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MEDIA PACK


ZAMBIA STORIES BIG PLANS FOR ANTI-POACHING IN THE KAFUE

Kafue National Park is an extremely vast and largely under-appreciated National Park full of diverse species of wildlife. However, it is also a severly under-resourced challenging environment that has seen a rise in illegal activities. Key players in the park are putting a stronger than ever focus into conserving and restoring the park’s wildlife through initiatives such as ‘frontier tourism’ activities (heading to lesser known arears in order to benefit the people of the surrounds in promoting tourism over poaching) as well as a new dedicated conservation initiave based in the heart of the National Park.

KEEP THE LUANGWA FLOWING

The Luangwa River has been identified as one of the longest remaining free flowing rivers in Zambia and it supports a wide range of wildlife, local communities and a growing tourism industry. However, the Luangwa River is now under threat due to plans for hydropower development, deforestation and unsustainable agriculture. As the campaign to #KeeptheLuangwaFlowing gathers momentum, now is the perfect time to cover this story.

SOMEWHERE OVER THE MOONBOW

Every year from February to August, when the Zambezi is high and the moon is full, a lunar rainbow (or moonbow) lights up the Victoria Falls. During this time, the Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park opens its doors from 6pm until midnight so you can witness this rare natural phenomenon with a drink in hand.

ZAMBIA IS LEADING THE WAY ON CLIMATE CHANGE

The Lower Zambezi National Park in Zambia has achieved the prestigious status of being the world’s first carbon neutral national park, and South Luangwa is also well on its way with more lodges taking responsibility for their emissions. This achievement illustrates the Zambian tourism sector’s commitment to going the extra mile to influence the global tourism market by taking carbon-conscious tourism sustainability practices seriously.

EMERALD SEASON

Historically, most wildlife enthusiasts visit Zambia during the drier months (May-Oct), but for those in the know, the green (or Emerald) season offers an entirely different safari experience. The rains – often present for just a few short hours in the morning – clear to reveal a new world of lush vegetation, intense colours and vibrant skies… along with a host of migratory bird species and newly-born antelopes.


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UGANDA STORIES 25 YEARS OF GORILLA TOURISM

Uganda is celebrating 25 years of Gorilla Tourism this year. Conservation efforts first started in 1993 and as a result the total wild population of mountain gorillas has increased. The gorilla census is well into its third phase with the number currently reaching more than 1,000. The demand for Gorilla permits has increased, and so, with the habituation of two new groups, tourists will now be able to trek to see 17 habituated families.

RHINO BABY BOOM

In 1983 both black rhinos and northern white rhinos were declared extinct in Uganda. Rhino Fund Uganda was formed as a non-governmental organisation in 1997 and has had great success in its efforts to repopulate rhinos in Uganda. Through the breeding and release programme at Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary there has been tremendous success. Last year saw the birth of two rhinos and this year has been even better, with three new baby rhinos born, bringing the total to 25.

MOUNTAINS OF THE MOON

The Rwenzori Mountains, is a Unesco World Heritage Site and an emerging tourism destination. The year-round snow topped mountains, with 106 mammal species and a variety of flora and fauna sets it apart. New projects in the mountains aim to preserve both the biodiversity of the park and improve neighbouring communities’ livelihoods. Projects include the development of a chimpanzee trail and cultural activities focusing on the Bakonzo culture and supporting local craftsmanship.

ANIMAL TRANSLOCATION

Uganda Wildlife Authority and The Giraffe Conservation Foundation have collaborated to sustain the future of endangered giraffes in Uganda. Fifteen Rothschild giraffes were relocated from Murchison Falls National Park to Kidepo Valley National Park this year. This comes after the success in 2015 of relocating giraffes to Mburo National Park and the birth of their first baby giraffe in April 2018. These efforts have proved how valuable the conservation efforts are for sustainability.

CHIMPANZEE CONSERVATION

Across Uganda, efforts are also being made to continue the conservation of chimpanzees in Kyambura, Kibale, Semliki and Budongo. Projects include the Snare Removal Project started by Uganda Wildlife Authority and The Kibale Chimp Project to reduce illegal activity of snaring in the forest. The Semliki Chimpanzee Project has uncovered the ‘Savannah Chimpanzee’ which head to the plains of the savannah for their food, rather than climbing the trees.


ESWATINI STORIES AFRICA’S NEWEST COUNTRY

In April King Mswati III announced that the country’s name would change to ‘The Kingdom of Eswatini’, meaning “place of the Swati people”. Most former colonies in Africa changed their names immediately on gaining independence, but even though this change is long overdue, it is no less important and marks a significant moment in the country’s history - giving a true meaning to its independence.

