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Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume V

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October 1, 2009

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Salbedo wins outstanding teen By NOELLE KAULUPALI, staff writer

Senior Napua Salbedo was crowned Miss Hawaiÿi Outstanding Teen 2009 on June 13 at the Leeward Community College theater on Oÿahu. Salbedo went on to compete in the Miss America’s Outstanding Teen pageant in Orlando, Florida on August 15. Salbedo said she was attracted to this program because, “The Miss Hawaiÿi Outstanding Teen pageant portrayed a message of the importance of education, healthy living, and community involvement, which got me interested.” For winning the crown, Salbedo received a full scholarship to Chaminade University that is renewable for four years. In addition to the scholarship money, she received a $1,000 scholarship from the Miss Hawaiÿi Organization, a custom 14k gold Hawaiian Heirloom pendant, South Seas mother-of-pearl earrings, 18mm silver Hawaiian bracelet and other valuable prizes. Salbedo, a Kamehameha

Schools varsity cheerleader, loves performing in the spotlight. “Through performing, I can show everyone what I'm passionate about and what I love to do,” she said. Her passion for dance showed during her performance in the talent section of the pageant. She displayed her love for dancing through a dance that combined Tahitian and hip-hop. From an early age, Salbedo said she liked to perform and watch pageants. “I really looked up to the title holders as role models,” she said. Now she holds the same position that her role models once did. Salbedo started Project Teen Attire as part of her community service platform for the Miss Maui Outstanding Teen pageant. The project helps underprivileged children get new clothes for school, so they feel better about themselves and can concentrate on their school work. Over the months since she started the project, she has collected See NAPUA, A5

Photo courtesy of STAN SALBEDO

Senior Napua Salbedo represents Hawaiÿi at the national Miss America’s Outstanding Teen pageant in Orlando, Florida, on August 15. Red carpet treatment at Planet Hollywood, meet-and-greets with sponsors and celebrities, and dinner at Medieval Times were all part of the experience.

INDEX Life/Features

B1

Senior Projects

A7

Fun and Games

B6

Sports

C1

Welcome Freshmen!

Editorials

D1

See class news A6

Photo by PILI KEPANI


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - News

Volume V

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October 1, 2009

A2

Graphic by Dayton Pascual

Lacey Farm pens winning state essay Kamehameha Maui senior meets Governor Lingle, tapes televised interview for statehood commemoration. By EMILY FARM, news editor

Senior Lacey Farm learned she had won first place among Hawaiÿi high school students for her essay celebrating statehood on June 29. She was invited to the governor’s office in Honolulu, where she was one of 50 people interviewed about statehood on July 1. The Family Reacts “It came as quite a pleasant surprise [to find out I’d won],” Lacey said, “It was an opportunity to express my undying patriotism,” “I’m proud of Lacey not only for her essay but for her confidence and the thought she exhibited during the interview,” said Joan Farm, Lacey’s mother. The Interviews The interviews were broadcast throughout August on local TV and radio stations. Only three students were interviewed. The other 47 interviewees were prominent adults, such as Kamehameha Schools Bishop Estates Trustee Nainoa Thompson and restaurant owner, author, and TV personality Sam Choy. Corrie Heck, the Chief Communications Officer for Governor Linda Lingle, conducted the one-on-one interview with Lacey in the governor’s office. “I was nervous but ready since it was my beliefs that I was to share,” Lacey said. Her parents, Joan and Gordon, and sister Emily flew to Honolulu with her and watched the interview. The First Twenty Seconds “I think that it’s good to be a part of the United States because it is the only nation in the world that is founded on…the

Photo Courtesy of LACEY FARM

Senior Lacey Farm (second from left) and (left to right) her mother Joan, sister Emily, and father Gordon in Governor Linda Lingle’s office in the capitol building on O’ahu. They were there to celebrate Lacey’s statehood essay contest win and to see Lacey interviewed about it.

mission, and Kippen de Alba Chu, chair“I think that it’s good to man of the 50th Anniversary of Statehood Commission, and they all nodded. be a part of the United One of the three camera operators clapped. The first twenty seconds of the States because it is the interview became the part of the interonly nation in the world view that aired. “[Lacey] represented herself, her famthat is founded on… ily, and her school very well,” said freedom, freedom of Gordon Farm, Lacey’s father. opportunity.” On Patriotism –Lacey Farm “You wrote in your essay about Hawaiÿi being one of the stars on the [American] flag,” Heck said to Lacey, idea of freedom, freedom of oppor picking out one of the highlights of the tunity. I think it’s good that Hawaiÿi can be a part of the United States because a essay. “We can glow brightly as the fiftieth lot of immigrants come to the United States, and they can assimilate into the and final star sewed on the United American culture, but they can also keep States flag,” she responded. Heck asked about Lacey’s aspirations their own culture,” Lacey answered to to join the Marines Corps, and de Alba the first question. Chu noted that they coincided with Afterwards, Heck looked at Lenny Lacey’s comments about striving for the Klompus, the vice-chair for events and elite as a part of the U.S. communication of the Statehood Com-


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October 1, 2009

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Joining union brought rights; commemoration honors day By ARIEL KAHAHANE, news writer

Hawaiÿi turned 50 years old as one of the United States of America on August 21, but becoming a state changed more than just putting an additional star on the American flag. There are many reasons why Hawaiÿi residents voted for statehood. One of the main reasons was to vote for a president and vice-president, something United States territories could not do. When President Dwight Eisenhower signed the Hawaiÿi Statehood Proclamation, the residents of the state were also privileged to other changes according to a 1959 report by the Honolulu StarBulletin:: Voting for Senators and congressional representatives would eliminate taxation without representation. People of Hawaiÿi could write their own state constitution. Residents could vote on amendments made to the U.S. or state constitutions

More visitors from the mainland would travel to the islands because of its status as a state. Residents would become entitled to all the rights of American citizens in the judicial system. Residents could vote for their own officials instead of having them federally appointed. Judges would be appointed locally instead of federally. The state would be eligible for federal grant money. On the anniversary date, the statehood commission hosted a convention called New Horizons for the Next 50 Years at the Hawaiÿi Convention Center. Bryan Clay, Olympic gold medalist; Andy Karsner, former assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy; and John Zogby, political pollster, gave the keynote speeches, and the rest of the day was highlighted by other statehood sessions for the approximately 2,000 people in attendance.

As it happened on the original Statehood Day, a new postage stamp was unveiled near the closing of the conference. Created by renowned Hawaiian artist Herb Kawainui Kane, the stamp featured surfers and canoe paddlers. In 1959, a commemorative statehood stamp, designed by Joseph Feher was issued. The year’s fiftieth anniversary celebration of statehood was downplayed out of respect for cultural sensitivities, according to Governor Linda Lingle. She said that fireworks and parades were not the best choices for commemoration of a controversial event, but Lingle is hopeful for the future of the state. “One thing I know for certain, the next fifty years won’t be easy because of the enormity of the issues that we face, but they will be great years for Hawaiÿi. The people here are too good, too beautiful, too decent, too respectful, too understanding to fail in the future. I’m so hopeful about the next fifty years,” she said in her closing remarks.

Protesters rally against 50 years of statehood By ALEXANDRIA AGDEPPA, staff writer

While others were celebrating, some Maui County activists protested against statehood in front of the state building in Wailuku and on Keolani Place near Kahului Airport on August 20 and 21. After a half century of Hawaiÿi’s statehood, protesters said they remain loyal to the once-sovereign, Hawaiian kingdom. Johanna Kamaunu, a Waiheÿe Valley bail bond agent, said she has been investigating the kingdom laws and the Hawaiÿi Revised Statutes in regards to Native Hawaiians and their rights. She said she was at the anti-statehood rally because, “We [Native Hawaiians] do not know our rights, and if there is any way Photo by ALEXANDRIA AGDEPPA A statehood protester references the ongoing dispute over ceded Hawaiian lands. The state’s golden we can learn about those rights, and anniversary included celebrations and protests, showing the diverse interests of residents of Hawaiÿi. teach them, and protect them, then that is why I’m here.” gent, and most literate nation in the Before Hawaiÿi became a territory of Kamaunu said she respects America world has become…less than what they the United States, it was a republic, and the Western culture, but said, “All could be.” which is a political status many Hawaiian this time we’ve been under Western activists would like to see reinstated. rule, what once was a thriving, intelli-


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October 1, 2009

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3 Organizations reject statehood By SHELBY LYNCH, staff writer

Around the nation, hundreds of native Hawaiians gathered to protest something many other people celebrated. On Maui, many gathered at the state building in Wailuku where they chanted to become unified and inform people about the overthrow of Queen Liliiÿuokalani and the rights they think Hawaiians are still entitled to. About 50 Hawaiians and nonHawaiians lined the street. Three organizations rallied together: Küÿë 1893 Nationhood, Hui Pono ÿIke Kanawai Group, and Kaÿapuni. Many held homemade signs, played music on their ‘ukulele and guitars, and some even displayed the Hawaiÿi state flag upside down. The signs read: “This is a stolen Kingdom”, “This is not the USA” and “This is my Kingdom.” Wilmont Kamaunu Kahaialiÿi II was at the protest to reaffirm his position and his rights as a Hawaiian. Kahaialii said, “If we continue how we are now, nothing will change.” He said he believes in youth researching what native Hawaiians are entitled to in order to educate others and fight to get lands returned. Kahaialiÿi said he believes that in 50 – 100 years Hawaiians can become educated and have a deeper appreciation for being Hawaiian, leading to the formation of a unified government. Johanna Kamaunu who is a part of the Hui ÿIke Pono Kanawai Group said her reason for participating in the rally is she very intent on people understanding the Hawaiian language. She said that the way people speak Hawaiian now is very different from ancient times. Kamaunu also said that to her, it is important for people to learn their genealogy because it ties them back to the land and makes them Hawaiian. The protest ended with the group at the state building singing Aloha Oe, followed by speeches given by leaders of the organizations who rallied against statehood. They encouraged the audience to research what happened during the events that led up to the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom in 1893.

Photo by ALEXANDRIA AGDEPPA

Protesters from three different Hawaiian sovereignty groups joined forces in Wailuku to show anti-statehood sentiments on Statehood Day. Nine wore shirts that spelled f-a-k-e s-t-a-t-e.

