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Kamehameha Schools Maui—270 ʻAʻapueo Pkwy, Pukalani, HI, 96768—(808)-573-7019—kyhaina@ksbe.edu—www.kaleoonakoa.org

KSM pulls together for WASC By AMANDA LEE, news co-editor

“It’s called accreditation and it means getting accredited,” Mr. Hal Schmid, co-chairman of the 2012 accreditation process said. Accreditation is a process of certification of competency, authority, and credibility. Kamehameha Maui was first accredited in 2006. The committee came back for a midpoint checkup during the third year, but every six years, a school must be accredited.

“It’s a way for

us to do selfstudy about our school and our programs” — Ms. Jay-R Kaawa on accreditation

“It’s a way for us to do selfstudy about our school and our programs, to see what our strengths and weaknesses are and an opportunity to share with the Western Association of Schools and Colleges committee,” Academies Principal Ms. Jay-R Kaawa said. The process of becoming a re-accredited high school started in August 2010. It includes presenting a report that shows

what the school is doing for their students. The report will be reviewed by the WASC committee March 4, 2012. Biology teacher Mr. Kyle Fujii is a co-chairman with Ms. Lisa Correa, career counselor, and Mr. Schmid. “We’re responsible for explaining what the high school does to prepare students for college. We have to explain what students do in the classroom, how the school is organized, and the roles of the counselors, the operations department, the athletics department, administration, and teachers. We have to explain how the students learn,” Mr. Fujii said. Students are able to participate in the accreditation process by meeting with the accreditation committee and evaluating lessons. “Students can be questioned at any time, and they need to know the mission statement, the vision, and the expected student learning outcomes. WASC will walk through classes and can decide to ask a question at any time, whether it’s in class or walking across the quad,” said Mrs. Ramona Ho, the high school librarian. She has been through five

accreditations at different schools where she’s worked. The accreditation process is

like an extensive research paper on the school. The fac(ConƟnued on page 2)

INDEX:

NEWS……………………..…….…..A1 CLASS NEWS…………….…..A12 ĀHA’ILONO…………..……….....B1 LIFE………………………...………...C1 ENTERTAINMENT………..C8-9 SPORTS…………………..………..D1 WWG………………………………...D4 EDITORIAL…………….…...……..E1

Food Drive….…..……….A11 Volleyball…………….…..D1 Football………….………….D3


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Palakiko makes medicine priority By DYLAN GODSEY, sports co- editor

A hands-on medical experience along with a fun-filled stay in California was what sophomore Kapahanau Palakiko had in store for him during his summer break. It started when Palakiko expressed a desire to be in the medical field to Mr. Kaholo Rickard, math teacher at KSM. So, when the opportunity to participate in the National Youth Leadership Forum on Medicine arose, Mr. Rickard nominated Palakiko. “[Palakiko] told me he was interested in medicine, and he seemed genuine about it,”

said Mr. Rickard. “I try to present my students with a chance to lead.” After being nominated for the NYLF, Palakiko was on his way to the University of California, Los Angeles. At the week-long convention, he said he got to do a multitude of things, from role-playing medical situations to riding rollercoasters at Six Flags Magic Mountain in Valencia. Palakiko said, “I really enjoyed learning about the different processes that it takes to become a doctor and playing out the real-life situations. “ The forum was a week-long

event mostly centralized at the UCLA campus. Attendees got to tour the campus and participate in leadership activities as well as find out what it takes to become a doctor. There were numerous seminars on topics from becoming a resident doctor to knee replacements. There was also a lot of socializing done at socials and dances. To participate in the NYLF, you need to be recommended by a teacher. Then the NYLF administration reviews your application and gets back to you. Funding for the trip is a personal obligation.

Photo by DYLAN GODSEY

KAPAHANAU PALAKIKO Palakiko received a $250 travel assistance grant to help with his travel expenses from KSM’s Parent Teacher Student Organization’s Ho’olaule’a foundation.

Photo by AMANDA LEE

The middle school team goes over their section of the WASC report to prepare for the March 4 visit of the accreditation committee. ACCREDITATION (ConƟnued from page 1)

ulty has to answer questions within the report and provide evidence to verify and prove their responses. Evidence can be anything from art pieces to student tests. “When teachers are gathering evidence they are giving examples of what they teach, and how they teach it. They are not supposed to just show the top students, but a range of student work. The committee wants to know if students

“When teachers are gathering evidence they are giving examples of what they teach and how they teach it.” — Mr. Hal Schmid on accreditation

are getting the help they need,” Mr. Schmid said. The accreditation process is a school-wide effort. In the elementary division, the committee is being headed up by elementary teachers Mrs. Annabelle Saiki and Mr. Edwin Otani. “We are currently trying to find our revisions and edits for the elementary sessions. We are focusing on what we like to call CIA: curriculum, instruction and assessments,”Mr. Otani said.

“We are providing the information for the criteria and pulling the staff together to make sure that the questions that have to be answered are answered honestly and accurately,” Mr. Otani said. Everyone is working together to get Kamehameha Maui accredited for its second time. Faculty and staff are broken up into committees for each section of the report. Those committees are: School Philosophy and Purpose, the (ConƟnued on page 3)


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High school launches new mission statement By MEHANA LEE, staff writer

The administration and staff of KS Maui high school have rewritten the campus’ mission statement to clarify the school’s direction and focus. At the end of last year and during the summer, they met to develop the mission statement.

“Hawaiian leaders prepared for college and a global society.” —new KS Maui high school mission statement

“The mission was developed by the high school leadership team and then presented to the entire high school faculty for comments and adoption,” said Business and Leadership academy team leader Mr. Kealii Mossman. The new mission statement: “Hawaiian leaders prepared for college and a global society.” Mentioned first in the statement is how the faculty aims to educate students as leaders who will represent Hawaiians well in the community.

The second part states that all students are expected to be prepared for college, specifically the state’s flagship institute the University of Hawaiʻi. Ultimately, students will also be prepared for a global society by being able to navigate through different cultures and religions. “The reason the vision only has three points is to keep it simple,” said Mr. Mossman. “If it’s too long, no one will remember it. If it’s short and sweet, it’s easier to keep in your mind for everyone to work towards.” Faculty presented the new mission statement to students at the beginning of the school year. “The students are able to see our school’s expectations in visual and written form. It allows us to work towards a specific goal in order to fulfill the mission statement. This year, the teachers put in lots of effort into emphasizing the mission statement and what is expected of us as Kamehameha Schools Maui students,” said junior Iwalani Kaaa.

2011-12 YALE BOOK AWARD

Mann receives Yale award By AMANDA LEE, staff writer

Academies Principal Ms. Jay -R Kaawa presented the Yale Book Award to Kamehameha Maui senior Makai Mann on Sept. 5. According to the Yale Book Alumni Association, the Yale Book Award is awarded annually to a high school junior who has shown intellectual promise and significant involvement in extracurricular activities and community service. The idea behind the award is to put Yale in the minds of

By AMANDA LEE, staff writer

The following are some facts about Kamehameha Maui’s accreditation: 2006: Kamehameha Maui’s first accreditation March 4-7: when the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) will come to observe the school 12+: committees at work on accreditation 1,070: students who attend Kamehameha Maui All: teachers and students working for accreditation 0: universities that will accept non-accredited high school diplomas

Photo by AMANDA LEE

Ms. Levi Mason listens as Mr. Jay Pa’a gives his presentation for the high school accreditation committee. ACCREDITATION (ConƟnued from page 2)

Governing Body, Finances, Development/ Fundraising, Administration, Faculty, and

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promising students. It is used as a tool to recruit possible students to apply to Yale and improve the school’s visibility in secondary schools. Mann said, “I am applying to Yale, I visited the school. I really liked the campus and their residential college system. I think it’s an amazing school that focuses on its undergraduates. It has a lot of history, and I thought it was cool that they have an original Gutenberg bible in their library,” he said. The book being awarded this year is The Geeks Shall Inherit

Get the 411 on accreditation

225: teachers at work

News

Staff, Students, Community of School, Program, School Library/ Resource Center, School Plant, and Health and Safety. Teachers are compiling re-

the Earth: Popularity, Quirk Theory, and Why Outsiders Thrive After High School, written by Alexandra Robbins. “I haven’t actually read it yet because I haven’t had time, but it seems like it’s interesting. It’s something that I might have picked out for myself if in a book store,” Mann said. The book award is of a “high degree of prestige,” said the Yale Alumni Association page. “I didn’t expect to receive it. At first, I was surprised. Later, when Ms. Kaawa called my name, I thought that might be what I was being called up for. I felt humbled to receive it, but I was also happy because Yale was already one of my first choices,” Mann said. ports to present to the committee chairs. Then, the chairs work together to check all the paperwork and evidence. On Sept. 27, all teachers have to submit their reports to Mr. Schmid and Ms. Linda Shibano, K-12 Assessment Coordinator and Analyst. On Oct. 7, the entire report will be sent for layout to Kamehameha Schools’ communication department on O’ahu. Once the report has been printed and published, it is sent to the WASC committee. The committee members will read the report, then come to the school to look at the evidence and observe the school March 4-7. On March 7, KSM will find out if they have received their 2012-2018 re-accreditation. “I’m confident we’ll receive another 6-year accreditation,” Ms. Kaawa said.


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Hawaiian leaders share mana‘o at Biz Fest By HOKU KRUEGER, news co-editor

The Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce held their 5th Annual Business Festival at the Grand Wailea Hotel Resort & Spa on Friday, Sept. 2. Many prominent leaders from the Hawaiian community were invited to speak in what was the most passionate conference yet, according to former chamber president Mr. Chubby Vicens. MR. NAINOA THOMPSON Captain of the Hokule‘a and former chairman of the Kamehameha Schools Board of Trustees Nainoa Thompson was the first speaker after opening statements. For the first time publicly, he shared information about the Hokule‘a’s upcoming world-wide voyage, in which 18 crews will make 60 stops around the world over a period of 37 months, traveling approximately 38,080 miles. He started his presentation speaking about those who taught him and their importance in his journey and the journeys of those that he went on to teach. “When we look at the worldwide voyage, it’s not about us, it’s about those who laid down the foundation. It is to remember the visionaries,” Mr. Thompson said.

“Hawai‘i is going to be a different place in 10 years …” -Mr. Nainoa Thompson, Captain of the Hokule‘a

He also spoke about the importance of Hawaiian leadership in the younger generations. Forty percent of the crew who will take part in the world-wide voyage will be under the age of 30, and 75% of those young navigators graduated from Kamehameha Schools, Mr. Thompson said. “Hawai‘i is going to be a different place in 10 years because of the way that Hawaiians have been educated

Photo by HOKU KRUEGER

Mr. Nainoa Thompson speaks at the Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce 5th Annual Business Festival about the importance of the inclusion of Native Hawaiians in Hokule‘a’s upcoming world-wide voyage.

over the last 20 years,” he said. DR. MICHAEL CHUN Kamehameha Schools Kapa¯lama headmaster Dr. Michael Chun spoke about what KS teaches students in order to make them Hawaiian leaders. “Our responsibility is to develop qualities of leadership in all of our hauma¯na,” Dr. Chun said. He shared two separate lists of what leadership meant. The first outlined the embodiment of the global outlook on leadership, which included words such as stature, power, wealth, winning, intelligence and expertise. The second list outlined the Hawaiian values that are commonly found posted within the KS campuses. Though the lists differed and the Hawaiian values are “more reflective of the heart than the head, both lists reflect accurately the qualities of leadership displayed by our kupuna,” Dr. Chun said. He built upon this statement, speaking more thoroughly about mana and what it means. “Contrary to what many be-

Photo by HOKU KRUEGER

A member of the Royal Guard, an organization that represents the palace guards of Lili‘uokalani, stands on duty for the morning ceremony.

lieve, leaders are not so much born as they are taught. This nurturing comes through education,” Dr. Chun said. Kamehameha Schools aims to teach leadership skills “but does so in the context of their Hawaiian culture,” Dr. Chun said. HISTORY The reason that the Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce held the festival was to “meet our mission by improving the standing of Native Hawaiians in business and community by fostering cooperation, coordination and ex-

change of information,” Kai Pelayo, president of the Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce said. The festival began 6 years ago in response to a lack of resources regarding information that would benefit businesses and individuals being easily accessible by the members of the Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce and the rest of the Hawaiian community, Mr. Pelayo said. Initially, the business festival was a two day event that fo(ConƟnued on page 5)


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aspire to,” senior Abby Okazaki said. Students learned about issues of importance to Hawaiian businesses throughout the day-long conference. The acceptance of innovation in Hawaiʻi, unity and responsibilities of Native Hawaiians were topics of the speeches.