UNPARALLELED RHINO CONSERVATION

Eswatini has been pioneering rhino conservation since their reintroduction to the country in 1986, and the population in Mkhaya game reserve is of international significance. The country has lost just 3 rhinos in the last 24 years compared to 3-4 a day in other countries. With large groups regularly encountered, Mkhaya, and Hlane are often touted as one of the best places in Africa for experiences with these magnificent beasts.

50 NOT OUT

2018 has been been a pretty remarkable and significant one for Eswatini. This year saw the country celebrate not one but two half centuries. King Mswati III, who is the figurehead that represents traditional Swazi life and is central to all celebrations in the country, turned 50 years old in April. He was soon ‘caught up’ by the country itself, which marked 50 years of independence in September.

BIG ROCK, OLD ROCK

Eswatini is home to both the world’s oldest mine, and the world’s largest exposed granite rock. Ngwenya has been mined since the Stone Age, with people seeking the red ochre from its haematite and, more recently, iron from its ore. It remains easy to visit and is in an area of stunning beauty. Sibebe Rock is the world’s second largest monolith (single rock) behind Australia’s Ulhuru.

ARTS & CRAFTS HOTSPOT

Eswatini has a fine artisanal culture. Crafts such as grass weaving, woodcarving and beadwork, are rooted in local tradition. Others, such as glass blowing and candle making have been introduced more recently, and have acquired a distinct Swazi flavour. These highquality handicrafts grace boutique outlets around the world, but in the country you can watch craftspeople in action, and learn about their techniques and traditions.


MALAWI STORIES AFRICA’S MOST COMPLETE DESTINATION?

Already lauded for its authentic cultural interactions and stunningly beautiful scenery, Malawi has always had some of the top attractions in Africa. But its perceived weakness was wildlife, the key draw card for this continent. With a massive programme of animal translocations underway (elephant, lions, cheetah and more) which are transforming its safari experiences, the next years will see Malawi emerge as one of the most complete destinations in Africa!

LAKE MALAWI

Home to the world’s first freshwater National Park, Lake Malawi’s size and depth gives it a sealike appearance with crystal clear, fresh water and an idyllic golden, sandy shoreline. The Lake has over 1000 species of brightly coloured tropical fish (Cichlids) swimming its waters - more species than all the lakes and rivers of Europe and North America put together – and with a huge choice of water activities on offer, from kayaking to windsurfing, paddle-boarding to snorkelling, there is no shortage of ways to enjoy its beautiful waters.

LEADERS IN CONSERVATION

Malawi’s Director of National Parks & Wildlife received the prestigious Tusk Award for Conservation in Africa last year and this year another Malawian, the country Director of Ripple, is a finalist. With highly-regarded conservation organisations like African Parks and the Lilongwe Wildlife Trust working tirelessly to preserve the country’s natural diversity and new legislation aiming to crack down on illegal wildlife crime, Malawi has taken conservation to its (warm) heart and is paving the way in Africa.

IT’S A RACE

Malawi has a growing number of sporting events that allow its visitors to challenge themselves through a variety of activities, whilst experiencing the natural beauty of the country’s landscapes. The Malawi Impact Marathon, the Lake Malawi Sailing Marathon, and the Luwawa International Mountain Bike Race are a few examples of events set in stunning locations and open to all. Most exciting of all, 2018 sees the launch of the Orbis Challenge, a mix of running, cycling and kayaking, with no less than Dame Kelly Holmes named as its first participant!

RESPONSIBLE TOURISM

Often used primarily for marketing purposes, responsibility and sustainability have long been principles on which Malawi’s tourist industry is run. Ask most Malawi lodge owners if they have a ‘Responsible Tourism Policy’ and it’s unlikely you’ll find many such formal documents. But ask if they work closely with communities, provide good employment opportunities and actively initiate sustainable projects of conservation and you will soon realise it’s the very reason they operate.


TANZANIA STORIES LOSE YOURSELF IN THE SERENGETI

If you thought that watching big game in the Serengeti meant sharing the experience with 30+ other vehicles, then think again. As it is 20 times the size of the Masai Mara, yet has a similar number of properties, it’s not too difficult to enjoy premier wildlife sightings all by yourself, especially given the seasonality of the Migration.

UNEXPLORED WESTERN TANZANIA

Whilst the northern circuit is famed the world over, Tanzania’s fabulous western parks receive far less visitors. Katavi, which is Tanzania’s second biggest national park, contains only 26 rooms in total, making this game-rich park a real connoisseurs destination. Plus there’s Jane Goodall’s Gombe Stream NP and the magical Mahale, both offering superb chimp experiences on the shores of Lake Tanganyika.