Hawaiian classes mälama ka ÿäina; students clean up Waiola Church By ROBERT ABORDO, features writer

forms into their yardwork clothes and began the strenuous battle against the WAIOLA CHURCH, LÄHAINA – foliage that threatened to overrun the Kumu Kapulani Antonio’s three Hagrounds of the church. The work was waiian History classes took a trip out to hard, and the merciless Lähaina heat historic Waiola Church in Lähaina on swept over the toiling students like the September 11 to pay tribute to Whistling Winds following the death of a Keöpüolani, one of the great chiefesses high ranking aliÿi. of ancient Hawaiÿi. While the students worked hard, an The students gave their hoÿokupu to imperceptible change took place. Slowly their aliÿi nui in the form of a chant, cre- the plants took on a more uniform apated specifically to honor her. pearance as the grass was brought low, “After we finished the chant, a breeze the trees trimmed, dust chased from the blew through our lines and…I felt the benches and windows of the church, a hair on the back of my neck stand up. It rebellion brought low by the might of was weird, kinda spooky, but at the human hands and gas powered technolsame time it felt like she [Keöpüolani] ogy. approved of what we had done.” Said Once the students had done all they Rockne Matsuda, a class member. could, with hunger clawing at their belAs soon as the students were done lies, they retired to the dining area and giving their gift to Keöpüolani, they were ate their fill of a delicious meal provided ushered inside to learn a little about the to them by the staff of the church. Conhistory of the church. sisting of beef stew, salad, succulent When the history lesson concluded, fruits, and the ever-desired white rice, CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE the students changed from their uni-


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October 1, 2009

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Tests to monitor growth By KYLE DEELEY, sports editor

Students from kindergarten to the twelfth grade have been taking MAP tests designed by the Northwest Evaluation Association to track their development throughout their years at Kamehameha Schools Maui. MAP stands for Measures of Academic Progress. The tests use a unique dynamic questioning system that adapts to each individual student’s strengths and weaknesses. The level of difficulty of the test fluctuates. If a student gets a question right in a certain category, the questions in that category get harder. The converse is also true. Because of the personalized nature of the tests, teachers will be able to use the results to identify individual shortfalls in student learning. Linda Shibano, K-12 assessment coNAPUA FROM PAGE 1

clothes and other items for local charities and organizations. "I've learned so much throughout this entire experience, but the most important thing that I have gained out of it would have to be staying true to yourself," she said. The Miss America Pageant and its sister pageants, like Miss Outstanding Teen, are organizations that help many young women. "The program encour-

ordinator and analyst, said, “Teachers won’t have to change their whole curriculum” based on the data from the tests, and instead can simply augment their existing lesson plans to target specific deficiencies. The MAP tests will also give teachers the lexile reading levels of all students so that they can make adjustments for the ranges of abilities in each class. Math teacher Kaholo Rickard said, “I have some general ideas [about using the test’s results]… when I get more feedback about how to interpret the data, I’ll know for sure.” The MAP test differs in type and purpose from the standard CTP4. “CTP4 testing just gives you a score,” said Shibano. The MAP will give teachers specific data on how to help their students, she said. ages young women to support community involvement...education, and living a healthy lifestyle," Salbedo said. The most important lesson Salbedo learned from this experience was not to doubt yourself. "No matter what trials or challenges I've faced, I have never given up on myself, and I also encourage others to do the same," she said. She also advanced to the national pageant held this summer in Orlando, Florida.

Photo by KYLE DEELEY

Freshman Devonte Llanes, takes the first MAP test in August on his laptop. The entire Kamehameha Maui student body will be tested 2-3 times annually to track academic progress across all grade levels.

Salbedo said, "Sometimes in situations like this, we're only given one shot, and that's the time where you have to show everyone who you truly are and your passion towards this goal that you've set for yourself." Salbedo did not place on the national scale, but she said she learned more about herself as a person and got to show other people her passion for performing.

CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS

the students ate, talked and relaxed after a day’s hard labor. The food had been consumed, tools put away, and farewells said. The students tramped back onto the bus, exhausted but thoroughly pleased with the job they had done. “Heck yes it was hard, we’re all tired, but I think that we did a good thing today. The way the staff put it, we did around a month’s worth of work in roughly 6 hours, so I think we did a darn good job here,” said Blayne Morton, another member of the classes that dedicated their time to the church. The students all worked hard and were justly rewarded for it. A gift for their aliÿi, more than just a chant, they gave her an actual, physical gift, the sweat of their brow and the beautiful fruits of their labor.

Photo by ROBERT ABORDO

Senior Maka Suapaia whacks at the overgrown shrubbery at the Waiola Church graveyard in Lähaina. Hawaiian History classes were visiting the site to pay homage to aliÿi buried there and perform community service by clearing brush, mowing, and cleaning inside the church.


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Volume V

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October 1, 2009

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Class of 2013

Class of 2011

By JAENALYN MATEAKI, class president

By KELLY LUIS, class president

The Freshman Class has settled into the busy life of high school. Representing India with enthusiasm, the class of 2013 soared on Aladdin’s magic carpet through their first big activity – Homecoming! As stewards of Pauahi, this fresh class is quickly learning the meaning of stress as they try to keep on top of their studies and with the activities. But they are coping well and making the transition. With purple as their class color, the freshmen roar into an exciting year filled with much to learn, much to enjoy, and much to be grateful for.

There will be a lunch meeting about class rings for all juniors on October 27 in Keöpüolani. Josten’s will be presenting information about options, pricing, payment, and delivery. Money will be due on November 3, 2009, and the rings will be delivered on March 30. The junior prom will be held at the King Kamehameha Golf Club. Keep in mind that the prom will have a “Roaring Twenties” theme. Think fedora hats, flapper dresses, Louis Armstrong, jazz music, and silent movies. Save the date: March 6, 2010!

Class of 2012 By TUIMANA MATEAKI, class president

The Class of 2012 has moved up the ladder one step, and sophomores are no longer the newcomers to high school. Still juggling school work and activities, the sophomores are energized and ready. As representatives of China, the kung fu kids of 2012 chopped their way successfully through Homecoming celebrations, and are ready to welcome Fall Break. Looking ahead, sophomores must gear up now and start thinking about which academy best suits their interests. Will it be Arts & Communications? How about Business & Leadership? Thinking about Science & Natural Resources? Want to be a part of the Information Technology Academy? Decisions, decisions… Although the year has just begun, the

“Life is for love.” –Tyler McDermott, counting on his fingers

Class of 2010 By CAMERON YEE, class president

This has been a crazy year for the seniors so far. School, sports, and senior projects have kept them busy. The class has already begun to have sad thoughts as they make their way through their last year. It has been going by quickly and, with the end of the first quarter here, graduation is nearing every day. time to make this decision will be here The class of 2010 is looking forward to in a blink of an eye – so start mulling it all the senior traditions, though: Senior over now. Ball in January and Mauna Ala at the Lastly, the Class of 2012 looks forward end of the year. Senior Luau is also to participating in the annual sophomore coming up on either October 17 or Nosleepover sometime next year , their vember 14. The final date will be ansophomore banquet on February 27 and nounced soon. fundraising in the pizza booth for For now, Höÿike Nui presentations and Hoÿolauleÿa. As this class strives for the college applications seem to be all the summit, külia i ka nuÿu, they commit to seniors have time to think about. Overworking together and accepting the chal- all, this looks to be a great year for the lenges with a positive attitude. class of 2010. Photo by KYLE DEELEY

Guest speaker Tyler McDermott gets everyone in the mood for the new school year on August 3, the first day of school. Through a riveting 45-minute presentation, McDermott encouraged everyone to be accepting of others, despite their differences. His engaging style had students both laughing and sitting up to hear his next words.

Message from the president: ‘make a difference’ By ERIN VENTURA, president, Associated Students of Kamehameha Schools Maui

vational speaker Tyler McDermott. He spoke about togetherness and unity among classes, people, and races. McDermott stressed the importance of acceptance. He told the student body, that we must help each other out and Photo by DANIEL BORGES make differences in peoples’ lives. McDermott’s message can be easily Welcome back-to-school everyone! translated into our everyday school lives. We kicked off this school year with moti- As students and peers, we should make

sure that everyone feels comfortable and willing to come to school. When you pass someone you don’t know, tell them “Hi,” wave, or introduce yourself. Do something to brighten someone’s day. I challenge you to give someone a smile today and every day. You’ll be surprised at how many you’ll get back.


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October 1, 2009

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SENIOR PROJECTS

Kalehuawehe interns at UH; Researches Unknown Protein By EMILY FARM, news editor

tations in the DNA strucSenior Heather Kaleture affects the localizahuawehe helped research a tion [distribution] of seprotein previously unknown lenoprotein K to to the world during an internthe endoplasmic reticulum ship at the John A. Burns membrane, which is an School of Medicine in Auorganelle [component] gust. The purpose of the profound in a cell.” ject was to discover the funcKalehuawehe said, “I tion of the protein. started “There are actually a lot of with genotyping mouse things the world doesn’t know DNA. I went through difbiologically,” Kalehuawehe Photo by SHELBY LYNCH ferent procedures [such said. HEATHER KALEHUAWEHE as] developing agarose According to Kalehuawehe, gels with little wells she was researching selenoprotein K, (holes), conducting Polymerase Chain which is found in the immune system. Reactions (PCRs) to amplify the DNA I She said it is “one of twenty-five prowanted to genotype, and running the gel teins spread throughout the human through an electrophoresis of 120 volts.” body.” Selenoprotein K has an incorporation Kalehuawehe researched this compo- of selenium in its DNA structure, acnent with her mentor, Dr. Peter Hoffcording to Kalehuawehe, and is a nutriman, a laboratory researcher at the Uni- tional necessity that is acquired through versity of Hawaiÿi. our diets. Kalehuawehe created mutations for No results were immediately forthselenoprotein K, and Dr. Hoffman incor- coming, but Kalehuawehe helped start a porated these mutations in an experiprocess that will be a long-term project, mental substance. with an undetermined finish date, for the Kalehauawehe said, “My mentor will Burns School. take a step further and see how the mu-

Students uncover path to past By ROYAL AFAGA, feature writer

Seniors Christian Lum and Kylie Watson and ten volunteers worked after school on September 3 to clear a path into the bottom of Kali’alinui Gulch for Lum’s senior project. The gulch is located to the south of the Kamehameha Schools Maui campus. Watson, accompanied by Kumu Cody Pueo Pata, was also there for her senior project. Watson found petroglyphs and marked their coordinates for easier location by others in the future. Watson found petroglyphs of a canoe, birdpeople, dogs and possibly Kü. She also found some ÿöpihi shells. Kumu Pueo speculated that the shells may have been used as tools or may hint that a river ran through gulch. Lum and the other volunteers cleared the path of brush and rocks that covered it, making it easier and safer to get to the

Photo by TANI NAKAMITSU

Senior Breana Asuncion walked in the spotlight in a Billie J outfit as a crowd of about 40 cheered her on for senior Krysten Ellis’s, senior project, a fashion show held in Keöpuolani on September 10. Ellis said she decided to put on a fashion show because she wanted to learn more about the business side of the fashion industry. Attendees took home gift bags from the show sponsor, Billie J Boutique. Twelve senior girls modeled 24 outfits. As each model came out into the spotlight, master of ceremonies senior Ekolu Kim described and commented on the dresses, shirts, skirts and pants that were on display. bottom of Kali’alinui Gulch. The path was originally a goat path, but after an afternoon of work, the path was wide and stable enough for humans to traverse side-by-side. Left: Senior Christian Lum led a crew of volunteers to clear the goat path in Kaliÿalinui Gulch for easier access to historic sites at the bottom. Fellow senior, Kylie Watson, was also there to photograph and catalog the petroglyphs on the walls of the ravine. She tied markers along the way to help track her progress and re-locate the etchings. Photo by ROYAL AFAGA


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Volume V

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October 1, 2009

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Haina selected for Reynolds Institute By TANI NAKAMITSU, staff writer

Journalism teacher, Ms. Kye Haina flew to Arizona State University on a Donald W. Reynolds Foundation fellowship. ASU’s Anita Luera, director of the ASNE High School Journalism Institute, estimated the value of the fellowship at $4,000 for each teacher to participate in the American Society of News Editors Reynolds Institute June 14-26. The purpose was to teach high school journalism to 35 high school teachers from across the country. Some of the topics that were included in the program were “reporting, writing, editing, photojournalism, layout and design, opinion pages, journalistic credibility ethics and responsibilities, the future of daily newspapers and business-side skills,” according to the institute Web site. For two weeks starting at 8:30 A.M. and studying until 8:00 P.M., Haina at-

Photos courtesy of KYE HAINA

Left: Haina practices field reporting at the Reynolds Institute in Phoenix, Ariz. this summer. Above: Institute presenter Gregory Favre.

tended sessions at Arizona State University’s Walter Conkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication to learn more about journalism and how it has changed. Lessons at the ASNE Reynolds Institute were taught through lecture, handson activities and guest speakers. Haina thought the most inspirational guest speaker was Gregory Favre, former newspaper editor and Poynter Institute Distinguished Fellow. Favre talked about the importance of journalism education, the future of journalism, and free-

dom of the press. Haina was not the only one who was deeply moved by the guest speaker. She said everyone in the room was crying at the end of Favre’s speech. And, “yes,” she said; he is a cousin of NFL’s Bratt Favre. At Arizona State University, Haina met professional journalists and other journalism teachers. She said she participated in the program to further her knowledge in journalism and to apply all of what she learned to the journalism classes at KS Maui.

