC, and Janeen (Barry) Godin of Kamloops and nine grandchildren. Surviving grandchildren are Wendy Torres, David and John Duarte of California and Staci and Michael Duarte of Washington. Residing in BC are grandchildren Jason (Kathy) and Josh (Lisa) Vallerga of Williams Lake, Ashley Godin of Alberta, and Hayley Godin of Kamloops. She is also survived by eight greatgrandchildren and many loving nieces and nephews. Jeanne was employed as a teacher both in Lodi, California and in School District #27 in Williams Lake and surrounding areas before her retirement in 1987. Thanks to the Riverbend Seniors Community in Kamloops where she spent many happy hours volunteering and enjoying activities while living in this retirement home. No formal service at her request but donations to the Williams Lake branch of the SPCA in her memory will be gratefully accepted as the welfare of animals was one of her greatest concerns.

250-554-2577

Sadly we announce the peaceful passing of Richard Douglas Shuttleworth of Chase, BC at the age of 79. Predeceased by his wife Patricia (Pat) and his brother Den. Dick is survived by his sons Garth (Tina), Greg (Debbie) and his granddaughters Emily and Maya. He is also survived by his sister Mickey (Bob) Ostergard of 100 Mile House and many nieces and nephews. Dick was born in Vernon, BC. The family relocated to Langley, BC where he and his father John had a broiler farm. In 1968 Dick and Pat found their place on the North Shuswap to raise their sons and farm purebred polled Herefords. In recent years Dick could be seen walking his dog Angel through the streets of Chase, raiding Colin’s garden and leaving “doggy bags” in the back of Eddie’s truck. A special thank you to his friends Shirley, Norm and neighbours of the Shuswap Sands Park for their help and kindness. As requested, no service will be held. A small family gathering will be held at a future date. In lieu of flowers and cards a donation to a charity of choice would be appreciated.


A20

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

EARL ANDREW KEITH

MARJORIE ANNE MERON

1940-2014

Marjorie Meron of Kamloops passed away peacefully on Saturday, October 11, 2014 at 96 years of age. She is survived by her children, David (Argentina) Meron of Kamloops BC, Carole Owen of Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta, Dianne (Tom) Sole of Calgary, Alberta, and John (Cindy) Meron of London, Ontario, 14 grandchildren and 19 great-grandchildren. Marjorie was predeceased by her husband, Wilf Meron.

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of husband and father Earl Keith, with his family by his side, on Monday, October 13, 2014 at the age of 73. He is survived by his loving wife Irene, sons Trevor and Sean, brother Don (Jeanette) of Ladner, BC, and niece Lori (Anu) of Kelowna. Earl was born at Royal Inland Hospital in Kamloops and spent most of his life here. He was a life long, successful businessman working in the menswear field, first with Mil’s Menswear, Garnet Brown and later as the owner of Brian’s Work and Western Wear. Earl’s passions were fishing, growing gladiolas and cheering for the Montreal Canadiens. He could often be seen riding his bike with a cowboy hat on. The family would like to offer a special thanks to Dr. Wiltshire and the staff at Marjorie Willoughby Hospice House. Thank you also to everyone that cared for Earl in these last months through difficult days. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Kamloops Hospice or the Kamloops Moose Lodge. Earl requested no formal service – Gone Fishing. Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

Special thanks to Dr. Wynn and the staff at Pinegrove Care Center for their care of Marjorie. Viewing will take place from 7:00 to 8:00 pm on Friday, October 17, 2014 in the Rosewood Room at Kamloops Funeral Home, 285 Fortune Drive. The Funeral Service will be held at 10:00 am on Saturday, October 18, 2014 in the Kamloops Funeral Home Chapel with Chaplain Mary Widmer officiating. Following the service, Marjorie will be laid to rest in Hillside Cemetery. Should friends so desire, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, 280 Victoria St W, Kamloops, BC V2C 1A4, in memory of Marjorie. Condolences may be expressed to the family from www.kamloopsfuneralhome.com

250-554-2577

250-554-2577

She was predeceased by husbands Marvin Chapman and Remie Plante; her father Roderick Ray and mother Edith; daughter Shannon Mott (Shane) and brothers Cheyne, Terry (Diane), Frank (Kathy). Left to cherish her memory are sisters Sharon Bilous (Orest) and Beverly Leasak (Bill); brothers Lyle (Sandra), Lorne (Yvonne), Ron (Lynda), Wayne (Gail) and Harvey (Patsy); sisters-in-law Diane (Terry) and Kathy (Frank); grandchildren Cliff Chapman Junior (Shannon), Chris Chapman, Trina Ford, Connie De’Arlieveria, Brody Mott (Jessica), Broc Mott, Cody Rennie, Cole Chapman, and great-grandchildren Grant Rennie, Caidee Ambler and Madden De’Arlieveria. Bernice was a resident of Kamloops for 50 years. She enjoyed the flowers, fruits and vegetables that grew in abundance in her garden. Trips to the Shuswap were always a favorite activity during the summer. During the winter season she enjoyed watching the NHL games. She also loved to curl. She loved going to all her grandchildren’s sports events and was persuaded to help the youngsters get to their games, but she enjoyed every moment as family meant everything to her.

SHARON KAY DUNCAN April 6, 1947 October 16, 2004

Always ...

Special Thanks to Dr. R. McLaren, Dr. A. Gabriel, The Royal Inland Hospital Medical teams on 7 North and 8 North, the staff and volunteers at the Marjorie Willoughby Snowden Hospice House and the nurses and staff at Community Home Care. A Service will be held on Monday, October 20, 2014 at 1 pm at Hillside Cemetery with Captain Lisa Trickett of the Salvation Army officiating. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation to the Hospice House or the Salvation Army of Kamloops. Arrangements entrusted to Schoenings Funeral Service telephone 250-374-1454

October 31, 1932 ~ October 3, 2014

June 30, 1941 – October 10, 2014

In 1966, Ernie met Coral, his wife and the mother of his children, Douglas (Violet), and Tracy Cooke (Lee). Together they raised their children in Edmonton, Alberta, Trenton, Ontario, Vernon and Kamloops. Sadly, he was predeceased by Coral in 2008.

It is with deep sadness that we announce the passing of our Dad, Waverly (Wave). He passed away suddenly while at home on October 10, 2014. He was 73 years old.

Ernie was a devoted son, brother, husband, father and citizen. He was the kind of father who made the backyard ice rink in the winter for Doug and coached Tracy in softball in the summer. He believed in community service and volunteered tirelessly for the Valleyview Overlander Lions Club. He was the recipient of many honours including the Melvin Jones Fellow in May, 1998 for dedicated services for the Lions Club International Foundation and a Lions Club Life Membership in May 2013. In his retirement, he combined all of his interests to successfully operate a beer garden business catering to Slo-Pitch softball tournaments throughout Kamloops.

He was a father, grandfather, brother & friend to many. We will miss his smile & laughter dearly. Wave was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba. He spent the greater part of his life being involved in the community of Kamloops, BC and spent his twilight years in the lower mainland making friends wherever he went.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in Waverly’s honour, to: Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) Foundation of Canada at http://endpkd.ca/donate

Bernice Lenore Mae Plante (nee Ray) died peacefully at the Kamloops Hospice Home on October 13, 2014 at the age of 74. She is survived by her partner and friend John Pleva, her sons Clifford Chapman (Sharon) and Grant Chapman (Dyna).

ERNEST WILLIAM SMITH

CONAN

There will be a Celebration of his Life on Saturday, October 18 at 3 pm in the lower mainland. If you are interested in attending please email waverlysfamily@gmail.com for further details. RSVP kindly appreciated at the same email address.

1940-2014

Schoenings Funeral Service 250-374-1454

WAVERLY JOSEPH

Wave is survived by his two daughters; Shelley (Ken and 2 granddaughters – Melina & Cassia) of White Rock, BC and Jo Ann (Chris) of Surrey, BC. His sister, Beverley (Ken) of Ladysmith, BC and brother Carl (Lynda) of Lethbridge, AB. He is also survived by nieces; Shannon (Jamey & Jonah), Danette (Mike & Kellan), Rachel (Hannah & Jacob), and Cassandra & nephews; Corey (Nancy, Brodie & Casey), Mikey, Ryan, and Tyrell. Predeceased by his mother Teresa Anna, father Joseph and his sister, Nadine.

PLANTE

Ernest (“Ernie”) William Smith passed away peacefully with his family at his side on October 3, 2014. Ernie was born on October 31, 1932 to Albert and Allison on Smith in Baltimore, Ontario. Ernie was the youngest of six surviving children, and was predeceased by his parents, brothers (Spencer, Andrew and Douglas) and sister, Betty. Left to mourn him is sister Jesse, brother-in-law Bill Wright, and the extended Smith family. Ernie joined the Canadian Army in 1952 and served for 26 years in the Royal Canadian Army Services Corps. A proud serviceman, he was stationed in Cyprus, the Gaza Strip and Egypt (to name a few) with the United Nations Peacekeepers. In 1999, he was awarded the Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal. After his time in the Canadian Armed Forces, he worked at a variety of positions for the Government of Canada, retiring in December, 1995. Ernie had a combined career in the service of Canada of 42 years.

In Memory of our loving father, nonno and devoted husband,

VINCENZO SPINA August 31, 1924 ~ October 18, 2013

The family extends heartfelt gratitude to his doctors, the staff at Chartwells (formerly “The Renaissance”), Royal Inland Hospital and his family at the Moose Lodge for the loving care they gave to Ernie. Ernie will be deeply missed by all who knew this very fine man. A Celebration of Life to be held at 11:00 am on Saturday, November 15, 2014 at the Moose Lodge 1552 located in the North Shore Community Centre, 730 Cottonwood Avenue, Kamloops, BC. In lieu of flowers, donations in Ernie’s name to the Valleyview Overlander Lions Club or a charity of your choice would be greatly appreciated. Condolences may be expressed at www.myalternatives.ca

Your first year in heaven and we miss you so much. Your memory is our keepsake with which we’ll never part. God has you in his keeping, we have you in our heart. With all our love, Your family


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

SPORTS

ROYALS OFF TO IMPROBABLE WORLD SERIES DAVE SKRETTA

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — When the final out was made on another improbable night, and the Kansas City Royals were headed back to the World Series, Ned Yost stood in the dugout and watched. Division Series. He watched as a The Fall Classic bunch of young playwill begin Tuesday in ers he has nurtured for Kansas City between years celebrated. He the Royals and the watched as veterans winner of the NLCS and journeymen and between the Giants baseball vagabonds and Cardinals. piled onto the infield. Coincidentally, it was And he watched as a St. Louis that fell to the fan base that has so Royals in seven dramaoften criticized him filled games during the relished a moment 29 ’85 World Series. years in the making. “I don’t think we’re “These kids, from done yet,” designated the minute you saw hitter BillyISButler said. OWNTOWN them, you knew they After the Royals were going to be speheld the Orioles to cial,” Yost said. “Their three hits in Game 3, goal was to get here Jason Vargas and their and win a championbullpen held them to ship, and today they four Wednesday night. accomplished that.” Kelvin Herrera and Led by a dynamic Wade Davis got the defence, an opporgame to Greg Holland, tunistic offence and who matched Dennis one of the best bullEckersley’s record with pens in the game, the his fourth save of the Royals sweptOWNTOWN aside the IS series. best-of-seven Baltimore Orioles on Holland got J.J. Wednesday, Oct. 15. Hardy to ground out With another tight to third base for the win, 2-1, the Royals final out and the Royals captured their first spilled onto the infield the American League in a wild celebration. championship since Fireworks shot over 1985. the crown-shaped That was also the scoreboard in centre last time they were in field, and a blue-clad the playoffs. “It’s hard to explain,” sellout crowd that included Royals greats said outfielder Lorenzo OWNTOWN IS George Brett and Brett Cain, whose clutch hits Saberhagen let out a and dramatic grabs roar while cars on nearearned him the series by Interstate 70 honked MVP award. “We’re their horns. clicking at the right “That’s what you moment right now.” dream of as a kid,” Now, the Royals Holland said. “Punch will carry an 11-game your ticket to the World playoff win streak into Series, especially before the World Series, one your home crowd. shy of the major league These fans have been record. waiting a IS long time. OWNTOWN That includes their They deserve it.” first eight this season, The Orioles, meansomething that had while, will limp into never been done in the off-season after a post-season history. 96-win season havKansas City beat ing been swept for the Oakland in a 12-inning first time in franchise wild-card thriller to history, a stretch of 21 start things off, then post-season series. swept the Los Angeles “I think it’s not what Angels in the

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we didn’t do. It’s more what they did,” said the Orioles’ Ryan Flaherty, whose home run represented their lone run. “We played good baseball.” Making his first start in nearly two weeks, Vargas shut down the vaunted Orioles lineup in Game 4. The only damage he allowed came in the third inning, when Flaherty went deep. By that point, the Royals had already manufactured a pair of runs. Alcides Escobar singled off Orioles starter Miguel Gonzalez to open the game, and Nori Aoki was drilled on the right knee a couple pitches later. Yost then opted to bunt with

Cain, one of his hottest hitters, to advance both of the runners. It was a questionable decision so early in the game. But like almost every unorthodox move that Yost has made, it worked out perfectly. Eric Hosmer followed with a chopping grounder and first baseman Steve Pearce went home with it. Escobar slid safely and the ball bounded away from catcher Caleb Joseph, allowing Aoki to follow his teammate home and giving the scrappy, small-ball Royals a 2-0 lead. After that, it was up to their defence and bullpen. Escobar turned a OWNTOWN pair of double plays IS early in the game to help Vargas escape jams and Gordon made a spectacular catch while crashing into the left-field wall to rob Hardy of extra bases leading off the fifth inning. In the sixth, second baseman Omar Infante was in perfect position

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to snag Nelson Cruz’s line drive and leave runners on the corners. Herrera breezed through the seventh and Davis handled the eighth, just as they have all season and Holland slammed the door on his fourth save of the series. In the midst of it all was Yost, the oftencriticized Royals manager who has guided a collection of budding young stars to baseball’s grandest stage. In doing so, Yost became the first manager in major league history to win his first eight postseason games. Now, just four more wins stand in the way of an improbable World Series championship. “These guys are willing to play selfless baseball where all they’re concentrating on is winning the game,” Yost said. “Nobody is looking to be a hero right now, they’re just looking to win a ballgame and they’ve done a tremendous job.”

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www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

FAITH

Of the antichrist and the Second Coming

M

illions of Christians believe an evil dictator called the Antichrist will appear on the world stage prior to a Second Coming of Jesus. John F. MacArthur says this future Antichrist is mentioned in the following Old Testament prophetic books: Isaiah, Ezekiel, Daniel and Zechariah (The MacArthur Study Bible, NASB ed., pp. 957, 1180, 1200, 1311). Actually, the term “antichrist” never appears in any of them. In fact, it’s completely absent from the Old Testament. Yet, in reference to the Old Testament prophets, MacArthur uses it 53 times in his study Bible. Billy Graham claims the Book of Revelation in the New Testament also refers to the Antichrist (Storm Warning, pp. 294-295). However, you won’t find the word there, either. Considering the plethora of books

MICHAEL FENEMORE

You Gotta Have

FAITH

available on the subject, not to mention predictions by radio and television evangelists, one might expect to find the word “antichrist” occurring frequently throughout scripture. In reality, it occurs in only two anonymous letters traditionally attributed to the apostle John. It is never applied to the Man of Sin mentioned in 2 Thessalonians 2:3, nor does it ever refer to the Beast or False Prophet of Revelation. In fact, it is never applied to any kind of political or religious leader. Furthermore, it is not limited to an individual.

The Bible says millions of people are antichrists. In 1 John 2:1822, the first-century author claims it is the “last time” (Greek: last hour) before the Second Coming of Christ because “many antichrists” are already on the scene. He defines an antichrist as anyone who denies Jesus is the Messiah: “Little children, it is the last [hour]: And as ye have heard that antichrist shall come, even now are there many antichrists; whereby we know that it is the last [hour] . . . Who is a liar but he that denieth that Jesus is the Christ? He is antichrist, that denieth the Father and the Son” (King James Version [KJV] throughout). Again, in 1 John 4:3 and 2 John 7, an antichrist is described as anyone who does not confess Jesus and the author repeats his observation regarding “many” antichrists existing in the first century: “ . . . every spirit that confesseth not that Jesus Christ

is come in the flesh is not of God: And this is that spirit of antichrist, whereof ye have heard that it should come; and even now already is it in the world . . . many deceivers are entered into the world, who confess not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh. This is a deceiver and an antichrist.” That’s it. There are no other occurrences of the word “antichrist” in the Bible. In the three passages where it does occur, we detect no sign of a world dictator. To be clear, an evil dictator could be considered an antichrist since he would probably not be a Christian — at least, not a genuine one. However, at the same time, the term would apply to millions of others. From this study, we can conclude the fol-

lowing: 1. The word “antichrist” does not apply exclusively to any individual political or religious leader. 2. Anyone denying Jesus as Saviour is an antichrist. 3. John knew it was the last hour before the return of Jesus because there were already numerous antichrists present in the first century. To some, the precise definition of “antichrist” may seem inconsequential. However, the third conclusion above highlights a significant issue. How is it John knew the Second Coming was about to take place in the first century, but MacArthur, Graham and myriad others believe it didn’t? Do they know better than the apostle John? If they are correct,

then John must have been mistaken. But, all the famous evangelists claim the Bible is the inspired “Word of God.” So, how could this biblical prediction be wrong? John understood the presence of numerous antichrists in the first century to be a sure sign the Second Coming of Jesus and the arrival of the Kingdom of God would occur within his lifetime, just as Jesus had promised (see Matthew 16:2728; 10:23; 24:34; Luke 21:28, 31-32; Revelation 1:1, 3; 22:10-12). Modern preachers disagree, promoting instead a future world-dictator antichrist and a pitifully overdue Second Coming. But, in whom are Christians supposed to be placing their trust — Jesus and

his “holy apostles” (Ephesians 3:4-5) or confused theologians who presume to contradict them, thereby implying Jesus was the most outrageous false prophet in history? The vast majority of today’s preachers are misusing the term “antichrist.” However, more importantly, they are clearly imprisoned by an enormous delusion regarding the nature of the Second Coming predicted throughout the New Testament. If we continue to rely on such misguided “experts” instead of finding time to investigate matters for ourselves, we will forever be as blind as they are. Michael A. Fenemore of Kamloops is the editor and co-author of The Twilight of Postmillennialism, available at Amazon.ca.

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A23

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

WHAT’S HAPPENING

THIS WEEKEND

OCTOBER 17, 2014

Keeping the promise, singing the blues Steve Kozak wouldn’t be happy playing anything but the blues. It’s why he’ll be in Kamloops to perform two shows on Oct. 24 and Oct. 25. Read more about it on page B3.

B1

To submit an item for THIS WEEKEND, email jessica@ kamloopsthisweek.com.

TODAY W FRI., OCT. 17 ART: SUSAN KNOX RECENT PAINTINGS, watercolour and acrylic exhibit on display until Oct. 31 at the old Courthouse Cultural Centre, 7 West Seymour St. FUN LAUGHTER FRIENDS 2014, appetizer and dessert party, 7 p.m. Adults only group. Wear a name tag, mobile devices are discouraged. RSVP to laugh2014@shaw.ca for all the details. HARVEST DINNER AND WINE PAIRING WITH BLACK DOG STRING QUARTET, annual wine, dinner and auction night hosted by the Kamloops Symphony Orchestra at the Plaza Hotel. Tickets are $100 for the dinner and wine tasting or $75 for dinner only. Wine tasting starts at 6 p.m. and dinner is at 7:30 p.m. MORE INFO: call 250-372-5000. MUSIC: JAM SESSION, held at the Fraternal Order of Eagles, 755 Tranquille Rd., beginning at 6 p.m. MUSIC: ALAN CORBISHLEY IN CONCERT, singing Vaughn Williams and Stephen Sondheim with Daniela O’Fee on piano. Held at the TRU Alumni Theatre beginning at 8 p.m. Tickets are available at Kamloops Live box office, 1025 Lorne St., 250-3745483 or online at kamloopslive.ca. More info: bclivingarts.ca.