CONSERVATION VS CULTURE

The Masai coming-of-age ‘Enkipaata’ ceremony traditionally required young, would-be warriors to kill a lion, but to conserve this increasingly at risk iconic species, the act is now being actively discouraged. It is ideally being replaced with participation in the Lion Guardian programme, designed to safeguard not only lions, but the Masai and their cattle.

THE SAFARI OF YOUR CHILDHOOD DREAMS

Remember when you were small and dreamt of being ‘on safari’ surrounded by countless iconic wild animals roaming across seemingly endless open plains, dotted with huge trees? Well, those places really do exist – Tanzania can be exactly that, whether that be the endless plains of the Serengeti, the mystical Ngorongoro crater, or the remote wilderness of the Selous.

LUXURY SAFARI SEEKERS

For those that want high-end holidays away from the crowds, staying in truly luxurious safari accommodation, combine the exclusive and less visited national parks of Ruaha or Selous. Then, add in the sophistication and stylish luxury of Zanzibar Island for the perfect beach and bush experience.


EDITORIAL STORIES KAMILI PORTFOLIO

HUMBLE BEGINNINGS FOR BASECAMP EXPLORER

KENYA

AN UNFORGETTABLE ELEPHANT ENCOUNTER

ZAMBIA

Basecamp Explorer embraces supporting the local community. Svein Wilhelmsen was inspired to create a company that would leave a positive footprint following a meeting with an old Masai Chief that marked the beginning of a friendship between men from completely different worlds; founded on mutual respect and shared ambitions. The priority has always been to sustain a close relationship with the Maasai. Today they employ 230 people in six camps across Kenya ran 100% by locals. More than 270 Maasai students have also graduated from Koiyaki Guiding School, an institution supported by Basecamp. Konkaymoya Lodge offers visitors the chance to see young orphaned elephants, due to the lodges close proximity to the Kafue Release Facility. The Elephant Orphanage Project was established in 2007 in Southern Kafue National Park with the mission to rescue, rehabilitate and release orphaned elephants back into the wild. At the release Facility there are currently 12 baby elephants – from 3 - 11 years old. Visitors donate to the project leaving with the great satisfaction that by staying at Konkamoya and visiting the facility they are supporting the conservation of elephants in Kafue.

MAKE A UNIQUE ENTRANCE TO TULI

BOTSWANA

Ever wondered what it would be like to arrive into your chosen destination in an extraordinary way? Visitors can do just that at Tuli Safari Lodge, with the lodge’s exciting cable car ride across the Limpopo River, gliding between the two borders of South Africa and Botswana. A caged cable car arrives to whisk guests along the river - cast all images of 5* luxury ski resorts out of your mind. This cable car ride is much more rustic and quintessentially African. Guests will slowly sway through tree lines and across the river in close proximity to a family of rather large crocodiles that can be found lurking beneath the murky waters.

ESCAPE THE CROWDS IN CHOBE ZAMBIA

On the less busy western side of Chobe Forest Reserve lies Muchenje Safari Lodge, set in an unspoilt safari playground situated on an escarpment. With wonderful views of the Chobe River, the Caprivi Strip and seasonal flood plains. Far away from the overcrowded parts of Chobe National Park. Providing visitors with both peace, tranquillity and a high density of game due to its close proximity to the river.


Kamili

Discover African Gems


EDITORIAL STORIES KAMILI PORTFOLIO

A LONG STANDING HISTORY

TANZANIA

CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE CHIMP KIND

TANZANIA

Takims Holidays are true pioneers developing Tanzania’s safari industry with over half a century of experience they have built their reputation to be one of the premier Destination Management Companies. Takims is a third-generation family business and the oldest family run safari company in Tanzania. After the family settled in Zanzibar in 1896, Akber Takim started the very first travel agency on the island. In 1964, they re-launched as Takims Holidays, now based in Dar es Salaam and Arusha. Of the approximately 150,000 wild chimps remaining in Africa, the largest known single population is approximately 1,000 in Mahale National Park. Mahale is located in Western Tanzania on Lake Tanganyika - the world’s longest freshwater lake, chimpanzees roam freely in a forest paradise. Mahale’s Head Guide Ramadan is one of the best guide’s in the business. His father previously worked with Jane Goodall and the chimpanzees at Gombe and so his experience, skills and knowledge of the great apes is inherent.