NEW FACULTY, STAFF Facchini fills in; Hajek leads Piÿina project By LACEY FARM, news editor

Say, “Hola” because Spanish teachers from Argentina have doubled since last year as Ms. Alejandra Facchini from Mar Del Plata, Argentina, fills in for Ms. Andrea Hajek, who also hails from Argentina, is working on a special project. Facchini applied for the job from O’ahu and moved to Maui this summer to accept the position. She said that, “Maui is so beautiful and peaceful.” She previously lived in California and Honolulu, where she was a teacher at Hawai’i Pacific University, St. Andrew School, and Sacred Hearts Academy. Facchini said that she had a “role model teacher” as a little girl, her mother. “My mother seemed to really help those kids learn and I wanted to do the same,” Ms. Facchini said. “I wanted to pass on my own knowledge and continue the cycle. I was surrounded by teachers as a girl because of all my mother’s friends, and I saw how

From Käpalama to Hillsboro, Pukalani By JARRIN ARAKAKI, staff writer

KS Maui has a new registrar. Her name is Sheleen Quisquirin. She is a graduate of sister campus, Kamehameha Käpalama. She graduated with a bachelors degree in social work from Pacific University in Oregon. Photos by Ka Leo o Nä Koa staff She had been living in Oregon for the FACCHINI QUISQUIRIN past15 years and working at Pacific University when she found out an opportunity to come back and work for Kameteachers are beneficial contributors to hameha Maui. the community.” Quisquirin said “After so many years While out of the classroom, Hajek is wanting to return to Kamehameha, the leading the Ka Pi’ina Project. This school that gave me so much, I wanted means “the ascent” and is a “framework to give back to not only Kamehameha to recruit, retain, and reward high quality teachers,” Hajek said. She is working as but to the Native Hawaiian students.” She said “The campus is beautiful and a pilot support team member for one very different from Kapälama.” She said year. Mr. Oliver, Mr. Kuoha, Ms. Ro“The classes are much smaller than mero, and Ms. Yatsushiro are all pilot Kapälama, so everyone can get to know participants, working with Hajek to set each other.” New registrar Quisquirin’s goals and receive training. goal is to make sure the students are Ms. Hajek said, “I enjoy my new role taking the courses that will prepare them but I do miss my students.” for whatever they do in the future.


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October 1, 2009

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New speed bumps deter speeding; fender benders By KYLE DEELEY, sports editor

This year, the Kamehameha Schools Maui Campus saw the addition of six new speed bumps in an effort to slow down drivers flouting campus speed limits. These speed bumps were placed at strategic points to ensure student safety, according to lead safety officer Martin Lacio. He said the security department was noticing a lot of drivers exceeding the posted campus speed limit of 20 mph, so the decision was made at the end of the last school year to add in the new speed bumps. Two speed bumps were added in front of the operations building to provide pedestrians with a safe place to cross the road. The section of road that those speed bumps abut is used by operations staff and visitors as a throughway to the

rest of the campus. Lacio said the school added them “to get people to slow down for the operations staff and visitors.” One speed bump was added on the road to the elementary school, right before a blind corner. This was done to protect students who may be crossing the road on the other side of the turn, Lacio said. He said the fifth speed bump is on the middle school campus, right in front of the drop off area for students to remind drivers to slow down. The final speed bump is actually a half speed bump added to the downsloping westbound lane of the road leading up to the front guard house. “People might not even be stepping on the gas, but that road is on a grade,” said Lacio about the placement of the

Photo by KYLE DEELEY

This is one of six new speed bumps that greeted staff and students upon their return from summer vacation. Each new bump was installed for a different reason, but all of them for safety.

speed bump. As far as the effectiveness of the speed bumps, Lacio said, “We’ve noticed a decrease in speeding… in the areas where the speed bumps are.”

Photo festival moves photogs By ARIEL KAHAHANE, news writer

The inaugural Maui Photo Festival gathered elite photographers from around the world at the Hyatt Regency Maui September 16-20. Thanks to a grant from the Ho’olaule’a committee, eleven lucky upperclassmen enjoyed this unique experience. On Friday September 16, students from Mrs. Abe’s Digital Photography II and III classes traveled to Lähaina where they were treated to a specially made itinerary with high-profile photography experts. Eddie Tapp, a Canon Explorer of Light, went over creative synergies, or

ways of making PhotoShop more effective. Following that, Eli Reed explained what it means to be a photo documenter and the impact it has on society. Andy Katz, a Sony Artisan of Imagery, took students around the grounds of the Hyatt to give them a clear idea of lighting’s importance. Abe wanted students to attend because she thought they would “get a clear idea about the life of a photographer” and “make real world connections.”

Photo by KYLE DEELEY

Junior Jeffrey Clarke poses for senior Kyle Deeley at the Maui Photo Festival, a field trip with Digital Photography teacher Mrs. Abe and her students. They practiced portrait photography with professional Andy Katz.

Dining hall supplies discarded carelessly By BLAYNE MORTON and staff

Since the introduction of metal silverware and plastic plates, cups, and bowls on campus last year, custodians have been finding the reusable items in trash cans, classrooms, and other unexpected places. “We find them everywhere; places you would never expect. Forks, cups, everything,” said custodian Tanya Higa. The official procedure for the disposable and permanent dining supplies is that students are to use the permanent items in and directly around Keÿeaumokupäpäÿiaheahe and take the disposable items only if meetings or other obli-

gations require that they eat elsewhere. This problem began in the middle of the 2008-2009 school year when the school first started providing the plastic and metal dining items to lessen the financial impact of throwing out 500 Styrofoam plates and plastic utensils every day. In a 19-schoolday month, the cost was more than $1100, or, over a 10month school year, more than $12,000. In comparison, each permanent dining setup (plate, fork, spoon) costs $6.33 and can last for years. The food services staff takes daily inventory of the items that are used at each lunch service. At the beginning of

the school year, many of the permanent items were gone at the end of lunch. “I saw the reports,” said kitchen utility worker Kaleo Gapera, “and the numbers showed a big difference [between what was set out and what was returned].” “People are just too lazy to take them back to the cafeteria,” said senior Jade Rosa, who said she has seen people remove items from the dining hall then leave them at other places around campus. In most cases, the job of digging supplies out of the trash, picking them up off the ground, and returning them from SEE DINING ON PAGE D1


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - News

Be Wise

Support the Health Care Bill; sign your will By LACEY FARM, news editor

If we follow the advice from Health Week, will we live longer? The health care bill that President Obama might mean “no.” I don’t think anyone would deny that the healthcare system isn’t perfect, but the president isn’t trying to reform it. He’s trying to completely overhaul it at the risk of increasing the economic deficit and decreasing the quality of health care due to government control. According to an Investors Business Daily TIPP Poll, 72% of doctors don’t agree that the government can cover 47 million more people with better-quality care at a lower cost as Obama insists. Forty-five percent of doctors said they “would consider leaving their practice or taking an early retirement” if Congress passes the bill. In an analysis of the poll by IBD editorialist Terry Jones, he said that many doctors believe government would have too much control, and the bill would create “socialized” medicine. One doctor said, “I oppose socialism in all its forms or incarnations… government should be shrunk drastically, not expanded.” The White House Web site posted this statement: “If you get an e-mail or see something on the web about health care insurance reform that seems fishy- send it to flag@whitehouse.gov.” So now we are told to tattle on our neighbors like people under communist regimes are instructed to do? Is the health care bill taking us on the route to where our freedoms are being eliminated one by one? Another doctor fears that this control would cause massive waste and interfere with their practices. He said, “All the efficiency of the post office, all the compassion of the motor vehicle bureau.” I am worried about the cost. The government hasn’t been very successful in running businesses. Look at the predicted $51 trillion

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in unfunded liabilities for Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security over the next halfcentury. I have ethical concerns because there will be “mandated protocols, long waits, rationing of care, infringement upon a doctor’s right of conscience, abortion paid for by (tax) dollars, with eventual euthanasia and infanticide,” according to one doctor replying to the poll. This especially worries me because I don’t agree with abortion, and I believe we have a right to say that we don’t want our tax dollars to pay for them.

Graphic by DAYTON PASCUAL

I don’t like that the bill will eliminate consumer choice, rack up health care costs, and drive down the quality of health care. Having fully paid health care for all will sharply increase the demand for health care providers. The government control and interference will sharply decrease the supply of doctors who will retire early, and students who will avoid the field. My advice: Convince your families and friends to talk to your Congressmen so they’ll vote against any bill that will destroy lives by letting the government decide what doctors and patients should decide. Our representatives do what the majority of the public wishes, so decide carefully. The bill will hurt the already bad economic situation by costing $900 billion - $1.6 trillion. We need a health care bill that actually reforms what we have now instead of drastically changing it. Until then, leave the system alone!