See page B6

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B2

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

Celebrating her seventh anniversary. JENNIFER HOWE, AT CHARTWELL SINCE 2007. It’s been seven years since Jennifer decided to move out of her house and into one of our residences. See the whole story and discover why she chose to write the next chapter at Chartwell. CHARTWELL.COM

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

B3

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Blues artist new again Kozak looks forward: ‘Younger people who hear it, they dig it’ ON STAGE DALE BASS

STAFF REPORTER

W

dale@kamloopsthisweek.com

hen you make a promise to Muddy Waters, you sort of feel obligated to live up to it. At least, that’s how Steve Kozak felt after spending several days with the blues legend back in the 1970s. “He gave me the whole speech about young guys playing the blues,” Kozak said, “and how we’d never really make any money but that we had to do it. “He made me promise him I’d keep playing the blues, so I went in there with my eyes open, but it’s what I love to do. “I wouldn’t be happy playing any other kind of music.” The Vancouverbased musician brings his band — the West Coast All-Stars — and the blues to Kamloops this month for two shows at the Ramada Inn on Oct. 24 and Oct. 25, the second concert for the B.C. Interior Blues Association’s season. For a performer whose been around for decades, it came as a welcome surprise when he won the Maple Blues Award last year for best new artist of the year — a fact he attributes to finally touring and promoting an album in Ontario, home of the awards. “It’s nice to be new again,” Kozak said.

Blues artist Steve Kozak will be performing two Kamloops shows at the Ramada Inn. EVAN LEUNG PHOTO

WHO: Steve Kozak and the West Coast All-Stars WHEN: Friday, Oct. 24 and Saturday, Oct. 25 WHERE: Ramada Inn TICKETS: $20 for society members and $25 for the general public, available at the hotel’s front desk, the Sahali Mall ticket centre or online at interiorblues.ca.

“I didn’t travel much east of Alberta, doing B.C. and Alberta most, but my last album got a lot of radio play in Toronto. “This [award] is really nice; it’s the first time I’ve had countrywide exposure.” It came as a double surprise, Kozak said, because it was the second year in a row the Maple Blues Society recognized a Western Canada blues band with the new artist award. Kamloops’ own Sabrina Weeks and Swing Cat Bounce received it in 2012. Like many professional musicians, Kozak’s career began in high school, when he took up the guitar. And, like many teenaged guitarists, his interests went to rock at first, with some dabbling into the blues — until he met McKinley Morganfield, the man the music world knows as Muddy Waters. The blues took hold and has seen him perform with the likes of Sonny Rhodes, Rick Estrin, Big Joe Louis, Evan Johns and James Harman. Kozak also worked as artistic director and talent purchaser for the Powell River Blues Festival in 2011 and 2012 and regularly makes the

NOODLE & CUTLET

rounds of similar festivals throughout the Western part of the country. Health issues sidelined his career for a while but, he said, he’s healthy and living for the music. His last recording, Lookin’ At Lucky, featured five original tunes as well as some covers — but, even then, Kozak looks for the unique, the obscure, the songs that might not be on every blues-band’s cover list. “I like the ones that tell stories,” he said. “I tend to stay away from the cliche tunes everybody does.” And, he does his best to also bring young musicians and music lovers into the world of the blues. “I was at a party a while ago and there were these young people playing rap and playing video games and we started up and I heard ‘What is this? This is great.’ “Younger people who hear it, they dig it.” Tickets for the shows are $20 for society members, $25 for the general public, and are available at the hotel front desk, the Sahali Mall ticket centre or online at interior blues.ca.

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B4

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Hoping last movie store gets happy ending

I

f you ask MovieMart customers why they still rent movies, they will likely give you a funny look with the mention of things like Netflix, Shaw On Demand, streaming or downloading. “I’m over 80,� one man said with a laugh. Another said his Internet connection is too slow for those types of things. Another enjoys the excursion. Taking his family to the movie store is “almost like an outing,� he said. “It’s something to do together.� Then there’s the whole “local� thing, mentioned by a customer who prefers giving money to a business owner who will reinvest in the Tournament Capital, rather than paying some random firm in Silicon Valley.

MovieMart is the sole M movie-rental store in m Kamloops. K One store remains. That’s it. That’s all. How incredibly depressing. d If you told me this a while back, I’d have replied, “Movie stores r still exist?� I mean, why leave home to get a movie? They’re available on every mobile device imaginable. Why spend money on one film? Unlimited watching is but a click away. And late fees? No thank you. I had been surfing Netflix one Sunday night when my mind was about to change. It was the movie Runner Runner. If you’re wondering why you haven’t heard of it, don’t worry — I hadn’t, either. At least, not until the $7.99 online streaming service rec-

JESSICA WALLACE

Generation

GAP

Each answer was more thoughtful than expected to a seemingly simple question about movie rentals — and it’s those thoughts that brought all of them to the same video store on St. Paul Street. “It’s the only one I know of,� one man said. His answer is more true than he may know — the store is the last of its kind in Kamloops. With the recent closure of the Brock Video Mart, the downtown

ommended it to me. In a nutshell, Runner Runner is Ben Affleck and Justin Timberlake trying to pull off Scarface circa 2013, only featuring an online gambling kingpin, not the drug lord for which Al Pacino was famously cast. Obviously, it sucked and it left me wondering how I ended up watching it at all. I could have been eager to click on a film after spending too long flicking through rows of movies with the Xbox joystick. Maybe I had secretly hoped Timberlake had an acting career beyond the skits of Saturday Night Live. I blame the computer. It had fooled me with some dirty pickup line like, “because you watched Breaking Bad.� The betrayal hit me so deep and, with my

pent-up film frustration, it catapulted me back in time — to the movie store. My early memories of trips to the video store come from Valleyview Video Mart’s “Five Movies, Five Days, Five Dollars� deal. I was a kid at the time and my parents would help me and my little brother pick out old movies to watch — films like Indiana Jones, Robocop and Teen Wolf. It was all coming back to me. The trip there, the anticipation and the extra special time that it takes to physically go somewhere to pick out a movie. There’s the actual store — the movie posters on the walls, the new-release section and the staff picks and that “secret room� of porn movies that leaves you hoping

customers are kind enough to both rewind and disinfect. There’s the act of picking up the movie boxes lining the shelves, reading the backs and chatting with other customers who may have seen another film worth recommending. The nostalgia and the wanna-be hipster in me got me excited to step into the store. But, it wasn’t enough to convince 21st Century Jess. On one of those first visits, I walked out just as quickly as I walked in. It went something like this: “You’re saying you don’t have Boyhood?� “Oh, it’s not out yet?� “You’d recommend

How do you watch your movies? editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

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Jessica Wallace is a reporter for Kamloops This Week, email her at jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com.

Information Valid for

Paramount Theatre

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About Time?� I went home without a movie and tried to find Boyhood online. I failed. I did find About Time, though. And, it was so good that I went back to MovieMart the following week to rent two movies, asking the store employees for more of their previously unappreciated movie advice, no less, with my tail between my legs. Those movies cost me $8.05 in late fees — or about a month of Netflix — but the value was worth so much more.

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

B5

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Under the microscope and under the lens DALE BASS

STAFF REPORTER

dale@kamloopsthisweek.com

Ross Outerbridge has taken a lot of photographs through the years. He’s even sent some of them to compete in the Professional Photographers of Canada competitions, both nationally and provincially, and he’s never won — until now. A photograph the orthopaedic doctor took to support a fundraising cam-

paign with the RIH Foundation has won the best-in-class and a judge’s choice ribbon at the provincial level of the organization. It’s one of several Outerbridge took to assist with the campaign. The works will be used in promotional material and some will be reproduced for flags and banners to be displayed throughout the city. Outerbridge said he wanted to volunteer

his services because the goal of the campaign — to help equip a new operating room — is important to him. He shot photographs in some of those surgical centres during general, orthopaedic and ear/nose/ throat surgeries. The winning photograph came during a long and challenging umblical-hernia operation. The doctor said viewing surgeries — even the knee-replacement one he’s done

many times in the past — seemed fresh and different to him as he viewed them through his Nikon camera, paying attention to lighting and other details. OWNTOWN IS Shooting in an operating room brings its own unique conditions, Outerbridge said; surgical lights are brighter than those found in regular rooms and, in adjusting his camera focus to deal with this, the room appears dark, with light shining down on

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the incision and the two doctors visible but in the shadows, only their hands holding surgical equipment clearly seen. Outerbridge said it was “kind of fun to see other procedures“ as he looked for visuals to shoot that would tell a story the foundation can use in

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B6

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

LISTINGS From page B1

MUSIC: TUNES FOR TOYS, held at Zacks Coffee House, $5 at the door. Part of the YMCA’s Week Without Violence campaign from Oct. 13 to Oct. 19. THEATRE: DRIVING MISS DAISY, Ontario production in Kamloops as part of a partnership with Western Canada Theatre. Performed

at Sagebrush Theatre, 8 p.m. Tickets are available at Kamloops Live box office, 1025 Lorne St., 250-3745483 or online at kamloopslive.ca.

office, 1025 Lorne St., kamloopslive.ca or 250374-5483.

THE TRANQUILLIAN SOLDIER TUNNEL TOURS, theatrical and historical tour at Tranquille Farm, 6 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. Tickets are $28.80 and can be purchased from Kamloops Live box

ART: SUSAN KNOX RECENT PAINTINGS, watercolour and acrylic exhibit on display until Oct. 31 at the old Courthouse Gallery, 7 West Seymour St.

SAT., OCT. 18

BOOK SINGING: B.J. DOYLE, local author

will talk about The Avalanche and the Executor, a prosedriven guide on how to prepare for your death, at 1 p.m. at Chapters bookstore. BOOK READING: ASHLEY LITTLE, 2 p.m. at the Kamloops Library, 465 Victoria St. She will read from her novel Anatomy of a Girl Gang, recipient of this year’s Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize for B.C.’s best novel. The event

WIN

2 TICKETS & 2 VIP PASSES

DRAW DATES:

SEPTEMBER 18, OCTOBER 3, 17

is free, but space is limited. Reserve a spot by calling the library at 250-3725145. BOTTLE DRIVE, TRU students will be canvasing the eastern Aberdeen area throughout the day raising money for Volunteer Kamloops. Those who would like to donate their bottle but will not be home may leave their bottles in front of their house. Cash donations will also be accepted, with tax receipts for donations over $20. All the proceeds will fund programs at Volunteer Kamloops. CORN MAZE, TRACTOR RIDES AND PUMPKIN PATCH, celebrate fall at Tranquille Agra Farms, 3275 Tranquille Rd. Corn maze tours are $5 for adults and free for kids under six. Tractor-trailer rides are free on weekends. Choose a potential Jack-O-Lantern from the pumpkin patch and seasonal vegetables and is open daily from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. DANCING LIKE THE STARS, Royal Inland Hospital Foundation fundraiser. Tickets are $200 and are available by calling 250-314-2325. EDUCATION: ANDROID TABLETS AND SMARTPHONES, free computer class hosted by the North Kamloops Library from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m. The event is free, but seats are limited. Pre-register by calling 250-554-1124. EDUCATION: DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY,

Win two tickets to the Gordon Lightfoot concert! Drop off this entry from at Kamloops This Week, 1365 Dalhousie Drive. One entry per person. 10 tickets to be awarded!

Name: ___________________________

Phone: _______________________

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free computer class hosted by the Kamloops Library from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The event is free, but seats are limited. Pre-register by calling 250-372-5145. FUN LAUGHTER AND FRIENDS, meet and greet and birthday celebration for the organizer, 6 p.m., potluck dinner. Once you RSVP you receive an email with the details. Must RSVP by 10 a.m. on Oct. 17 via email to laugh2014@ shaw.ca. Adults only, new couples and singles always welcome. MUSIC: SABRINA WEEKS AND SWING CAT BOUNCE CD RELEASE PARTY, 7 p.m. at the Double Tree by Hilton, 339 St. Paul St. Go online to sabrinaweeks.com. RUN: KAMLOOPS BRIDGING THE GAP RUN-RELAY, fundraiser walk in support of Special Olympics B.C., featuring a twokilometre zombie shuffle, five-kilometre run or walk and 13-kilometre run or team relay, 10 a.m. at Riverside Park. Registration is $50 per person for all events, except for the 13kilometre run, which is $60. Register online before Sept. 1 to save $10 off registration. For more information and to register, go online to sobc.kintera.org/ kamloops. SWIM BY DONATION, downtown YMCA hosting public swim as part of the YMCA’s Week Without Violence campaign from Oct. 13 to Oct. 19. THE SHRINER’S ANNUAL CHARITY BALL, buffet dinner and dancing to the

Big Band, a 16piece group, at the Kamloops Hotel and Conference Centre. Tickets are $125 per couple. Funds raised go to providing free medical care and transportation to kids. Cocktails are at 6 p.m. and dinner is at 7 p.m. Tickets must be purchased in advance by calling Ken at 250-434-5545. THEATRE: DRIVING MISS DAISY, Ontario production in Kamloops as part of a partnership with Western Canada Theatre. Performed at Sagebrush Theatre, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Tickets are available at Kamloops Live box office, 1025 Lorne St., 250-3745483 or online at kamloopslive.ca. THE TRANQUILLIAN SOLDIER TUNNEL TOURS, theatrical and historical tour at Tranquille Farm, 6 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. Tickets are $28.80 and can be purchased from Kamloops Live box office, 1025 Lorne St., kamloopslive.ca or 250-374-5483. WORKSHOP: BRUSHBOTS, hosted by the TNRD Library System from 10 a.m. to noon. The free workshop is led by DayDream Unique and Kamloops MakerSpace and includes creation of brushbots, made of the heads of toothbrushes, microvibrating motors and coin-cell batteries. The event is for kids ages eight and up, and is limited to 10 participants. Reserve a spot by calling 250372-5145.

ARE YOU RUNNING AN EVENT? SUBMIT EVENTS FOR THE FRIDAY LISTINGS TO JESSICA@KAMLOOPSTHISWEEK.COM AND FIND THEM EVERY WEEK IN FRIDAY’S B SECTION, OR ONLINE AT

kamloopsthisweek.com/listings


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

B7

LISTINGS SUN., OCT. 19 ART: SUSAN KNOX RECENT PAINTINGS, watercolour and acrylic exhibit on display until Oct. 31 at the old Courthouse Gallery, 7 West Seymour St. CORN MAZE, TRACTOR RIDES AND PUMPKIN PATCH, celebrate fall at Tranquille Agra Farms, 3275 Tranquille Rd. Corn maze tours are $5 for adults and free for kids under six. Tractor-trailer rides are free on weekends. Choose a potential Jack-O-Lantern from the pumpkin patch and seasonal vegetables and is open daily from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. FUN LAUGHTER AND FRIENDS PUMPKIN PATCH PICKING, noon. Once you RSVP you receive an email with the details. Must RSVP via email to laugh2014@ shaw.ca. Adults only, new couples and singles always welcome. FUNDRAISER: WEEK WITHOUT VIOLENCE IT TAKES A COMMUNITY FUNDRAISING DINNER, second annual event at Flavours of India with proceeds going towards the Y Women’s Emergency Shelter.

Choice of 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. seatings. Tickets are $40 and include dinner, entertainment and a silent auction.

non-profit centre provides a variety of child-oriented programming. Meeting is open to the public.

KARAOKE NIGHT, at the Fraternal Order of Eagles, 755 Tranquille Rd., from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

TUE., OCT. 21 ART: SUSAN KNOX RECENT PAINTINGS, watercolour and acrylic exhibit on display until Oct. 31 at the old Courthouse Cultural Cenre, 7 West Seymour St.

SEMINAR: LEARN TO READ THE BIBLE, free sessions at the Heritage House in Riverside Park, 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Register by calling 250-3769716.

FAMILY: TOOPY AND BINOO FUN AND GAMES, based on the children’s books by Dominique Jolin, performing live at Sagebrush theatre, at 3:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

THE TRANQUILLIAN SOLDIER TUNNEL TOURS, theatrical and historical tour at Tranquille Farm, 6 p.m., 7:15 p.m., 9 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. Tickets are $28.80 and can be purchased from Kamloops Live box office, 1025 Lorne St., kamloopslive.ca or 250-374-5483.

PULL-TAB TUESDAY, at the Fraternal Order of Eagles, 755 Tranquille Rd., 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

MON., OCT. 20

WED., OCT. 22

AGM: KAMLOOPS CHILD DEVELOPMENT, held at the centre, 157 Holway St., at 6:30 p.m. Board elections will be held at that time. Anyone interested in joining the board should contact the centre at 250-376-2233 or email contact@ cdckamloops.com. The 47-year-old

ART: SUSAN KNOX RECENT PAINTINGS, watercolour and acrylic exhibit on display until Oct. 31 at the old Courthouse Gallery, 7 West Seymour St. ART: KAMLOOPS PHOTO ARTS CLUB, weekly meeting at 7 p.m. at the Henry Grube Centre, 245

Kitchener Cresc., Room 1B. More info: 250-372-1778. FUN LAUGHTER AND FRIENDS CANDLELIGHT DINNER, 6:15 p.m. Once you RSVP you receive an email with the details. Must RSVP via email to laugh2014@shaw. ca. Adults only, new couples and singles always welcome. HORSE RACES, held at the Fraternal Order of Eagles, 755 Tranquille Rd., from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. KAMLOOPS GARDEN CLUB, meeting at 7 p.m. in the upper level of the Heritage House, 100 Lorne St. Guest speaker includes master beekeepers who operate a local honey farm. All are welcome. More info: 250-374-4181 or judyricher@shaw.ca.

THUR., OCT. 23 ART: SUSAN KNOX RECENT PAINTINGS, watercolour and acrylic exhibit on display until Oct. 31 at the old Courthouse Gallery, 7 West

Seymour St. FILM: HEART TO HEAD, hosted by the TRU Faculty Association Status of Women Committee and the Rotary Club of Kamloops Daybreak, 5:30 p.m. in room 1008 of the International Building at TRU. Event features guest Gabriel Munro, who works in public relations for the Amarok Society, on which the film is based. Light refreshments will be served. More info: amaroksociety.org. KAMLOOPS FAMILY HISTORY SOCIETY, monthly meetings are held on the fourth Thursday of each month from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Heritage House in Riverside Park. All are welcome. More info: 250-372-5679. KAMLOOPS TRAVEL CLUB, chat about travel at The Art We Are, 246 Victoria St., beginning at 7 p.m. More info: Call James at 250-879-0873 or email james@ talkabouttravel.ca.

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MUSIC: JIM COCHRAN AND MARK PETRI, next in the musical rooftop series at the Kamloops Ramada Hotel, 555 West Columbia St. Music is from 7 p.m. until 10 p.m every Thursday. More info: facebook. com/kamloops.rooftop. sessions.

To submit an item for THIS WEEKEND, email jessica@ kamloopsthisweek.com.

To submit an event for the event listings: Email jessica@ kamloopsthisweek. com with the event, when it happens, where, who can attend and anything else KTW readers should know.

City of Kamloops

101- 929 LAVAL CRESCENT, KAMLOOPS

250-314-9923

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MUSIC: SARAH MCLACHLAN, Canadian singersongwriter will be performing at Interior Savings Centre as part of a Canadian tour promoting her recent album Shine On. Tickets range from $62 to $88.50 and can be purchased online at ticketmaster.ca or at the ticket centre in Sahali Centre Mall, 945 Columbia St. W.