BIZ FEST

cused mainly on basic business and fundraising. The focus has changed over the years to also cover issues in the Hawaiian community and the importance of Hawaiian leadership. A focus of this year’s conference was that people in the Hawaiian community “seek leadership in a pono manner, thereby putting yourself in a position to help other people, specifically Native Hawaiians,” Office of Hawaiian Affairs trustee Judge Boyd Mossman said. DR. DENNIS GONSALVES Director of the Pacific Basin for Agricultural Research Center Dr. Dennis Gonsalves spoke about the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the importance of Hawaiian leadership in local and international science. He said Hawaiians can take the knowledge they have acquired through studying science and agriculture and apply it to local issues that could eventually help others around the world. “Don’t just be a test tube scientist. Do something that will help people,” Dr. Gonsalves said. He explained how the USDA created the transgenic rainbow papaya using genetic modification in response to the papaya ringspot virus, which was killing off much of the papaya found in the Hawaiian Islands. Now, 85% of the papaya in Hawai‘i is transgenic. The papaya has also been accepted in Japan, Dr. Gonsalves said. MR. KYLE NAKANELUA Captain of the State of Hawai‘i’s Department of Transportation Airports Division, Kyle Nakanelua, Administrator of the Maui Medical Group Cliff Alaka‘i and Director of Research at the Office of Hawaiian Affairs Dr. Kamana‘o Crabbe shared their thoughts on how warrior leadership applies to Hawaiian business. SENATOR SHAN TSUTSUI Senate President and State Senator Shan Tsutsui spoke

News

“The Hawaiians, as a nation, will be very strong if we learn to say ‘we’ instead of ‘I.’” -Mr. Mercer “Chubby” Vicens, Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce past-president

Photo by HOKU KRUEGER

Senior Nazareth Thibodeaux listens as Director of Education for the Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce Mr. Charles Kealoha speaks to students outside the ballroom before the conference begins.

MNHCC Business Fest inspires KSM students By MEHANA LEE, staff writer

Nineteen Kamehameha Schools Maui students benefited from the Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce 5th Annual Business Fest recently. Students discovered the importance of leadership and their responsibilities as future leaders to unify and strengthen the Native Hawaiian community. “We send students from Kamehameha Schools Maui to provide opportunities to learn of what is happening in the adult business world and have students begin establishing their network,” said Career Liaison Ms. Priscilla Mikell, who coordinated the student involvement. This is the second year students from Kamehameha

Schools Maui were able to attend the business fest. The conference took place Friday, Sept. 2 at The Grand Wailea Hotel Resort & Spa. Students witnessed the insight of Hawaiian leaders. They also began to establish networks through various exhibitors who provided information and statistics about scholarships, schools, businesses and organizations encouraging Native Hawaiian leadership. “It was an amazing experience that exposed me to many opportunities that are available for Native Hawaiians. I definitely think that more Kamehameha Schools students should attend the Business Fest. It showed us many Hawaiian success stories and gives us something to

Stories of successful Native Hawaiians encouraged students to become better leaders at school and in the community. “My overall experience was a very good one. It benefited me because I started networking for possible future references. Hearing all of the stories was very inspirational because it showed how successful people are still connected to their roots in Hawaiʻi,” said junior Kiaʻi Kaya. The list of speakers varied from politicians to activists. Speeches addressed the roles of leadership, fulfilling the dreams as Native Hawaiians and important core values to live by. “Our youth is our future, challenge them to be better. The Hawaiians, as a nation, will be very strong if we learn to say ‘we’ instead of ‘I,’” said MNHCC past-president Mr. Mercer “Chubby” Vicens. The Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce’s mission is to sustain Hawaiian culture and improve the status of Native Hawaiians in businesses and individuals. MNHCC is an organization of community leaders that focuses on the benefits available to Native Hawaiians. This organization was founded six years ago.


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Kylie Yamada organizes rummage fundraiser By MEHANA LEE, staff writer

Senior Kylie Yamada coordinated a benefit rummage sale for Ikaika Suzuki’s family for her senior project. 17-year-old, Shaun-Shane “Ikaika” Suzuki was diagnosed with a rare form of terminal brain cancer and passed away on April 17, 2011. “I’m glad I chose to do this because I’m helping a family who had many difficulties by doing something that will benefit them,” said senior Kylie Yamada. Although Yamada has no connection to Suzuki, she was moved by his inspiring story of optimism and bravery. Students and fac ult y dropped off donations at Mr. Robert Laxson’s classroom for Yamada to collect. Yamada also sent letters to 50 different companies asking for donations. She received $575 from seven companies. Yamada also raised $1,850 from the sale, and all proceeds will be given to the Suzuki family by the end of this school year. The rummage sale took BIZ FEST (ConƟnued from page 5)

about the state budget, how it has been affected by budget cuts, and how Hawai‘i’s senators plan to replenish it. He also answered questions afterward. OTHER SPEAKERS A business panel informed the attendees about how to acquire loans and grants, employment opportunities, and proving ancestry for Native Hawaiians. Dr. Crabbe shared statistics about Native Hawaiians gathered from the 2010 census and announced OHA’s release of the 2011 Hawaiian Databook, which is planned for the end of September. Programs Specialist at Alu Like, Dr. Ishmael Stagner, shared “The 5 F’s of Polynesian Society,” his take on the essentials of what make Polynesians who they are culturally. His 5 F’s are faith, family, food, fun and feeling. Ms. Alaka‘i Paleka served as Master of Ceremonies for

Photo courtesy of KYLIE YAMADA

Junior Kalia Tamashiro and senior Makamae Palos assist Kylie Yamada (seated center) with a fundraising rummage sale at the Maui Waena cafeteria. Proceeds from the sale will benefit the Suzuki family.

place on Saturday, Sept. 3 at the Maui Waena Intermediate School cafeteria from 8 a.m.12 p.m. “The rummage sale was supposed to start at 8:00 a.m., but people were already there by 7:00. We had to end early at 10:00 a.m. because there was barely anything left,” said the event, and Maui Mayor Alan Arakawa and OHA Chairperson Colette Machado gave opening statements. “More and more we need to involve people who want to work for the community, not just for self-gratification,” Mayor Arakawa said. OUTSIDE THE BALLROOM The conference started with a ceremony honoring past queens of the Hawaiian Islands who were born and raised on Maui. Traditionally, the ceremony would begin at sunrise, with a canoe being brought to shore. Because of the unexpected south swell, the ceremony commenced with only a procession of paddlers down the shore of the beach. It concluded with traditional hula offered to the queens. Exhibitions were set up outside the ballroom throughout the day. They ranged from the Hawaiian Small Business Development Center to Hawai‘i Commercial & Sugar Company.

Yamada who ran the rummage sale. Proceeds from the rummage sale will help pay for all of the medical treatment Suzuki received and also possibly for funeral expenses. Other than managing through the passing of Ikaika, the family has had other hard-

ABOVE: Mr. Dirk Soma of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs shares information with junior Mehanaokala Lee. RIGHT: Junior Pono Freitas networks with a member of the Maui Native Hawaiian Chamber of Commerce.

Photos by HOKU KRUEGER

ships to deal with, such as the chromosome disorder of Sky Suzuki, Ikaika’s14-year-old brother. “It really made me appreciate what I had because when things are bad someone else always has it worse,” Yamada said.


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Visual arts teacher Ms. Angie Abe entered her classroom one morning at the beginning of the school year, not anticipating the surprise that awaited her. A pair of black, furry creatures sat in the corner of her room staring up at her, equally surprised. It took her only seconds to realize what the culprits were: mice. “I closed the doors, called operations, and within an hour the mice were caught,” Mrs. Abe said. Mice became an issue this summer for Hawaiian and ‘ukulele kumu Kalei ‘A‘aronaLorenzo. “I would say over a month we caught probably over forty mice,” said Kumu Kalei, who used paper glue traps to catch the mice invading her home before calling Terminix to help with the problem. “I felt like I was cleaning the house literally every night. It made me mad because the house is brand new,” Kumu Kalei said. The mice were eating dry foods in her cupboards such as oatmeal, cocoa packets, granola and saimin. “We ended up wrapping all of our dry goods,” Kumu Kalei said. According to her, mice have also been commonly seen around campus hiding in the shrubbery. Donald Taketa, Supervisor of the Vector Control Branch of the Hawai‘i Department of Health on Maui, said that the problem is seasonal. “We had a wet winter and

spring, and because of the rain there’s a lot of grass and, more importantly, grass seeds,” Mr. Taketa said. According to him, mice feed primarily on grass seeds. The more food there is for the mice, the more they can multi-

“I felt like I was cleaning the house literally every night. It made me mad because the house is brand new” -Kumu Kalei ‘A‘arona-Lorenzo

ply. On Maui, ranch land is surrounded by housing subdivisions. Homeowners are beginning to notice mice in and around their homes because now that the weather is drier, there is no food left in the ranch land for the large population of mice that sprang from earlier seasons. These mice are branching out to those surrounding subdivisions, whose lots are overgrown with grass and other plants because of all the rain Maui experienced over the last year, Mr. Taketa said. Vector Control’s purpose is to control and prevent the spread of organisms that transmit infectious agents and diseases. In 2009, The Vector Control Branch on Maui was hit with a reduction in force in which 6 of

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Less campus deer for now

Mice move in on Maui residents By HOKU KRUEGER, news co-editor

News

By HOKU KRUEGER, news co-editor

their 8 employees were laid off. “There is an effect because there are only two of us in the office, so we can’t do much,” Mr. Taketa said. Homeowners now have to take responsibility for controlling and preventing the spread of vectors on their property. A vector is any type of organism that can carry and transport infectious viruses and diseases to and from humans. Mr. Taketa said that steps that people can take to do this include keeping their property free of harborage, not leaving any small places for them to hide, keeping their grass short, not piling anything on the ground, and feeding animals only enough food for one meal. Operations Team Leader at Kamehameha Schools Maui Mr. Edwin Torres agreed that a part of the problem is how people dispose of food products into trash bins and other receptacles. “We are creatures of habit the same way they are,” Mr. Torres said.

Photos by KA LEO O NA¯ KOA STAFF

There are less deer on the KS Maui campus, as evidenced by the lack of deer droppings on lawns and pathways, a common sight in the 2010-2011 school year. “The reduction of deer traffic on campus is likely the result of higher rainfall during the summer months that results in more vegetative growth and water in pasture lands and gulches adjacent to campus,” Campus Operations Director Mr. Carl Alexander said. Because of this, the deer have food and water sources away from campus.

Photo by HOKU KRUEGER

A deer crossing sign is posted at the exit of the KSM campus.