October 1, 2009

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Universal Health Care; it might save you one day Obama’s health care reform will save lives By MATTHEW QUENGA, features editor

There is a lot of controversy and gossip when it comes to president Obama’s health care reform plan. “You know how television loves a ruckus,” said Obama in his weekly presidential address on YouTube on August13. The problem is unreasonably priced insurance and the uninsured. In today’s economy, the current price of health insurance is ridiculous. The average price of U.S. health insurance is $10,728 annually for the average family. In this economy, people are losing their jobs and are still expected to be able to pay for the health care they need. In the same address Obama said, “People shouldn’t have to go broke just because they got sick.” I agree. Getting sick or injured is usually an involuntary thing. I mean, I don’t remember a time when I called the flu up and told it to come visit, or a time I purposefully ran into an open locker or, God forbid, a brick wall. What I’m trying to get at is that, in my opinion, health care reform is a good thing. Twelve million people were denied coverage this past year because of a preexisting condition when they got sick and needed it the most, according to Jared Bernstein, chief economist for the vice president. Under the current system of private health insurance, some people cannot afford to be insured, and some have had coverage denied. Others who were insured, lost it when they lost their jobs or came down with expensive ailments. With health care reform, people who cannot afford insurance will be covered. People can also rest easy knowing that their health coverage will not be denied based on their medical background. If passed, the bill will provide affordable insurance for those families with low to CONTINUED ON FACING PAGE


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - News CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

moderate income. Along with this comes guaranteed affordable oral, hearing and vision care for children. These are just a portion of a long list of other benefits, all of them insuring lower health care costs to the individual.The plan, if passed, will give greater choices and will ensure higher quality along with stability and peace of mind. Without the reform, small businesses will spend around $2.4 trillion on health care costs for their workers over the next ten years, according to the National Coalition on Health Care. I don’t know about any of you, but if I was a business owner I would not go around saying, “Oh yeah, it’s just a couple trillion dollars, no biggie.” As for those bogus rumors being circulated on the World Wide Web, the plan will not require anyone to enter into a governmentrun health care plan. The plan will not threaten Medicare coverage for senior citizens. Don’t believe everything you read on the Internet. The health care reform plan will help in this time of economic strife. Obama’s Health Care Reform Plan will save the economy and billions of lives.

HEALTH WEEK

Photo by ROYAL AFAGA

Senior Kelsey Galago tests Kumu Pueo’s eyes.

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October 1, 2009

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First health week teaches important lessons to all ages By ARIEL KAHAHANE, news writer

Health Week was the combined senior projects of several Science and Natural Resources Health Services endorsees. These industrious seniors worked under the advisement of science teacher Mrs. Jennifer Caravagelli. They covered healthy nutrition, eye health, and teen pregnancy. This is the first year for Health Week, but it will become an annual event. Senior Ashley Caris chose Health Week as her senior project “Because it was a good opportunity to show students possible…health occupation careers.” Senior Kelsey Galago said she became involved because “High school students need to be more aware of some health concerns that are arising amongst Hawaiians.” Attendees had positive comments about the effectiveness of Health Week. Junior Beth Onaga said, “The stations were well organized, and they didn’t overwhelm us with information.” Display boards tastefully displayed important information about the afternoon’s topic. Junior Robbie Akuna’s said, “They were informative and well organized. I liked the card system.” Upon entering the Counseling Center students were given a card to be stamped at the individual stations as they worked their way through the

event. At the end of the “tour” through the exhibits, visitors deposited the card into a box. A card with all four stations stamped counted as spirit points for each 9-12 class. On Wednesday Kelsey Galago and Uÿi Tanigawa brought awareness to adult and child eye issues. Vision screenings and health referrals were highlights of the day. Ashley Caris and Jade Rosa focused Thursday’s gathering on teen pregnancy prevention and prenatal care. Attendees saw displays about the effects of music on unborn babies and teen relationship information. Then a matching game tested their medical knowledge. Aysia Peters discussed healthy self image among teens on Friday. Exercise videos assisted students in perfecting proper stretching techniques. Peters prepared granola samples that were designed to be satisfying and nutritious. She gave out the samples along with copies of the recipe. Blood pressure screenings gave students an idea of how just how healthy their hearts are. Game winners received tasty prizes. In addition to high school students, health care professionals, and middle school students also attended. The week’s attendance was nearly 300. The Counseling Center hosted Health Week during lunchtime September 2-4.

Nurse, school meet H1N1 head-on with new policy By CAITLYN DEMELLO, staff writer

With Kamehameha Schools Maui is easing into an early flu season, precautions and stringent measures have to been put in place to keep students and staff safe. One of those steps included sending home students with symptoms of H1N1 Because of this, the rate of students with a possible case of H1N1 has decreased within this month. KSM nurse Sue Hardesty said, “Although the symptoms could not have been swine flu, our main purpose is prevention. Because students are surrounded by each other daily we want to pull that certain one out so that the other ten won’t be next.”

Because of student confidentiality, Nurse Sue could not disclose any names, but she said that a dozen students have been sent home with H1N1 symptoms. Senior Danika Ribucan said that she was one of those who had to stay home for seven days when she came down with flu-like symptoms. “It was like a basic flu: fever, sore throat, headache, tiredness and vomiting. But I only had some of those symptoms for one day.” She also said that,” I had a hard time getting back on track after being gone for a week.” Because we are now entering flu season, more students could be going home daily.

“High school students are not good with keeping up with sleep, healthy eating, and taking their vitamins” said Nurse Sue. With the flu season here, Nurse Sue said you should do these things in order to stay healthy and in school: First, you need to get least 8 hours of sleep nightly. On average, students do not get nearly this amount of sleep, which can lower the chance of your immune system being able to fight off sickness. Second, you need to eat a healthy and balanced diet. Eating fruit with nutrients can work to your benefit. And finally, during this flu season, vitamins are a must. With these steps, fighting off any viruses that enter your body will be easy.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - News

Volume V

Issue 1

Okakopa 1, 2009

A12

Hui pü nä koa; he ÿohana hoÿokahi Nä ÿEKOLU KIM, mea käkau

Ua pae Nä Koa, ke kime pöpeku o Ke Kula Kaiapuni ÿo Änuenue, mai ke awäwä ÿo Pälolo i ka uka o Haleakalä ma ka lä ÿumikumakolu o ÿAukake. Na Kaleialoha Kaniÿaupiÿo-Crozier, kekahi haumäna o ka papa ÿumikümäkahi, i kökua me ke oli a me ka lei ÿana i Nä Koa. Ua hele mua ÿo Kaleialoha läua ÿo Kuanoni, kona palala mai ka papa ÿumikümälua, i Änuenue. Hauÿoli a hoihoi läua e ÿike i na hoaaloha kahiko mai ke kula haÿahaÿa a me ke kula waena. Na ka Papa ÿÖlelo Hawaiiÿi ÿehä i hoÿolauna iä läkou iho i nä haumäna o Änuenue. Ua hui pü nö kekahi haumäna o ia papa, ÿo ia hoÿi ÿo Leipölani Watson, me kekahi haumäna o Änuenue mai ka papa ÿumikümälua, ÿo Kalani Pua’oi kona inoa. ÿÖlelo akula ÿo ia. “Mälama ÿia kä mäkou mau papa a pau ma ka ölelo Hawaiÿi a he hula ia ma ko mäkou kula e ÿölelo Hawaiÿi i nä Manawa a pau.” ÿOkoÿa ke ÿano o Ke Kula Kaiapuni ÿo Änuenue a ÿokoÿa ke ÿano o ke Kula ÿo Kamehameha ma Maui. ÿOi aku ka nui o nä haumäna ÿölelo Hawaiÿi ma laila no ka mea he kula ÿolelo Hawaiÿi ÿo Änuenue a he kuleana ko nä haumäna e aÿo a mälama i ka ÿölelo makuahine. Wahi a kekahi haumäna ÿë aÿe o ka papa ÿölelo Hawaiÿi makahiki ÿehä, ÿo Kamahaÿo Freitas, “Maikaÿi wale ko läkou kula no ka me ÿoi aÿe ka nui o nä papa a me nä hana i mälama ÿia ma ka ÿöleleo Hawaiÿi. Ua hiki nö ke hoÿonui i koÿu ÿike Hawaiÿi a me koÿu ÿöleleo Hawaiÿi ÿana ma laila. He mea hoihoi ka noho a kamaÿilio ÿana me kekahi haumäna mai ke kula kaiapuni, a he mea hoÿoikaika i ka puÿuwai a me ke aloha no nä mea Hawaiÿi.”

Photo by ERIN VENTURA

Nui ka meaÿai i hoÿomäkaukau ia. He ÿono nö!

I ka lä ÿumikümähä o ÿAukake, 2009 ua päÿani Nä Koa i ke kula ÿo Kekaulike no ka hoÿomaÿamaÿa wale nö. ÿÖlelo akula ÿo Kumu Kealohamakua, ke poÿo o ke kime pöpeku ma Änuenue, ua paÿi a paÿi nä ÿai o nä kime ÿelua a ua maikaÿi nö ka hoÿomaÿamaÿa ÿana no ka päÿani ÿana i nä koa o Kamehameha. I ka pö ÿumikümälima o ÿAukake, 2009 ua komo mai Nä Koa o Änuenue i ke kahua paÿani ÿo Kanaÿiaupuni no ka paÿani ÿana i ka pöpeku. Ua hoÿomaka ka päÿani me ka hïmeni ÿana i ke mele kula no Änuenue me ke mele kaulana o ia pae ÿäina ÿo Hawaiÿi Ponoÿï. Ua lohe ÿia

ÿUlu koa planting

Ka pö mahina Na ÿ EKOLU KIM, mea käkau

Story and Photo by ROYAL AFAGA, feature writer

Kindergarten student Daxton Vickers helps to cover two ÿulu koa on September 4. Senior class officers Heather Kalehuawehe, Cameron Yee, and U’i Tanigawa along with Kumu Kanani Baz helped to plant the two trees between Charles Reed Bishop Library and Kamaläläwalu. The planting of the Ulu Koa is a tradition which was started five years ago by former headmaster Dr. Rod Chamberlain. Following the five year tradition, the ÿulu koa were planted on the first Friday of September.

nä leo hoÿöho i hana ÿia ma ka ÿölelo Hawaiÿi wale nö e nä mea hoÿoho o Änuenue. Ua lanakila nö Nä Koa o Änuenue, akä naÿe, ua keu a ka maikaÿi ka päÿani ÿana o Nä Koa o Kamehameha ma Maui kekahi. ÿO kekahi mea hoihoi, ua hoÿolaha ÿia ka hapa ÿelua o ka päÿani ma ka ÿölelo Hawaiÿi. Kupaianaha! He nani ka ÿölelo makuahine, akä, huikau nö hoÿi ka hapanui o ke anaina. Ma ka pau ÿana o ia päÿani, na Nä Koa i oli i ke oli mahalo e höÿike ai i ko läkou mahalo no ka hoÿokipa maikaÿi ÿana e nä koa o Kahemhameha.

Photo by ROYAL AFAGA

Currently, there are 15 trees planted. Six were planted in the first year, one for each group represented at KS Maui, and an extra tree was planted last year by retiring KSBE trustee and avid gardener Admiral Robert Kihune.

I këia pö, e ÿalohi ana ka mahina i kapa ÿia ÿo Hua. He lä maikaÿi ia no ka ÿohi ÿana i nä hua loaÿa mai käu mau hÿaÿawina. No ka mahiÿai ÿana, he wä maikaÿi këia no ke kanu ÿana i nä läÿau hua, e like me ka ÿuala, ka maiÿa, ka ÿalani, ka manakö a pëlä wale aku. No ka lawaiÿa ÿana, maikaÿi ka lawaiÿa ÿana ma ke kai hohonu a me ka laupapa i ke ahiahi no ka mea mälie ke kai. ÿO Hua ka pö mahina no këia lä.