By the Seashore - 6 Days • Oct. 19* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ONLY 4 SEATS LEFT! From $579 Coeur D’Alene & Northern Quest - 5 Days • Oct. 26* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$409 Silver Reef – 3 Days • Nov. 24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $214 Silver Reef – 4 Days • Nov 11*, 16* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . From $289 Tulalip - 4 Days • Nov 2*, 10*, 16*, 18* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $349 Tulalip - 3 Days • Nov. 4* & 25* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $259 Coeur D’Alene Bingo Weekend – 4 Days • Nov. 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .From $279 Reno – 8 Days • Oct. 18*, Nov. 1* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . From $349 Grey Cup 2014 – 3 Days • Nov. 29* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . From $659 New York City for the Holidays – 6 Days • Nov. 30* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . From $3199 Canucks Hockey - 2 Days Feb. 7 Pittsburgh, Mar. 14 Toronto, Apr. 11 Edmonton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . From $239

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WINTER RETREATS 2015

Be Bear Smart Bears and people come into conflict when our garbage is easy to access and other attractants are poorly managed. Properly storing and securing garbage and other bear attractants is a proven method for discouraging bears and preventing problems in your neighbourhood. Bear Prevention Tips • Freeze pungent waste and store garbage inside until pick up. • Rinse recyclables • Pick fruit daily as it ripens or before it ripens if you don't intend to use it • Do not put meat, oils, dairy or un-rinsed eggshells or cooked foods into the compost bin • Turn your compost regularly and cover with leaves or soil to help decrease odours Bear Bylaw Residents are reminded not to place their solid waste containers out before 4 am on collection day between April 1st and November 30th and to not accumulate or improperly store bear attractants. Violators are subject to a $100 fine. To report an aggressive or habituated bear, call the RAPP line at 1-877-952-7277. Check out the new bear sightings map at: wildsafebc.com

Cultural Hawaii Experience – 10 Days • Feb. 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3599 Arizona & San Diego Winter Escape - 19 days • Feb. 7, $200 EBD . . . . . . . $3299 Mexican Riviera Cruise - 11 Days • Mar. 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . From $2650 Palm Springs & Las Vegas • Mar. 12, $100 EBD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1899 European River Cruises - Magnificent Europe 16 Days • May 24* . From $9999 Europe’s Rivers and Castles - 14 Days • Sept. 26*. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . From $7799 Check out www.sunfuntours.ca for more 2014 vacation experiences •• ALL TOURS PRICED IN CDN $$ ••

Prices based on double. All discounts incl. if applicable. GST on Canadian tours only. Subject to change BC Reg #3015-5

www.kamloops.ca


B8

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT The Rockin’ River Musicfest is moving from the Fraser Valley to Merritt.

Family Pumpkin Fest This Saturday and Sunday

Wagon Rides to the Pumpkin Patch • 10 am - 4 pm Caramel Apples & Fresh Pressed Apple Juice

The

Spookly Storytime 11:30 am Face Painting

“Learn to Juggle” LIVE MUSIC from the 29th Street Music School Pumpkin Treats Galore!

BBQ’s on!

Rockin’ River Musicfest moves to Nicola Valley Country music will return to Merritt festival grounds in 2015, following announcement CHRISTOPHER FOULDS

KTW EDITOR

I

editor@kamloopsthisweek.com

VERNON

Honey Crisp, Ambrosia & many more apple varieties.

Open Daily 8 am - 6 pm except Sunday 8 am - 5:30 pm davisonorchards.ca • 250-549-3266

CONGRATULATIONS TRU Faculty of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism and Tourism Sun Peaks Tourism Award

n its six years of operation, the Rockin’ River Music Festival (RRMF) has become a well known and respected musical event for B.C. country music fans. While RRMF has been based in Mission since 2009, festival organizers felt it was time for a change. After many months of consideration and countless hours of consultation with fans, industry and management officials, organizers say steady growth of the festival and the limitations of Mission Raceway Park have necessitated the festival’s relocation to

a more-appropriate venue. Yesterday (Oct. 16), RRMF president Kenny Hess announced Rockin’ River Musicfest will move to Merritt as of 2015. “After considering many locations and listening to our fan base, we are very excited to announce that Rockin’ River Productions will be moving the festival to Merritt,” Hess said. “This is a natural choice as Merritt is not only the home of a very well-established festival site and the home of the Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame, it also known as the Country Music Capital of Canada and is located right in the heart of B.C.”

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Hess added that, with Merritt’s easy highway access from all four directions, the move gives the entire province a destination well within reach. Geography is just one reason for moving the festival to Merritt. The site is a wellestablished festival ground, with almost unlimited camping facilities and permanent structures designed to service all the needs of thousands of country-music fans who will come to Merritt for their summer country-music fix. The sheer size of the venue will allow RRMF to expand the festival’s fan-driven events and change the dates of the show to the B.C. Day R I C E

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long weekend. The 2015 festival will run from Thursday, July 30, through Sunday, Aug. 3. Rockin’ River organizers believe this move will help RRMF become the destination event of the summer. While moving away from Mission and into the original home of the Merritt Mountain Festival, RRMF is intent on retaining the familyfriendly event’s atmosphere. Rockin’ River Muscifest has steadily grown in its six years in Mission from humble beginnings to the point that it has hosted approximately 26,000 to its three-day event at Mission Raceway Park.

A T U S M I N O Y M I N T A Q U A R U P S I T M T O R E E R S A W I N N O T I O N P P E A T E B E R R E A E L L B D E Y N E E E N U P D E R S

I R E P E A T

A P T E S A T N Y E T R I U M P E T

C O N S E R V E R A I S E

O A S K D I E D L E O F S E

A L A I V E R D E A T E T O A G H O L E E E R E S S A A A R G A P P E R S F E C T O O S T P O O E S T B S E S E T N U S T A C F E N S C L U D

S O N D E T H O R A N T E S S K E E

ANSWERS TO NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD ON PAGE B27


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

B9

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Attention all short-film makers in the TNRD Deadline today for new bursary from commission, film society The ThompsonNicola Film Commission and the Kamloops Film Society are offering a new bursary to short-film filmmakers. The $300 bursary was donated by the production company Downtown Reel Productions. Applicants must live in the ThompsonNicola Regional District area and the film must feature a person, place, attraction, event or story set in the area and be less than five minutes in length. The winning film will be screened at the Independent Short Shorts Film Festival, which will take place during the Kamloops Film Festival in March. Applicants must submit a short written description of their film and how the money will be used. Pictures and other materials may also be used to help convey the concept. Post-secondary or high school teachers

Arts & Entertainment

BRIEFS

may apply for a short film that is a class project. Submissions can be mailed to 465 Victoria St., Kamloops, V2C 2A9, dropped off on the fourth floor above the Kamloops Library or emailed to tnfc@ tnrd.ca by Friday, Oct. 17. The bursary will be awarded on Friday, Oct. 31.

the dinner and wine tasting or $75 for dinner only. The wine tasting begins at 6 p.m. and dinner begins at 7:30 p.m. For more information, phone the Kamloops Symphony office at 250-372-5000. Tickets can be purchased online at brownpapertickets. com.

Home tunes on Nicola Street

Wine and dine tonight at Plaza

Juno Award-winning singer-guitarist Brent Parkin will be performing at 1059 Nicola St. on Saturday, Oct. 25. The concert is part of the Home Routes series, and begins with a pot-luck dinner at 6:30 p.m., followed by Parkin’s performance at 7:30 p.m. The event is family friendly. Parkin has been a member several blues bands, including Houndog. He’s worked

Wine will be paired with food and music at the Plaza Hotel on Friday, Oct. 17. Kamloops Symphony Orchestra is hosting a harvest dinner featuring wine tasting, a gourmet dinner and entertainment by the Black Dog String Quartet. The evening will also include a silent auction. Tickets are $100 for

with Bo Diddley, Billy Boy Arnold, Gatemouth Brown, Otis Rush and opened for Johnny Winter, Buddy Guy and John Prine, among others. Tickets are $15 and $20. For more information, call 250-377-6875. The biggest fundraiser by local shriners is coming to the Coast Kamloops Hotel and Conference Centre on Saturday, Oct. 18. The Shriner’s Annual Charity Ball will include a buffet dinner and dancing to a 16-piece group of musicians, the Big Band. Tickets are $125 per couple. Funds raised go to providing free medical care and transportation to children.

Symphony songs on Saturday

Vancouver-based Black Dog String Quartet joins the Kamloops Symphony Orchestra for a performance of chamber

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music on Saturday, Oct. 18 at 7:30 p.m. at TRU’s Alumni Theatre. The program include works for string and oboe by Mozart, Arthur Bliss, Phillip Glass and Bill Douglas and the concert will feature Marea Chernoff, principal oboist with the KSO and the Sinfonia Orchestra of the North Shore in North Vancouver. Quartet members

include Elyse Jacobson, Molly MacKinnon, John Katelic and Doug Korkoff. Tickets for the performance are at the Kamloops Live box office, 1025 Lorne St., 250-374-5483, kamloopslive.ca.

Sarah to sing sweet sounds at ISC

Sarah McLachlan is coming to Kamloops on Thursday, Oct. 23,

and tickets go on sale beginning tomorrow (Sept. 5.) She will also be performing in Vancouver on Oct. 20 and 21 at the Orpheum theatre and in Kelowna on Oct. 24 at Prospera Place. Tickets range from $62 to $88.50 and can be purchased online at ticketmaster.ca or at the ticket centre in Sahali Centre Mall, 945 Columbia St. W.


B10 t

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

COMMUNITY

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lexis Forseille, the 2012-2013 Williams Lake Stampede Queen and Thompson Rivers University student, is counting down the days now until she makes her run for Miss Rodeo Canada. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Things have been very busy with only 20 days to the start of the pageant,â&#x20AC;? Forseille said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was in Airdrie, Alberta for a Miss Rodeo Canada Fundraiser at the Roper Warehouse on Sept. 26 and, since then, everything seems to be ramping up for the competition.â&#x20AC;? To prepare for the pageant Forseille, 20, has been taking lessons with Tammy Keith-McNally at Horse Basics and Beyond and has had the opportunity to ride horses she hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t met before with Lori Rankin at Eagleview Equestrian Centre. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also been busy memorizing my speech, practising impromptu questions, refreshing my horsemanship knowledge, studying rodeo knowledge and practising modelling for the fashion show,â&#x20AC;? Forseille said. She said the pageant will go by quickly, scheduled over five days from Nov. 3 to Nov. 7. She will be heading toOWNTOWN Edmonton on Oct. 31.IS â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have volunteered for the Black Tie Bingo on Nov. 1, a fundraising dinner and auction hosted at Northlands Expo Centre for the cowboy benevolent fund,â&#x20AC;? Forseille said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Although it is not mandatory for the competition, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be able to meet many people right before the pageant starts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And then, it all begins.â&#x20AC;? On Nov. 3, the horsemanship competition runs at Northlands-Rexall Place.

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The following day, include the written exam and personal interview. Then, on Nov. 5, comes the speech competition, with a public appearance day in Edmonton on Nov. 6. On Friday, Nov. 7, the Ladies of Canadian Professional Rodeo Fashion Show and Lunch will take place before the crowning of the 2015 Miss Rodeo Canada during the evening rodeo performance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am looking forward to every portion of the contest with my favourites being the personal interview, speech and fashion show,â&#x20AC;? Forseille said. Forseille has many sponsors to help her with the costs of participating in the contest, including Lake Excavating Ltd, R. Micheal Tarcon Inc, United Carpet, Total Ice, Woodland Jewellers Ltd. and Prosperity Ridge Shopping Centre. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I cannot thank them enough for everything they have provided me with over the past four years,â&#x20AC;? Forseille said. Raised on her grandfatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hobby ranch, Forseille spent the two years since she served as the Williams Lake Stampede Queen in 2012-2013 studying science at TRU. Her goal is to become a veterinarian. OWNTOWN IS Forseille has an enduring love for rodeo and she enjoys promoting the sport and the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Western heritage through leadership and volunteer roles and by travelling to other communities. She took her first horseback ride when she was nine months old and has completed the third level of the Western Equestrian Preparation Program. She enjoys gymkhanas and colt-starting clinics. Forseille has also volunteered for the Williams Lake Stampeders, the Williams lake SPCA, the Williams Lake Indoor Rodeo, Williams Lake Stampede and at TRU in OWNTOWN Kamloops for various IS science activity days. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I try to volunteer within the community wherever help is needed and whenever I can attend,â&#x20AC;? Forseille said, who has also worked at Lake Excavation for the past four summers.

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www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

B11

COMMUNITY

Sinatra for the seniors

City of Kamloops

Left: Frank Sinatra tribute artist George Ellenton recently performed at the Ridgepointe Seniors’ complex during an open house. Above: Executive chef Eugene Dery, supervisor Tiffany Rourke and office manager Linsdsay Meton showed off the residence while listening to some old Sinatra tunes. ALLEN DOUGLAS/KTW

Let’s Ta!k

2015 BUDGET Join Council and City staff for a meaningful discussion about service levels. How often garbage is picked up and fixing potholes are just part of the service levels that account for millions of dollars in expenses. We think you should have a say on how it’s spent and where. Last year you brought us ideas and 10 requests made it into our 2014 budget. Projects like the Todd Road Pedestrian Upgrade, the new Traffic Signal on Columbia Street, funding for the Kermode Bear Habitat at the Kamloops Wildlife Park, and a Water Park for Westsyde amounted to $1.7 million of the annual budget. We're listening. Your voice counts. And we thank you for participating. This year, we hope many more will get involved. Follow us online, listen in and post your comments. Let’s continue the conversation.

On October 22nd Let’s Get Together Save the Date October 22, 11:30 am - 2:00 pm Interior Savings Centre, Parkside Lounge October 22, 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm McArthur Island Sports Centre Lounge

Join Us at the Table Attend a budget meeting where staff and Council sit down with you to discuss City Service Levels. Participate and be a part of the process.

Let’s Talk.

Follow Us

Follow #kamloopsbudget on Twitter. Or listen in and post your comments and ideas with TeamSpeak. For set up details, please visit www.kamloops.ca/2015budget.


B12

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

COMMUNITY

Load up on homemade Ukrainian food at sale

WHAT’S BLACK AND WHITE WHEN RED’S ALL OVER?

A reclaimed old fire hydrant sporting a dalmation look, at its new home outside of Petland on Notre Dame Drive.

It might be a good time to fill up the freezer with comfort foods for the winter months. Homemade potato and cheddar cheese perogies, cabbage rolls and baking will be among the goodies available at an upcoming bake sale in Kamloops.

DAVE EAGLES/KTW

The Ukrainian Catholic Women’s League is hosting the annual event at the Holy Trinity Ukrainian Catholic Church, 109 Tranquille Rd., It will be held on Saturday, Nov. 8., and runs from 10 a.m. until noon. All are welcome.

Announcement River City Nissan is pleased to welcome

David Thompson to their management team. David has been part of the automotive industry for the past 23 years, specifically the Finance Department. He is a Cranbrook native who looks forward to building strong bonds with River City Nissan customers.

US ON

TWITTER

David has your best interests at heart, and looks forward to meeting you!

TWITTER.COM /KAMTHISWEEK

2405 East Trans Canada Hwy, Kamloops On the Kamloops Auto Mall in Valleyview

Phone: (250) 377-3800

www.rivercitynissan.com • sales@rivercitynissan.com

& January 1

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

COMMUNITY Finalists set for Southern Interior building awards in Kelowna

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Kamloops, Chase businesses recognized at aboriginal awards

Commercial and industrial properties from every corner of the Thompson, Okanagan and Kootenay regions are represented as finalists in the Sixth Annual Southern Interior Construction Association Commercial Building Awards, set for Thursday, Oct. 23 at the Coast Capri Hotel in Kelowna. Kelowna and Kamloops led the way with six nominations each, while Penticton had five and Salmon Arm, Vernon and Oliver have two apiece. The event is held annually and draws the top developers, general contractors, realtors, contractors and business people to celebrate the best of the best from Kamloops to Fernie and Osoyoos to Golden. It is sponsored by Fortis BC, Re/MAX Commercial and Canadian Western Bank, among others. Finalists: • Kelowna: Copper Sky Pool Redevelopment, Cora Restaurant, Gateway Properties II, the Kelowna Fire Hall, Kensington Terraces and the YLW (Kelowna Airport) Washroom. • Kamloops: Craftsman Collision, CSC Industrial, Gathercole Chiropractic, Hotel 540, Prairie Coast Equipment, and the Telus Kamloops Internet Data Centre. • Penticton: Bad Tattoo Brewery, Painted Rock Estate Winery, the Penticton Indian Band’s Snxastwilxtn Centre, SS Sicamous and the UBC Chime Observatory. • Salmon Arm: The Lerwick Building, and Salmon Arm Savings & Credit Union. • Oliver: Burrowing Owl Estate Winery expansion and Southern Okanagan Secondary School. • Vernon: 27th Street Medical Office and Vernon Veridian. • Summerland: Summerland & District Credit Union • Okanagan Falls: Okanagan Falls Landfill Waste Diversion • Osoyoos: Convivia Bistro. • Cranbrook: Cranbrook Water Treatment and Disposal System Irrigation and Disinfection Facility. • Sparwood: Teck Coal Line Creek Dust Collection Upgrades, Sparwood • Revelstoke: Revelstoke Commercial Building • Golden: Holiday Inn Express Tickets to the event are $95 plus tax and are available online at businessvi.ca/events. They must be purchased by Tuesday, Oct. 21. For more information, call Mark MacDonald at 1-866-758-2684 Ext. 120.

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usinesses in Kamloops and Chase were among the winners this week as the B.C. Aboriginal Business Awards were handed out in Vancouver. SCS Diamond Drilling of Kamloops won the Outstanding Achievement Award in the category of Business of the Year Enterprise (10 or more people). Secwepemc Camp and Catering of Chase won the Outstanding Achievement Award in the Joint Venture Business of the Year category. The awards were handed out on Wednesday, Oct. 15, by Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation John Rustad. “The recent surge in aboriginal businesses in B.C. has

created economic development initiatives in every corner of the province,” said Kevin Bent, director of the B.C. Achievement Foundation, the presenting organization of the B.C. Aboriginal Business Awards. The B.C. Aboriginal Business Awards were launched in 2008 to honour and celebrate business excellence in six categories. A total of 17 aboriginal businesses, entrepreneurs, joint ventures and community-owned enterprises were recognized this year. Members of the independent selection panel are Ruth Williams of Kamloops, John Harper of Victoria and Annita McPhee of North Vancouver. The awards are presented by the B.C. Achievement Foundation in partnership with the Ministry

of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation, and sponsored by New Relationship Trust, BC Hydro, Teck, Encana, Spectra Energy and MNPllp.

Outstanding Achievement: IVL Contracting Ltd., Lillooet Outstanding Achievement: Sidney Whale Watching, Sidney • Business of the Year - 10 or more person enterprise: Recipient: Harwood Custom Composites, Sidney Outstanding Achievement: SCS Diamond Drilling, Kamloops • CommunityOwned Business of the Year: Recipient: 4Evergreen Resources LP, Moberly Lake Recipient: Heartland Economics Ltd., Westbank Outstanding

2014 BC Aboriginal Business Award Recipients:

• Young Entrepreneur of the Year: Recipient: Santana Walker, West Vancouver • Business of the Year - one to two person enterprise: Recipient: Pure Beauty Ltd, Surrey Outstanding Achievement: Bell-E Acres Recreation, Williams Lake Outstanding Achievement: Northern Star Adventures, Quesnel • Business of the Year - three to 10 person enterprise: Recipient: Bizzie B’s Cleaning, Squamish

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Achievement: Kalum Quarry Limited Partnership, Terrace Outstanding Achievement: Thunderbird RV Park and Campground, Campbell River • Joint Venture Business of the Year: Recipient: Salish Sea Industrial Services Ltd. Victoria Outstanding Achievement: Meziadin Junction Holdings LP, Kitwanga Outstanding Achievement: Secwepemc Camp and Catering, Chase • Individual Achievement Award Recipient Recipient: Councillor Garry Feschuk, Sechelt First Nation

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

COMMUNITY Q: Who are the voices directing people across crowswalks in Kamloops, such as across Columbia Street?

It’s not likely you know the person behind the voice on Columbia Street.

A: City of Kamloops traffic and transportation engineer Elnaz Ansari said the voices comes prerecorded. “The information is provided to the supplier by city staff with a consistent message followed by the road name,” Ansari told KTW in an email.