The deer were originally drawn to campus because it is irrigated during dry conditions, which is also why they are drawn to properties such as golf courses and farms. Several from the KSM campus have taken eradication measures after obtaining a permit through the Department of Land and Natural Resources. Their efforts have been going on for two years on a periodic basis, according to Mr. Alexander. Residents surrounding KSM are also taking actions to eradicate the deer. Though the deer on campus has lessened, “DLNR estimates that the deer population island wide is increasing,” Mr. Alexander said. Deer have caused several problems on the KSM campus in past years, including damage to plants, trees and shrubbery, traffic hazards on ‘A‘apueo Parkway and droppings on campus playgrounds.


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KS Maui cracks down on parking By HOKU KRUEGER, news co-editor

Problems with following student parking rules in past years has led to stronger enforcement from the Kamehameha Schools Maui high school administration. High school Vice Principal Leo Delatori is now reprimanding those who break the rules. Student drivers must have their blue passes visible through their front windshield while driving into school, as well as while the car is parked in the student parking lot. “We’ve had problems in the past where students were using passes from graduated siblings or their parents’ white passes,” said KS Safety Coordinator Martin Lacio. Mr. Lacio said that another problem is that some students have dark tints on their windshields, making it difficult to view the blue parking pass. “It was sort of out of the blue,” said senior Nicole

Ka‘auamo about the new enforcement. She is one of the students who was reprimanded because “they couldn’t see my parking pass on my rearview mirror” due to the tint on the top part of her windshield, she said. Students used to be able to pick passes up directly from Mr. Lacio’s office, where they are made. Now, the passes are routed down to Mr. Delatori, who issues them to students. “It was asked by campus safety that I speak with them. The problem was that students were filling out the application without actually reading the rules on it,” Mr. Delatori said. He meets with the students before giving them their passes and reminds them of the details of the rules. According to Mr. Delatori, since KSM began enforcing the rules more strictly, campus

Photo by HOKU KRUEGER

Student driver Jarred Pulido properly displays his blue parking pass as he reverses into a stall in the student parking lot one morning.

security has had to reprimand students less for breaking them. “I think students understand more that when you get your license, whether it’s on cam-

pus or off campus, you are responsible for the safety of the people in your car and in the community as well,” Mr. Delatori said.

Hawai‘i suicide: how to get help By HOKU KRUEGER, news co-editor

According to the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, between the years 1999 and 2005 in Hawai‘i: Suicide was the 11th ranking cause of death An average of 126 state residents died of suicide each year 10.9 out of every 100,000 people committed suicide 414 people were hospitalized each year because of attempted suicide Suicide hotlines dedicated to helping those who are considering suicide include:

Photo courtesy of MS. PRISCILLA MIKELL

Along with students from other high schools, KSM seniors Melia Mattos, Lilinoe Bal, Nikki Davis and Kara Frampton waved signs along Ka‘ahumanu Avenue on Wednesday, Sept. 7, as part of the 2011 Suicide Prevention Week activities. Davis created posters (seen above) and a flyer (on facing page) as a part of the Prevent Suicide Maui Country Task Force’s name and logo design contest for her senior project. The contest is open to all Maui County public and private high school students.

USA National Suicide Hotline: 1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-7842433) National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (1800-273-8255)


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y, ligibilit e t u o b oubt a . d n i n Whe s. Cajudoy call Mr

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Destroying hunger one ton at a time By SHERIDAN KAILIEHU, staff writer

Senior Kyeton Littel led a canned food drive to benefit the Maui Food Bank for his senior project Monday, Aug. 29-Friday Sept. 9. “I chose to do a food drive because I wanted to help people who can’t help themselves because of the tough economy. I always feel spoiled when I come to school and know that I’ll be in an air conditioned classroom with clean tables and knowing I’ll get to eat as much as I want during lunch,” Littel said. The canned food drive was also a chance for each class to compete for spirit points. The class that donated the most canned foods received 400 points and the other classes won 300, 200, or 100 points. On the final day, Littel an-

By SHANISE KAAIKALA, staff writer

Kamehameha Schools Maui is preparing for that time of the year again: homecoming! This year’s theme is Elements Unite. “They needed to relate it [the theme] to this school year’s theme, hulia¯mahi,” said ASKSM President Christopher Kim. Throughout the week, there will be five themed dress-up days, and participants will earn spirit points for their classes. There will be three basic dress-up day options. First, students can wear a school uniform. No points will be awarded for this option. Second, there will be a nonuniform dress option. Students may wear pants and shirts predominant in the days’ colors and dress code shoes.

Photo by HOKU KRUEGER

Seniors Kainoa Santos, Ryder Pahukoa, Travis Haas and Kyeton Littel along with freshman Buddy Santos work together to load the Maui Food Bank truck with goods raised through Littel's senior project.

nounced the winners: the seniors came in first place with over 1,000 pounds of food. The sophomores came in second; the freshmen came in third, and the junior class was in last place with 19 pounds of food. Overall, the drive collected over a ton of food to be donated. “I think the food drive is good

for the community because we get to help others and make a difference,” said Jessica Walker, a freshman who donated four cans to the food drive. “To me, that’s how our ancestors were. If someone was hungry, they’d give at least half of what they had, even if what they had was very little,” Littel said.

The Maui Food Bank accepts donations throughout the year. To donate, drop off the non-perishable foods at any local fire station or at the Maui Food Bank itself, which is located at 760 Kolu Street in Wailuku. They are open Monday-Friday, 7:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.

Shorts are not allowed. Neither are slippers, tights or tank tops. This option will earn 1 spirit point. The third option is to dress up to match the theme of each day. “This will be worth 3-5 points. We’re still deciding,” said Ms. Naomi Ashman, student activities coordinator. Specific dress-up rules and regulations will be posted throughout campus. Monday’s dress-up element is fire, the seniors’ element. Some examples of costumes that students can dress up in are fire fighters, the Human Torch, Mr. Sun or any character associated with fire. Students may wear red, orange and yellow shirts and accessories with long pants and uniform shoes for the nondress option. Tuesday’s element is wind, the juniors’ ele-

ment. Students can wear purple and silver shirts and accessories. Some examples of a costume would be a pilot, a tornado, a bird or any windrelated object or character. Wednesday’s element is water, the sophomores’ element. Wear white or blue shirts. Examples for a water costume would be a paddler, a fish, a sailor, a mermaid or anything related to water. Thursday’s element is earth, the freshmen’s element. Wear green or brown shirts and accessories. A few costumes would be an earth bender, earth Pokémon or even a character from A Bug’s Life. Friday, wear your class homecoming shirt and long jeans or long pants in your class color. One event to especially look forward to is boys cheer-

leading. It was excluded from all homecoming activities two years ago because of two classes using inappropriate moves, including aerial stunts, and for having songs with inappropriate lyrics. “Chris [Kim] wanted boys cheer to come back, and the ASKSM went to the administration and brought it back,” said Ms. Ashman, student activities coordinator. “This is their second and final chance,” she said. The homecoming game will be Saturday, Nov. 5 against Maui High School. Though the football games are scheduled for midday with the homecoming dance to follow, the final scheduling was still under discussion at the time of this writing. It is likely that events will proceed as scheduled.


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Class of 2012 By TUʻI MANA MATEAKI senior class president

A quarter of the year has gone by and the senior class has been busy with PAL’s, products and preparing for life after high school. Time is short for seniors. Along with planning for college and keeping up with daily assignments, the seniors are gearing up for their last homecoming week. The class of 2012 is eager to taste victory again as they come together in the spirit of Hu¯liamahi to win spirit week just like they did as sophomores. Here are a few tips for senior success: be aware of upcoming deadlines (college visits, college applications, homework, and tests), be organized (set priorities), and be prayerful (seek the Lord for guidance), support the senior class (homecoming activities, senior nights etc.). Go forth together as one.

Class of 2013 By HULALI BROWN, junior class president

The junior class officers have been working hard to ensure a successful and wellorganized school year. We appreciate the class participation. We have high hopes for Spirit Week and homecoming. Practices are underway, and you are obligated to stick with the activity you signed up for. Suggestions and ideas are always welcome. We can only learn from our past mistakes. Along with homecoming, we are also focusing on prom. If you have not signed up to join the prom committee and wish to do so, contact your officers

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or Mr. Lopez. Please do not forget about the mandatory PSAT test taking on October 12. As you face the busy year ahead, there will be times where you may feel overwhelmed. Remember that you are an ‘ohana and can always turn to each other for help.

Class of 2014 By AAREN-JOSHUA K SORIANO sophomore class president

Spirit Week begins on Monday, Oct. 31 and ends Saturday, Nov. 5. The theme is “Elements Unite.” We are the element water, the most powerful element there is. If you want to come out and help with the committees come to Mrs. Laepaʻa’s room during lunch. Speaking of lunch, we need people to volunteer for Warrior Wednesdays (biweekly) and Lunch Time Activities; we cannot continue having the same people in the activities. So, talk to your officers or Mrs. Laepaʻa a week before the Warrior Wednesday. If you would like a prize at the end of the year, you must be active in helping us with Homecoming, participating in LTAs and other events. Remember, if you don’t help with anything; you can’t complain. Sophomore Sleepover is now Friday, Oct. 21-Saturday, Oct. 22. We will be sleeping in the Wrestling Room. Watch for signs or posters for further details. There is no charge. Food and fun will be provided. Sophomore Banquet is scheduled for Saturday, March 24, right after Spring Break. If you have any suggestions talk to your officers or Mrs. Laepaʻa.

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Class of 2015 By SHAI IBARA freshmen class president

Freshmen, remember to rep the gray, and pump up the spirit, especially with homecoming coming up! We encourage you all to get involved this year, whether it’s through sports, clubs, or helping out with Spirit Week. Also, go out to the games and help support and cheer on our classmates. Homecoming week is about a month and a half away, so please stay informed about committee meetings if you signed up for anything. Information will be posted in Mrs. Laepa’a’s and Mr. Rickard’s classrooms. Anyone is welcome to come or help out even if you didn’t sign up. The freshman class t-shirt design contest was a tie between Aaron Kokubun and Lilia Lorenzo. They are working on combining their designs so they both can go onto our homecoming shirts. There will be opportunities throughout the year to earn spirit points for the freshman class, so please step up, and don’t be afraid to win.

Homecoming Week Schedule Monday: Battle of the Bands (assembly schedule) Tuesday: Sheet Ball (lunch time activity at the counseling center) Wednesday: the return of Boys Cheer. (lunch time activity at the counseling center) Thursday: Don’t Forget the Lyrics (lunch time activity at the dining hall). Friday: class cheer and step (assembly schedule)

ASKSM president’s message By CHRISTOPHER KIM ASK president

As I look to the school year ahead, I am reminded of a scene from The Lion King. Do you remember when Mufasa said to Simba, “A king’s time as ruler rises and falls like the sun. One day, Simba, the sun will set on my time here, and will rise with you as the new king”? In the movie, Simba shakes off his selfish behavior and rises to fulfill his destiny – to be the next leader of the pride. When I look at our student body, I ask myself, “Who will be the next leader?” Each of you has the potential to be that person. It is not a matter of whether you can or cannot be a leader. It is a matter of when you will come to realize that you already are a leader. In all of us, there is a special talent waiting to be developed. You may be the “voice”; the one who is able to speak for the people. You may be the “eyes”; the one who is able to envision a better tomorrow. Or you may be the “ears”; the one who is able to listen to another. Although we each have our strengths, the potential of what we can do together is limitless. In areas that you may be weak, others may be strong. We are the leaders of Hawai’i. We are Hawaiians. We were meant to hulia¯mahi. We are the students of the Kamehameha Schools Maui Campus. Who’s ready for the challenge?