Graphic by TANI NAKAMITSU


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Life

Volume V

Dane Lum Ho rocks America By ROBERT ABORDO and staff

MAUI ARTS AND CULTURAL CENTER - Senior Dane Lum Ho opened for the band America at their concert Maui concert August 8. Lum Ho performed as part of the musical duo Why Bother? at the Maui Arts and Cultural Center. “The crowd was huge…a sea of people,” Lum Ho said. With partner, Kalaÿe Camarillo (09) on ÿukulele, he performed a mix of reggae, rock, and contemporary music for the first twenty minutes of the concert. “The songs we chose had a lot to do with how we view music. It’s a passion, something I want to do for the rest of my life,” said Lum Ho. Opening for the concert was part of Why Bother?’s prize for winning the Tom Moffatt Productions competition Band Champ in March. Lum Ho said, “It was a life-altering experience. Just meeting everyone and being exposed to the excitement of a real big concert, well, it’s enough to make anyone nervous.” One of the people he met was America guitarist James Iha. Lum Ho that Iha

Issue 1

gave him advice about making it in the music business. Iha told him, “Keep practicing and try to groove and work with your band.” At the end of the concert, America invited opening acts Hapa and Why Bother? back on stage for an all-out jam of their classic 1970s hit “A Horse with No Name.” With Lum Ho on guitar and Camarillo on ÿukulele, the finale was greeted with loud cheers and applause. Although he felt nervous at first, Lum Ho said that he felt more excited than anything else, and that he would love to have the chance to do it again. “It’s something I’ll remember for the rest of my life, you know? Something to tell the kids about.” Watch for Why Bother?’s singles release. Lum Ho said either one or two songs should be available in stores in the next few months. He and Camarillo are also continuing to pursue music by working on a full demo CD.

October 1, 2009

B1

Above Photo by PILI KEPANI Photo at Left Courtesy of DANE LUM HO

Above: Dane Lum Ho plays acoustic guitar at Hawaiian Ensemble practice. A multitalented performer, Lum Ho opened for the band America. Left: Why Bother? performs at the Band Champ finals in April.

Jennifer Lawrence

Alex Agdeppa

Kolby Ah Sau

Kara Frampton

What are your priorities or goals for this new school year?

Photos by PILI KEPANI

“My goal is to keep my grades up so that my parents don’t take me out of sports.”

“Make it memorable because sophomore year isn’t a big thing. So I’m gonna make it a supercalifragilisticexpialadosious year.”

“Just livin’ the high school dream, baby. ‘Cause, shoot…I got less than 2 years left.”

“My priorities for this year is to live it up to it’s fullest potential. I want senior year to be the one I remember, because I don’t remember my previous years at all.”


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Life

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Issue 1

October 1, 2009

B2

By Linda C. Black Courtesy of MCT/Tribune Services Horoscopes are an entertainment feature. If you want real advice, look in your BIBLE.

Today’s Birthday (10/01/09): Use your communication skills to help you learn something new. Adjust your thinking to the prevailing situation. Creative efforts in an imaginative direction reap big rewards. Females play the larger role. Pay attention to what they offer.

Aries (March 21-April 19) You say what you mean today. But do pay attention to the response you get. It matters.

Above: The junior boys thrill the judges with their Thriller-style tribute to the late Michael Jackson.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Romance extends beyond personal relationships to include your work and extracurricular creativity. Enjoy!

Left: The freshman class cheers their classmates in the step competition during their first spirit week.

Gemini (May 21-June 21) Below: Teacher Coach Bala Spenser smiles doing his “step” exercise before the real step competition.

When talking about your feelings, remember those of the other person. A female may challenge your social position.

Cancer (June 22-July 22) You warm up to the subject right after your first cup of coffee. Others chime in, and suddenly you have a plan.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) All systems are go for fun, profit and love! Take advantage of the moment.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

SPIRIT WEEK RESULTS Grade:

9

10 11 12

Penny Wars

4

2

3

1

Battle of the Bands

4

2

3

1

Step

D Q

2

1

3

Cheer

4

1

3

2

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) All systems are go. Record your

Jeopardy

3

2

1

4

message early, and replay it frequently. That way you believe it yourself.

Relay

2

3

4

1

Safety Pin

3

2

1

4

Boys Cheer

D Q

2

1

D Q

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

Dress

4

1

2

3

Usually talk is cheap. Today, not so much. Spend your words carefully. You may have to eat them.

Banner

4

1

2

3

Float

4

1

2

3

Overall

4

1

2

3

Take care of details today (as if you don't always do that). Conversations lead in positive directions. Take notes.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Open your mouth. Try not to insert your foot. Instead, serve yourself some sweet remarks.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Actually, luck is on your side today. Use this advantage to get what you want.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) You have a hard time balancing all of your acts today. Respond to e-mails or letters that were on the back burner.

Photos and Graphics by PILI KEPANI

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) This month you get to do just about whatever you want. Take advantage of that, starting today.

Ruben Yamada plays his saxophone as Pono Gaspar-Fujihara sings in the Battle of the Bands.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Life

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October 1, 2009

B3

The First Installment of an Epic Tale of Auto Destruction Photos, graphics and story by KYLE DEELEY, sports editor

gawa Towing or Maui Tow & Transport. Police officers tag the cars for removal with the infamous orange “abandoned” stickers. The fee for the tow ranges from $53 to s the cars blast past on the free- $390, and if the tow is substantially more way, an abandoned hulk of metal sits difficult than an average tow (i.e. the car alone on the side of the road. It waits for is in a ditch or otherwise badly oriented) the truck to come and tow it away. Its an additional fee will be assessed. frame burnt and stripped by scavengers, A simple tow from the Kamehameha it silently awaits the car crusher. Schools Maui campus to the Maui This is the story of what happens to Baseyard could cost the owner $171.75. cars that get left on the side of Maui If that same car had been properly County roads. disposed of through one of the countyAfter a car has been left on public authorized scrap dealers, it would have property for 24 hours, it can be officially cost a fraction of that. Vehicle disposal designated “abandoned,” and after anat SOS Island Recycling, for instance, other 24 hours, can be legally towed to costs a maximum of $130.00. the Maui Baseyard. According to Alohalani Haupu, comThe towing is handled by either Kitapany representative, if you tow your own

This burnt-out shell of a car sat abandoned at the Pukalani cutoff on Haleakalä Highway waiting to be towed. The average time from reporting to towing is two weeks, according to Maui police officer Mark Kaaa..

vehicle to their facility, it only costs $50 to turn it in for recycling. Make sure to remove the license plates and any rubbish. Prices may be higher depending on the size of the tires and other factors. If a vehicle owner drains the fluids and removes the tires, there is no cost. Either way, the car owner should be prepared to sign an affidavit turning the vehicle over to SOS. SOS also offers frequent discounts to make proper disposal of cars affordable according to SOS Island Recycling employee Brendan Halton . “We get anywhere from 0 to 150 cars a month,” said Halton . This means that operating at maximum capacity, a total of 1,800 cars a year could be processed through just this one island recycling partner.

Coming next issue, part 2: “What Happens next?”

A wider view shows the car had its hood wrenched open and windows punched out by vandals while waiting for the tow truck.


Volume V

Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Life

Issue 1

October 1, 2009

B4

Willy Wonka comes to KSM Director Camille Romero promises a sweet musical for all By KAIO TUBERA, staff writer

The chocolate factory comes to Kamehameha Schools Maui this fall as the drama club presents Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory in Keöpuölani Hale. Willy Wonka is a story about a poor boy named Charlie Bucket played by junior Wesley Kiaha. He finds a prized golden ticket, winning a visit to Willy Wonka’s famous chocolate factory. Along with four other children, Violet Beauregard (junior Alana Song), Mika Teavee (senior Katie Perryman), Augustus Gloop (senior Kuanoni Crozier), and Veruca Salt (sophomore Rachel Bega) and their parents, Charlie enters the factory where he discovers the magic of candy and the benefits of telling the truth Senior Kainalu Yen who plays both Charlie’s father and Mr. Salt, Veruca Salt’s business-driven father, expects the musical to be a hit. “The cast has really great energy and I know everyone will be trying their hardest.” he said. Directed by KSM drama teacher, Camille Romero, Willy Wonka opens on October 30 at 7:30 p.m. in Keöpuölani Hale. Additional evening performances are at 7:30 on October 31 and November 6 and 7, with matinee performances at 2:00 on October 31 and November 7.

Above: Sophomores Kalani Ruidas and Rachel Bega and senior Ekela Hill help each other make parts of the set for this year’s theater production, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory at a drama workshop on campus September 26. Right: Senior Danika Rubican holds down a piece of wood while Junior Kaio Tubera saws. The play opens on October 30.

Photos by KYLE DEELEY

Honolulu Symphony helps dwindling music education By KA`IO TUBERA, staff writer

Music education programs in Hawai`i have been reduced dramatically in the past few years. Public schools lack the funding for instruments and teachers, so the department of education has cut the budget for music classes in most public schools. According to the Center on Education Policy, “44 percent of districts reported cutting time from one or more other subjects or activities at the elementary level, including science, social studies, art and music, physical education, lunch and recess.” The Honolulu Symphony is helping to educate Hawaiÿi’s youth. Established over 100 years ago, the Honolulu Sym-

Photo by KYE HAINA

Above: Kathy Hafner, symphony violinist, and Steve Dinion, another Honolulu Symphony member, speak at the 2009 Journalism Day event at University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa.

phony strives to enhance Hawai`i’s quality of life through music. “Last year, members of the Honolulu Symphony went to Nänäkuli Elementary School two times a week for an entire school year,” said Honolulu Symphony member, Steve Dinion. The members brought instruments and taught music classes at Nänäkuli. Teachers and students in public and private schools in Hawai`i get help from members of the Honolulu Symphony. The musicians teach music and train music teachers at the University of Hawaiÿi along with managing their student outreach programs. SEE EDUCATION B8


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Features

Volume V

Issue 1

New clubs on the block have something for all

B5

Clubs N’ Advisors

By MATTHEW QUENGA, features editor

Ever year, students flock to the front of the counseling center to sign up for the schools’ different student organizations. New clubs designed to excite and entice students came out on August 28 in an attempt to fill their ranks. Coach Bala Spencer is advising one of the new clubs, the Car Club, where car enthusiasts will enjoy the company of other car lovers. In the Ocean Club, students will enjoy aquatic activities, such as fishing. Senior Aasin Torricer, club founder, said, “This club is going to be the most fun of all clubs because we are actually going to go out there and do stuff with the ocean.” The Ocean Club is advised by Mr. Duane Iwamura. Students can expect to do beach cleanups to give back to the `äina, Torricer said. He said, “We will learn to do many different things that our ancestors did at the beach.” The club has more than 90 members signed up. Mr. Rickard is advising the Guitar Club. He said, “The main goal of this club is to spread knowledge of the guitar and music theory and history to anyone interested in learning, regardless of their skill level.” The club meets every Thursday at lunch. “Members can expect to explore different genres of music on the guitar as well as different styles of playing (fingerpicking, rhythm, and lead),” Rickard said. They will share their knowledge and even try to master a few rock and blues classics. “We’ve decided as a club that we would concentrate on different styles of music for about a month at a time, ”he said. In September and October, members will be concentrating on playing the blues. After that comes rock , jazz, reggae, and slack-key. Move over Guitar Hero…..here comes the real deal! KSM’s Hot AX Guitar Club!” said Rickard. Another new activity is the Afterschool Band with Mr.Laufou. It’s not too late to join a club if you’re still interested. Just let the president or advisor know that you wish to join. According to Mrs.Naomi Ashman, student activities coordinator, it is even pos-

October 1, 2009

Photos by SHELBY LYNCH

Seniors Kyle Deeley and Tani Nakamitsu hold up signs to promote clubs. Below:Ocean Club founder senior Aasin Torricer lures and reels in prospective club members.

sible to start your own club as Torricer did with his Ocean Club. In order to do this, she says to speak to her about it, and she will contact someone to advise

ADVISOR

CLUB

Aarona-Lorenz, Kalei

Hawaiian Ensemble

Abe, Angie

Art

Akeo, Ladd

Color Guard, FCA

Antonio, Kapulani

OMG!