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

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Bolivia and Brazil: Apples and oranges

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o nobody’s great surprise, Bolivia’s President Evo Morales has won a third five-year term by a landslide majority. It’s no surprise because Bolivia’s gross domestic product has tripled since he took office in 2006. The number of people living in poverty has fallen by a quarter, even the poorest now have the right to a pension and illiteracy has fallen to zero. Of course he won. What has happened in Bolivia seems as miraculous as what happened in Brazil, where another left-wing president, Luiz Inacio “Lula” da Silva, took office in 2003. The economy started growing at five per cent a year, unemployment fell steeply, and some 40 million Brazilians, almost a quarter of the population, were lifted out of poverty. Lula’s former chief of staff and successor as president, Dilma Rousseff, is also likely to win another term in office. Is there some secret they share? Many other South American economies have been growing fast too, but without the dramatic change in the distribution of income that has happened in Brazil and Bolivia. Even the late Hugo Chavez’s “Bolivarian revolution” in Venezuela, for all its anti-imperialist rhetoric and despite the country’s great oil wealth, has not delivered a comparable transformation in the lives of the poor. Evo Morales has another claim to fame, too. He comes from the poorest of the poor: “Until I was 14, I had no idea there was such a thing as underwear. I slept in my clothes . . . [which] my mother only removed for two reasons: to look for lice or to patch an elbow or a knee,” he wrote in his recent autobiography. He spent only a short time in school and he did not become fluent in Spanish until he was a young adult. Morales grew up speaking Aymara, one of the languages

GWYNN DYER

World

WATCH spoken by Bolivia’s indigenous peoples. They are a two-thirds majority of the country’s population, but, in almost 200 years of independence, Morales is the first indigenous Bolivian to become president (all previous presidents were drawn from the 15 percent white minority). And, his government passed a new constitution in 2009 that entrenches indigenous rights in politics and in law. So, should we hail the arrival of a new and better model for economic growth and social justice? Unfortunately, no. The only economic secret that Lula, Dilma and Evo all share is that if you want the economy to grow, you must not frighten the horses. The international markets got ready for a meltdown when Lula, a self-taught former trade union leader with a penchant for radical rhetoric, became president of Brazil, but he turned out to be the very soul of fiscal responsibility. And, although Morales nationalized a large part of the Bolivian economy — oil, gas, tin and zinc mining and key utilities — he negotiated deals that compensated foreign investors and kept the markets happy. All the rest of it — things like Morales calling Barack Obama “an imperialist” at the UN General Assembly meeting in New York last month, and Rousseff cancelling a scheduled state visit to the United States last year after Edward Snowden revealed that the U.S. National Security Agency had been spying on her emails — simply doesn’t worry serious investors so long

as the numbers come out right and the financial and fiscal environment is predictable. So, Morales has not been punished by the markets for being a “socialist,” and neither has Rousseff. Both still have strong support at home, too. Unlike Morales, Rousseff didn’t get enough votes in the first round of the presidential election earlier this month to avoid a run-off on Oct. 26, but she will probably win again, even though the Brazilian economy is now teetering on the brink of a recession. Despite all the similarities, however, comparing Brazil and Bolivia is rather like comparing apples and oranges here. Brazil has a very large and diversified internal market (fourth largest car-maker in the world, for example), and has 20 times as many people as Bolivia. The latter has an economy that is almost totally dependent on the export of commodities, mainly oil, gas and minerals. Bolivia’s soaring GDP of the past decade, and the modest prosperity it has brought to what was South America’s poorest country, is mostly fairy gold. What goes up usually comes down again eventually, and what drove Bolivia’s GDP up was almost entirely rising commodity prices. When they come down again, so will the GDP, the government’s income, and its ability to support even the sketchiest outline of a welfare state. In the meantime, Morales has spent the extra money wisely and it will be very hard for any successor to abandon this kind of “social spending.” He has also made it normal for Bolivia’s indigenous majority to have a big say in policy decisions at the national level, and that too will be almost impossible to roll back. He has even built up big financial reserves to cope with falling commodity prices. But, he has not really transformed the economy. Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

NATIONAL NEWS

Canada’s connection to Lincoln’s assassin ANDY BLATCHFORD

THE CANADIAN PRESS

MONTREAL — A little-known connection between Canada and Abraham Lincoln’s assassin will quietly mark an anniversary this week: It’s been 150 years since John Wilkes Booth hobnobbed with Confederate leaders in Montreal. Six months after Booth’s October 1864 visit, he shot the president in the back of the head. Clues have pointed to Booth’s mysterious trip to Montreal as a precursor to Lincoln’s April 1865 assassination in a Washington theatre. At the time, the pro-Southern cause enjoyed considerable sympathy in Montreal, which was also known as a haunt for agents of the Confederacy. Conclusive evidence, however, tying the murder plot to Booth’s nine-day Montreal stay was never established by authorities. “Booth was definitely in and out ] [of Montreal[ and he may well have discussed this plan, but they were never able to nail it,’’ said Adam Mayers, who authored Dixie & the Dominion: Canada, the Confederacy and the War for the Union. “What was always in dispute was whether the guys in Canada were involved in a concrete way in the

conspiracy to assassinate Lincoln and, of course, that was never proved.’’ But, even without a confirmed Canadian link, evidence did emerge that suggested Booth’s Montreal mingling six months earlier might have laid the foundation for the murder. History books recall how the prominent American actor checked in on Oct. 18 at the prestigious St. Lawrence Hall, an Old Montreal hotel widely known as the Confederacy’s Canadian headquarters. Following Lincoln’s death, witnesses alleged they had seen Booth chatting up Confederate officials and heard him expressing open contempt for Lincoln. In one example, Booth’s remarks over a game of billiards in the hotel’s saloon suddenly became significant six months later, Clayton Gray wrote in his 1950s book, Conspiracy in Canada. “It makes little difference, head or tail,’’ Booth, who had been drinking freely, allegedly told his opponent while they discussed the upcoming November 1864 presidential elections. “Abe’s contract is near up and whether re-elected or not, he will get his goose cooked . . . “I like our Canadian style. I must

post myself in Canuck airs, for some of us . . . may have to settle here shortly.’’ Authorities also learned of an earlier plot to kidnap Lincoln, a conspiracy witnesses later alleged would be led by Booth. He seemed to allude to the kidnapping plan over that same game of pool. “Do you know I have got the sharpest play laid out ever done in America?’’ Booth said in comments later reprinted in newspapers. “I can bag the biggest game this side of . . . just remember my address . . . you’ll hear of a double carom one of these days.’’ Booth also left behind Canadian money with a mystery of its own. When authorities cornered and killed Booth in Virginia a couple of weeks after the assassination, he was carrying a bill of exchange from Montreal’s Ontario Bank and dated Oct. 27, 1864. A bank book from the same institution, stamped with the same date, was also discovered among his belongings. “He cashed out all kinds of money and he had a banker’s draft when they captured him,’’ Mayers said. “He had that in his pocket, which is why everybody called it a Canadian connection to the assassination.’’ Through his bank account,

Booth’s link to Montreal endured after he was gunned down. His account at the Ontario Bank, an institution acquired by the Bank of Montreal in 1906, stayed open with a balance of $455 for an undetermined length of time following his death. “The [Booth] family refused or didn’t want to have anything to do with that account,’’ BMO spokeswoman Jessica Leroux wrote in an email, attributing the information to a 1967 book by the bank’s historian, Merrill Denison. Leroux said the cash had been described anecdotally over the years as “blood money.’’ Jacob Thompson, chief of the Confederate secret service in Canada, also kept an account at the Ontario Bank. Witnesses testified at the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators that Thompson had been spotted with Booth at the St. Lawrence Hall. “Spies and bystanders could hardly miss the fact that John Wilkes Booth, a noted celebrity, was talking to the Confederacy’s senior men,’’ author Michael W. Kauffman wrote in his book, American Brutus: John Wilkes Booth and the Lincoln Conspiracies. Confederates used Montreal as a base during the American Civil War because of its sophistication

and good communications network, Mayers said. He added many of them liked to escape the sweltering summers of the U.S. South by vacationing in Quebec’s Eastern Townships. In Canada, the Southerners also enjoyed sympathy from the public. “They hated Yankees,’’ Mayers said of Canadians, who viewed New Englanders as aggressive and expansionist. In his book, he wrote of Booth’s own popularity in the city and how the actor “electrified’’ Montreal audiences in October 1864 with his readings of Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice and Tennyson’s Charge of the Light Brigade at Corby’s Hall. But, even with support for the South in Montreal, the city and Canada offered a huge outpouring of sympathy following Lincoln’s assassination. Lincoln himself still has a footprint in Montreal nearly 150 years after his death. McGill University houses the Joseph N. Nathanson Collection of Lincolniana, believed to be one of the biggest Lincoln exhibitions outside the U.S. Among the objects on display is a piece of cloth the attending doctor wrapped around Lincoln’s head after Booth shot him. It is still stained with the president’s blood.

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

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NATIONAL NEWS

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Canadians killed in Nepal storm THE CANADIAN PRESS

An avalanche and a blizzard in Nepalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mountainous north have killed at least 27 people, including four Canadians, authorities said. Nepal army rescuers spotted eight more bodies along a mountain trail buried in avalanches and blizzards, authorities said Thursday, Oct. 16. The co-founder of Montreal-based travel agency Terra Ultima said three Quebecers are among those missing and feared dead. Julien Passerini said six Quebecers in all were in the area, including those missing: two women in their 50s and one in her 30s.

Avalanche, blizzard kills 27, including four from Canada One of the three is the hikersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; guide. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The group of five people, accompanied by an experienced guide, left Canada for Nepal on Oct. 3 for a three-week trip,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Terra Ultima said in a statement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our thoughts are with the friends and families of those who are missing.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Two Ottawa women â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jane Van Criekingen and Virginia Schwartz â&#x20AC;&#x201D; were also believed to be missing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have unconfirmed reports that both Virginia and Jane are OK,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Mark Schwartz, Virginiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

brother, told Ottawa radio station 1310News. A statement from the Trekking Agenciesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Association of Nepal said the bodies of five people â&#x20AC;&#x201D; four Canadians and one Indian trekker â&#x20AC;&#x201D; were recovered from Phu area in Manang district. A company called Panorama Himalaya confirmed the deaths of three Canadian clients in an avalanche while a company called Nepal Hidden Treks confirmed the death of a Canadian woman. Panorama Himalaya also said it had rescued three other Canadian trekkers, according to

the Trekking Agenciesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Association of Nepal. The death toll was likely to rise as rescuers struggled through snow and rough terrain to help dozens who remained stranded, the officials said. Prime Minister Stephen Harper took to Twitter to voice his sympathy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Laureen and I express our condolences to the families and friends of the four Canadians who lost their lives in an avalanche in Nepal,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; he wrote. Three villagers were killed Monday in the same district, about 160 kilometres northwest of the capital, Kathmandu, and their bodies were recovered

Powerful storm Some downtown heads toward N.L. Calgary lights back on â&#x20AC;&#x201D; finally HALIFAX â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Forecasters say hurricane Gonzalo is expected to be a powerful post-tropical storm when it reaches Newfoundland this weekend. The mighty storm is hurtling toward Bermuda as a Category 4 hurricane, gaining strength over the open Atlantic. The Canadian Hurricane Centre in Halifax said there is a 40 to 50 per cent chance of the weakened storm making landfall in Newfoundland. The centre says itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s looking more likely that southeastern Newfoundland will bear the brunt of Gonzalo with rain and potentially wind, even if the centre of the storm remains at sea. The strongest winds will be felt to the right of Gonzaloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s track and the heaviest rainfall to the left. The latest forecast suggests Cape Breton could be spared from the stormâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rain, but forecasters are warning of large ocean swells of two to three metres along the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia beginning late Friday. Apart from Gonzalo, the centre also says strong winds and heavy showers are expected Friday in the Maritimes and Saturday in Newfoundland. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Canadian Press

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CALGARY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The lights are back on in part of downtown Calgary after an underground electrical fire last weekend knocked out power to scores of buildings and hundreds of residents. Enmax Corp., the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s electrical utility, flipped the switch at 5 a.m. yesterday (Oct. 16) to restore service, but officials warn it will take time for building systems to be checked. Anyone who was put up in a hotel during the outage was being asked to check out prior to an information update on

the status of their residences. Janine Orom, who works downtown, said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a long haul for her and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice to see the power restored so people can get back to their normal schedules. Gianna Manes, CEO of Enmax, said it could be a month or more before the utility finds out what caused the fire. About 1,900 customers in 112 residential and commercial buildings were affected by the outage. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Canadian Press

on Wednesday. In the neighbouring Mustang district, four trekkers caught in a blizzard died Tuesday.

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LIKE US ON FACEBOOK FACEBOOK.COM/KAMLOOPSTHISWEEK La Dolcevita Welcomes Andrea to our team of estheticians. Andrea is a finalist at the Canadian Biosculpture Nail Art competition. She would like to invite her former clients to her new location, where she will continue to specialize in Biosculpture gel nails and nail art.

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SOCIAL WORKERS ENRICH OUR COMMUNITIES Social workers support clients in complex life transitions. They provide services in our communities, not-for-profit and government agencies, hospitals, schools, prisons and through private practice. They connect their clients to services and resources in the community. Those registered with the BC College of Social Workers are the only ones who can use the title Registered Social Worker.

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

TRAVEL

INSIDE: Classifieds B21 | Comics B26

B-SECTION CO-ORDINATOR: JESSICA WALLACE 250-374-7467 or email jessica@kamloopsthisweek.com

OFF THE RAILS in INDIA The wooden tressel of the Blue Mountain Railway. MARGARET DEEFHOLTS PHOTO MARGARET DEEFHOLTS

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he dawn sky is flamingo pink as my cousins and I, board a minuscule carriage at Metapullayam station. Even at this early hour the platform is bustling with eager vacationers. The Nilgiri’s Blue Mountain “toy” Train is bound for the town of Coonoor in the Nilgiri Hills of South India. This is one of only two steampowered train journeys in India, the other one being the Darjeeling Mountain Railway. From Coonoor the journey to Udagamandalam (formerly known as Ootacamund, and popularly shortened to “Ooty”), is powered by diesel — a more prosaic locomotive than this coal-fired little Puffing Billy. The entire railway line from Metapullayam to Ooty covers 26 kilometres.

HOW TO GET THERE MORE INFORMATION: To find out more about the area, go online to tamilnadutourism.org or indica.co.in. BLUE MOUNTAIN RAILWAY: For information about the railway, including schedules, go online to indianrail.gov.in/ooty.html. WHERE TO STAY: TripAdvisor provides informative reviews of accommodations in the area. Go online to tripadvisor.com and search for Coonoor Tamil Nadu hotels.

The train will negotiate 208 curves, 16 tunnels, and cross 250 wooden trestle bridges along one of the steepest tracks in India, in about four hours and 10 minutes. We have been looking forward to this trip for months, as it completes a foursome of mountain railway journeys we’ve done together over the past couple of years. The Siliguri-Darjeeling train and the Kalka-Shimla train both traverse the lower ranges of the mighty Himalayas, with spectacular vistas around each curve of the track, while the Matheran

Hill Railway, a short distance from Mumbai, climbs a flat topped plateau. For us, the Nilgiri ranges of Tamil Nadu in South India are unexplored territory. The little train jerks into life, pushed by a steam engine at the rear. A railway conductor perches on a platform in front of the train to check for obstacles; herds of wild elephants have been known to amble leisurely across the tracks. We have front centre views of the narrow gauge track as it winds sinuously through tropical forests

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and dense undergrowth. At this stage, the terrain is relatively flat, so we move along quite briskly but, on the horizon, the Nilgiri ranges lie against the sky like azure smudges, giving rise to their popular nickname, “Blue Mountains.” At Kallar station, the train engages with a rack and pinion rail that runs along the middle of the track. Then, as the climb begins in earnest, the little train clicks and clatters as it pants uphill along an average gradient of 1:24.5 and at a maximum speed of 13 km/h. The scenery changes to rugged gorges and silvery waterfalls plunging over jagged rocks. The train rides along the rim of canyons, and we gaze out at chiffon scarves of mist wreathing the summits of peaks. Wild flowers and feathery ferns line the route, and as we climb ever higher, we chug over several wooden trestle bridges across yawing chasms.

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This is thirsty work and the locomotive is replenished with water at stations with English names like Adderley, Hillgrove and Runneymede. At Hillgrove, passengers dismount to sip chai and click their cameras at vistas of the Nilgiri mountains folded range upon range, reaching skywards to heights of 9,000 feet or more. After Runneymede, the scenery gives way to rolling hills with tea bushes like green knitted shawls flung across their slopes. Houses painted bright primary colours of orange, green and purple dot the hillsides or stand tucked into tree-shaded valleys. The air is fresh and cool now and the breeze carries the scent of pine and wild flowers. Travel Writers’ Tales is an independent travel article syndicate that offers professionally written travel articles to newspaper editors and publishers. To check out more, go online to travelwriterstales.com

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2014 Destination Travel Show- Kamloops Join us for a media presentation of upcoming tours, cruises and international destinations. Tuesday, October 28th 1:30 to 3:30 PM St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, 1136 6th Ave. Please RSVP 250-374-0831

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

B19

LOCAL NEWS

TWO SHOWS UNDER ONE ROOF AT ISC

KAMLOOPS HOME SHOW JOINS FORCES WITH LIFE  55+ THIS WEEKEND For years, the Kamloops Fall Home Show has been a staple of autumn at Interior Savings Centre. Right around this time each year, as the leaves change colour and twirl to the ground, Kamloops homeowners make their way to the downtown arena to get inspired to renovate, decorate and recreate. This year, home-show owner Jim Rice has added to the popular event by twinning it with the Kamloops Life @ 55+ showcase, which features a wide array of information for those entering the primes of their lives, from retirement planning to enjoying the fruits of a life’s labour. Rice said it simply made sense to combine the two events as they both deal with a similar demographic — the population segment between the ages of 45 and 75. The Kamloops Fall Home Show and Kamloops Life @ 55+ will take place on Saturday, Oct. 18 (10 a.m. to 5 p.m.), and Sunday, Oct. 19 (10 a.m. to 4 p.m.), and, as always, admission is free.

Saturday’s lineup includes three guest speakers, with Marlene Stocker of Benjamin Moore presenting Perfect Paint Colour Tips For Your Home at 11 a.m. At 1 p.m., David J.A. Porteous of CAUS Financial and Insurance Inc. will speak on How To Save Money Buying Drugs, a presentation that will also discuss prescription-drug pricing, health and dental and out-of-country travel, medical and financial issues. The 2:30 p.m. speaker is Shari Simpson, owner of Keenfit The Pole Walking Company. On Sunday, Stocker will again lead the speaker series at 11 a.m. She will be followed at 1 p.m. by Ryan Scorgie, a partner with Forward Law LLP, who will talk about Elements of Estate Planning. The weekend speaker series will wrap up on Sunday with a 2:30 p.m. presentation by Shae Cook, an aromatherapy instructor and shamanic healer who will talk about Cleansing and Detoxifying Your Body.

Keep that fresh smell alive WINTER NEED NOT BE A MUSTY, SMELLY SEASON There are a few items you can find in a Canadian home during the winter months — a sled, winter gear for the whole family and the dreaded smelly hockey gear. We have come to accept certain odours of indoor living, but did you know there are easy solutions that will keep your home smelling fresh? Start by identifying any unwanted odour. This is especially important during the winter months when most days are spent

inside away from the cold. To reduce the smell, move the source, if possible, to a less frequented room, like the basement or mudroom. Opening windows throughout the home a least once a week will help significantly and will deliver a nice fresh scent. Even small changes, such as lighting a candle, can help reduce household odours for a while. If you would like a long-term reliable solution, look into an air purifier that will also produce a pleasant scent.

Lil Mama’s Housekeeping

Nu-Vue! your experts in.... HardiePlank & Vinyl Siding Vinyl Decking Aluminum Railing Patio Covers & Awnings

THE T A S U SEE OW! HOME SH

Sunrooms

FREE HOUSEKEEPING* *Book four 4+ hour cleaning sessions and get the 5th session FREE! NEW CLIENTS ONLY

DON’T DELAY, CALL LIL MAMA’S TODAY!