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

ʻA¯haʻilono

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Ho‘omau ka ho‘olina o na¯ mele Hawaiʻi Na HOKU KRUEGER, mea kākau

Lawe ʻia maila na¯ mele Hawai’i i ke kula kiʻekiʻe ʻo Kamehameha Maui ma ka Po¯ʻalima, la¯ 9 o Kepakemapa. Na Greg Juan o ka papa ʻumiku¯ma¯lua i lawe mai i kekahi mau ka¯naka hoʻokani pila kaulana loa i ko ka¯kou kula no ka¯na ho¯ʻike nui. Ua ma¯lama ʻia ihola na¯ papahana i loko o ka hale o K e o¯ p u¯ o l a n i n o k a l a¯ holoʻokoʻa. ʻO Sheldon Brown la¯ua ʻo Kevin Brown o ka hui mele ʻo Wai‘ehu Sons na¯ ka¯naka i hele mai me ko la¯ua hoaaloha ʻo Dennis Kamakahi o ka hui mele ʻo Sons of Hawaiʻi. Aia kekahi hoaaloha ʻe¯ aʻe ʻo Norman DeCosta i ko¯kua mai ma o ka hi¯meni a hoʻokani ʻana. Na la¯kou ʻeha¯ i hoʻokani a walaʻau e pili ana i ko la¯kou ola me ke kumu o ko la¯kou aʻo ʻana i na¯ mele. Hoʻokani la¯kou i na¯ ki¯ka¯ ki¯ho¯ʻalu a na kekahi, ʻo Sheldon Brown, i ho¯ʻalu i na¯ kaula o ka¯na ʻukulele. Ma ka hoʻokani ʻukulele e loaʻa ai ke kaila i kapa ʻia ʻo “Cha-lang-alang.” “‘Aʻole ke¯ia he huaʻo¯lelo maoli no na¯ mele, aka¯ he ʻano kani no¯ ia o ka ʻukulele. No ke¯ia kaila, ʻano like me ka ʻoluʻolu o ka hoʻokani ʻana ma ka pa¯ hale me kou ʻohana,” i ʻo¯lelo mai ai ʻo Juan. Kono ʻia maila ʻo Juan e hi¯meni pu¯ me la¯kou. Pe¯la¯ pu¯ me kekahi hauma¯na papa ʻehiku, ʻo ia hoʻi ʻo Kaulike Pescaia. He hoapili ʻo ia na ka ʻohana o Sheldon Brown. Ma ka hopena o ka ho¯ʻike, hi¯meni aʻela la¯kou i kekahi mele no ko la¯kou hoa aloha ʻo Pekelo Cosma. Ua pono ʻo ia e hoʻokani me la¯kou aka¯ naʻe, ua hala iho nei ʻo ia. ʻOiai la¯kou e hi¯meni ana, ua hiki ke ʻike ʻia na¯ kiʻi o Pekelo ma luna o ka papa kiʻiʻoniʻoni.

Pa‘i ‘ia kēia mau ki‘i e HOKU KRUEGER

Ma luna: Ha‘i ‘o Dennis Kamakahi a me Kevin Brown i kekahi mo‘olelo i ke anaina. Ma lalo hema: Pa‘ipa‘i lima ‘o Kailey Cabos no na¯ mea ho¯‘ike. Ma lalo ‘a¯kau: ‘O¯lelo pa¯‘ani ‘o Greg Juan mai ka papa alaka‘i me na¯ mea ho‘okani pila.

Ua ko¯kua no¯ hoʻi ʻo Cody Pueo Pata ma ka palaka ʻekahi me ke aʻo ʻana aku e pili ana i ke oli a me ka hi¯meni leo kiʻekiʻe. Hoʻi maila ʻo ia e hi¯meni a hoʻokani pu¯ ma ka palaka ʻeha¯ no ka ʻaha mele. ʻO¯lelo mai ʻo Greg Juan, “Manaʻolana au, e hoʻomanaʻo

ana na¯ hauma¯na i na¯ mea a pau i aʻo ʻia mai e na¯ mea hoʻokani pila, no ka mea, ina¯ hala la¯kou, e loaʻa ana kekahi hanauna hou i hiki ke hoʻomau i na¯ mele Hawaiʻi.” Hoʻoma¯kaukau ʻo Greg i ke¯ia papahana me ke ko¯kua o Kumu Kalei ‘A‘arona-Lorenzo.

“He ko¯kua nui ke¯ia ʻano papahana e hoʻomau i na¯ mea Hawaiʻi,” i ʻo¯lelo mai ai ʻo Sheldon Brown. Mea mai ʻo Taylor Harris o ka papa ʻumiku¯ma¯lua, “Makemake nui au i ke¯ia, ʻano like me ka walaʻau ʻana me koʻu mau ku¯puna.”


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

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Landlines: the next woolly mammoth? By KIANA KAMALU, op-ed editor

One of the most ubiquitous items out there is the cell phone, which evolved from the land line. Today, those landlines are quickly headed for extinction. According to the National Health Interview Survey Jan.–June 2010, families with only cell phones are growing. About 26.6% only had cell phones and this percentage had increased 2.1% since

2009. This survey found that during the first six months of 2010, about 40 million adults lived in cell phone-only homes. In homes that have not yet taken the cell phone-only plunge, the number of cell phones is quickly overtaking the number of landline phones. A Ka Leo O Na¯ Koa poll taken in September shows that 122 out of 200 students, almost 84%, have four or more cellphones in their households, but only 1.5% have four or more landline phones. The ratio is only slightly different among the teachers with 30 of 40 teachers, or 75%, having four or more cellphones and about 6% with four or more landline phones. Freshman Taylor Lee does not have a landline at home. “I don’t notice it’s gone because I never used it,” Lee said. “No one uses it any more because

no one needs it.” Lee believes cell phones are better because, “They are portable and they have a lot more features.” He also said that landlines are bothersome because of the incessant telemarketers. Another student has the opposite (and rare) situation of having four landlines in his home. “I think that landlines are very useful,” said freshman Dayson Damuni. “They are used very often in my home, and are even used more than cell phones.” He actually prefers the landline and thinks they are much easier to use and “they are always in the house, unlike cell phones that travel everywhere.” “Using landlines are also easier because they are much bigger than cell phones,” said Damuni. As popular as cell phones are, Mr. Siuai Laufou, the

a cell phone because I am not subjected To constantly answering calls, reading messages, Returning (ConƟnued on page 15)

Pollsters: Reid Cairme and Mehana Lee Sample: 200 students and 40 teachers Poll Taken: September 2011

People surveyed

People surveyed

How many landline phones and cell phones are in your household?

band and orchestra teacher, does not own one. “I chose not to have a cell phone because I never needed one to begin with,” Mr. Laufou said. “People tell me that I am lucky not to have

Number of phones

Number of phones


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

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Web site offers businesses, public a quick and easy way to fund school projects and help teachers

Technology pairs donations, classrooms By AMANDA LEE, news co-editor

People across the nation are lending a helping hand to teachers through a Web site called donorschoose.org. Their catchphrase is, “Help a classroom in need.” This is a site that allows donors to choose classroom projects to fund. Teachers post projects on the site. Projects can be anything from funding a class trip to refurnishing the library with new computers. Donorschoose.org then advertises their request for funding and possible benefactors can view and choose to fund the project. Donors can and have donated as few as $5 to over a million dollars. KSM language arts teacher Ms. Kye Haina has been a donor at DonorsChoose for two years. Last year, she received an e-mail from DonorsChoose. It told about an especially generous benefactor for donorschoose.org. “Last year, an anonymous benefactor called donorschoose.org and asked how much it would cost to fund all the projects in California. They told him ‘a million dollars,’ and he said, ‘Do it.’” He donated enough money to fund all the projects in California and a little more, Ms. Haina said. In Hawaiʻi, there are 38 projects posted by teachers. There are 12 on Hawai‘i island, LANDLINES (ConƟnued from page 14)

calls, or Simply attached to the phone 24/7.” He feels that landlines are better to have because they are convenient, and so far nothing has gone wrong with them. “Outside of work and the house, I am not reachable. That’s how things were until the arrival of the cell phone. My contact with people has been normal with the use of emails, landline phones, or mailed letters. Mr. Laufou also believes that the cell phone is a major factor affecting society.

24 in Honolulu, 1 on Kaua‘i, and 1 on Maui. Recently, Mr. William Fisher,

an English teacher at King Kekaulike High School, posted to the site asking donors for computers for his students. “Every computer that I can provide in my classroom is an opportunity for those students to experience 21st century learning,” Mr. Fisher said. In order to receive funding for a project, teachers write an essay explaining why they want it after calculating the amount of money it will take to fund their project. “I like the fact that you can be very specific about where the money is going. You can be very specific about where it’s coming from. You can put your project together using real vendors like Best Buy – vendors that I’ve used before for purchases – and the people who are donating can actually see where the money is going. I think that’s very im-

“Most people with cellphones are [so] addicted and attached to them that their [entire] day will be ruined by misplacing their cellphone,” he said. “It is like losing your wallet. You go nuts.” Not only are today's cell phone users “addicted” to their phones, as Mr. Laufou suggests, but they are also quickly becoming ill-equipped to use the standard landlines. At the start of the school year, one KSM staffer shared her story of her pre-adolescent son trying to use a landline phone for the first time. She said that she had instructed him to make a call on

it, but could tell that he was confused. He lifted and replaced the handset several times, she said. When she asked what was wrong, he said that the phone was making a funny noise. As it turns out, that funny noise was simply the dial tone, a sound he was unfamiliar with. Still, Mr. Laufou is not alone. There are other dedicated landline users out there. It might surprise some to know that some of Hollywood’s greatest stars do not use or own cell phones. According to 10 Famous Celebrities Without Cell Phones a Hub Page post by Kathryn

Photo by AMANDA LEE

Mr. William Fisher, King Kekaulike High School English teacher used DonorsChoose.org to fund a set of computers for his classroom.

portant,” said Mr. Fisher. According to the Web site, “DonorsChoose.org is an online charity that makes it easy for anyone to help students in need. Here's how it works: public school teachers from every corner of America post classroom project requests on DonorsChoose.org. Requests range from pencils for a poetry writing unit, to violins for a school recital, to microscope slides for a biology class.” If you would like to look at some of the projects go to donorschoose.org. And, if you are feeling generous, perhaps you’ll decide to donate a few dollars to help a classroom in need.

DonorsChoose reaches out By AMANDA LEE, news co-editor

According to the donorschoose.org Web site, since 2003, when the site started, there have been… $88,016,035 raised for projects 5,251,074 students helped 215,229 projects funded 190,272 teachers posting 48,251 schools participating 550,307 supporters contributing 1,197,706 contributions made Vercillo, celebrities Vince Vaughn, Tom Cruise, Elton John, Christopher Walken and Tyra Banks do not own them. Vercillo has been a freelance writer and blogger for 10 years. The landline is still useful. Landlines make it easier to fax documents and to call people in foreign countries without worrying about software updates, service plans, or compatibility. Since they are physical lines, they are also more reliable when it comes to emergencies, during which cell phone services can become overwhelmed more easily than landlines.


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Issue 1

125th anniversary of Kamehameha Schools

A legacy’s beginnings

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By KALANI RUIDAS, features co-editor

Dec. 19, 2011, will mark the kickoff of the 125-year anniversary of the founding of Kamehameha Schools. To celebrate, Ka Leo O Na¯ Koa will feature an installment of school-related facts and history in each issue. In this issue, we take a look at the school’s beginnings. Find the answers to questions below in the picture captions on these two pages. 1. When and where was the original Kamehameha School for Boys located? 2. How many students were at the school on the first day in 1887? 3. What time did the day begin? 4. What kinds of classes did they have? 5. What other sorts of things did they study? 6. What did girls study? 7. What were their uniforms like? 8. Who chose the school colors?