Antonio, Lokahi

Chess

Baz, Kanani

Bike

Cajudoy, Brandy and Kyle Fujii

HOSA

Haina, Kye

Quill and Scroll Society

Iwamura, Duane

Surf/Diving/Ocean

Kuoha, Keoni and Pueo Pata

Nä Kamahele o A’apueo

Laxson, Robert

NHS

Mason, Levi

Spirit

Mateaki, Jared

Japanese

Nitta, Dale

Surf

O’Brien, Kevin

Close Up

Razo, Tracy

Interact

Romero, Camille

Drama

Spencer, “Bala” Charles

Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Car

Rickard, Kaholo

Guitar

Laufou, Siuai

After-school Band


Volume V

Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Life

Figure it out By Robert Abordo

Sudoku

Issue 1 October 1, 2009

B6

(Intermediate Level)

Unscramble the words below. Transfer the numbered letters into the numbered boxes at the bottom to reveal a secret message. Answers on D1.

Sudoku courtesy of KrazyDad.com

Fill in the blank squares so that each row, column and each 3-by-3 block contains all of the digits 1 thru 9. Answers on B8

Bill n’ Fred

By DAYTON PASCUAL, features writer

Graphic by MATTHEW QUENGA


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume V

Issue 1 October 1, 2009

B7

Photos by KA`iO TUBERA Graphics by MATTHEW QUENGA

Clockwise: Senior Kyle Deeley as Spock/alien/ Transformer, Eyore, and uncostumed trick-or-treater. Sophomores Kylie Dudoit as a Pilgrim and Rachel Vega as witch.

What does your costume say about you? By KAÿIO TUBERA, staff writer

Halloween comes with wild parties, tons of candy, and, of course, amazing costumes. Costumes can range from simple outfits to elaborate get ups. So what does your costume say about you? Historical Figure This type of costume may show a hidden desire to be well known. Students who choose this type of costume are leaders. They choose to embrace their greatness through emulating people greater than them. Some people who choose this costume may make history themselves. Magical People Costumes involving magic, such as wizards or witches, reveal a fascination with the fantastic. Those who pick these types of costumes for Halloween have active imaginations. Oftentimes, these people may be amazing artists or story

tellers. Dressing as a witch or wizard shows a desire to dominate situations that are uncontrollable. People who choose these costumes may grow up to be scientists as they develop new theories and break the barriers of human limitations.

be different from everybody else. These people may grow up to be science fiction authors, handymen or explorers of UFO and other supernatural phenomenon. Cartoon Characters A cartoon character costume is symbolic of a need to embrace the inner child and innocence. People who wear Alien these types of costumes are fun and outgoing people. They are comfortable Extraterrestrial enough with themselves that they don’t costumes are mind looking ridiculous, as long as unusual. People they’re having a good time. who dress as No Costume aliens or other types of strange Yep. They come around every year — creatures often people who look like they’re wearing have a good regular clothes. These people who don’t sense of humor or bother to dress up and just show up at have a desire to your door with a grocery bag saying, “Give me candy,” are just plain lazy, but Kyle Deeley’s costume reveals he is funny, give them a break. Everyone deserves a different and full of ‘awesomeness.’ little candy on Halloween.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Life

Volume V

Issue 1

October 1, 2009

B8

Fast Facts:

the Kaimana Award By MATTHEW QUENGA features

Award: Kaimana Award Trophy and a

$2,000.00 prize.

Winner: Kamehameha Schools Maui Campus, MIL D2 Who is Eligible?: Individual schools in each league (MIL,OIH,ILH,BIIF, and KIF) and division award for each league and division

Awarder: HMSA Kaimana Awards and Scholarship Program Why: According to HMSA, this award embodies HMSA’s “go” Campaign and encourages physical activity.

How: Each school earns points based on athletics, academics, sportsmanship and community service

Importance: “This award is important to us because it represents scholarship, citizenship, and sportsmanship, qualities that speak highly of our student athletes and our school. It is a reflection of the values we hold in high esteem on our campus.” – Dr. Warren Hitz, high school principal “The Kaimana Award is a great honor. It is a collaboration of the hard work and dedication on the student athletes’ part. The coaches worked hard to help the athletes get to where they are, along with parent support and the great teachers at our school that have helped create amazing student-athletes.” – Coach Kurt Ginoza, high school athletics director “It shows how much dedication our student athletes put into their education and sports all at the same time. This can be hard for some of us at times but if we want to be involved and do extra curricular activities we need to get good grades. “ – Desmond Machado, senior student/athlete

Education

Just For Laughs

CONTINUED FROM B4

Cuts in music programs and public education brings professional musicians into the classroom, improving the quality of the program and providing additional income for the musician. Entry-level musicians in the symphony are paid $31,000 a year, and most have side jobs teaching private lessons or in schools for extra money, according to Dinion. Kathy Hafner, violinist for the symphony says, “The Symphony brings the knowledge to the community, something a single musician elsewhere cannot bring.” She also said, “Although music classes are limited in Hawai`i, small programs, such as those provided by the Honolulu Symphony, give hope to the musicians of the future.”

Photo by KYLE DEELEY

Sudoku answers

Cartoon by LACEY FARM


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Sports

Volume V

Issue 1

October 1, 2009

C1

Photos by KANOA YAP and KAÿIO TUBERA

Right: Senior running back Chase Bell charges through Saber linebacker Jarren Kanohokula on September 11th at War Memorial Stadium in Kahului . The game ended with a 10-6 win for the Warriors. Top: Keenan Kaluau scrambles to avoid Luna defensive back George Chihara after receiving the ball.

Spirit week ends in disappointing loss By ERIN VENTURA, staff writer

Homecoming week is filled with crazy dress-up days, tons of spirit, and many activities that may distract the football players from their one goal of the week

— victory. The Warriors suffered a 29-6 loss to the Lähainaluna Lunas at their Homecoming game in Kanaÿiaupuni Stadium last Saturday.

“In the past years, homecoming week has served as a distraction to the football boys,” said Leo Delatori, varsity SEE HOMECOMING PAGE C2

The nighttime season that almost wasn’t

Saturday Night Lights Shine By KYLE DEELEY, sports editor

Due to budgetary constraints imposed on the Maui Interscholastic League, the Kamehameha Schools Maui varsity football team was almost forced to play all home games at 1:00 in the afternoon this fall season. Standard stadium lights cost approximately $200 an hour to run. Because of budget cuts in the Hawaiÿi Department of Education, the schools could not fiscally justify paying for night games and put forth the all-daytime schedule. The Kanaÿiaupuni stadium lights cost twice the standard charge at $400 an hour; a cost that Kamehameha Schools was willing to absorb for home games, but that did not solve the problem of daytime games for the other schools. MIL varsity football games were set to be played midday until August 11, when $30,000 was donated to the MIL to be given to Maui public schools for the sole earmarked purpose of moving the games back to the evening.

Photo by KYLE DEELEY

“The daytime game schedule would affect too many people, including Pee Wee leagues, cheerleaders, school bands, parents, and other sports,” said

former Kamehameha coach Keaka Robinson, whose company, Maui Linen Supply, donated $10,000 to support the night games and high school football. Following his lead and with the involvement of State Senator Shan Tsutsui, twenty other individuals and businesses donated $1,000 apiece to the cause. These donations will finance all stadium lights for the football season and possibly into the start of the soccer season. All varsity football games are now scheduled to be played under the white glow of stadium lights, save the October 24 game in Lähainaluna’s stadium, which does not have lights. “I think it’s good, health wise. We’re a little fresher and we don’t have to worry about getting heat stroke,” says Warrior defensive player and Kamehameha junior Nico Lopes. “Plus, more people will be able to come to the games.” Offensive linemen, Nainoa Bright said simply, “I love it.”


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Sports

Name: Leah Santos Sport: Volleyball Jersey Number: #5 Position: Outside Hitter/Defensive Specialist Height: 5’4” Age and Grade: 16, junior Workout: lifting, conditioning, and court workout Hobbies: beach, movies, hanging with friends Something others (KSM students) do not know about you: “I like walruses.” Other Sports: Track and Field What you add to the team: “My 4 years of experience, which include 2 years on varsity.” Challenges your team has faced so far this year: “Close calls.” (Referring to match scores) How you have conquered “the hurdles”: “By keeping positive and striving for the summit. Külia i ka Nuÿu.” How long you have been playing: “I started playing in middle school.” HOMECOMING FROM PAGE C1

Head Coach. This year was no different. The Warriors went into the game with something to prove, coming off a previous week’s loss to the Nä Aliÿi 39-28. In the opening drive, the Lunas were able to score, putting pressure on the Warriors defense. The Warriors went scoreless in the first three quarters. Offensive attempts by senior quarterback Eli Ferreira came up short of a score, and backup Bryson Souza fared no better in the second half, also unable to find a scoring combination of plays.

Volume V

Issue 1

Name: Levi Almeida Sport: Cross Country Height: 5’ 10’’ Age and Grade: 16, junior Workout: lots of running and abs, anything and everything Hobbies: anything outdoors, meditating, reading, writing Something others (KSM students) do not know about you:“If you really want to know, you should paddle for Hawaiian Canoe Club this summer.” Other Sports:Paddling and Track and Field What you add to the team:“Inspiration and motivation.” Challenges your team has faced so far this year:“Challenges are opportunities to improve ourselves, so there are no challenges, just opportunities.” How you have conquered “the hurdles”: “Mind over matter. All things pass quickly and whatever you put in, you will get the same.” How long you have been running: “A long time.”