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Serving Kamloops for over 25 years! 250-376-1632 NVexteriors.ca

FREE IN HOME

DESIGN CONSULT


B20

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

HOME SHOW

Before the snow flies Here are some late-season jobs to get done around the house to make sure you’re ready when Old Man Winter comes calling Like it or not, the first blast of cold winter weather and snow arrives well before the first day of winter, on Dec. 21. So, you’d better get to work if you want to make your home warm and cozy before the winter season.

ADEQUATE INSULATION

2

For a home to be healthy and comfortable, it has to be airtight, well insulated and well ventilated. If the walls and floors are cold, if the heat is not evenly distributed, if heating costs are exorbitant, or if there is mould on the walls then the home is not properly insulated. Consult a specialist in order to choose the right kind of insulation

ATURDAY

CT

MAJOR HOT TUB SALE! OVER

120

DISPLAYS!

AM

DECORATE! RECREATE!”

SUNDAY

SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKERS

11:00 AM “Perfect Paint Colour Tips for Your Home”

Marlena features inspirational room shots and her “tips and tricks” to help you navigate through decorating myths and choose the perfect paint colour for your home!

Marlena features inspirational room shots and her “tips and tricks” to help you navigate through decorating myths and choose the perfect paint colour for your home!

Marlena Stocker of Benjamin Moore

Marlena Stocker of Benjamin Moore Sponsor: Kamloops Paint & Window Coverings Ltd.

Sponsor: Kamloops Paint & Window Coverings Ltd.

“How to Save Money Purchasing Drugs”

1:00 PM

Dave will talk about drug pricing and how to lower drug costs, health & dental, out of country travel medical & financial issues.

“Don’t Just Walk... WALK your FAT OFF!”

“Elements of Estate Planning” Ryan will focus on the elements of estate planning including the documents needed while you are still alive and once you have passed away, and some of the challenges people face when they pass away without any estate planning in place.

David J.A. Porteous (CAUS Financial & Insurance Services Inc.) Elder Planning Councilor (EPC)

Ryan Scorgie (Forward Law LLP), Partner

2:30 PM

“Cleansing and Detoxing Your Body”

Make Walking a lot more Fun & Easier! Turn a simple walk into a total-body workout! Double your benefits with less effort & time!

Pollutants in our bodies are an ongoing concern. Learn how you can cleanse and re balance your body with the six different blends in Shae’s Master Cleanse line for a thorough detox.

Sheri Simson (aka The Pole Lady) Owner, Keenfit, the Pole Walking Company

Shae Cook (Fiveblueheron Trading) Aromatherapy Instructor and Shamanic Healer

FREE COFFEE!

SPONSORS / PRESENTERS / MEDIA PARTNERS

ENTER TO WIN!

Serta iComfort Genius Everfeel with Motion Perfect II Adjustable Base

MSRP

3,44400

$ Hearing the needs of tomorrow... today!

Fiveblueheron Trading

FIRST 100 VISITORS TO CANADIAN HEARING BOOTH!

HEATED FLOORING

Some homes are equipped with a secondary source of heating to fight off the rigours of winter. A wood, gas or oil burning appliance can give a big boost in making your home more comfortable. Choosing the right location for this appliance is extremely important — if possible, it should be located in the basement in the centre of the home or close to a staircase. That way, the heat will be distributed

Heated floors are really appreciated in bathrooms, but they are also increasingly common elsewhere in the house. An electric heated floor can be installed under ceramic and stone tiles or floating floors. According to some experts, hardwood flooring should be avoided as it can warp with the heat. Heated flooring is installed on a plywood underlay or in an insulated concrete slab.

PM

KAMLOOPS FALL HOME SHOW

COMPLIMENTARY “HEARING HEALTH CHECK” BY CANADIAN HEARING CARE “RENOVATE!

11:00 AM “Perfect Paint Colour Tips for Your Home”

2:30 PM

SUPPLEMENTARY HEATING

SUNDAY OCT 19 10AM - 4PM INTERIOR SAVINGS CENTRE - FREE ADMISSION!

“PLAN YOUR RETIREMENT TODAY”

1:00 PM

more evenly. Be sure to purchase an appliance with controlled combustion or one that is EPA-certified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or Canada’s equivalent.

SHOWS UNDER 1 ROOF S O 18 10 - 5

KAMLOOPS LIFE@55+ SHOW

SATURDAY

and consider hiring him or her to install the materials. For insulation to be efficient, it should not be packed down and there should be no gaps around it.

B.C. HomeShows Ltd. / B.C. Retirement Shows / bctradeshows.ca

Model #500823938

Winter is coming What you need to know about staying warm as the mercury plummets and snowflakes fall The cost of installing a heating system in a home and paying for the ongoing heating costs is a major chunk of a family’s budget. The purchase, as well as the annual operating costs and maintenance of equipment, can entail a lot of expense. Here are a few heating systems that combine savings with cozy pleasure.

FIREPLACES AND STOVES

Fireplaces and stoves have no equal in coziness and comfort, whether they use natural gas, ethanol, propane, wood, pellets or electricity, and whether they are built-in, prefabricated, freestanding, traditional or modern. Before choosing a heating system, compare the characteristics of different fuels and available models.

Name: ____________________________________ Phone: ____________________________________ Enter at

Display Draw Time: 3:30 pm, Sunday

ELECTRONIC THERMOSTATS

With programmable electronic thermostats, electric baseboard and linear induction heating systems allow you to economize on heat-

ing costs without compromising on comfort. During the winter, each room can be heated independently.

RADIANT HEATING

This type of system does not heat the air but rather the walls, floors, windows, and furniture. All of these elements store the heat and then release it into the air, providing exceptional and long-lasting comfort. This is an invisible heating system that can be installed in floors, walls or ceilings.

HEAT PUMPS

Heat pumps, central heating systems and other devices all have their advantages and disadvantages. Before making your choice, consider your specific needs and your budget. And don’t forget to take into account the environment — a heating system that is both efficient and green is possible. Some advice? Before you start spending, talk to the in-store experts.


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

ClassiÀeds

INDEX

kamloopsthisweek.com Announcements ...............001-099 Employment....................100-165 Service Guide ..................170-399 Pets/Farm ......................450-499 For Sale/Wanted..............500-599 Real Estate .....................600-699 Rentals ..........................700-799 Automotive .....................800-915 Legal Notices ................920-1000

Announcements

Anniversaries Word Classified Deadlines •

2pm Friday for Tuesday’s Paper.

2pm Tuesday for Thursday’s Paper.

2pm Wednesday for Friday’s Paper.

Advertisements should be read on the first publication day. We are not responsible for errors appearing beyond the first insertion. It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the paper in the event that errors occur in the publishing of any advertising shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for the portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only and there will be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such advertisement.

Coming Events Bible Talks in Heffley Creek Community Hall every Sunday at 4pm. All Welcome. Info 604309-5434 (no collection and no literature).

If you have an

upcoming event for our

COMMUNITY CALENDAR go to

kamloopsthisweek.com and click on the calendar to place your event.

phone: 250-371-4949 fax: 250-374-1033 email: classiÀeds@kamloopsthisweek.com

*Run Until Sold

*Run Until Rented

1 Issue ..................$13.00 1 Week ..................$30.00 1 Month ................$96.00

Household items, vehicles, trailers, RV’s, boats, ATV’s, furniture, etc.

Houses, condos, duplexes, suites, etc. (3 months max.)

Special: Add an extra line to your ad for $10

for one month at a time. Customer must call to reschedule No refunds on classified ads.

Tax not included. No refunds on classified ads.

*Ads scheduled for one month at a time. Customer must call to reschedule. No refunds on classified ads.

Regular Classified Rates

Deadlines 2 pm Friday for Tuesday 2 pm Tuesday for Thursday 2 pm Wednesday for Friday PAYMENT - All ads must be prepaid. No refunds on classified ads.

Based on 3 lines

*$35.00 + Tax *Some restrictions apply.

Employment

Employment

Housesitting

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

Education/Trade Schools

We require qualified US capable Class 1 drivers immediately: We are an Okanagan based transport company looking for qualified drivers for US loads we run primarily in the Pacific Northwest, Utah, Arizona and Nevada. We offer a new pay rate empty or loaded. All picks and drops paid. Assigned units company cell phones and fuel cards. Regular home time Direct deposit paid every second Friday with no hold backs. We offer a rider and pet policy. Company paid US travel Insurance. All applicants must have reliable transportation and a positive attitude. Please fax resume & abstract to 250-546-0600 or by email to parris@ricknickelltrucking.com NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

APARTMENT/CONDO MANAGER TRAINING

Vacation Spots ATTENTION Snowbirds: Vegas Condo $1,200/mth Please contact Badick@shaw.ca or 778-471-4854.

SHOP LOCALLY Employment Business Opportunities ~ Caution ~ While we try to ensure all advertisements appearing in Kamloops This Week are placed by reputable businesses with legitimate offers, we do caution our readers to undertake due diligence when answering any advertisement, particularly when the advertiser is asking for monies up front. New Global Mobile Phone for approx $45/mo with unlimited talk, text and data and! You get paid everytime you use it. Call me now to get in line. 250-852-0658.

FOODSAFE COURSE by Certified Instructor October 13th & 27th Logan Lake October 25th 8:30am-3:00pm $70 Pre-register by phoning 250-554-9762

Opportunity

3 Days Per Week call 250-374-0462

Personals

Courses. Next C.O.R.E. October 25th & 26th. Saturday and Sunday. P.A.L. November 2nd, Sunday. Challenges, Testing ongoing daily. Professional outdoorsman & Master Instructor:

Career Opportunities

250-376-7970

Career Opportunities

Destinations Manager, Rockies and Interior BC

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

Join the team at Rocky Mountaineer – the award winning train that travels between Vancouver, Pacific Northwest and the Canadian Rockies.

EXPERIENCED CLASS 1 Drivers, F/T, P/T for California & Arizona produce hauling, excellent pay and benefits, safety bonus and home time. Call Jerry or Bill 1-877-539-1750.

We are seeking a full-time year round Destinations Manager in our Kamloops Office. Do you possess strong leadership experience, a Guest service focused mentality and the flexibility to travel extensively during our April to October operating season? Full benefits package and competitive salary provided!

For more details and to apply online please visit:

www.rockymountaineer.careers

GWM 54, seeking a fun GWM 30-50 who enjoys movies, dinners out and quiet times too. I am 5’8”, dark hair, blue eyes and single. Lets meet over coffee and go from there. Phone 250376-8578

Lost & Found Found - Silver necklace with pendant on the sidewalk in Brock near Coopers. 250-5541759 to identify. Lost Short Blue Jacket w/embroidery South Shore near Battle (250) 372-8345

TRY A CLASSIFIED AD

Start your Health Care Career in less than a year! Study online or on campus Health Care Aide – 6 months

- Kamloops needs more Care Aides...ASAP!

Nursing Unit Clerk – 6 months

- Work in the heart of the hospital

Pharmacy Technician – 8 months

- The first CCAPP accredited program in BC

Medical Transcriptionist – 9 months - Work online or in hospitals

Financial Aid available • PCTIA and CCAPP accredited

Thompson Career College

250-372-8211 or toll free 1-877-840-0888 or online at www.ThompsonCC.ca

Special: Add an extra line to your ad for $10

Career Opportunities 6478349

“All the people I work with are impressed by the knowledge I gained through this course. You guys are amazing!!” - Senja, July 2012 Grad

Employment (based on 3 lines)

1 Issue...................................$16.38 1 Week ..................................$39.60 1 Month ............................. $129.60 Tax not included. No refunds on classified ads.

Garage Sale

$11.5+tax per issue 3 lines or less

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

Truck Driver Training

Professional Truck Driver Program - Funding available for those who qualify!

CERTIFIED ICBC AIR BRAKE COURSE

Oct. 17-19 • Oct. 31-Nov. 2

Air Brakes 16 Hour Course 20 Hour Course

HUNTER & FIREARMS

Information

PERFECT Part-Time

*$53.00 + Tax *Some restrictions apply. *Ads scheduled

• Certified Home Study Course • Jobs Registered Across Canada • Gov. Certified 35 Years of Success! www.RMTI.ca

Bill

Career Opportunities

(No businesses, 3 lines or less)

(No businesses, 3 lines or less)

Travel Reliable, quiet non-smoking couple available to house sit for snowbirds between November and April. Will treat you and your house with care and respect. Call Russ 250319-8995.

B21

call 250.828.5104 or visit

tru.ca/trades

Class 1, 2 and 3 Driver Training - Job placement available!

6689173 DIRECTOR OF COUNCIL OPERATIONS Status: Schedule: Reporting to: Salary Range:

Full-time (35 hours/week) – November 2014 to March 31, 2015 with possible extension subject to funding Monday - Friday, Full-Time, Some evening and weekend work will be required Director of Operations $49,140.00 - $60,000.00/annum

Summary of Position: The Neskonlith Indian Band is seeking a manager, preferably with First Nation / Public Policy experience, to support Council and Tmicw Operations, providing effective planning, organizing, leading and managing the Neskonlith Indian Bands’ territorial land management services Job Description: Available upon Request Qualifications & Requirements: • Knowledge of Current Indigenous Rights and Title issues affecting land use, government and industry relations and Case Law, affecting aboriginal rights and title; • Excellent negotiation and communication skills (including technical writing) • Proven ability to work effectively with community members & other stakeholders; • Strong computer skills using MS Office software, social media, videoconferencing, Skype, working knowledge of mapping software, Google Earth (kml files), etc. • Must be able to successfully pass the pre-employment Criminal Record Check • General knowledge of Neskonlith Community, culture and Secwepemc laws, protocols and values Education and Experience: • Degree in Political Science, Public Administration or similar course of study; plus 3 years of management experience, including supervision, financial, and administration; • Equivalent combination of education, training and supervisory experience. Please submit: Cover Letter and Resume by Monday, November 3, 2014 at 12:00 Neskonlith Indian Band Attention: Director of Operations Box 318, Chase, BC, V0E 1M0 Fax: (250) 679-5306 We thank all applicants for their interest. Only those applicants who are under consideration will be contacted.

SHOP LOCALLY


B22

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

Employment

Employment

Employment

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

An Alberta Oilfield Company is hiring experienced dozer and excavator operators. Meals and lodging provided. Drug testing required. 1-780-7235051.

Full Time Translator Position. Must be able to translate Mandarin or Cantonese fluently. Must have working knowledge of Cabinet Making Business. The successful candidate will be required to act as a translator between owners of the company and staff. Please email resume to: insitecabinets@telus.net Helper needed for Kamloops based septic company.Could lead to driving job if your the right person. bdagg@live.ca I PAY Cash $$$ For All Scrap Vehicles! and $5 for auto batteries Call or Text Brendan 250-574-4679

EARN EXTRA $$$

KTW requires door to door substitute carriers for all areas in the city. Vehicle is an asset Call 250-374-0462

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

ADVERTISING CONSULTANT Award winning Kamloops This Week has an opening for an Advertising Consultant. The position requires a highly organized individual with ability to multi-task in a fun, fast-paced team environment. Strong interpersonal skills and a strong knowledge of sales and marketing are required. Excellent communication skills, valid driver’s license and reliable vehicle are necessary. If you have a passion for the advertising business, are creative and thrive on challenges, we want to hear from you. Interested applicants should send their resume and cover letter to: Attention: Advertising Manager 1365 B Dalhousie Drive Kamloops BC V2C 5P6 Fax: 250-374-1033 Email: sales@kamloopsthisweek.com We thank all applicants; only those being considered for an interview will be contacted.

Kamloops This Week is part of the Aberdeen Publishing Group

6689189 An opportunity is here for you.

is looking for substitute distributors for door-to-door deliveries. Vehicle is required. For more information please call the Circulation Department at

250-374-0462

Looking for experienced Danglehead Processor Operator for the Kamloops area Top wages and benefits. Close to town call (250) 320-1871 or email: terratim1@gmail.com Looking for nursery and ginseng workers Mon-Sat 8-10hr per day transportation provided Call 250-319-7263 or fax 250-554-2604

Need extra $ $ $ Kamloops This Week is currently hiring Substitute Carriers for door-to-door deliveries. Call 250-374-0462 for more information.

Employment

Employment

Help Wanted

Sales

Trades, Technical

Tow truck driver required. Full time position. Training provided. Need class 5 drivers licence with a good driving record. Apply IN PERSON with resume and drivers abstract to Don’s Auto Towing 671 W Athabasca Street.

ADVERTISING Consultants: Our company is always looking for great sales representatives to add to our team. Our business requires a highly organized individual with ability to multi-task in a fun, fastpaced team environment. Strong interpersonal skills and a strong knowledge of sales and marketing are required. Excellent communication skills, valid driver’s license and reliable vehicle are necessary. If you have a passion for the advertising business, are creative and thrive on challenges, we want to hear from you. Interested applicants should email their resume and cover letter to:khall@aberdeenpublishing.com We thank all applicants; only those being considered for an interview will be contacted.

Community Newspapers We’re at the heart of things™

Medical/Dental Certified Dental Assistant

Required immediately. Fulltime for our busy, fast paced Endodontic Specialty office. CDA designation is mandatory. Our office is open Monday to Thursday. We offer competitive wages, CE and uniform allowances. Apply with resume to: dralexmclean@shawbiz.ca Or in person at office: Dr. Alex McLean 410-301 Victoria St. Kamloops, BC V2C 2A3

Professional/ Management

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking Find us on Facebook

Closing Date: Until Filled Qualifications: • High School diploma/Grade 12 plus CUIC 210 and CUIC 240; or an equivalent combination of education and experience • Possess a Mutual Funds License • 4-6 years of job-related experience in a financial sales & services environment • Strong interpersonal skills – ability to investigate, negotiate, guide and meet member needs • Ability to meet and exceed goals and objectives, using self-motivation and initiative • Strong judgement skills, in particular with more complex products (mutual funds, mortgages) • Quality/Accuracy/Detail Driven For more information or to apply for this position please visit our website: www.interiorsavings.com” and submit your online application. We thank all applicants for their interest and will contact short-listed candidates only**

(Trimac)

Trimac Transportation is North America’s premier provider of services in highway transportation of bulk commodities. Our Kamloops, BC location requires...

We’re at the heart of things™

TAX FREE MONEY is available, if you are a homeowner, today! We can easily approve you by phone. 1st, 2nd or 3rd mortgage money is available right now. Rates start at Prime. Equity counts. We don’t rely on credit, age or income. Call Anytime 1-800-639-2274 or 604-430-1498. Apply online www.capitaldirect.ca

Fitness/Exercise WE will pay you to exercise! Deliver Kamloops This Week Only 3 issues a week!

call 250-374-0462 for a route near you!

SHOP LOCALLY Carpentry/ Woodwork

JOURNEYMAN Carpenter All Renovations Call for quote. No job too small. (250) 571-6997

Help Wanted 6689525

Help Wanted

The Hamlets at Westsyde is a revolutionary residential care facility which allows care providers to focus on resident-centered living and activities that inspire and support personal choice. We advocate the “gentle care” model of care and are currently looking to add to our team of professionals:

Company Drivers Owner Operators

Excellent pay • Shared benefits • Safety equipment • Safety bonus Dry bulk pneumatic hauling • Shift work involved • B-train and mountain experience required

All postings must have experience. Cook – Casual Experience in Residential Care setting is an asset Certification is an asset

Please send your resume to: Wayne Peddie, E-mail: canrecruiting@trimac.com Phone: 866-487-4622 Fax: 888-746-2297

If you are passionate about providing the highest standard of care and support in an atmosphere of acceptance that promotes client dignity, self worth and choice we invite you to apply by submitting your resume in confidence to:

North America’s Premier Provider www.trimac.com

Fax 205.579.9069 Email: careers@thehamletsatwestsyde.com

RUNSOLD TILL

• Cars • Trucks • Trailers • RV’s • Boats • ATV’s • Snowmobiles • Motorcycles • Merchandise • Some restrictions apply • Includes 2 issues per week • Non-Business ads only • Non-Business ads only

ly On

35

ARE YOU RUNNING AN EVENT? SUBMIT EVENTS FOR THE FRIDAY LISTINGS TO JESSICA@KAMLOOPSTHISWEEK.COM AND FIND THEM EVERY WEEK IN FRIDAY’S B SECTION, OR ONLINE AT

kamloopsthisweek.com/listings

00 3 lines PLUS TAX

Add an extra line for only $10

250-371-4949

L RUN TIDL SOL

Community Newspapers

Financial Services GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

Trades, Technical

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

Full Time Financial Services Representative II in our Merritt Branch. The primary focus of this position is to develop new business relationships by providing deposit, investment and lending services to member traffic, ensuring that the Credit Union is the primary financial institution.