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7. The first uniforms were designed by the first principal, Reverend William Brewster Oleson. Students wore neat and pressed shirts and pants.

4

6. Along with the standard curriculum, there were sewing, cooking, laundering, nursing and hospital practice classes. Girls 13 and older learned how to be homemakers and mothers. Above: Girls in Domestic Economy class.

3 3. 5:30 AM. The girls school only had one day off per month. Above: Girls in Sewing class. Some sold the clothes they made in the school store. Philippians 4:8 is pictured on the tapestry behind them, reflecting the Christian foundation of Kamehameha.

4. The core classes were arithmetic, algebra, geometry, English, geography, penmanship, business, health, bookkeeping and mechanical drawing.

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5. Their time was also dedicated to devotional and vocational studies such as wood turning, carpentry, pattern making, blacksmithing, tailoring, horseshoeing and Photos from KSBE archives dairy farming. Military disciplines were also a major part of the boys’ lives. Uldrick Thompson, principal of Kamehameha from1898-1901, said, “The curriculum emphasized industrial training considered necessary for a Hawaiian to achieve personal and social success.”


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Volume VII

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

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1 1. The school for boys opened in 1887 on Oʻahu at Pa¯lama. The first girls school was opened in 1894. It wasn’t until 1965 that the boys and girls schools combined into Kamehameha Schools. In the photo above, students line up in their chapel dress. 2. 40 Hawaiian men (members of first graduating class of 1891 in photo at left) 8. Rev. Oleson and the school’s music teacher, Mr. Theodore Richards, wrote Sons of Hawaiʻi, the school song. The cadet officers below would have already been singing the alma mater in 1927.

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Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

Fun facts: County Fair returns for 89th anniversary By KELSIE CHONG, features co-editor

The annual Maui County Fair will celebrate its 89th anniversary on Thursday, Sept. 29 at War Memorial Stadium. To kick off the fourday event, the Maui Fair Parade will begin at 4:00 p.m. Gates will open to the general public by the end of the parade at 5:00 p.m. Admission prices are the same as last year. Adult tickets go for $7, children 5-11 are $3 and children under 4 are free. The newest activity entry is the Events Arena. This stage will be located in front of the stadium pool on the lawn and will feature local entertainment and activities. “We try to add new events

and activities every year to the fair to keep it current and interesting,” said Maui County Fair Managing Director Sherri Grimes. The fair is an annual event that attracts many each year. While having fun with friends and family, keep safety in mind. Grimes suggests, looking both ways twice before crossing the road. She said drivers often get distracted by the lights and noise coming from the fair. She also advises that fair goers should be aware of their surroundings and always pay attention to what is

going on around them. “The management of the fair has a primary focus and that is to present to the community a safe and fun event for all,” Grimes said. You don’t have to wait until Thursday to enjoy the fair. Here are some fun facts to read while you wait for the real fun to begin: Largest number of fair goers on single day? A total of 31,658 people attended the fair on Saturday, Oct. 2004. Saturdays are always the busiest days, followed by Sundays. Thursdays are least crowded. Most interesting object placed in the lost and found? A diamond ring in 1995. Directors and management of the county fair could not figure out how the ring slipped off the person’s finger, but it was later returned to its rightful owner.

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How long does it take to assemble the rides? With a crew of 15, working 10+ hours a day, it takes about three days. The Musical Express takes the longest to assemble because of its complexity. Heaviest animal exhibited? A bull estimated to weigh over 2,200 lbs. claimed the title as heaviest animal in the livestock exhibit. The heaviest animal that has been brought to the fair was an elephant, weighing over four tons or 8,000 lbs. Any animals escaped? In past years, only the smaller animals and poultry have escaped. Owners of these animals were not surprised because incidents like these are common. There have been no serious escapes from the livestock exhibit. Fair’s previous locations? The Maui County Fair was not always held at War Memorial Stadium. In 1989, the Maui County Fair was relocated to the War Memorial complex. Prior to that, the fair was held where the Ford car dealership is currently located. The first fair was held at Wells Park in Wailuku. Number of participants in the parade? Last year, there were over 5,000 participants in the parade. When the fair had just begun, in 1918, there was no opening day parade. “It’s by far one of the most lookedforward-to days and activities of the fair,” Grimes said. Estimated number of fair goers? Approximately 90,000 people are estimated to attend the fair this year. According to the Maui County Population Census for 2010, Maui, the third most populated island, has a population of 154,834 people.


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

By AMANDA LEE, staff writer

Ask Amanda is coming soon! Got questions? Need answers? Submit your question during lunch in the Ask Amanda box or email at askamandaksm@gmail.com. I will publish the answer right here, in the school paper. Questions can be about anything! I will use my finely honed research skills to find the answer to anything and everything that you’ve ever wanted to know. Everyone’s got questions, but I have the answers. Trust me, your questions are in good hands. Have an idea, but scared to ask? Don’t be. Check out the example below, and you’ll see how easy it is to ask and get the answers you need. Dear Amanda, How do you tie a tie? Signed, Knot in the Know

College flyins benefit seniors By REID CAIRME, staff writer

Everyone knows that college representatives fly in for college visits to help students gain information about different colleges. But, many don’t know that some colleges offer a college fly-in, where students are able to fly out and attend that college for a few days on a trip paid in full by that college. “The student will be able to gain first-hand experience about college life.” said Ms. Lisa Correa, post-high counselor.

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Dear Knot, I hear you! Ties are becoming nearly non-existent! So, what’s a person to do when it’s time to get fancy? Never fear, I’m going to teach you how to tie the Half Windsor Knot. They actually have different styles of knots for ties, but this one is the most versatile. 1) Start with the wide end ("W") of your necktie on the right, extending about 12 inches below the narrow end ("N") on the left. 2) Then cross the wide end over the narrow end. 3) Bring the wide end around and behind the narrow end. 4) Then bring the wide end up. 5) Pull the wide end through the loop and to the right. 6) Bring the wide end around front, over the narrow end from right to left. 7) Again, bring the wide end up and through the loop. 8) Then, bring the wide end down through the knot in front. 9) And -- using both hands -tighten the knot carefully and draw it up to the collar. Students interested in visiting colleges will need to have shown an interest in that particular school in their college portfolio, meet the expected criteria required by the college, pass KSM’s eligibility requirements, and apply. Each college has its own deadline for meeting the requirements. Traditionally KSM has worked with Stanford, Dartmouth, Harvard, Yale, and Wesleyan University. Occidental, Skidmore, Bentley and Kobe are among others that have a fly-in program. Students who are interested in a certain college must see Ms. Correa for sign-up information. Applying for the fly-in is like applying to the school. The school may require letters of

September 23, 2011

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Want more information on how to tie ties? Go to: http:// www.tie-a-tie.net

Sincerely,

recommendation and an essay depending on the college’s admission requirements. Students who wish to visit these colleges must be interested in the school or a certain area of education that the school offers. Students shouldn’t go “just cuz,” Ms. Correa said. “The school doesn’t want just random people to attend their school,” Counselor Kato Moala said. “They are looking for particular students who are truly interested in that college.” “I feel that the college visits are a big help for the seniors. They can go to the college and actually experience what life is like attending that college. It helps them decide if they really want to go,” Ms. Correa said.

While this is a great opportunity for students, it is very difficult to be chosen for a flyin. Because the schools pay for the entire trip, only a select few from our school usually attend. There are two types of flyins, pre-admission fly-ins and admission fly-ins. Pre-admission fly-ins are for students who are strongly interested in attending the school and take place in the first quarter. Admission fly-ins are for students who have already been accepted into the college and take place in the third quarter. This year, 2-3 students will be making the visits according to Ms. Correa.

Amanda Lee


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

With increasing new technology, inventors are furiously releasing the newest, latest and greatest gizmos and gadgets. These devices often come in brightly colored boxes, practically jumping up and down and promising consumers a better, easier, more comfortable life if you “pick one up today.” But do they really work? This year, I have valiantly taken on the task of testing these crazy contraptions and providing you with an honest, unbiased review in our new regular feature, Reviews by Ruidas. Product: SideSleeper Pro Pillow The claim: The SideSleeper Pro Pillow was developed especially for those who sleep on their sides, providing them with the most restful and comfortable sleep possible. According to the official Web site, the design was patented in 2004 by chiropractor Dr. Larry Cole. The SideSleeper Pro is de-

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

Photo by KALANI RUIDAS

SIDESLEEPER PRO PILLOW

signed to align the sleeper’s spine and lessen the neck stiffness, external ear folding and back discomfort found in side sleepers. Specifics : The pillow measures 16 inches by 14 inches in a crescent shape, arching down around the back for support. Its filling is 100% polyester. It also features an inch-deep ear well for additional comfort. The good: There were several things I noticed straightway when I

Student survey:

first lay down on the SideSsleeper. First, my arm wasn’t being crushed under the pillow. I also noticed how comfortable my ear was in the ear well. My mother, who purchased the product for herself, said, “Yes it works. I previously had neck pain because my head was not aligned with my spine when I slept on my side. I had to bunch up my pillow to make it high enough so my head would be aligned. The SideSleeper is high enough to

Life

C7

maintain head alignment and gives back support. I also don’t have to sleep with my hand under my pillow to keep it in that position,” The bad: Like most people, I change positions throughout the night. When I tried the pillow, I eventually woke up on my back. So it did function well as a normal pillow, however not so much as what it was specifically designed for. The final analysis: Unfortunately, unless you’re onlycomfortable on your side or don’t move at all when you sleep, this product is only helpful for however long it takes to initially fall asleep. If you’re a dedicated side sleeper, it’s definitely worth the buy. If not, you’re better off with the pillow you’re already using. Price: $19.99 Available at: Wal-Mart, Sears, amazon.com and thesidesleeperpro.com Rating: 3 Sheep Ba-a-a-ad Still tossin’ and turnin’ Herding in z’s Comfortably counting A restful “sheep”

If you could have one wish, what would it be?

Josh Higa

Kyle Mauri

Amber Kama

Freshman

Sophomore

Junior

Senior

“To be a psychic so I can do all the fun stuff like lift objects, telekinesis and reading people’s minds, turn invisible and all that other stuff.”

“I would love to breathe underwater.”

“If I had one wish, it would be a week where teachers are NOT allowed to give homework.”

“The more you eat, the more buff you get.”

Compiled by KELSIE CHONG

Kyeton Littel


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Things to do at football 1. Cheer! Do not be afraid to be part of the crowd and stand, yell and dance along with the cheerleaders to support the football players. Break out of your shell! It makes the experience a lot more fun. 2. Make signs. Support the whole team or just one player. Make them shine so the players on the field know that there are people out there rooting for them. 3. Bring lots of friends. Inviting more than one friend will make it a night to remember. Going alone to a football game? That’s okay; there are plenty of people to sit with. Try sitting with the Spirit Club. 4. Participate in the “I-feel-sogood” cheer. Keep the cheerleaders busy. When you see them standing around yell: “Hey (insert cheerleader’s name) how do you feel?” She should reply: “I feel good, oh I feel so good, oh I feel so, oh I feel so, oh I feel so good, UGH.” If the cheerleaders yell at you, “Hey, how do you feel?” You should reply: “I feel good…”

Issue 1

Also try some of the other new cheers for 2011-12. 5. Be daring. Get a group to wear the same outfits to look unified. You could wear all blue including blue face paint, hair spray, clothes or shoes at one game. Come up with something to unify the KSM supporters; it makes our school look and feel stronger.