Senior running back Chase Bell said, “It was very disappointing to lose our last homecoming in high school.” He felt the offense could have done a lot better by executing all of their plays. The Warriors’ only touchdown of the game came on a fumble by the Lunas, which was picked up by senior defensive linemen Solomon Ezera. “It was nice to score my first touchdown and the only touchdown of the game. Overall the game was very disappointing because of how much we prepared in this past week,” he said. His

October 1, 2009

C2

Name: Solomon Ezera Sport: Football Jersey Number: #52 Position: Defensive end/Defensive line Height: 5’ 11’’ Age and Grade: 17, senior Workout: pumping iron Hobbies: diving Something others (KSM students) do not know about you: “My goal this year is to catch a hundred pound ulua.” Other Sports: Paddling What you add to the team: “A stronger defensive line.” Challenges your team has faced so far this year: “Senior Projects, grades, and injuries.” How you have conquered “the hurdles”: “By working hard and trying not to get hurt.” How long you have been playing: “Many moons.”

expectation for the Warriors defense was to stop the Lunas by shortening their offensive drives and putting pressure on their offense to convert on third down situations. The Warriors look forward to redeeming themselves next week against the Baldwin Bears. Ezera said, “This week’s preparation will be key because of the amount of time that we will have. Our practices will need to be intense and aggressive.” The Warriors will have only four days to prepare for their upcoming game.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Sports

Volume V

Issue 1

October 1, 2009

C3

My Summer of College Training A look inside my training at University of San Francisco’s USA Volleyball Camp By ERIN VENTURA, staff writer

On July 24, 2009, I was fortunate enough to go to the University of San Francisco to better my volleyball skills at a USA Volleyball camp. When my sister dropped me off on Friday afternoon, I checked in and went to a briefing in the lobby of our dorms. I stayed in a dorm named Hayes Heely. The dorms gave me a preview of what my life will be like in the next few years. I was able to meet new people from all over the continental US. I met girls from New Jersey, Florida, Connecticut, and Chicago as well as girls from California. I was the only person from Hawaiÿi there. My nickname was “Hawai.” I attended three two-hour sessions for five days. We barely had time to breathe. My day-to-day schedule was basically breakfast, practice, lunch, practice, dinner, practice. After the first day, my hips were covered in bruises, and my knees were throbbing. Waking up every day was a mental push because I knew how sore my body was, and yet I still had several days left. I had been invited through an organization called USA Volleyball High Performance. During mid-April, I tried out for the USA Junior National team; it’s approximately 2000 girls trying out for 19 spots. Unfortunately, I did not make the cut. But as a result of my tryout, I was invited to the USA Volleyball training camp at the University of San Francisco. There,

Photos by KYLE DEELEY

Top: Senior Erin Ventura makes a dig against the Baldwin Bears. She says that her schools have improved a lot since being invited to train at one of the USA Volleyball High Performance camps held across the nation this summer. Right: Opposite hitter Oiÿaÿiÿo Gilliland Anuhea Kaiÿaokamalie jump for a block at the net.

we were trained by college coaches. Even though each session was a pain and I was constantly counting down to the last one, my overall experience was amazing. I was ecstatic! I learned to be consistent in my skills. After returning, Coach Brooke, assistant coach at the University of Denver, said that my skill level had increased drastically, and my work ethic can take me far. That helped me to believe that college volleyball could be in my near future. My teammates juniors, Kaulana Ane, varsity setter, and Ginger Long, varsity outside hitter, also competed in a USA Volleyball tournament this summer in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

They enjoyed their experience, and they plan to do it again next summer. As for me, my chance at playing for USA is basically over because I am graduating in the summer. It was a great experience. If time allowed it, I would participate again.

Junior Varsity volleyball girls kick off another bright season By TANI NAKAMITSU, staff writer

Photo by Shelby Lynch Sophomore Uluwehi Young tips the volleyball to the Maui High Sabers.

With a winning start of seven wins and one loss, the JV volleyball girls are working hard at practices to continue their winning streak. Head coach of the Junior Varsity volleyball girls Mark Kaaa is proud to say,” The girls have been working hard and they have been meeting our expectations.” Coach Mark feels that this year’s season has been successful, and he is expecting to have zero losses from now on because he believes that the girls have been performing well. Photo by SHELBY LYNCH


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Sports

Volume V

Issue 1

October 1, 2009

C4

New, veteran runners strive for success By Ka Leo o Nä Koa staff

The cross-country team has at least nine members whose times indicate they might qualify for the state championships at the MIL meet on October 24 at King Kekaulike High School. Of the nine, five are newcomers to the team. They are part of 17 first-time competitors on a squad of 26 Warrior runners. What’s their secret? Senior Aacin Torricer said, “I try to work hard at practice, and when I am tired and want to just quit, I think about the meet…I try to get in a whole new mindset and take it seriously. I run my own race and do not care about the others.” Sophomore Sonya Donohue has a similar strategy. “I try to push myself to do better…and to get ahead of as many people as I can before crossing the line.” Donohue said she has another secret, “Also [I try] to beat my sister who goes to Baldwin.” Fellow sophomore Naomi Holokai

Photos by TANI NAKAMITSU and staff

Top: Senior Aasin Torricer sprints for the finish line. Left: Junior Levi Almeida rounds the bend at the MIL meet #2 at Seabury Hall.

thinks ahead by preparing her body for successful runs. “I am trying to succeed in cross-country by eating healthier and trying not to eat snacks…before practices because I am afraid that I might

have a harder time with the sugar in my body.” Coach Karl Blaeuer believes that several of the cross-country runners are on target to be in the field of the top 27 male and female runners who qualify for the state championship. "The most important ingredients for successful distance running are guts, determination, and dedication. It's like a an apple pie; you must have the apples, the flour, and the cinnamon. All three are wonderful, but the complete dessert is achieved only with all three," he said.

Comparing KS Maui and KSHawaiÿi Athletic Programs

KS Athletics through the Eyes of Brianna By ERIN VENTURA, staff writer

Brianna Vargas-Hafoka, a senior, is the first starting girl to ever play football at Kamehameha Schools Maui on the varsity squad. She transferred from the Kamehameha Schools Hawaiÿi Campus at the beginning of this, her senior year. Vargas-Hafoka is a five-sport athlete competing in football, softball, wrestling, paddling and track and field. She said that both KSM and KSH athletic programs that she has been a part of have positives and negatives. Vargas-Hafoka describes both programs as requiring hard work and a “go getta” attitude. She says, “KSM and KSH will do whatever it takes for them to have success in one play.” She has the same attitude, “My work ethic is basically pushing through what ever is asked and mainly finishing,” says VargasHafoka.

Photo by KAÿIO TUBERA

Offensive player Vargas-Hafoka warms up before the Homecoming game.

Vargas-Hafoka says that KSM and KSH have the same work ethic, but the areas of emphasis are different. The Big Island athletics focus on strength and speed, she says, as opposed to KSM athletics, whom she sees focus on endurance and execution. KSH works hard in the weight room and KSM works

harder on the field, she said. Vargas-Hafoka feels that there could be more diversity in training. “The emphasis should not be solely based upon physical strengths, but also mental strengths as well,” she said. SEE BRIANNA ON NEXT PAGE


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Sports

Volume V

Issue 1

October 1, 2009

C5

Photo Courtesy of Margo Sneed

Left: Rodeo Rookie of the Year and Kamehameha Schools Maui senior Dylan Godsey takes on a cow in the Hawaiÿi High School Rodeo Championships on the Big Island this summer. Above: Godsey pursues a calf on horseback with a partner.

Godsey named Rookie of the Year at HHSRA State Rodeo By JARRIN ARAKAKI and staff

PARKER RANCH – Sophomore Dylan Godsey, was awarded the Rookie of the Year belt buckle in the Hawaiÿi High School Rodeo Association Rodeo Championships at Parker Ranch on the Big Island, June12-14. Godsey said, “It was very different compared to other rodeos I have competed in. The competitors were all older than me, so I was challenged to work hard.” Senior Caprese Castillon attended the rodeo and said, “I'm really proud of him because he was one of the youngest competitors and he placed in all of his events.” In Hawaiÿi’s own events, Godsey comFROM BRIANNA PAGE C4

One aspect of the KSM athletic program that she feels needs some adjustments is bridging the gap between athletics and the Hawaiian culture. She believes that it is the responsibility of Hawaiians to link the past with the present. Before every game, she uses Tileaves to tie her shoulder pads. “I do it because of a story that was told by my coaches at KSH about Kamehameha and his warriors would use it for protection in battle,” she said. This is a way for her to incorporate her Hawaiian culture in football and athletics. Vargas-Hafoka says,” I believe that if we become one with our culture we will find ourselves victorious as our ancestors were.”

peted in po’o waiü and came in third in mugging. In the National High School Rodeo Association events he placed fifth in team roping, calf roping, and cutting. Because other contestants gave up their national placement spots, Godsey’s finishes were enough to qualify him for nationals in New Mexico in July, but he wasn’t able to attend due to other obligations. “Overall, I put my 100% out there, and I’m happy with the outcome,” Godsey said. Godsey got into several tight scrapes at the competition. “It was intense!” said Castillon. “When he got his hand caught in the rope [in calf roping]. That’s when I

Sports scoreboard Cross Country Results: 9/05/09– Boys: 18. Levi Almeida, 46. Jared Toba, 54. Aasin Torricer, 63. Dane Lum Ho, 65. Chris Kim, 70. Cameron Yee, 72. Kamaka Pocock, 81. Makai Mann, 89. Blake Lau Girls:29. Kamalani Uehara, 32. Sonya Donahu, 37. Kelly Luis, 40. Elise Bal, 44. Sarah Ing, 45. Lilihoe Bal, 46. Naomi Holokai, 47. Shana Kong 9/19/09 Boys: 13. Levi Almeida, 18. Alex Guererro, 22. Jared Toba, 37. Dane Lum Ho, 39. Kamaka Pocock, 45. Cameron Yee, 54. Jimmy Wickland, 56. Makai Mann Football Opponent Anuenue Maui High KKHS LLHS

Date 8/15/09 9/11/09 9/19/09 9/26/09

Volleyball Opponent Date Lahainaluna 8/08/09 Maui High 9/05/09 King Kekaulike9/8/09 Baldwin High 9/10/09 Maui High 9/15/09 Lahainaluna 9/17/09 Baldwin High 9/23/09 King Kekaulike9/25/09

Varsity 20-26 ANHS 10-6 KSM 36-29 KKHS 29-6 LLHS

JV N/A 19-6 KSM 34-0 KSM 0-22 LLHS

Varsity 3-0 KSM 3-0 KSM 3-0 KSM 3-0 KSM 3-0 KSM 3-0 KSM 3-0 KSM 3-0 KSM

JV W W L W W W W W

yelled.” “I thought I broke my wrist [at the time],” said Godsey. He said it feels back to normal except for some remaining tenderness. He never got a doctor’s diagnosis. “He’s a cowboy; they don’t go to doctors,” Castillon said. Godsey laughed. Godsey found himself in another tense situation in mugging, a cow immobilization technique. “I had my arms clenched around the cow’s neck, so this thing, I think it was about 800 lbs., started to take control. I lost my feet, and they were dragging underneath, so he [the cow] was stepping on my jeans, and he tore a gigantic hole in the back!” said Godsey, recalling the struggle. “I just remember him being dragged across the whole arena,” Castillon said. The whole incident ended on a comedic note. “I had to buy a new pair of jeans for the fashion show that night, and my story got all the people in the store laughing,“ Godsey said. Ever since being named state champion in goat tying in 2008, Godsey said he has been approached by many parents who ask for his help. “Many people I’ve taught have gone on to win money in goat tying. That’s kinda cool.” He said he would love to continue to teach others more about rodeo. Godsey has been competing in rodeo for ten years, and has been a member of the National High School Rodeo Association for the past five years, three as ajunior wrangler. Before he graduates, he said, “It would be good to be named Hawaiÿi High School All-Around Chamthe pion.” As for the further future, he said, “I’m not counting on it, but it would be nice to continue to compete in college, and one day, I’d like to teach my children how to rodeo.”