HOME & YARD HANDYMAN If you need it done, Give us a call ! Steve 250-320-7774.

1-800-222-TIPS

Optometrist’s office requires experienced Optician. Email resume to: opticianposition@shaw.ca

We are seeking solution-focused people to help us deliver our vision – to be the best in the communities we serve. As a valued team member, you will experience a diverse, exciting and rewarding workplace and a great place to build a career.

Work Wanted

Alternative Health

JOUNERYMAN Plumber/Gas Fitter required immediately for F/T employment with busy plumbing firm. Wage $30/hr to start+ benefits package. Reply to: workingonadream@ outlook.com

Interior Savings is the largest credit union based in the interior of B.C. We deliver exceptional financial services and products to over 71,000 members in 14 communities through 21 branches, two Commercial Lending Centres and associated companies.

MECHANIC

Required for Westline Ford, in beautiful Vanderhoof, BC...where you can afford to live in comfort. Offering competitive wages & benefits. Apply with resume to: tammy@westlineford.com

Services

Retail Clerk: start part-time extending to full time including weekends. Hemming pants an asset. Deliver resume to Rivers Workwear Unit B - 1780 Versatile Drive

Financial Services Representative II – Merritt

Services

Employment

YOUR

TURN

STUFFINTO

CASH$

$

3 items-3 lines for $35 Additional items/lines $10 each Non business ads only Some restrictions apply

Does not include: Car/Truck/RV’s/Power Boats/Street Bike

www.arrow.ca

FORKLIFT OPERATORS Kamloops, BC We oīer: • The stability of a 90+ year old company • Part Time, Year Round Work • CompeƟƟve Wage and BeneĮts • Opportunity for RRSP match You possess: • Previous experience with f/l having capacity of at least 22,000 lbs. Experience loading and unloading lumber, steel rod, and pipe from trucks or railcars is considered an asset. We are an equal opportunity Employer. Online: jobs.arrow.ca, Email:jobs@arrow.ca, Fax:250-314-1750, Phone: 1-877-700-4445

1365 Dalhousie Drive • 250-371-4949


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Services

Services

Services

Electrical

Heat, Air, Refrig.

Landscaping

SUNDANCE ELECTRIC

FURNACE

“A” Licensed and Bonded Serving Kamloops Small Jobs & Silver Label on older Mobile Homes

Call Gerry 250-574-4602

SALES & SERVICE

sundanceelectric.ca

Classifieds Get Results! Floor Refinishing/ Installations BC Floor Restoration. Lino, Tile and Grout. Tile and Hardwood repairs call 250-5549442 or 778-257-4845

Handypersons RICKS’S SMALL HAUL For all Deliveries & Dump Runs. Extra large dump trailers for rent. Dump Truck Long and Short Hauls!!

J.WALSH & SONS 2321 E. Trans-Canada Hwy. Kamloops 250.372.5115

FIREPLACE

SALE NOW ON! J.WALSH & SONS 2321 E. Trans-Canada Hwy. Kamloops 250.372.5115

FURNACE DUCT CLEANING

J.WALSH & SONS 2321 E. Trans-Canada Hwy. Kamloops 250.372.5115

250-377-3457

FIND EVERYTHING YOU NEED IN THE CLASSIFIEDS

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Pets & Livestock

Merchandise for Sale

Pets

Misc. for Sale

Animals sold as “purebred stock” must be registrable in compliance with the Canadian Pedigree Act.

PETER’S YARD SERVICE

Tree Service Lawn & Hedges Leaf Racking All types of Yard Service Licensed & Certied 250-572-0753

PETS For Sale? TRI-CITY SPECIAL!

YOUR BUSINESS HERE

for only $46.81/week, we will place your classified ad into Kamloops, Vernon & Salmon Arm.

Run your 1x1 semi display classified in every issue of Kamloops This Week

classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com

classifieds@kamloopsthisweek.com

Merchandise for Sale

Only $150/month

(250)371-4949

*some restrictions apply.

Call 250-371-4949

Painting & Decorating

Appliances

Steve’s Handyman Services. Painting, building decks, fences, repairs. 250-578-8719.

Plumbing

Kenmore white washer and dryer, good cond. $250/both. (250) 374-3962

$500 & Under

HOT WATER TANKS REPLACEMENT

Do you have an item for sale under $750?

J.WALSH & SONS 2321 E. Trans-Canada Hwy. Kamloops 250.372.5115

Call our Classified Department for details!

SPECIAL. SAVE $$.

Did you know that you can place your item in our classifieds for one week for FREE?

Stucco/Siding

250-371-4949

1-set of Nokian Winters on rims 235/75/R16. Used one season. Regular price new $1200 selling for $600. Call 250-851-1304. 4- Good Chev Firestone Truck Tires. 8-hole, LT245/75 R16 108/104R on Eagle alloy rims. $300. 250-376-7583. A-STEEL SHIPPING DRY STORAGE CONTAINERS Used 20’40’45’53’ and insulated containers all sizes in stock. SPECIAL Trades are welcome. 40’Containers under $2500! DMG 40’ containers under $2,000 each. Also JD 544 & 644 wheel Loaders. Wanted to buy 300 size hydraulic excavator. Ph Toll free 1-866-528-7108 Delivery BC and AB www.rtccontainer.com Craftsman Snowblower 24” 9.0. Looks brand new. $750. 250-828-6690. Excersize bike asking $50 obo (250) 372-8345 call after 3pm HOT TUB (SPA) COVERS. Best price. Best quality. All shapes & colours available. 1-866-652-6837 www.thecoverguy.com/ newspaper? MISC4Sale: Camperette $300, Oak Table Chairs-$400, 2-Standard 8ft truck canopies $300/ea Call 250-320-5194 after 6pm or leave msg.

*some restrictions apply

Computer Equipment WANTED! Newer MacBook Pro or MacBook Air 250-3711333

Firewood/Fuel ALL SEASON FIREWOOD. For delivery birch, fir & pine. Stock up now. Campfire wood. (250)377-3457.

BROCK Sat and Sun 9-3pm 2455 Fleetwood Ave Misc household items, Princess bed, books and more

Misc. for Sale

Firewood fir ready to burn, supplies limited. Guaranteed loads (250) 377-1884.

Misc. for Sale

Furniture

TARPS! TARPS! “BEST PRICES IN TOWN!”

BLUE TARPS

10X8 weave (Medium Duty)

STARTING AT $2.19

WHITE TARPS 10X10 weave (Heavy Duty)

STARTING AT $3.99

BLACK TARPS 14X14 weave (Industrial Duty)

Dining room table & hutch/6chairs. $400. Sofa set & Lazy Boy. $200. 250-3195258. Oak China Cabinet. $500/obo. Armoire. $500/obo. Good cond. 250-672-9408 (McLure).

Pets & Livestock

Livestock

Medical Supplies

DORPER Cross Sheep flock for sale. 15 ewes and 25 lambs. $4500. Phone 250397-4126.

Invacare pwr wheel chair, $3000, King size medical bed (2 twins together) $1350 (250) 579-5231 aft 6pm

Run Till Rented

STARTING AT $5.49

FOAM SHOP MATTRESS REPLACEMENTS SINGLE TO KING SIZE 2” TO 6” THICK - CUSTOM CUT OR CUSTOM ORDER MEMORY FOAM TOPPER PADS - 3LB DENSITY SINGLE TO KING SIZE - 2” & 3” THICK

CUSHION REPLACEMENTS TORN OR TATTERED? SOFAS, CHAIRS, OTTOMANS, SNOWMOBILES SEATS, TRACTORS

YOU NEED IT - WE WILL CUT IT!

CAMPING FOAM, MEDICAL WEDGES & BOLSTERS, PILLOWS

“ A CUT ABOVE THE REST” FIND US ON FACEBOOK

www.surplusherbys.com

248 TRANQUILLE RD, NORTH SHORE - KAMLOOPS 250376-2714 • OUT OF TOWN CALL 1-800-665-4533

“Read All About It” Kamloops This Week Run Till Rented gives you endless possibilities... $5300 + tax Max 3 Lines Max 12 Weeks Must be pre-paid (no refunds) Scheduled for 4 weeks at a time (Must phone to reschedule)

Private parties only - no businesses - Some Restrictions Apply

Special: Add an extra line to your ad for $10

CALL 250-371-4949

The Heart of Your Community

ROLL ENDS AVAILABLE $5-$10/ ROLL 1365 B Dalhousie Drive

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

Rentals

Rentals

Apt/Condo for Rent

Bed & Breakfast

1bdrm n/p adult oriented building n/s Avail nowt 383 Arrowstone Dr. Call Mike 3778369 email mikeof @shaw.ca

BC Best Buy Classified’s

Acacia Tower

Place your classified ad in over 71 Papers across BC.

343 Nicola Street 1bdrm and bachelor suites starting @$645 per month includes utilities laundry facilities adult building no pets no smoking 1 year lease reference and credit check required

250-374-7455

CARMEL PLACE 55+ Quality Living in new medical building. Studio suites with affordable rates, FOB entry, elevator, scooter stations and Telus Optik Package! Call Columbia Property Management to book your appointment: 250-851-9310 Cozy 1&2bdrm renovated Apartments $750-$850 a mnt + util. Avail Now n/p, a/c, laundry free parking, close to bus route & shopping (250) 377-8304 Executive furnished apartment. 2bdrm 2bth quiet residential neighborhood, excellent location for temporary posting. Fully furnished down to the wine glasses 250-5549993 or email: msallis@wf.net GARDEN VIEW APARTMENTS - BROCK Modern 2bdrm apts., 5 appliances, a/c, video monitoring, secure bldg., $870/mos. + utilities, min. 6 mos. lease. No Smoking & No Pets. 250-3762254.

www.sundenmanagement.com

Logan Lake 1bdrm. $475/mo. tenant pays hydro. 604-4633728. Logan Lake 2bdrms. $550/mo. tenant pays hydro. 604-463-3728.

NORTH SHORE

Antique Upton upright 100 yr/old piano in good condition. $700/obo. 250-579-5660.

1 and 2 bedroom apartments. Clean quiet building. Rents starting at

Real Estate

$625 + utilities.

For Sale By Owner Sale or trade 2009 3 bdrm,2 bath, 16x68. full drywall.Senior Park. assessed at $143,000obo 250-819-1051

Houses For Sale FOR SALE OR TRADE for residential property in Kamloops. This very bright, fully furnished, three bedroom/two bath corner unit townhouse in Big White offers your very own hot tub on the patio, carport, high end furniture/appliance pkge, stacking washer/dryer and rock-faced fireplace. Short stroll to Gondola, skating rink, tube park, Day Lodge. Ideal for family or as a revenue generator throughout the ski season. Strata fees only $155.00 per month. Call Don at 250-682-3984 for more information. Asking $189,000.00

Rentals Apt/Condo for Rent 1&2bdrms renovated, N/P. Avail now, close to mall and bus. N/Shore. (250) 554-4996. 1BDRM a/c, patio, n/p ref required heat and hot water incl (250) 376-1485.

For Lease 2400 sq ft shop 12ft high overhead front door 13ft ceiling, office, avail Oct 1st $1500 +gst and util 250-6820005

Duplex / 4 Plex Brock, 3bdrms, new kitchen, fenced big yard. $1200/mo. 250-376-6421. Valleyview 2Bdrm 5 appl. n/s n/p single garage $1350/mth refs Nov1st 250-374-8526

Homes for Rent Looking for a Rental in Kamloops or Logan Lake? Check out our Listings at

www.sundenmanagement.com

Call 250-376-0062

Room in house, Rosewood Ave. $600/mo. $300/dd, w/d all util included 778-257-0544.

Large 1bdrm apt in Logan Lake n/p, $550 Avail Nov 1st (250) 523-6933

Apt/Condos for Sale

Commercial/ Industrial

2 or 3 Bedroom Condos Juniper, 1-2 bathrooms Hot Water Heat Included. $1,000-$1,150 + Hydro Sunden Management Ltd (250) 376-0062

Misc. Wanted

Affordable independent secure living in N Kamloops 55+senior building close to transit medical and shopping mall spacious 2bdrm 2 bath 5 appl $245,000 250-376-9378 or 250-376-6637.

for more information

Juniper Village

Kamloops BC call for availability 250-374-7467

Musical Instruments

Call 250-371-4949

Top floor 2 bdrm, F/S, washer/dryer hookups. Lrge yard with garage. N/S, N/P. $950 +hydro. Call 250-554-3520.

Landmark 2, McGill Rd. 2bdrm, 2bath condo, 5appl, ungrd prking. N/S/N/P. Oct. 16th. $1,600. 250-215-3947.

Private Coin Collector Buying Collections, Accumulations, Olympic Gold & Silver Coins + Chad: 778-281-0030. Local. PURCHASING old Canadian & American coin collections & accumulations. 250-548-3670

B23

CALL 250-682-2293 250-682-0312 ONE Month Free Rent and Free Telus Cable and Internet for one year! New 55+ living. Next to North Hills Mall with in suite laundry, balconies, A/C, rooftop terrace, amenities room, parking and storage. Pet friendly. $900/mth. Call 250-819-0101. Retirement living at its best! NEW! corner unit great views, private patio, 2bd, 1.5bath, 5appl, a/c, f/p, NP/NS, access to amenities incl; gym, library, restaurant and hair salon! Move-in ready. $1800/mth +util. COLUMBIA PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LTD. 250851-9310.

RIVIERA VILLA 1&2/BDRM Suites

1/bdrm starting at $675/mth 2/bdrm starting at $800/mth Incl/heat, hot water. N/P. Senior oriented.

250-554-7888

The Sands, Lower Sahali. Centrally located, renovated 2-1 Bdrm, $850-$1100. Bach Suite. $700. 250-828-1711.

Rooms for Rent

RV Pads RV site, winterized, in town. North Shore, fully serviced, incl cable, util, tel hookup, coin lndy, starting @ $525/mo 250376-1421

Shared Accommodation Basement suite male util, internet/cable w/d, incl in quiet clean owner occupied home $450 n/s, n/p 376-7484/ 250320-7707 North Shore $400 per/mo incl util & basic cable, np/ns 250-554-6877 / 250-377-1020 Quiet non smoking male to share North Kamloops home with mature male. $400 mo for details call 778-470-0370

Suites, Lower 1bdrm clean, perfect for student/working person,n/s n/party,n/p util incl $750/mo. 250851-2025 1bdrm + den NShore priv drive/ent n/s, n/p, mature female preferred ref req $900 util incl (250) 554-3904 1Bdrm lrg daylight suite, own laundry, A/C, close to Brock shopping centre & river. N/S, sm pets neg. $800 inclds util. 250-320-8509. 2bdrm 4 working person or couple, central air, $800 ref vacant shared util 376-0633 2BDRM in Brock. W/D. Private entr. & parking. N/S, N/P. $1000/mo. 250-319-1911. 2 Bdrm main flr near school, bus/shopping, n/p, n/s, Northshore $900/mo 250-376-8465 2bdrm NShore sep ent, util incl w/d, n/s, sm pet neg $1000 availnow 250-376-8241 ABERDEEN 2Bdrm daylight f/s w/d ns/np $1000/mo util incl Avail Immed. 250-372-2482 Brock 1bdrm furnished on river. N/S/N/P. Close to bus. $850 util incld. 250-376-6914. Cumfy 1bdrm. Close to University, Hospital. Perfect for student or quiet person. Excellent Location. ns/np. Call now $495-$725 (250) 299-6477 Large 2bdrm Basement Suite Westsyde. f/s w/d n/p n/s u/t inc. $1300 Call 250-319-7421

Suites, Upper 1BDRM 800sq/ft. N. Shore quiet clean bright ns/np, W/D $850/mo +util. 250-376-1421


B24

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

Rentals

Transportation

Transportation

Transportation

Transportation

Transportation

Adult

Motorcycles

Recreational/Sale

Sport Utility Vehicle

Trucks & Vans

Escorts

Suites, Upper

Cars - Domestic

2bdrms, N/Shore. F/S, W/D hook-up. Fenced yard. Pets neg. $825/mo. 250-554-9692

1992 Buick Roadmaster. 5.7L, 53,000kms. Exc Hwy car, new tires. $4,300. 250-319-4104.

Townhouses

1999 Red Ford Escort Auto 2yr old motor excel tran, 2 set tires, very gd body As is ICBC W/O $600 obo 250-672-9712 or 250-819-9712

3BDRM 3bth Valleyview pet neg, $1300 close to school and shopping. Avail Immed. 250-374-5586 / 250-371-0206 JUNIPER TERRACE 3bdrm townhouse, 1.5 bathrooms, 5 appliances, garage, patio,$1,250.00/mo. min. 1 year lease. Available immediately. Gateway 250-372-1231

2005 Volvo XC90 AWD. 2.5T. 5passenger, fully loaded. Low mileage. New all-seasons. $10,000. 250-374-6151. 2007 Buick. 61,000kms. New winters/battery. Premuim. $10,000. 778-471-8556.

TOWNHOUSES

2010 Ford Fusion SE. Auto, 4dr, 4cyl. 94,000kms. $11,500. 250-682-1002.

NORTH SHORE

2011 Mercedes CLS 550. 4dr. coupe, fully equipped. AMG sport pkg, V-8, 40,000kms. New $97,000, Now $49,800. 250-319-8784.

Best Value In Town

*Bright, clean & Spacious 2&3 bedrooms *Big storage rooms *Laundry Facilities *Close to park, shopping & bus stop PROFESSIONALLY MANAGED

318-4321

lilacgardens1@gmail.com NO PETS

Transportation

Antiques / Classics 1967 Ford Falcon Futura St.6 Auto 2dr all original runs good, $6000 obo (250) 376-5722

Auto Accessories/Parts 2-215/60R16 Snow tires, $200 2-245/50VR16 Eagle Snow $200, 4-275/45R20 Eagle M&S $400, 2-225/60R16 M&S $200, 2-275/40ZR17 M&S $300 call 250-319-8784 4 Bridgestone Winters on BMW Rims 185/70R14 used one season. $600. 374-5251. Firestone Winters 4-215/65 R16 80%. $350. 4-Nitto SN Studless winters 205/55 R16 90%. $350. 4-Nokian 205/60 R15 studded 85%. $300. 4Nexen 195/65 R15 winters studded 80%. $240. 250-3712129.

Cars - Domestic

94 Olds Achieva Sedan Moving Must Sell Well Maintained & Regularly Services, Remote Start, incl 4 winter tires, A/C, $1250 OBO 250-851-2848 97 Camaro Z28 350 6spd 120,000km black loaded $9,000obo (250) 319-7058

1ST CHOICE

KAMLOOPS TEMPTRESS Sexy, fun, accommodating, & discreet. 1996 Yamaha Royal Star with sidecar, airbrushed. $30,900. Over $80,000 invested. 250-573-7610. 2009 Vulcan LT Kawasaki. Blue, 43,050kms. 1-owner. Excellent Condition. $5,000. 250372-7116. 2013 Victory Cross Country. 1731cc. 1145kms. Transferable warranty. $19,000. 250-372-0250.

‘05, 38’ RV trailer 2 slides, sleeps 6 winter pkg, fully loaded, $23900obo 250-376-1655 1990 8’10” Slumber Queen Camper. Exec. cond. $5,000/firm. 250-374-9671. 1991 27ft. 5th Wheel. Fully loaded, like new. Everything incld. Shower, toilet never used. $8,000. 250-579-9029.