September 23, 2011

Life

C8

A timeless tradition By KALANI RUIDAS, features co-editor

Directions: Unscramble each of the clue words. Copy the letters in the numbered cells to other cells with the same number. Answers on page C9

New cheers Having trouble hearing the new cheers? Here are the words! Learn them and cheer along with the cheerleaders at the next game. Defense show your power Gimme a (give me a) P-O-W-E-R. Defense show your power. Gimme a (give me a) P-O-W-E-R. Defense show your power. Gimme a (give me a) P-O-W-E-R. Defense show your power, defense show your power, defense show your power. Pump it up Pump it up lets go big blue, pump it up lets go (repeat 2 more times). Pump it up lets go, pump it up lets go, pump it up let’s go. Defense hit, tackle rough Defense hit, *pause* tackle rough, defense HEY let’s get tough (repeat 2 more times). Defense hey let’s get tough, defense hey let’s get tough, defense hey let’s get tough. Stop that ball hey big D S-T *pause* *pause* O-P, stop that ball Hey big D (repeat 2 more times).

Secret message:

By KIANA KAMALU


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Horoscopes Horoscopes are for entertainment purposes only! If you need answers, you’ll find them in your Bible. By Nancy Black and Stephanie Clement, Tribune Media Services Graphics by KELSIE CHONG

AQUARIUS: Jan. 20-Feb. 18 A partner comes to18 your rescue Jan. 20-Feb.

when you comes find yourself Focus A partner to yourlost. rescue on abundance, balancelost. andFocus unity. when you find yourself A tiny bit of frivolity would beunity. on abundance, balance and okay ... fresh flowers?

PISCES: Feb. 19-March 20 Time to put on those work gloves and start digging for buried treasure. It requires effort, but you're being extremely productive now. It's closer

than you think.

ARIES: March 21-April 19 There's a serenity about you that's attractive. Contribute to your family. Accept circumstances as they are, and be an unstoppable proponent of love.

TARUS: April 20-May 20 The next two days are good for making changes at home. Put in the extra effort for improved output. Friends are happy to help. Whistle while you work, and the love grows.

GEMINI: May 21-June 21 Acceptance and ease rule the day. Get involved with studies and projects that require keen concentration; you've got it in spades. Finish up old business to make room for new.

CANCER: June 22-July 22 You're entering a prosperous phase. Don't fritter it all away. This next month you earn greater perspective, seeing all sides of issues. Use this to grow and get your house in order.

LEO: July 23-Aug.22 You're in charge and looking good. Unleash your brilliance. Follow a strong leader (or be one). Respectfully let others know what you want. Always say "thank you."

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

Life

Hawaiian: What’s your score?

By REID CAIRME, staff writer

Let’s take a quiz!! Answer each question to the best of your ability, then score yourself accordingly at the bottom. Let’s see how native you are. Freshman 1. What is the Hawaiian law system called? 2. A Hawaiian temple is known as a what? 3. Who united the Hawaiian Islands? Sophomore 4. What is the creation chant known as? 5. What is the term used for family gods? 6. Which king abolished the kapu system? Junior 7. What type of religion did Hawaiians practice? 8. What is the separation of men and women during mealtimes known as? 9. Who was the sacred wife of Kamehameha the Great? Senior 10. What year did missionaries arrive? 11. What were the 1970ʻs known as in Hawai`i? 12. When was Queen Lili`uokalani dethroned?

Graphic by KELSIE CHONG

Answers: 1. Kapu 2. Heiau 3. Kamehameha the Great 4. Kumulipo 5. `Aumakua 6. Liholiho 7. polytheism 8. `aikapu 9. Keo¯pu¯lani 10. 1820 11. The Hawaiian Renaissance 12. 1893 Scoring: Score 1 point for each correct answer on the freshman Level, 2 points on the sophomore Level, 3 on the junior Level, and 4 points on the senior Level. 40 points – Haaaawaiian!; 30 to 39 points – All that studying finally paid off; 20 to 29 points-You know just enough to get by; 10 to 19 – This is your culture, care enough to at least try; 1 to 10 points – Get off Facebook; 0 points – “Aloha and welcome to Maui, I hope you enjoyed your flight. Please enjoy your stay.”

Sudoku

level: easy

Fill in the blank squares so that each row, column and each 3-by-3 block contains all of the digits 1 thru 9.

VIRGO: Aug.23-Sept.22 Follow-up and completion are key for the next two days. You get farther than expected, and friends help. Take action to forward a brilliant idea.

Word scramble answer key: 1. Funnel Cakes 2. Games 3. Prizes 4. Entertainment 5. Better Living Tent 6. Ferris Wheel 7. Malasadas 8. Spin Out 9. Frosty Pog 10. Dizzy Dragons 11. Music Express 12. Coin Toss 13. Maui County 14. Poi Mochi 15. Livestock 16. Art Show 17. Pharaoh’s Fury 18. Hypnotism 19. Music Hidden message: Have fun at the fair

LIBRA: Sept. 23-Oct.22 You're the life of the party now. Get together with friends to create new possibilities. What do you have to offer? What can you invent together? Make music.

SCORPIO: Oct.23-Nov.21

Sudoku answers:

Assume more responsibility for the next few days, and don't expect it to be effortless. However, you're gaining lost of brownie points. Add a smile and some elbow grease.

SAGITARIUS: Nov. 22-Dec.21 Go for what you believe to achieve it now. Don't despair if the road to success has a few potholes, at least you're on the right road.

CAPRICORN: Dec. 22-Jan. 19 Now's a good time to reaffirm a commitment (romantic or otherwise). Discover the freedom of knowing where you're going, or at least knowing who you are.

C9

Puzzle used courtesy of KrazyDad.com. All rights reserved.


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

Sports

D1

Photo by NICOLE KA’AUAMO

Junior Anuhea Kaʻiaokamalie tips over Seabury Hall blocker Brooke Sturdevant in a 25-15, 25-18, 25-21 victory over the Spartans on September 3.

Girls volleyball remains dominant in regular season By NICOLE KAAUAMO, sports co-editor

The girls volleyball team is en route to another Maui Interscholastic League championship and state championship bout. After the first half of this season, the team has a winning record of five wins and no losses after playing La¯hainaluna, Seabury Hall, Baldwin, and Maui High. Their emphasis on teamwork and nonindividualization made the biggest impact. Defeating Oʻahu’s Hawaiʻi Baptist Academy and winning the Maui Invitiational Tournament was a good morale booster as well as an opportunity to make corrections

before the season began. Coach Bala Spencer said that even though the tournament helped the team know what to fix, it’s also difficult for them to come down from that level of play. “Our practices are so intense, and I think the girls are getting kind of tired of beating each other up,” he said. The practice match against Seabury was also fortunate because they are one of the team’s strongest opponents in the MIL, but being in two different divisions, the teams do not face off in the regular season unless they schedule a match among themselves. One of the team’s most effective strengths is their ability

to correct their mistakes early. Using this along with strong communication has minimized errors and given them opportunities to control the game. Junior Bobbi Kalama said before the season began that they have been putting emphasis on team bonding and togetherness. This is evident in their cooperative playing and the way they help each other throughout the games. Coach Bala is optimistic about the season. Their goal is not necessarily to win the state championship, but to place in the top four there. “I think one of the mistakes we made last year was not using what we had with Ginger [Long (’11)] and all of them.

But this year, we’re already doing things we never did,” Spencer said. They will play next tomorrow against La¯hainaluna at Ka’ulaheanuiokamoku Gymnasium.

CALENDAR September 24 vs. LHS at Kamehameha at 2 PM September 29 vs. KKHS at King Kekaulike at 4:30 PM October 1 vs. BHS at Kamehameha at at 6 PM October 4 vs. LHS at Lahainaluna at 6 PM October 6 vs. MHS at Kamehameha at 6 PM October 11 vs. BHS at Baldwin at 6 PM


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Sports are synonymous with rivalries; every true sports fan knows that. Violence, however, shouldn’t be an automatic and certainly not for fans. There are better ways to handle things. Let the athletes play, and you do your job as a spectatorwatch. Last year, when the KSM football team scrimmaged with La Jolla High School from California, one of the La Jolla parents said she was shocked when she saw that our bleachers are only on one side of the stadium. She said that in California, school rivalry is so intense that stadiums are made with different entrances for each school’s fans and they sit on opposite sides of the field because they can’t even be in the same vicinity without a fight starting. The pros aren’t any better. In fact, they’re worse! Three men

Issue 1

were taken to the hospital at the 49’ers and Raiders football game in San Francisco on August 21. A 26 year-old San Rafael man was beaten in the stadium bathroom. He was wearing a shirt with profane insults about the 49’ers. Shortly after, one 24-year old man and another in his 20’s were found in the parking lot after being shot. Maui isn’t at that point, and it never should be. We need to stop thinking that sports automatically mean fights. Last season, there were five fights and three assaults at football games according to Sgt. Mel Lorenzo of the Maui Police Department. Four of those involved more than 15 people. Keep in mind that these are only the ones that were reported to the MPD. That is way too much for a reasonably small league like the MIL. Who knows what could happen as the rivalries get stronger? It doesn’t seem like a good idea to find out. The key to stopping this problem is making people realize how small an island this really is. Things will be peace-

September 23, 2011 ful, as they should be, once people decide there’s no reason to divide among ourselves and to let a united Maui be something to “rep” itself. For some people, sports are a getaway. People look forward to those weekly games because it’s the one time to not care about anything… except what’s happening on the field. That time should not be tainted by the inabilities of others to control their tempers. When we played Baldwin on October 16, there was a small altercation in the walkway. As it always goes, everybody rushed to the scene or turned away from the game to watch from the top of the bleachers. Fights at games are not only dangerous, but also take away from the essence of the sport. As soon as people hear commotion from the spectators, their backs are turned on the game. Who would pay $5 to watch girls scream at each other? The stadium is for settling athletic scores, not petty high school drama. As Kamehameha Schools students, it’s important that players and spectators do not

Cross country shows promise mid-stride By HŌKŪ KREUGAR, news co-editor

With half of the Maui Interscholastic League season over, the Kamehameha Schools Maui cross country team has proven that they are competitive with the other teams in the league. KSM’s boys placed 3rd overall during their first MIL meet on Saturday, Aug. 27, at KSM, with the girls taking 4th. This was the first meet held in which the athletes ran the new course laid out on the KSM

CALENDAR September 24 at Keōpūolani Park at 9 AM October 1 at Maui High School at 9 AM October 8 at Hāna at 10 AM October 15 JV Championship at King Kekaulike at 9 AM October 22 MIL Championship at Keōpūolani Park at 9 AM

campus. Both teams matched their record during their second MIL meet at Seabury Hall, which also has a new course. No one from the KSM cross country teams competed in the Ha¯na relay on Saturday, September 10. At the Westside Invitational on September 17, both the girls and boys teams placed fifth. KSM cross country coach and 8th grade science teacher Mr. Jon Svenson is optimistic about the rest of the season. “I’m very confident. It’s all because of the way we’re training. If you cry at practice, you’ll smile at the race,” Mr. Svenson said. According to Mr. Svenson, this year’s team is a tight bunch. “I love them. They’re very spirited, they’re very fun, they work hard and they get along really well,” Mr. Svenson said.