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Sports

Volume V

Issue 1

October 1, 2009

C6

Here’s the Freshman

40

By KANOA YAP, sports writer

Wailuku – Throughout the past three years, the KS Maui JV football team has not consisted of this many freshmen. They make up over three-fourths of this year’s junior varsity football team and they are determined to take the JV championships for the third straight year. Could this possibly be the next generation of football stars? Freshman Tyler MacArthur seems to think so, “We already have an educated team. By the time we are seniors our team will be much stronger.” This relatively young team thinks that they can take the MIL JV championship again with their strength and determination. Although behind the confidence and ego, they admit that there is a lot of room for improvement. “We always need more work,” said freshman, Makoa Medeiros, “No one’s ever perfect.” The team looks to improve a lot on their offensive side of the ball. Most feel that the defense is more organized than the offense, according to freshman Pono Freitas. The sixteen sophomores that make up

Camanse competes in weightlifting By DANIEL BORGES, staff writer

Kamehameha Maui sophomore Ikaika Camanse was part of a second-place weightlifting team at the World Association of Benchers and Deadlifters competition at the Hawai`i Convention Center on July 5. There were 20 different age divisions

Photo by JARRIN ARAKAKI

Stanley Cabanas evades pursuers and breaks for the end zone.

the rest of the team are also excited for this upcoming season. “We have faith in ourselves to lead this team to victory,” said sophomore Jordan Nauka. Offensive lineman Joe Aguilar said that more sophomores should be a part of the junior varsity team. “Most of the returning sophomores hold the captain positions. The freshmen are good though,” he said.

“It was a good experience and decision to join.” - Ikaika Camanse

Photo by ERIN VENTURA

that ranged from 12 to 85+. Camanse got started when an old friend asked him if he wanted to join his deadlifting team since he seemed to enjoy weightlifting.

Many of the sophomores are concerned about the lack of experience on this young team, but sophomore starting running back Kupono Cabanas, said, “I see some talent [alive in the freshmen], hopefully we can do well this year.” The JV team’s upcoming games will be on October 2 against the Baldwin Bears and on October 10 against King Kekaulike, which will both be held at Kanaÿiaupuni stadium at 4:30 pm. Camanse enjoyed the competition and said, “It was a good experience and decision to join.” Camanse competed in the 14-15 age group. He said he came in second place because the winning competitor, Kainoa Caballerro, started off with 415 lbs, which is more than Camanse could lift. First place went to Caballerro, and Camanse finished in second with a 308 lb lift. For placing second, Camanse was awarded with a koa bowl. Overall his team placed second.

Single trainer finds ways to cope with shortage By TANI NAKAMITSU, staff writer

Having one trainer left to take care of the fall athletes has made an impact on the sports department and the athletes. One sports trainer, Coach Alika Asing, remains after trainer Kathryn (Kat) went back to Chicago to pursue additional education and Coach Charles Roggow had to go out temporarily on personal

leave. Coach Kat will remain in Chicago to pursue a Physician’s Assistant Degree, but Coach Charles will return on December 1. Until then, Athletic Director Kurt Ginoza said, “Their [Coach Charles’/Kat’s] absence is felt during the daily practices and away events. The manpower short-

age has required KSM coaches to increase their supervision and collaboration with Coach Alika.” Although Coach Kat is no longer at KSM, “She misses everyone and enjoyed her time here,” said Ginoza. Coach Alika divides his time between CONTINUED ON C7


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Sports

Volume V

Issue 1

October 1, 2009

C7

Maiava takes pro field, fan has high hopes By KANOA YAP, sports writer

Maui’s own Kaluka Maiava was drafted by the Cleveland Browns on July 25 as their new incoming linebacker. Could he possibly be the missing link that the Browns’ defense needs to advance to the playoffs this year? Maiava graduated from Baldwin High School in 2005 and continued on to the University of Southern California on a football scholarship. He is the first athlete from Maui to play for USC’s football team. I always thought that he was underappreciated in the media, playing in the shadows of star defensive players Rey Maualuga and Brian Cushing, but Maiava would disagree. “Of course they didn’t pay me any attention; I would not pay any attention to me also,” Maiava said. “Rey and Brian are the true definition of football and linebacker. They are both amazing athletes and without them, I would have never had the personal success on the field that I had. I owe a lot to Rey and Brian.” Maiava’s impressive stats throughout his high school and college careers earned him his position with the Browns, and I think he will have an equally impressive professional career. In his senior year of college (his only starting season), Maiava earned the second team All-Pac-10 accolade. He also won many other awards including

for him right here: “The Maiava.” When I asked Maiava about it, he said that “Kalukxx” (Kuh-looks) is what his friends call him from time to time. He is okay with that, but he draws the line at nicknaming yourself. He said, “Giving yourself a nickname is lame.” I would agree, The Maiava. One of Maiava’s greatest influences comes from Seattle Seahawks linebacker, Lofa Tatupu. defensive MVP honors in the Trojans’ “Nobody believed in him,” said Maiava. Rose Bowl victory over Penn State. “But he still proved them wrong, and he Maiava finished the 08’-09’ season with 66 tackles and 7.5 tackles for loss, is now one of the top linebackers in the NFL.” He calls these non-believers finishing behind only Maualuga and “haters.” “The haters are the ones that Cushing atop the Trojans’ stat sheet. While I would like to have seen Maiava really inspire and motivate me. I love haters,” he said. play on the first string throughout his I would love to see Maiava and Tatupu time at USC, seeing him start in his senplaying on the same field, both bringing ior year was still exciting. Maiava their best defensive games. It would be agreed, “It was the greatest feeling in awesome to see Maiava face off against the world being named a starter for the best team in the nation, although, I wish one of the greatest linebackers ever. Maiava cannot help but to make an I could have started all 4 years. But, I impression on the field. He has done it had the opportunity to play and learn here and will continue to do it in Clevefrom a bunch of future NFL legends such as Keith Rivers, who now plays for land. I will be watching for Maiava to show some grit and real Maui-style edge the Cincinnati Bengals.” while in the NFL. Throughout his professional career, I Overall, hopes are high for Kaluka expect to see Maiava excel over time as Maiava. Even though the Browns’ seahis experience continues to grow. son is starting with a string of losses, I I would love to see him earn a cool nickname like “The Flyin’ Hawaiian,” the am looking forward to seeing how he will affect the dynamics of the Browns’ denickname of the Philadephia Phillie’s fense and what he will contribute to the Maui-grown outfielder Shane Victorino. In fact, I will propose my own nickname gridiron.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE C5

football, volleyball, and cross-country. As part of a trainer’s job, he tapes, wraps, ices and treats injuries to athletes. At the same time, he makes sure athletes stay hydrated. Coach Alika attends both practices and games in case of an emergency. On a daily basis, Coach Alika sees up to an average of 45 athletes in the training room and tends to their injuries or necessities. “It has been a real challenge. Some days it's like a tornado and other days it's like a hurricane,” Coach Alika said. He said he stays positive by doing the best he can for the athletes while getting to know more about them. Coach Alika handles the temporary situation in several ways, “Exercise has helped me to be mentally stable - you know - paddling, surfing, mountain biking, dirt biking, road bicycling, and keeping up with my children. Just taking it one day at a time, works.... I try not to think too far ahead of myself!” he said. Coach Alika said he appreciates students who come to help out while he is busy attending to the athletes.

Photo by KANOA YAP

Coach Alika Asing wraps the ankle of offensive lineman, Hanoa Puaÿa-Freitas.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa - Editorials

Ka Leo o Nä Koa Staff Faculty Advisor:

Ms. Kye Haina News Editors:

Lacey Farm and Emily Farm Life Editors:

Matthew Quenga and Pili Kepani Sports Editor:

Kyle Deeley Staff:

Robert Abordo Royal Afaga Alex Agdeppa Jarrin Arakaki Daniel Borges Caitlyn DeMello Ariel Kahahane Noelle Kaulupali Shelby Lynch Blayne Morton Tani Nakamitsu Dayton Pascual Kaÿio Tubera Erin Ventura Kanoa Yap Wire Services: Some material courtesy of American Society of Newspaper Editors/MCT Campus Highschool Newspaper Services.

Editorial Policy The staff of Ka Leo o Nä Koa is dedicated to objective and balanced coverage of campus and community news. We welcome comments, corrections, suggestions and letters.

Volume V

Issue 1

October 1, 2009

D1

We Want You For Yearbook! By KYLE DEELEY, sports editor

A yearbook is a lot more important than most people realize. Sure, right now it’s just a place for signatures, but look forward to the future. Imagine 40 years from now. You run into a classmate at the store and strike up a conversation. As you bid them farewell, you ask yourself “Who was that?” Thankfully, there is a handy compendium of memories, perfectly preserved on the pages of the yearbook. Unfortunately, this year has seen a dearth of yearbook students and no true yearbook class. Instead, this year’s yearbook will be put together by three dedicated advanced art students who volunteered to take on this important job. They don’t want to see their peers go without some documentation of the year. Most of the pictures in this year’s annual will come from the school’s journalism staff, who have taken on the photographic responsibilities of yearbook. So if a person on our staff asks you to pose for a shot, ham it up.

As great a job as I’m sure our yearbook staff will do, the reality is that it will be a hardship for these students who also have to complete the assignments for their regular classes—Advanced Art and Journalism. Since all three main yearbook staffers are seniors, it will also be hard for them to get pictures of underclassmen. A yearbook should mirror the student body as a whole. We need a mix of ideas and age levels, or it’s just an upperclassman photo album. How can you help? Take pictures at class and club events and bring them on a jump drive to Ms. Haina in room X-126. She’ll be happy to take them off your hands, and you may get to see your photographic genius in the yearbook. Last, if you want a great yearbook next year, sign up! Yearbook is offered as a yearlong, every other day class. Register when you register for all of your other classes. Yearbook is open to students of all grade levels.

DINING CONTINUED FROM A9

tance of respecting school property, appreciating our resources and doing the right thing.” Students are responding to campus efforts to keep dining ware in its place. “On several occasions (this year included) we've had students bringing back utensils or cups that were found in various areas [like trash cans],” said Cagasan. Higa said, “It’s definitely gotten better.”

classrooms and bathrooms fell onto the custodians. “There’s definitely less [plates] being thrown away this year,” custodian Margo Carmody said. She has had to return plates, cups, and utensils abandoned around campus. For vice-principal Lance Cagasan, going to the students was the best answer. “Last year, we had our student body president [and several seniors] address the imporSo That’s What’s Happening...

To have your letter considered for publication, limit the text to 100 words or less, include full name and grade, and email to: kyhaina@ksbe.edu. Letters may be edited for length and propriety.

Disclaimer: Ka Leo o Nä Koa is a student publication of the journalism class of Kamehameha Schools Maui. The views expressed represent the views of the individual student writers and editors and does not reflect the views of KSM, KSBE, or its affiliations. Answers to Figure It Out: monsters, werewolves, vampires, witches, goblins, ghouls, pirates, ninjas, zombie, trolls, mummy, All Hallows Eve

October 1, 2009 Ka Leo o Na Koa  

Miss Outstanding Teen, Napua Salbedo, Kaimana award, stadium lights funding, 50 years of statehood, Lacey Farm essay winner, Waiola Church c...

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