RUN UNTIL SOLD ONLY $35.00(plus Tax) (250)371-4949 *some restrictions apply call for details

Cars - Sports & Imports

2001 BMW 540i “M” Sport (Rare Model) 4.4L/6spd. Slvr/Blk. 223K 2 full sets whls.(smr/wntr) on OEM rims. Roof rack. Exc. Cond $9995 Ph (250) 374-0070

Vehicle Wanted

Motorcycles 1995 H.D. Ultra Classic 30th Anniv. #1405 out of 2000 made. 83,000kms. Loaded. $8,500. 250-672-9887.

2004 Lexington motor home well equipped new tires like new only 36000 miles call $32,000 obo 250 573 2332

1993 31ft. Bounder. Exc. cond. Must See. 87,000miles. Generator. Exec tires. Awning/screens. Repainted, satellite, sleeps/6. 454 eng. Hitch/tow pkg. New MW/fridge. $19,500. 250-376-8471. 1994 Travelaire 19ft. 5th Wheel. Canopy, hitch. Exc Cond. $3,800. 250-554-0333. 1995 Jayco Trailer 30ft. No slide-outs. Good shape. $9,000/obo. 250-851-0264.

2006 36ft. Forest River Georgetown XL. Loaded, 19,560miles. 3-slides. Gen, winter pkg. Awnings. New Mich tires. $68,000. 3728820/574-0090.

2007 Jayco Baha Trailer Rare off road edition. Front deck for ATV/Dirt Bikes Furnace, fridge, in/out stove, bbq, extra water tank Large Mud Tires for clearance, Heavy duty steel frame $7500 250-682-3511

2005 8ft. Okanagan Camper with solar panel. $11,500. 250554-8031. 2008 28ft. Lightweight Trail Cruiser. 1-owner, 5-seat lvngroom. $15,000. 299-3019. 9FT Okanagan Camper. F/S, bathroom. Good shape. $4,900/obo. 250-376-1841. ATV Suzuki King 4x4 Quad 300. 1773km in very good cond $2800 (250) 573-4027 ralphgab@telus.net

• • • • • • •

1995 Ford F150 Full size box 319,000 kms Auto Transmission Dual tanks, Good condition Dark green colour White canopy Well maintained.

• • Asking $2900obo

2003 Chev Tracker. 4cyl, auto. 130,000kms. Good condition. $7,500. 250-3747979.

Run until sold

1999 Dodge 1500 Larime V8 mag Quad drs trailer hitch a/c 269000k $1800 250-828-1532 2005 Ford E-450 Cube Van Diesel, 6L Engine. 162,000 kms. $14,000. 250-571-2471. 2006 GMC W3500. 5.3L, Isuzu diesel. Med duty tilt cab wit air dam. 16ft. alum box with roll-up back door. Auto, PW, PL, exhaust brake. 375,000kms. 1-owner. $9,000/obo. 250-828-0599.

2010 Ford Escape. Lady driven. Very clean inside & out. Non-smoker. 60,000kms. $13,000/obo. 778-471-5630. Jeep YJ 4x4 1987 restored, 6cyl 5sp, lifted, 33”tires on Eagle Rims, 10,000 lb Winch, over $12,000 invested asking $9000 (250) 828-0931

Trucks & Vans 1992 Ford F150 6cyl, 5spd. Well kept. 280,000kms. $2,850. 250-828-0824.

91 Toyota fully rebuilt, 6 cyl, std 4x4 - lift, winch, 33” tires, hitch, newer seats/carpet – awesome ride. Extra parts. $5900/obo 250-319-1946 NEW LEER Truck Canopy. 82”x70”. White. $500, Call: 1(250) 314-0072.

New Price $56.00+tax

Boats

Call: 250-371-4949

17ft Grumman Aluminum Canoe 3 paddles & sail connector incl $1200 (250) 377-3686 1974 21ft Reinelle 6cyl chev gas merc. stern dr. gps sys c/ w trailer $6000. 250-554-2631 1996 Seadoo, 5-seater jet boat & trailer. New motor & impellars, many extras. Excellent shape. $7,000. 250-672-9887. 2007 Sea Doo Speed Boat, 4 Seater.$15,000obo Call 250320-5194 (after 6pm)or lv msg

Do you have a vehicle, boat, rv, or trailer to sell? With our Run til sold specials you pay one flat rate and we will run your ad until your vehicle sells.* • $56.00 (boxed ad with photo) • $35.00 (regular 3 line ad) *Some conditions & restrictions apply. Private party only (no businesses).

1998 24ft. Citation Class C Motorhome. 163,000kms. Well maintained with records. Ind. solar panel. $14,000. 250-523-6446.

2003 Acura MDX, 179300K, excl cond, new s&w tires on rims, seats 7. $9,975 (250) 682-1590

1-250-679-2926(Chase BC), naidahamoline@hotmail.com

Recreational/Sale

97 Ford Escort. 4dr, std, new alt., timing belt. A/C. Good running cond. $1000 250-5541023.

Wanted Small Pick-up for dump loads, Must run good don’t care about looks. Will pay up to $800 (250) 3711333

1986 BMW Coupe 325i. 6cyl. 5spd. Looks good, runs good. Extras. $4,200. 250374-5251.

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

Scrap Car Removal

Sport Utility Vehicle 1981 GMC Suburban 4X4. Re-built motor/trans. Good shape. $2,900. 250-828-1808.

1992 Mazda B-2600 5 speed 2wdr 14” tires 2 buddy rear seats white canopy box liner rear air shocks + reg body Very good cond Blue in color, $3800 250-374-4713 fmi 1994 Mazda pickup 6 cyl 2wd manual, canopy winters 244,000km $2200. 374-7708 1995 3/4 Ton GMC 4/4 $3500.00 obo Vic 250-3711323 or 250-573-0067 1996 Dodge half-ton ext cab 4x4. Good shape. $4900/obo. 250-828-1808. 1997 GMC 4X4. Canopy, auto boat-loader, 5.7L, A/C. 1-owner. 177,846kms. $6,800/obo. 250-374-5520. 1999 Chev Dually diesel low km, great cond incl new canopy needs tires $7700 (250) 579-5231 aft 6pm

Legal

Legal Notices I Dion Eugene Nystoruk am now separated from my wife Carmen Marie Lorenzen and I am not responsible for any debt acquired after October 1st 2014

Ask about our daytime specials & Stag Parties.

Call 24/7

www.kamloopstemptress.com

250-572-3623 Attractive blond provides massage. Discounts this mth Ph.250-376-5319 9am-10pm

CURVES OF KAMLOOPS ESCORTS Your longest running agency.

Honesty is our policy.

250-851-1777 250-819-0011

Hot Sexy Asian girl 23 years old 5’4” 36C 120lbs, Pretty, friendly and sweet. No rush 778-220-5372


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

Memories & Milestones Mary Jane Reid announces with great joy the marriage of her daughter

Jennifer Dawn to

Tyler John Laychuk

August 31, 2014 at Waterton Lake, Alberta

Mr. Gary Birkeland and Mrs. Rossella Bepple and Mr. Kim Black and Mrs. Regina Black are pleased to announce the marriage of their children, MARISSA JADE LINDSEY BIRKELAND to NICKOLAS SCOTT BLACK

on August 16, 2014 The couple to reside in Kamloops CONGRATULATIONS AND MUCH LOVE FROM ALL FAMILY AND FRIENDS

Welcome

TO THE WORLD!

MR. LINCOLN TREVOR FINCH BORN SEPTEMBER 6, 2014 7lbs 13oz. 20.75” 11:47pm

ITSABOY! ITSAGIRL!

Announce your new family member here! Friday Edition Kamloops This Week • Full Colour Announcements

Proud Parents Trevor & Melissa and big sister Harper are over the moon to introduce their son.

• Bonus No Extra Charge for Colour

Let us help you announce your

Special Moments in Life Thursday Edition Friday Edition

Kamloops This Week

• Full Colour Announcements • Bonus No Extra Charge for Colour

Call 374-7467 for details

B25


B26

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

WEEKLY CROSSWORD

ACROSS 1. Mother (var.) 4. Not happy 7. Reciprocal of a sine 10. Periods of time 12. Relating to wings 14. Alias 15. Hebrew lawgiver 17. Beget 18. Middle East chieftain 19. Worldly and refined 22. Having a distinct existence 23. Mexican painter Frida 24. Showing sound judgment

25. Surrounding circle of light 26. 1/6-inch printing unit 27. Atomic #28 28. Spreads grass for drying 30. Common animal parasite 32. Nursing degree 33. Prefix for again 34. Circle width (abbr.) 36. Freshwater duck genus 39. English philosopher 1285-1349 41. Opposite of 24 across 43. Angina medication 46. Political action committees

6. Afghan Persian 7. Massee Lane Garden flower 8. 23 ___: Go away 9. Automobile 11. Thin dividing membranes 13. Take heed 16. Polished 18. Colorless, odorless gas used as fuel 20. Single units 21. Express pleasure 28. Barcelona gestural theatre 29. Makes into law 30. Old French monetary unit 31. Eyeglasses 34. Magnate Trump 35. Blemish or spoil 37. Moses’ elder brother 38. Twisted Sister’s Dee 40. Bon ___: witty remarks 41. 8th Jewish month 42. Related on the mother’s side 44. Stairs leading down to a river in India 45. Songstress Horne 46. Pirate’s prosthesis 49. Very fast airplane

47. Those mentioned 48. Pops 50. Rt. angle building wing 51. Capital of Yemen 52. Fish traps 53. Alternate H. S. diploma 54. Pitch 55. Soak flax DOWN 1. 13th Hebrew letter 2. Got up 3. Bricklayers 4. Impertinent 5. Perched

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRANK & ERNEST

BY BOB THAVES

T H E B O R N LO S E R

BY ART & CHIP SAMSOM

B I G N AT E

BY LINCOLN PEIRCE

THE GRIZZWELLS

BY BILL SCHORR

Crossword Answers FOUND ON B8

SUDOKU FUN BY THE NUMBERS

Like puzzles? Then you’ll love sudoku. This mind-bending puzzle will have you hooked from the moment you square off, so sharpen your pencil and put your sudoku savvy to the test!

HERMAN

K I T ’ N ’ C A R LY L E

BY JIM UNGER

BY LARRY WRIGHT

Answers

WORD SCRAMBLE

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Rearrange the letters in the word to spell an upcoming event.

C

L

O

N

I

T

2014 Barn Haunt Vale Family Yard Haunt Find Us On: @barnhauntvale

In support of the Kamloops Food Bank October 30th and 31th 5:30pm until 9:30pm

ANSWER 1:ELECTION ANSWER 2:CANDIDATE

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS:

4938 Uplands Drive Barnhartvale Non-perishable food donations are encouraged and appreciated

E

Rearrange the letters in the word to spell participant in aforementioned upcoming event.

E

T I D D A C A N E

Sponsored in part by:


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

B A BY B LU E S

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

BY RICK KIRKMAN AND JERRY SCOTT

NEWYORK TIMES CROSSWORD INNER WORKINGS 1

2

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BY PAWEL FLUDZINSKI / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 6

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20 23

SHOE

BY GARY BROOKINS AND SUSIE MACNELLY

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90

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A R C T I C C I R C L E BY ALEX HALLATT

BETTER HALF

BY RANDY GLASBERGEN

FA M I LY C I R C U S

BY BIL AND JEFF KEANE

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ONLINE

ALL THE TIME

WWW.KAMLOOPSTHISWEEK.COM

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ACROSS 1 Short end of the stick 8 1960s dance 14 French port just up the coast from Boulogne 20 Speedily 21 Key of Grieg’s only piano concerto 22 Belabor, say 23 Leading indicator? 25 Spruce up 26 Sinus specialist, succinctly 27 Zest 28 Bacalao and boquerones 30 Ugly one 31 Misfit 36 “American Pie” songwriter 39 Boosts 40 “___ Grows in Brooklyn” 41 Shakespearean lament 42 Like a pilot that’s working again 45 Locale that made Hillary famous 49 One who’s enthralled, metaphorically 52 French possessive 53 Response to a 26-Across, perhaps 54 Botanist Gray 55 Dedicated 56 Quod ___ demonstrandum 58 First steamship with a planned circumnavigation of the globe 59 Something on a hero, maybe 62 Greeted and seated 64 Pitbull or Snoop Dogg 66 Never 69 1998 Winter Olympics host 72 Studio behind “Amadeus” and “Platoon” 73 Winning an Oscar, Emmy and Tony, e.g. 77 Activist Brockovich 78 Hypnotist’s signal 79 One of a dozen popes 80 Suffix with ball 81 Game warden? 82 U.S.N. rank 84 Much ado about nothing 89 “I wouldn’t bet on it!” 92 Top of the Eiffel Tower? 93 Honduras-to-Guatemala dirección 94 Hearing-related 95 Blues rocker Chris 96 Become fixated 97 Deteriorate rapidly 104 Make ___ dash for

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BY JERRY SCOTT & JIM BORGMAN

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ZITS

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

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REPORT ON BUSINESS OCTOBER 17, 2014 |

Small Business Week 2014

TLC for Pets is a full animal boarding facility. Owner Tammy Osborne started the business 10 years ago with the help of the Community Futures self-employment program and mentoring.

A tail-wagging success COMMUNITY FUTURES HELPS SMALL BUSINESS FIND ITS BEGINNING When Tammy Osborne went to Community Futures to begin planning her business 10 years ago, her vision was small. Her love for animals had pushed her to fill a need in the community she felt was lacking — someone to help people take care of their pets, walk them daily, babysit them when needed and board them when owners went on vacation. “When I was working at a pet store, there were so many people asking ‘Do you know anybody…?’ So, I thought, ‘I’m just going to do it,’” she said. She took her idea to Community Futures to start her business plan and, 10 years later, she runs a full boarding

facility in Knutsford that accommodates close to 100 animals — TLC for Pets. Community Futures Thompson Country (CFTC) is a federally registered not-for-profit corporation that promotes community economic development by providing small businesses access to information-training and business-advisory services. Osborne entered the CFTC’s self-employment program, which helps clients develop a business plan over 10 weeks. The CFTC then offers counselling and mentoring for a year afterward. They will do site visits, monitor financials and offer consultation, as well as work to

anticipate any potential problems with the business. The CFTC also grants loans of up to $150,000. “I think it gives the businesses a bigger leg up, especially if they have never been in business before,” said CFTC loans manager Shelagh Pemberton. “They have professionals that are counselling them on things. “If they are in their business and we see future problems on the horizon, we can talk to people about that.” After completing the self-employment program, Osborne received a loan that helped her get a canopy for her truck so she can transport the animals she was caring for. In the beginning,

she also did children’s birthday parties, bringing up to 15 animals to play. She ran TLC for Pets out of her home for a few years before the eight baby gates became too much of a hassle, at which point her and she husband, Denis Lessard, moved the business to a twoacre Knutsford property in 2007 where it is today. TLC for Pets will board about 70 dogs, as well as other animals. Three years ago, Osborne started hiring staff to help with her growing business. She now has six to eight staff year-round. “You like what you do and you like your job or you actually really love your job, like it’s what you’ve been want-

ing to do your whole life,” Osborne said. After 10 years, Osborne returned to Community Futures to get another loan — this time to build an expansion to accommodate more animals. “They were quite happy when I came back,” Osborne said. “They’ve helped me both times so I highly recommend it.” The CFTC selfemployment program takes client referrals from WorkBC and caters to people who have relied on employment insurance or been on maternity leave within the last five years. Pemberton said they see a wide range of businesses, from the accountant who wants

BDC Small Business Week 2014 takes place from Oct. 19 to 25 under the theme Back to Basics, Re-energize your Business. Small and medium-sized businesses are the cornerstone of the Canadian economy. They account for 99 per cent of all Canadian companies and employ more than 60 per cent of private-sector workers. Successful entrepreneurs focus on tried and true strategies to take their companies to the next level. They know there will be challenges on their path to creating and sustaining a competitive business. To prevail, they need the right preparation and a solid road map. That means fostering excellent customer and supplier relationships, applying sound financial-management principles and hiring the best people. Use BDC’s Small Business Week 2014 — a time to celebrate and promote Canadian entrepreneurs — to go back to basics and re-energize your business. to start his own firm to the stay-at-home mom who wants to do esthetics out of her basement. “I think one of our benefits is, unlike the bank, we can look at people that really need a leg up. “They may not have a lot of money in the bank, they may be just coming off disability or a sickness. We have the ability to be able to help them just get to the next step,” Pemberton said. Community Futures will work with busi-

nesses even after their one-year mentoring period. Pemberton said the overall feedback from clients is the business planning and consultation afterward is invaluable. Statistics show the businesses the CFTC works with have a good success rate, she said. “When Tammy came through, her vision was very small,” Pemberton said. “It’s just kind of snowballed and, over the last 10 years, has really become a vibrant, growing business.”

City of Kamloops Office of the Mayor Mayor Peter Milobar

Mayor and Council would like to extend their "Thanks" to all small businesses.

Councillor Donovan Cavers Councillor Ken Christian Councillor Nelly Dever Councillor Tina Lange

Your contribution to our community is greatly appreciated! www.kamloops.ca

Councillor Arjun Singh Councillor Marg Spina Councillor Patricia Wallace


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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

REPORT ON BUSINESS

2014 Business Excellence Award winners to be announced Kamloops Chamber of Commerce will announce the winners of the 2014 Business Excellence Awards at the Nov. 1 gala event. The finalists were revealed on Sept. 10. “It was a record-setting year for nominations and the calibre of local businesses and leaders has again been outstanding,” said Aleece Laird, president of the Kamloops Chamber of Commerce board of directors. “We all now are looking forward to our gala event which will reveal the winners in each of the 16 award categories.” The 45 independent selection-committee members will now research and interview each finalist to determine the winners of the coveted 2014 TD and Kamloops Chamber of Commerce Business Excellence Awards. Tickets for the Business Excellence Awards Gala are available online at kamloopschamber.ca or by calling the Chamber office at 250-372-7722.

2014 Awards Finalists City of Kamloops Community Service Award • NL Broadcasting Ltd. • TELUS Communications Inc. • The Milton Group Venture Kamloops Resource Industry Award • Absorbent Products Ltd. • Finning (Canada) – Kamloops Branch • New Gold – New Afton Mine Berwick on the Park Service Provider Award 1-10 Staff • Adrienne Landscape Design • Rozalind Ewashina Photography • Thrive Business Strategies BC Hydro Green Award 1-10 Staff • Dragon Decorative Concrete Company • Nuggles! Cloth Diaper Co. • Presidium Network Operations Consultants Kamloops Lincoln Service Provider Award 11+ Staff • Berwick on the Park • The Noble Pig Brewhouse • Wells Gray Tours Ltd.

Rocky Mountaineer Green Award 11+ Staff • Absorbent Products Ltd. • ARC Asphalt Recycling Inc. • Moly-Cop Canada KGHM International – Ajax Project Home Based Business of the Year Award • Judy Basso Events • Kent Wong Photography • The Great Canadian Dog Academy & The Buckhorn Dog Ranch Aberdeen Mall Retailer Award 1-10 Staff • Aglow Bridal Lounge • Discover Wines Ltd. • Retail Therapy BCLC Technology Innovator Award • Cedar Dental Centre • Scorpion Technologies Ltd. • TELUS Communications Inc. Underwriters Insurance Brokers Retailer Award 11+ Staff • Coopers Foods – Valleyview • Kamloops Home Hardware Building Centre • Princess Auto TRU Faculty of Adventure, Culinary Arts & Tourism and Tourism Sun Peaks Tourism Award

• • •

Harper’s Trail Estate Winery Privato Vineyard and Winery Tranquille Farm Fresh

BDC Manufacturer Award • Absorbent Products Ltd. • Moly-Cop Canada • Riversong Guitars Excel Personnel Business Person of the Year Award • Brenda Colman, Invis • Jason Paige, Acres Enterprises Ltd. • Jo Berry, Get Happy Events / RUNClub • Norman Daley, Daley & Company Chartered Accountants LLP Nutech Safety Young Entrepreneur of the Year • Angela Veltri, Kix 4 Chix Fitness Kamloops • Brendan Shaw, Brendan Shaw Real Estate • Kris Brunsgaard, Adroit Technologies Home Hardware Aboriginal Business of the Year Award • Sportsman Light Truck Ltd. • Tk’emlúps Petro Canada • ZERO Tolerance DD’s Service Ltd.