“We have strong companionship and we’re looking a lot stronger this year,” junior runner Kamaha‘o Cavaco said. Christian Education teacher

Sports

D2

SCOREBOARD Varsity Girls Volleyball 9/2 vs. Seabury Hall 3-0 W 9/6 vs. Lähainaluna 3-0 W 9/10 vs. Maui High 3-0 W 9/14 vs. KKHS 3-2 W 9/16 vs. Baldwin 3-0 W JV Volleyball 9/2 vs. Seabury Hall 3-0 L 9/6 vs. Lähainaluna 2-1 W 9/10 vs. Maui High 2-1 L 9/14 vs. KKHS 2-1 L 9/16 vs. Baldwin 2-0 W Varsity Football 8/27 vs. Maui High 28-27 W 9/3 vs. KKHS 24-15 W 9/9 vs. Baldwin 41-7 L JV Football 8/27 vs. Maui High 30-0 W 9/3 vs. KKHS 19-7 W 9/9 vs. Baldwin 27-7 L Cross Country 8/27 at Kamehameha Girls: 4th Boys: 3rd 9/3 at Seabury Hall Girls: 4th Boys: 3rd 9/17 at La¯hainaluna Girls: 5th Boys: 5th stoop down to the combative levels of other schools and pro sports fans. It is up to us to keep our side of the stands calm and collected. Let’s make Pauahi proud and keep sports a happy place. Kumu Kanani Baz also coaches the teams. The four team captains are seniors Erika Kekiwi, Chris Kim, Naomi Holokai and Jared Toba.

Photo by: HŌKŪ KREUGER

Laura Albert is greeted at the finish line at cross country meet #2 at Seabury Hall on September 3.


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

Sports

D3

Photo by DYLAN GODSEY

Junior Kalaʻi Yap runs into the end zone for a touchdown against the Baldwin Bears on September 9 as senior Jonah Aruda keeps away a Baldwin defender. The Warriors lost to the Bears 41-7.

Warrior football digging in, building up By DYLAN GODSEY, sports co-editor

The Kamehameha Schools Maui Warriors varsity football team, with a record of one win and two losses, keeps pushing through this fresh season. The team started off the year with a tough pre-season loss to Kapaʻa High School on Kauaʻi, 36-0. This was followed by a double overtime loss to

the Sabers of Maui High School, 28-27. The Warriors started strong, but the Sabers scored early in the game. Ku¯pono Cabanas was the point leader for the Warriors, scoring multiple times in the game. Their game against Na¯ Aliʻi of King Kekaulike was a suc-

Photo by DYLAN GODSEY

Junior Sayge Edrada attempts to get around Maui High defender Camryn Wilhelm on August 27 at War Memorial Stadium.

cess, and the team clicked. Leading scorer, quarterback Kalaʻi Yap, brought in two touchdowns. The game ended 24-15, Warriors. The Warriors then took on the Baldwin Bears at War Memorial Stadium under the Friday night lights. Though the Warriors’ Yap scored once, the Bears dominated, finishing the game 41-7. So far this season, some of the team’s strengths and weaknesses have emerged. “Our strengths would probably be our speed, heart, and also our physicality on the field.” explained Kaiea Hokoana, #2 and running back on the Warrior’s varsity offense. Hokoana also said, “Our weakness is probably our team's size and that our team is also young and still developing.” Linebacker Alika Sanchez said, “We are bonding together, and we are getting better each week. I believe we can

go far this season.” Hokoana said, “I expect that throughout this season, our true leaders on the field will begin to show and motivate the team even through the hardships. I also expect that throughout the season we will also develop more maturely as players, students, and young men.” If the Warriors defeat La¯hainaluna and keep a better record than the Lunas, we may see the first state appearance for the Warriors since 2006.

CALENDAR September 24 vs. Lahainaluna at War Memorial at 7 PM October 7 vs. Baldwin at Kamehameha at 7 PM October 15 vs. Lahainaluna at War Memorial at 7 PM October 28 vs. King Kekaulike at King Kekaulike at 7 PM November 5 vs. Maui high at Kamehameha at 3 PM HOMECOMING GAME


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

Sports

D4

Photos and feature by NICOLE KAAUAMO, sports co-editor

Alika Sanchez Sport: Football Jersey #: 14 Grade: Senior Workout: Speed and agility

Sport: Volleyball Jersey #: 12 Grade: Junior Workout: Agility on Tuesdays/Thursdays, weightlifting on Mondays/Wednesdays Position: Setter Hobbies: Going to Ha¯na, “chillin like a villain” Contribution to the team: Leader Biggest challenges the team has faced so far: We have to work a lot harder than we did last year, and everyone else is a little more competitive How long have you been playing: 7 years

Coach Corner

Position: Linebacker and running back

Sports I’ve played: football, basketball

Hobbies: Dodgeball, going to the beach Contribution to the team: Playing my heart out and helping others

Where: Farrington High School, University of Hawaiʻi, Ma¯noa, Maui Stars semi-pro league

Challenges the team has faced so far: “Losing a lot of our main guys [in the class of 2011]”

Position: Offensive lineman, long snapper

How long you have been playing: 6 years

Accomplishments: 1985 Honolulu District varsity football champs, 1985 Honolulu District varsity basketball champs, 1995-1997 semipro football Tsunami Bowl champs

Post-high school plans: Play football for somewhere on the West Coast

Bobbi Kalama

COACH LEMOE TUA

Biggest challenge as a coach: Getting student athletes to realize importance of off-season conditioning and weight-training Best advice to players: Work as hard in the classroom as you do in your sport… remember the term is scholar-athlete! Strong academics + strong body + strong mind equals self-discipline, endurance and resilience. That all adds up to success in life! Something we may not know about you: I had minor roles as an actor here on Maui. I played the role of Burp in The Legend of POG, a halfhour spoof on finding the origin of the milk-cap game that little children played like marbles. It was a hit before video games took over.


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

Sports

D5

PCA for studentathletes By SHERIDAN KAILIEHU, staff writer

Photo by KA LEO O NĀ KOA staff

Kaulupono Hokoana runs the ball down the field against the JV of King Kekaulike Sept. 3.

JV football tackles teams By SHANISE KAAIKALA, staff writer

The JV football team started the season with two wins and one loss. The first season game took place at War Memorial Stadium as the Warriors fought the Sabers. By halftime, the score was 21-0 with the Warriors in the lead. By the fourth quarter, the crowd was anticipating a win as the Warriors dominated. “I think everyone working hard in practice and executing their plays really helped us win this game,” quarterback Chase Newton said. The final score was 30-0, Warriors. The Warriors then took on Na¯ Ali’i at Kana’iaupuni on Sept. 3. At the end of the second quarter, the Warriors were in the lead, 12-0. “These players have won two games and are very dedicated, good, young Hawaiian adults, and they play a huge part to these wins,” said JV Coach Ronald “Jojo” Chong Kee. Na¯ Ali’i scored in the third quarter, but the Warriors scored one last touchdown to win the game, 19-7. On Friday, Sept.9, the Warriors challenged the Bears at War Memorial Stadium. By the end of the first quarter, the Bears were in the lead, 7-0. The second quarter began,

Photo by DYLAN GODSEY

Colton Cabanas dices past the JV Baldwin Bears’ defense. and the Warriors were determined to make a comeback, but the Bears seemed to be two steps ahead of the game and ended the second quarter 14-7, Bears. By the end of the game, the Bears conquered

the Warriors, 27-7. “They played hard and gained confidence. The score did not affect the game. Everyone makes mistakes and it’s gonna happen,” Coach Chong Kee said.

The Positive Coaching Alliance is a non-profit organization developed at Stanford University. They’re partnering with schools to create student -athletes. Kamehameha Schools Maui has been part of the Positive Coaching Alliance since 2007, when it was created. To win and to gain life lessons through sports are the two main things the Positive Coaching Alliance wants to teach. Athletic Director Coach Kurt Ginoza said that, “The program aspires to change the game to be about who put their best effort on the table and who took the most morals and life lessons away with them.” According to the Positive Coaching Alliance training workbook, an athlete who is part of the Positive Coaching Alliance has a motto of: “Better, to make yourself better, to make your teammates better, and to make the game better.” This year, KSM has held two parent workshops because “parents request it to be mandatory,” Mr. Ginoza said. “To hear that kind of feedback is very motivating.” Each workshop is angled toward a different goal. The parent workshop is angled toward teaching how to be a double-goal parent. A student workshop will teach one how to be a triple-impact competitor. For instance, Students learn about the ELM tree of mastery. E is for effort, to put the best effort every time one plays, L is for learning, to have constant improvement, and M is for mistakes and how to deal with them. As of now, there are no upcoming workshops scheduled. The scheduling of additional workshops has yet to be determined.


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

Sports

D6

Photo by SHERIDAN KAILIEHU

Kelia NeSmith sets the ball keeping up the rally against MHS on September 10, 2011.

JV volleyball girls balance on the edge By SHERIDAN KAILIEHU, staff writer

The JV girls volleyball team so far has won two out of the five games they’ve played, but they are working hard and training day in and day out to fulfill the championship tradition of Kamehameha Schools Maui volleyball. The girls varsity volleyball team has won the MIL title for the past seven years, and this year will be the eighth year they defend it. The JV team is young, con-

sisting of mostly freshmen. Anianiku¯ Holt-Mossman is the only one out of the13 players who is a returning sophomore. She has had many consistent hits and strong kills alongside freshman Tiare Laufou. Since it is “a very young team” according to varsity volleyball coach Bala Spencer, they are still learning how to play as a team. On Tuesdays they condition, on Mondays and Wednesdays the girls are in the weight room working on their weight training and on Thursdays they double up on the workouts doing weight training and conditioning.

Photo by SHERIDAN KAILIEHU

Kylyn Fernandez, freshman, goes up for a block against the Maui High School Sabers on September 10, 2011.

So far, the season for the team is going “pretty good,” said Coach Bala. Each girl brings something to the team. “I think I affect the team in a positive way, I try to influence them to work harder and keep a positive attitude,” said Kelia Nesmith, freshman setter and opposite hitter.

“The season is going pretty good. The team is on the right track to compete at the level varsity does,” Coach Bala said. The ultimate goal of the JV girls volleyball team is to win the JV championship. The MIL JV tournament will be held here on campus on Oct.15.

New club for skateboarders By NICOLE KAʻAUAMO, sports co-editor

Photo by NICOLE KAʻAUAMO

Dylan Godsey, senior, skates at Kulamalu Park, trying a flip.

Skateboarders now have a new club just for them. Senior Dylan Godsey has created the Skateboarding Club as a bonding experience for all skateboarders. This is the first club of its kind and the goal is to schedule time for skateboarders to ride together. He is also in the process of getting sponsorship by Loaded Longboards. Godsey made eight skateboard decks from scratch for the club. He is also asking for donations of parts. He hopes

to put these toward boards for students who want to join and can’t afford their own. “I started making them because I wanted to have my own hands-on feel of what it takes to actually create a skateboard,” Godsey said. Bi-weekly on-campus meetings will take place in Mr. Iwamura’s room. Members will discuss fundamentals of riding and modifying boards. They will also choose places around the island to ride together because skateboards are contraband on campus.

You do not need previous skateboarding experience, so anyone can participate. If you did not already sign up on Club Sign-Up Day, you can see Godsey to join or e-mail him at dylan.godsey @imua.ksbe.edu. The first meeting is Sept. 27 at Mr. Iwamura’s room during lunch.