GUESS THE LEMUR SPECIES

MADAGASCAR

Excitingly, there are more than 100 species and sub-species of lemurs in Madagascar. These charismatic primates - endemic to the island - display a wide range of interesting behaviours from singing like a whale (the Indri) to dancing across the sand like a ballerina (the Sifaka), whilst the two most widely recognised species – the sun-loving Ring-Tailed Lemur and the fear-inspiring Aye-Aye, captivate the hearts of wildlife lovers worldwide. Sadly, all lemur species are officially on the ‘endangered’ list, due mainly to habitat destruction.


Kamili

Discover African Gems


EDITORIAL STORIES KAMILI PORTFOLIO

KAFUNTA RIVER LODGE TURNS 20

ZAMBIA

NEW CAMPING OPTION IN OMO VALLEY

ETHIOPIA

THE FUTURE MADE BRIGHT BY TUKONGOTE

ZAMBIA

Kafunta Safaris has come a long way since the opening of their first lodge in South Luangwa in 1998. Owners Anke and Ron have seen first-hand the progression of the Luangwa Valley as this year marks their 20th anniversary. The construction first began in 1996 when the couple purchased land in South Luangwa and began building the lodge. Many people from the local area were hired to work on the construction and were eventually re-trained to become staff members exchanging their construction helmets for chef’s hats and guide’s caps. Some of those first staff are still working amongst the 70 people employed at the lodge today. Omo Valley is one of Africa’s most fascinating regions as it is home to numerous indigenous tribes. Visiting their villages provides the opportunity to gain a much deeper understanding and interest in their differing cultures and now this is made all the easier thanks to a new mobile camping experience provided by Dinknesh. This new camp, located deep within the tribal homelands, delivers a convienient stopover, at the heart of the action. Fascinating tribes include the Suri, the Karo, Dassenechs, Mursi, Bena and Hamars – all living in close proximity but adopting hugely different cultures. Waterberry Zambezi Lodge’s Tukongote Community Projects have continually improved the educational opportunities in nearby villages. What initially started as a single pre-school has now evolved into a growing educational hub. The aim of the project is to support school students with extra tuition; to offer a community library with a wide range of books; to offer basic skills training such as sewing and gardening and to introduce an Adult Learning Facility offering adult literacy classes. The project is providing materials and training teachers in 4 other nearby schools, with a total responsibility for more than 400 pupils. Guests are always pleased to discover that Waterberry funds the building and administration of these projects.


Kamili

Discover African Gems


UPCOMING GROUP PRESS TRIPS UGANDA TRIP 1 | JULY 2019

7 days Murchison Falls Semliki Kibale Bwindi (Mountain Gorillas) option

TRIP 2 | JULY 2019

5 days Rwenzoris Queen Elizabeth National Park

ZAMBIA TRIP 1 | FEBRUARY 2019 5 Days Green Season South Luangwa

TRIP 2 | SEPTEMBER 2019 7 Days Kafue Livingstone (Victoria Falls)

TANZANIA

TRIP 3 | OCTOBER 2019 7 Days Western Circuit Mahale & Katavi

All with the option of a Zanzibar add on.

MALAWI TRIP 1 | MAY 2019

7 Days Southern Circuit Liwonde & Lake Malawi

TRIP 2 | OCT 2019

7 Days Northern Circuit Nyika & Nkhotakota

ESWATINI MAY 2019

3-5 Days Country Circuit Ezuiwini & Mkhaya This trip can be easily added on to an existing South Africa visit.

TRIP 1 | FEBRUARY 2019

7 Days Northern Circuit Serengeti, Manyara & Tarangire (nov-may)

TRIP 2 | JUNE 2019 7 Days Southern Circuit Ruaha and Selous

- For each of the press trips above we have a maximum of 3 places and a minimum of 1 place. - The journalist is required to have commission/s for 1 travel magazine or 1 national press with at least 1 of these being a UK based publication. - We will aim to make group trips non-competitive where journalists will have separate story angles.


MEDIA PACK We are here to help you create inspirational editorial content. We’re happy to help throughout the process from creating interesting and innovative story angles, organising your travel arrangements; coordinating exclusive access / interviews and providing eyecatching imagery. We work across Africa, so talk to us for more information.

Anisha Parmar | PR Manager anisha@kamageo.com Tim Henshall | Chief Executive tim@kamage.com 01664 823750 Manor Farm, Nether Broughton, Leicestershire, LE14 3HB, UK

Profile for Kamili

Safari Media Pack September 2018  

Media stories and ideas for Uganda, Zambia, Tanzania, Malawi and Eswatini from the UK's number one source for Africa tourism PR - Kamageo.

Safari Media Pack September 2018  

Media stories and ideas for Uganda, Zambia, Tanzania, Malawi and Eswatini from the UK's number one source for Africa tourism PR - Kamageo.

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