What do these Kamloops area businesses all have in common?

What do these Kamloops area What do these Kamloops businesses have in common? businesses allareahave inallcommon?

They are just a few of the employers who have benefited from our Career Focus hiring grant initiative over the past year, sharing more than $400,000 in wage subsidy reimbursement funding for hiring university or college educated youth into neware jobs! learningwho more? us at (250) 828-0420, or visit the Career Focus (2014) page oursharing website: They just Interested a few of thein employers haveCall benefited from our Career Focus hiring grant initiative over the paston year, more $ in wage subsidywho reimbursement funding for hiring university collegegrant educated youthover into the newpast jobs!year, They arethan just a400,000 few of the employers have benefited from our Career Focusorhiring initiative www.tqmconsulting.ca Interested in learning more? Call us at (250) 828-0420, or visit the Career for Focus (2014) page onor ourcollege website: www.tqmconsulting.ca sharing more than $400,000 in wage subsidy reimbursement funding hiring university educated youth into This initiative is funded in part through the Government of Canada’s Youth Career Focus program new jobs! InterestedThis in initiative learning more? ustheatGovernment (250) 828-0420, or visit the Career is funded in partCall through of Canada’s Youth Career Focus programFocus (2014) page on our website: www.tqmconsulting.ca This initiative is funded in part through the Government of Canada’s Youth Career Focus program

Career Planning and Job Search Services for Individuals Human Resource Management Services for Employers

Human Resource Management Service for Employers ෽ Career Planning and Job Search Services for Individuals


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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

Growing communities one idea at a time 650 businesses • 2,000 new jobs • $16.5 million in business development loans Since 1987 Community Futures Thompson Country ntry (CFT (CFTC) has been successfully helping entrepreneurs realize their business goals and dr dreams. dreams As a leader in Small Business Loans and Community Economic Development, Community Futures has built a solid reputation in turning business ideas into business successes. Community Futures specializes in customized loans and has developed a grassroots approach to lending by taking a hands-on approach to supporting its clients. In a report from Statistics Canada in June of 2014, businesses that had assistance from Community Futures were more likely to survive than those businesses without Community Futures guidance. The report showed higher employment growth and revenue growth for those businesses assisted by Community Futures; 76% after 5 years compared to 60% respectively. (Source: Western Economic Diversification Canada: Evaluation of Community Futures Program, June 2014 http://www.wd-deo.gc.ca/eng/18559.asp#d4). The success of the CFTC loans program can be attributed to the support it gives to its clients through all the stages of business development. As a result of this support the organization has developed an enviable proven track record of longterm and sustainable businesses in the region. In the last 17 years alone, Community Futures Thompson Country has assisted entrepreneurs in developing over 650 businesses throughout Kamloops, Barriere, Chase, Clearwater, and the Thompson Country region. This assistance has resulted in more than 2,000 new jobs through the lending of over $16.5 million in business development loans! The organization is fortunate to be guided by an excellent team of community business leaders with a wealth of information to support local entrepreneurs and a professional staff with years of experience in supporting business start-ups and business growth in the community. CFTC services include: • • • • •

Business counselling and advisory services Business succession guidance One-on-one start-up or expansion consulting Support in gaining access to other small business supports, information, and access to capital Small business training through our Self-Employment Program

Supported by Western Economic Diversification Canada

Diversification de l’économie de l’Ouest Canada

Growing communities one idea at a time #230 - 301 Victoria St. Kamloops, BC V2C 2A3 T: 250-828-8772 Toll-free: 1-877-335-2950

info@communityfutures.net • www.communityfutures.net

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

REPORT ON BUSINESS

FIVE TIPS TO MANAGE YOUR CASH FLOW

IMPROVE YOUR BOTTOM LINE BY FOLLOWING THESE SIMPLE STEPS Cash is king â&#x20AC;&#x201D; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a common saying in the business world. Surprisingly, few entrepreneurs take steps to manage their cash flow so they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wind up with an empty bank account and nothing to pay the bills. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the main causes of business failure is poor cash-flow management,â&#x20AC;? says Susan Rohac, Senior vice president, financing and consulting, at the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC). The good news: Cashflow management is easy to improve with a few simple steps. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Getting control over your cash flow helps you prepare for slow periods, plan your financing and have peace of mind,â&#x20AC;? Rohac says. Follow these five steps to get a better handle on your cash flow.

1. Profitability check

First, make sure your business is earning a reasonable profit. Even the greatest cash flow management wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help if your fundamentals are out of whack. Analyze each product and service separately to see whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pulling its weight. Make sure your products are appropriately priced, and work to eliminate inefficiencies. Instead of just chasing sales, chase profitable sales. In 2007, Mike Whittakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s company BontĂŠ Foods learned the consequences of poor cash flow the hard way after facing large cost overruns on two major projects. The company had to act quickly to restore its cash position.

It analyzed its profitability and realized it had to raise prices to better reflect costs. BontĂŠ also unloaded lower-margin product lines and launched an efficiency drive while tightening cash-flow management. The changes had a huge impact. Sales in BontĂŠâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meat division are up 36 per cent since 2009, while gross profit is up almost six per cent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We learned to watch our cash very carefully,â&#x20AC;? Whittaker says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You need to always be ahead of the curve on cash flow management.â&#x20AC;?

2. Do a cash flow projection

Next, prepare a cash flow projection for the coming year. This is your early warning system for cash flow

hiccups. Use an Excel spreadsheet or accounting software to plug in expected monthly cash inflows and outflows, including anticipated big-ticket purchases. Use the projection to anticipate slow periods and plan in advance what to do about them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Through the year, check your actual cash position regularly â&#x20AC;&#x201D; once a week or month â&#x20AC;&#x201D; against your projection to see how youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing and deal promptly with any divergences,â&#x20AC;? advises Rohac.

3. Finance big buys instead of draining cash

One of the most common cash-flow mistakes is using cash to buy a major long-term asset, instead of getting financing. Even if you feel flush right now, you may suddenly wind up short of cash if you experience a sudden revenue shortfall or rapid growth.

Use your cash-flow projection to plan your financing needs ahead of time, not in the midst of a crisis, when bankers may be wary to lend. Rohac also recommends matching the lifespan of a purchase with financing of similar duration.

4. Speed up cash inflows

Getting money into your business more quickly can save you carrying costs on your line of credit. Some tips: send out invoices more quickly, ask customers to pay electronically and charge interest to slow-payers.

5. Raise cash quickly in a crunch

Facing an unexpected cash flow crunch? You can raise cash quickly using various techniques: approach your bank for help; check your inventory and assets to see what you can sell off, even

at a discount; ask suppliers or your landlord for extra time to pay bills; or offer your customers a big discount to earn some quick sales.

Many businesses ignore cash flow management: survey

BDCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Susan Rohac points out that managing finances is one of the main challenges for entrepreneurs, coming in second after marketing and sales. The findings of a BDC survey this year confirm her observation: More than four out of five entrepreneurs (82 per cent) say theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the ones managing cash flow and financing in the company. However, many of the entrepreneurs donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take basic steps to control their finances. Almost half say they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make cash-flow projections and check them against actual results â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a basic procedure of financial management.

Congratulations to all finalists. Experience and wisdom

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hard work and great ideas never go unnoticed.â&#x20AC;&#x153; combined with

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FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

D5

REPORT ON BUSINESS

Planning to fail HOW MISTAKES CAN HELP YOUR BUSINESS Failure — and learning from mistakes — is often an important milestone on the path to success,” Bergeron says. “We have to change our perception about failure in order to help business owners stay in the game.” Deborah Conroy of EY agrees. She

been a key ingredient in some of the business world’s great success stories, says Michel Bergeron, senior vice president of marketing and public affairs at the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC). “Canadian entrepreneurs and the public at large need to be more forgiving about failure.

Every entrepreneur feels it at some point: the fear of failure. Only half of new businesses make it to their fifth birthday, and that can cause entrepreneurs a lot of stress. However, experts say failure can actually lead to major accomplishments. In fact, failure has

points to the new BDC Entrepreneurial Resiliency Award, an initiative that recognizes a Canadian business that has successfully undergone a turnaround or pivotal event in the past and come back stronger because of it. “Many entrepreneurs talk about some kind of massive failure or hurdle they’ve overcome,” says Conroy, vice president of transaction advisory services at EY. She is also President of the Montreal chapter of the Turnaround Management Association, a group for corporate turnaround experts that teamed up with BDC for this award. No business is too big or too small to confront roadblocks. Bergeron cites the example of Groupon, the giant deals website. The company got its start as a social media site called The Point, which was created to help people connect for social activism

purposes. After a year of effort and US$1 million in operating costs, the start-up was going nowhere. “The founders shifted gears and turned their offering into the discount coupon service Groupon. They learned, adapted and made a fortune,” Bergeron says. T wo years later, the shift in focus proved profitable: Groupon ballooned from a few dozen employees to 10,000 and was the fastest company in history to make $1 billion (US) in revenue. Bergeron advises entrepreneurs to adopt a “try, try again” philosophy. At its core: learning from mistakes and showing resilience, a new business approach that is growing in popularity in today’s rapidly changing economy, he says. Instead of the old model, which emphasized extensive planning before launching a new venture — by which time technology and markets may change substantially

— the new approach favours a lean and nimble start-up. The idea is to engage customers early with a basic product, even if you haven’t worked out all the bugs. The second step: Learn quickly from customer feedback and missteps. Third: Constantly refine your efforts. And the final secret ingredient: Don’t give up. “I don’t think fear is all bad. It can be healthy and reasonable. It keeps entrepreneurs from making rash decisions,” Conroy says. “But it’s important to avoid excessive hesitation and waiting for the exact perfect moment. Trying, failing and trying again is much better than not trying at all.”

Canadians slow to accept failure

How do entrepreneurs turn failure into success? “They have had a knack for seeing failure as an opportunity or challenge,” says BDC’s Michel

Bergeron. “When solution ‘A’ didn’t work, they tried solution ‘B’ if they were still convinced there was a need. Or they decided to meet a different need and, in the process, found a new path. The setback helped them identify a weakness, and they fixed it.” Deborah Conroy of EY agrees. She cites a 2013 EY survey that found the following: Over one third of Canadian entrepreneurs (35 per cent) said business failure is seen as a barrier to future business prospects. This is nine percentage points higher than the average across the G-20 countries, which was 26 per cent. Canadian entrepreneurs may be more worried about failure because of “higher expectations,” but they should also keep in mind Canada’s “many entrepreneurial upsides,” such as the low cost of starting a business, the survey authors noted.

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Help change the story: By giving to the United Way Community Fund you are creating life altering change for individuals and families. Thank you to our local businesses for making our community strong.

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P

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REPORT ON BUSINESS

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THERE’S MORE THAN MONEY HOW NONFINANCIAL BENEFITS CAN BE A GAMECHANGER FOR YOUR BUSINESS

What is the cost of losing a good employee? Entrepreneurs know it can be high. At Frima Studio, a fast-growing video-game maker, the challenge of attracting and keeping talent got harder five years ago, when a pair of deep-pocketed multinational competitors opened offices nearby. “We couldn’t compete on salary, so we decided to create an attractive workplace, one that was fun and inspiring,” says Nathalie McLaughlin, Frima’s human resources director. Twice a year, Frima emulates the Dragons’ Den TV show and invites its employees to pitch innovative projects to a panel of judges. “If we judge a project to be solid enough and to have sufficient marketing potential, we will release its creators from a few of their usual tasks so that they can devote one day a week to the development of their amazing idea. A few months later, we review the state of the project and decide if it’s worth pursuing, in which case we greenlight its production and marketing. This program is already starting to yield impressive results,” explains McLaughlin. The array of benefits

designed to make Frima’s employees’ lives easier includes flexible work hours, as well as a week of paid vacation time between the 25th of December and the New Year. The company offers employees gaming areas and an on-site gym. Twice a month, two massage therapists and a hair stylist also drop by. Frima isn’t alone in turning to creative ways to provide employees with non-monetary rewards. “Companies in all industries — not just high-tech — increasingly see nonfinancial compensation as vital to their growth,” says Nathalie Gélinas, senior vice president, consulting, at the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC). In today’s challenging economy, it’s harder than ever for many entrepreneurs to find the resources to draw in and retain skilled employees, she adds. At the same time, boomers are quitting the labour market, leading to labour shortages in many fields. This means businesses are increasingly competing for good workers, but they have less money to do it with. The good news: nonfinancial benefits can be inexpensive and can even boost a company’s productivity, Gélinas says. “The cost is a lot smaller than what the employer gets back. Losing an employee is very costly.

Human capital is the most important resource a business has,” she says. “The ultimate challenge is to mobilize employees. Salary alone will never mobilize or retain talent over the longterm. Businesses should be creative about finding ways to attract and engage talent.” At Frima, the employeefriendly workplace became a beacon for smart, enthusiastic workers who helped propel the company’s explosive growth. “The key to our success is our work culture,” McLaughlin says. “We listen to employees a lot. People always talk about the customer experience. We have developed the employee experience. It means people don’t want to leave.” Frima also has a performance reward system that awards points that employees can exchange for services, thus reinforcing the company’s commitment to helping employees maintain work-family balance. Perks include tax preparation, lawn mowing, babysitting, movie/dinner combos and more. “Our office is completely different from anything else in the area. It’s really made a difference in attracting people,” McLaughlin says. Frima’s success shows that while pay is important, it isn’t what makes employees happy at work, Gélinas

says. Employees want flexibility, trust and the chance to develop as part of a team, she adds. “We spend a lot of time listening to customers to serve them better. We also need to listen to employees.”

How to compensate without cash

Entrepreneurs should listen to employees to learn what benefits they value and work on non-financial compensation constantly until it becomes part of the company’s way of life, BDC’s Nathalie Gélinas says. Here are three types of nonfinancial compensation to consider. Flexibility. A flexible workplace is increasingly in demand. You can offer flexibility in terms of time (variable work hours) and space (opportunities to work outside the office). Trust. Employees like to have responsibility, work in a harmonious environment and be trusted to make decisions. At the same time, you should hold employees accountable via solid performance appraisals. Self-development. Entrepreneurs should think about how to help employees develop themselves. The result will be more a productive and motivated workforce.


www.kamloopsthisweek.com

The Leader in Pharmacy Convenience 4 LOCALLY OWNED LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU!

SAHALI LOCATION Everyday 8am-midnight 1210 Summit Drive 250-374-0477 VALLEYVIEW LOCATION Mon-Sat 8am-midnight Sun 9am-midnight 2121 E. T.C. Hwy 250-374-3131 NORTH KAMLOOPS LOCATION Everyday 8am-10pm 700 Tranquille Rd 250-376-9010 BROCK LOCATION Mon-Fri 9am-7pm Sat 9am-6pm Sun 11am-5pm #35-1800 Tranquille Rd 250-376-5611

s Free Prescription Delivery Mon - Fri s Personalized Service s Free Blood Pressure Monitor s Compliance Packaging s On-Line Prescription Service sNew & Improved Med Ready® Automated Phone Refill Service

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

D7

LOCAL OWNERSHIP & NATIONAL BUYING POWER Everyone knows Shoppers Drug Mart is a leading Pharmacy in Canada. One of their little known facts though is that every Pharmacy is locally owned and operated. In Kamloops, Shoppers Drug Mart has four locations to provide the best service and convenience for the entire community.The four locations are locally owned and operated by Jim Motokado-Valleyview location, Mike Huitema-Sahali location and Tim Phillips-North Shore locations. Founded in 1962 by Toronto pharmacist Murray Koffler, the Company has grown to a network of more than 1,180 Shoppers Drug Mart/Pharmaprix stores across Canada. These stores are locally owned and operated by the Company’s licensed Associateowners who have helped build a brand that is synonymous with exceptional service, value and trust. Shoppers Drug Mart has become Canada’s retail drug store and one of Canada’s favourite brands and is the number one provider of pharmacy products and services. For local owners Mike, Tim and Jim,they are committed Pharmacists

TIM PHILLIPS

Pharmacist/Owner Northills Mall & Brocklehurst

MIKE HUITEMA Pharmacist/Owner Sahali

that provide you the services and support you need to understand and manage your prescriptions. By taking a leadership role in looking after your health there is also a Certified Diabetic Educator on staff at the North Shore & Valleyview locations. Shoppers Drug Mart offers the most convenient hours for prescription service. Both the Valleyview and Sahali locations are open 8 am to midnight 7 days a week and the North Shore location is open 8 am to 10 pm 7 days a week, Brock location is Monday-Friday 9-7, Saturday 9-6, Sunday 11-5. Every day from Monday to Friday all 4 locations have free prescription deliveries. This is perfect for people with busy schedules or that are not able to come in to the pharmacy.

JIM MOTOKADO Pharmacist/Owner Valleyview

Sahali location owner Mike Huitema said “Nobody touches Shoppers Drug Mart on convenience for our prescription service”. All four locations provide compliance med organizer packages as well. The MedOrganizer Packs are designed to help make it easier to manage regular medications and ensure they are taken properly for those taking 3 or more prescriptions daily. Together with their team of pharmacists & pharmacy technicians, your locally owned and operated Shoppers Drug Mart Pharmacists, Jim, Mike and Tim are dedicated to making a difference to the health and well-being of your family.

EXCLUSIVE TO SHOPPERS DRUGMART

COSMETICS AVAILABLE AT ALL 3 LOCATIONS

Boots SAHALI & NORTH SHORE LOCATIONS ONLY

VALLEYVIEW LOCATION ONLY


D8

www.kamloopsthisweek.com

FRIDAY, October 17, 2014

No. 5 in a Series

Largest selection of footwear in BC Interior

Think Local

Local Business Profiles

FOOTWEAR: The proper fit is crucial to your health and well being

• Locally Owned & Operated • Walking Shoes & Running Shoes • Fitting Orthotics • Nordic Poles • Complete Range Of Footwear, Apparel & Accessories • Mens, Womens & Kids • The Proper Fit Every Time

74~1395 Hillside Dr. Aberdeen Village (beside Milestones)

check out our webpage at

Runners Sole owner Wayne Richardson has been serving Kamloops and area for 12 years. There are some bright colours that have just arrived. Wayne Richardson loves looking after your feet. His locally owned and operated business, Runners Sole has the largest selection of footwear in the BC Interior. Richardson says "Our staff are fully trained to check the length, width and depth of your feet including the arch, ailments-bunions, planter fasciitis, etc." "We also analyze your gait as you walk to find out if you have a Pronated, Neutral or Supinated foot." This is simply whether you walk on the inside, outside or all of your foot. Most people wonder why their shoes wear in certain spots more than others." This is your gait and

If running is your therapy

we can help you with that to avoid muscle and joint pains", adds Richardson. Runners Sole will try several shoes in your foot type to find the correct fit for you and the activities you love to do. "We take pride in helping you and put your feet first", said Richardson. Wayne is also a great community supporter and enjoys giving back to Kamloops. "Our great team of staff and customers has helped our business grow tremendously & supporting numerous community groups and organizations is something I really love

doing", said Richardson. The Runners Sole team are multi-sport enthusiasts committed to ensuring that individuals are fitted in shoes and apparel according to foot structure, activity level or type of activity and body ailments. As Kamloops' technical store they want to provide you with the correct shoe rather than the trendiest or most expensive shoe. Keeping true to what they do, they want you to have what's best for YOU!

E SNOWSHO RENTALS AVAILABLE!

You already know the value of a great pair of running shoes

www.runnerssole.com

250.377.4055

In this space next week: Could be you

Kamloops This Week October 17, 2014  

Kamloops This Week October 17, 2014

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