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

Sports

D7

Athletics makes changes By SHERIDAN KAILIEHU, staff writer

This year there are some changes in the athletics department, such as new uniforms for the cheerleaders, new weight room rules, and possibly a JV softball and JV soccer team. After seven years, the cheerleaders have gotten new uniforms. They have been using the same ones, recycling them year after year. The new ones are custom fit to each of the cheerleaders on the team. They have, however, ordered extra ones for the future. “I love the new uniforms. They are so pretty and we look good in them,” varsity cheerleader Kayla Tactay said. Another change is that students have to have permission and take a workshop to work out in the weight room. Two trainers have also been added to ensure the safety and productiveness in the students’ work out. The weight room is no longer a hangout spot. Athletes have to be serious about working

out and bettering themselves to be in there. “The students are adapting to the changes rather quickly,” said Mr. Kaeo Lau Hee (’06). Mr. Lau Hee and Ms. Chelsea Machida are in the weight room to teach students how to train effectively and make sure everyone’s working out right and avoiding any injuries. “These rules provide a foundation for our weight room environment. This allows users to take advantage of one of the best facilities in the state and reach our goal of becoming bigger, faster, and stronger athletes,” said Mr. Lau Hee. The weight room hours were also extended to 2:45-6:30, Monday to Thursday. They had also been extended to include morning hours from 6:15-7:15 for a short time. Due to low demand for the morning hours, they were discontinued at the beginning of September. This year, the school is hoping to offer JV girls soccer and JV softball. “We are a small school, so offering new sports

Photo By KA LEO O NĀ KOA staff

Ciana Ruidas sports the new cheerleading uniform at the King Kekaulike High School vs. KSM football game, Sept. 3, 2011.

is a challenge because of enrollment,” said Mr. Kurt Ginoza, athletic director. However, except for air rifelry and bowling, Kamehameha Schools

Concussion testing increases safety

Photo by DYLAN GODSEY

Coach Charles demonstrates the ImPact concussion testing program, an online system for measuring brain acuity . By DYLAN GODSEY, sports co-editor

ImPACT is an online concussion testing site that is now a mandatory test for the athletes of Kamehameha Schools Maui who choose to be involved in sports, according to

Coach Charles Roggow, KSM athletic trainer. “This system gives the high school athletes a baseline so that they know when they have a concussion in the future,” Coach Charles said.

The test has six modules: Word Discrimination, Design Memory, X’s and O’s, Symbol Matching, Color Match, and Three-Letter Memory. Each of these areas is pre-tested then retested if a concussion occurs. Word Discrimination has 12 words shown for 750 milliseconds each then put on a list with 12 other words. Out of the 24 words, the student must choose the12 correct words by clicking yes or no. The Design Memory module is much like the Word Discrimination module except with designs. The other four modules have similar formats. The test was first administrated to all athletes last spring. KSM will be testing all athletes this year, during the time of the particular sport. “Instead of ruling and testing by us [to determine] wheth-

Maui does offer the same sports as Baldwin High School, the largest school on Maui.

er an athlete can return to a sport or not, this test gives us documentation that we base our decisions off,” Coach Charles said. “It was very challenging for my brain, sometimes I thought it was a bunch of tricks but it ended up being much simpler than I imagined. It’s just a matter of focus and alertness,” junior Pololu¯ Nakanelua said. Nakanelua and the rest of the 2011 judo team were among the first teams to use the new concussion baseline system. Judo sophomore, Sean T. Segundo said, “I think that it [the concussion test] is good for not just testing for concussions but for just regular brain practice.” So far, the system has been used about 7 times according to Coach Charles. It has proven to be a valuable tool for determining whether or not athletes can return to their sport.


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

Football Camp…

Boys take on University of Oregon

Photo courtesy of DAYLAN MACHADO

Jordan Nauka, Ku¯pono Cabanas and Daylan Machado stand in front of a University of Oregon O before Oregon Football Camp this summer. By DYLAN GODSEY, sports co-editor

Three seniors of the Kamehameha Schools Maui Warriors varsity football team received training from Chip Kelly Head Coach of the University of Oregon, and his 2010 runner-up National BCS Championship coaching staff. Ku¯pono Cabanas, Daylan Malchado, and Jordan Nauka took part in the 2011 Oregon Football Camp held at the University of Oregon, June 1923. The four days were divided into an introductory session on the first day, practice on days two and three, and a scrimmage on day four.

Benched

Sports

During the introductory session, the boys were introduced to the college coaches that they would be working with, who explained the ground rules and the functioning of the camp, and they were divided into groups by skill (position). “It has taught me how to get faster and make more explosions with my coverage at defensive back,” Nauka said. Cabanas a slot back, fullback and kicker described the experience as a self-building one. He said, “I learned a lot of new techniques to make me better.” He also said, the camp “added on new skills … making you a better overall football player.” Days two and three were filled with actual practice and training. All campers were fully geared up complete with shoulder pads, helmets, leg padding, and cleats. On the final day, all the positions came together, scrimmaged and then departed. Malchado, Nauka, and Cabanas have aspirations of playing at the university. For those interested in the camp next year Cabanas says, “You should go. It’s a great experience. It also helps your confidence. For me, after playing with bigger and faster guys, it made me more confident in the MIL.” Prices varied from $465 for overnight boarders to $330 for day campers.

By Dylan Godsey

Man, it’s junk being benched!

Photo by DYLAN GODSEY

Senior Ku¯pono Cabanas celebrates after scoring a touchdown against Maui High on August 27 at War Memorial Stadium. Cabanas attended a skill-building football camp at the University of Oregon over the summer with two other senior football players.

D8

e Imagin feel! I w o h


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Issue 1

Photo courtesy of KAMEHAMEHA SCHOOLS

A portrait of Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop, Kamehameha Schools founder and a victim of breast cancer.

Game for a princess By KALANI RUIDAS with SHANISE KAAIKALA

September 2630 is National Breast Cancer Awareness Week, and the girls volleyball teams will once again be designating one game as their Dig Pink match. Informational displays, freebies, and Dig Pink t-shirt sales

will all be there. There will also be the traditional Wall of Honor where fans can post notices in honor of loved ones who have survived, battled or lost their lives to this cancer. October 6 is the date set for the Dig Pink match, even though it is one week after the official cancer awareness week.

September 23, 2011 Kylie Yamada will forward proceeds from sales and donations at the game to the Side-Out Foundation. Side-Out’s priority is to unite players, coaches and spectators in working towards a common goal. They work to raise breast cancer awareness, provide those affected by cancer with compassionate support and contribute to local breast cancer programs. Kamehameha Schools supports breast cancer in memory of its founder, Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop. “The main reason why we host this event is because this is how our founder lost her life,” Coach Bala said. Princess Pauahi was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1884 according to Cobey Black and Kathleen Dickenson Mellen’s book, Princess Pauahi and Her Legacy. The anxiety and grief caused by the passing of her cousin Princess Ruth Keʻelikolani had diminished Pauahi’s health. So, her doctor, a Dr. Trousseau, recommended that she take a trip to San Francisco for more medical consultation. Although the climate had no true effect on her condition, upon arrival, she said the cooler climate seemed to help. Later she ran into a friend

Sports

D9

from Honolulu who was also visiting San Francisco for medical evaluation. Princess Pauahi told her friend, “I am wretched. I need patching up, suppose we both go to the hospital.” Cancer was confirmed and specialists performed an operation in the Palace Hotel annex. After returning to Honolulu in July, she improved for several more months. Unfortunately, she relapsed, which led to her passing on October 16, 1884.

Facts to know: breast cancer By KIANA KAMALU, op-ed editor

1 in 8 women will get breast cancer in her lifetime.

70-80% percentage of breast cancers occurring in women who have no history of it.

2.5 million people who survived breast cancer in 2010

1 in 4 cancers diagnosed in women that are breast cancer

230,480 estimated cases of invasive breast cancer diagnosed in women in 2011

527 new cases of breast cancer every day in the USA

110 people who die of breast cancer per day in the USA

1% percentage of breast cancer cases that are found in men Photo by NICOLE KA’AUAMO

Bobbi Kalama and Raven Poepoe are too much for a Sage Hill defender at the Maui Invitational Tournament. The Warriors went on to take first place at the pre-season tournament, defeating Hawaiʻi Baptist Academy. Aside from being hard-hitters on the court, the team will also be holding their annual Dig Pink match on October 6 to share raise awareness about breast cancer and to raise funds to benefit breast cancer research.

39,970 estimated number of women to die from breast cancer this year


Ka Leo O Nä Koa

Volume VII

Issue 1

September 23, 2011

Opinion

E1

Accreditation: Why are we here? Ka Leo o Nä Koa Staff Faculty Advisor: Ms. Kye Haina News Co-Editors: Hoku Krueger Amanda Lee Life Co-Editors: Kelsie Chong Kalani Ruidas Sports Co-Editors: Dylan Godsey Nicole Kaÿauamo Op-Ed Editor: Kiana Kamalu Staff: Reid Cairme Shanise Kaÿaikala Sheridan Kailiehu Mehanaokala Lee Wire Services: Some material courtesy of American Society of Newspaper Editors /MCT Campus High School Newspaper Services Editorial Policy: The staff of Ka Leo O Nä Koa is dedicated to objective and balanced coverage of campus and community news. We welcome comments, corrections, suggestions and letters. To have your letter considered for publication, limit the text to 100 words or less, include full name and grade, and email to: kyhaina@ksbe.edu. Letters may be edited for length and propriety. Disclaimer:

Ka Leo O Nä Koa is a student publication of the journalism class of Kamehameha Schools Maui. The views expressed represent the views of the individual student writer and editors and does not reflect the views of KSM, KSBE, or its affiliations. 9-10 Principal: Mr. Lance Cagasan Academies Principal: Ms. Jay-R Kaÿawa Address: 270 ÿAÿapueo Parkway Pukalani, HI, 96768 Phone: (808)-573-7019 Email: kyhaina@ksbe.edu Twitter: @kaleoonakoa Website: www.kaleoonakoa.org

Inspecting our curriculum, scrutinizing our programs, and questioning our students and teachers, the Western Association of Schools and Colleges is once again coming to accredit our school. Accredit you ask? To make sure we offer an excellent and challenging program, the visiting committee reads an extensive self-written report and spends a week on the campus, checking everything out. Without the accreditation, our diplomas would just be a piece of paper. Universities do not consider accepting students from non-accredited schools. Waking up at 6 a.m., slaving over mountainous homework and even staying after school to make up late schoolwork leads me to ask, “Why are we here?” We have to get up every morning and do our best for a number of reasons: we want to create a good reputation for our school, we have to make

Editorial Cartoon

the grade to please the parents, but we are also here for ourselves. Without realizing it, we are the ones to demonstrate how well or poorly our school is doing, which gets us accredited or not. Everything that you do is reflected on you, so make a good impression. Try your hardest in your classes by doing work on time, coming to class on time, and trying to get that extra credit. It may take some work, but in the end, it will be worth it. Having a positive attitude is also a great way to make an impression. Another example is if we do not follow the dress code and act like it does not matter, we are perceived as sloppy. Tucking in your shirt makes you look neat, sharp and polished. You look like you “know better.” Whenever you picture a public school student—brightly colored hair, skimpy or baggy clothes, piercings, tattoos and by Kiana Kamalu

other things associated with the “dress code” of a public school—it makes you think the school does not really care how their students are perceived by the public. Even when you are out of uniform, you are still a KSM student, and what you say or do can impact the school and its reputation. How you present yourself at sports events has an impact as well; you are not in uniform, but you are still representing the school. Your grades, your attitude, your outerwear—everything is important to the accreditation of our school. These are the reasons why working hard and doing well pays off. Together we create our own diplomas and an excellent school for the younger generations, so we can all one day sally forth into that scary place we call The World.

What do you think?

Ka Leo O Na¯ Koa

wants your letters sent to our editor!

We would like to invite you to write to the editor. Respond about any topic in this issue by emailing your letters to Ms. Haina at kyhaina@ksbe.edu. Please keep your reaction brief, under 100 words, and your letter may be featured in our next issue!

Ka Leo O Na Koa September 23, 2011  

The first issue of the 2011-12 school year at Kamehameha Schools Maui.

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