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Ka Leo o Na¯ Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8, 2013

We know that our students know best about what Maui has to offer. That’s why we asked them to tell us about their favorite places to eat, hang out and shop. See which Maui businesses won in Ka Leo o Na¯ Koa’s annual Maui’s Best reader survey. Introduction, graphic and photo by MAYA NITTA, features editor

Winners are revealed beginning on page D1

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Ka Leo o NaÂŻ Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8, 2013

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Ka Leo o Na¯ Koa

Volume VIV

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Inside our issue... Page A4

HOSA results

Sections: News….A, Āhaʻilono...B, Editorial...C, Life...D, Sports...E

Check out how KS Maui HOSA students did in the state competition on O‘ahu.

Our Staff Page A14

Class News See what your class president has to say, and take a peek at banquet season pics.

Page B1

Makahiki in Moloka‘i Kumu Kalei’s Hawaiian four class took a trip to Moloka‘i to participate in the annual Makahiki games.

Page D1

Maui’s Best The results are in! See what the students of KSM voted as “Best Of Maui.”

News Editor: Mehana Lee Features Editor: Maya Nitta Sports Editor: Reid Cairme Staff: Landon Ballesteros Shayna Ho Jaylin Kekiwi Lexis Viena Faculty Adviser: Ms. Kye Haina 9-10 Principal: Mr. Lance Cagasan Academies Principal: Ms. Jay-R Kaÿawa

Contact us Address: 270 ÿAÿapueo Parkway Pukalani, HI, 96768 Phone: (808) 573-7019 Email: kyhaina@ksbe.edu Twitter: @kaleoonakoa Website: www.kaleoonakoa.org

The Fine Print Page A6

Happy Women’s Day Today is International Women’s Day. So, girls, put on your heels and show us who rules the world.

Page E1

Winter sports Want to know how the Maui Warriors did during the winter season? Look no further.

Wire Services: Some material courtesy of American Society of Newspaper Editors /MCT Campus High School Newspaper Services Editorial Policy: The staff of Ka Leo O Nä Koa is dedicated to objective and balanced coverage of campus and community news. We welcome comments, corrections, suggestions, and letters. To have your publication, limit or less, include and email to: Letters may be propriety.

letter considered for the text to 100 words full name and grade, kyhaina@ksbe.edu. edited for length and

Disclaimer:

Ka Leo O Nä Koa is a student publication of the journalism class of Kamehameha Schools Maui. The views expressed represent the views of the individual student writer and editors and does not reflect the views of KSM, KSBE, or its affiliations.


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KS Maui HOSA wins, going to nationals

March 8, 2013

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2013 HOSA results State Competition: First Place: Kalia Tamashiro – Medical Photography Ryan Foree – Dental Terminology Kasie Apo-Takayama – Extemporaneous Writing Second: Avinash Singh – Extemporaneous Speaking Sai Furukawa – Medical Terminology Noʻeau Pereza, Kelcey Lorenzo and Leeana Batungbacal — Public Health Justin Fernandez, Carolynn Krueger and Rachel Smith – Bio-Medical Debate Third: Jackie Gorman – Extemporaneous Health Poster Kaylee Correa – Healthy Lifestyle

Regional Competition: Photo courtesy of SHAI IBARA

Some of the Kamehameha Schools Maui Health Occupations Students of America members and adviser, Mrs. Brandy Cajudoy, at the State Conference held Feb. 21-22 on O ‘ahu. 13 HOSA members qualified for the national competition. By MAYA NITTA, features editor

After breaking last year’s school record of 25 students moving on from HOSA Maui regionals, 33 of Kamehameha Maui’s students moved on to the Health Occupations Students of America State Conference February 21-22 on Oʻahu. Of the 33 students, 13 placed and qualified for the national competition in Nashville, Tenn., June 23-29. “I think the students did very well. Their hard work paid off. I think we have a lot more to study,” HOSA Advisor Brandy Cajudoy said. This year, senior Kalia Tamashiro placed first in Medical Photography. For the past three years, she has been competing in this event, each previous time qualifying for nationals by placing second. “It was nice coming in first for my last year. I think the experience had made a difference,” she said. Junior Kasie Apo-Takayama also placed first in her event, Extemporaneous Writing. She chose to compete in this event because she enjoys literature and writing, and she felt that by competing in this event she would have more practice for the SAT. “For me, the fact that I was given the opportunity to represent our school, and nationals

is already much more than an honor,” Apo-Takayama said. Fellow Junior Ryan Foree also placed first, but in Dental Terminology. He felt that he would be comfortable in this competition. His mother is a dental hygienist, and he said that he has grown up in a dental office. He also said that he feels comfortable learning about teeth. “I was happy that I did my ‘dental genes’ proud,” he said.

Q and A:

HOSA Historian Shane Naeʻole

First: “Noʻeau Pereza, Kelcey Lorenzo and Leeana Batungbacal – Public Health Kawelau Yen, Aaron Dela-Cruz, Kekoa Uyechi, Mahina Bantilan and Kiana Antonio – Public Service Announcement Kyle Mauri – Veterinary Science Mikela Rindlisbacher – Biotechnology Mehana Fisher – Nutrition Kalia Tamashiro – Medical Photography Jackie Gorman – Extemporaneous Health Poster Sanoe Lanias, Mikayla Lau, Kiana Kanoa, and Regina Kuhia – Biomedical Debate Second: Shikara Fitsimmons – Nutrition Avinash Singh – Extemporaneous Speaking Kasie Apo-Takayama – Extemporaneous Writing Ryan Foree – Dental Terminology Justin Fernandez, Carolynn Krueger, and Jolene Kuaana – Biomedical Debate Third: Brandy Takiguchi, Jaye-lyn Orikasa, and Shai Ibara – Public Service Announcement Shanise Kaʻaikala and Nalani Kikuyama – Career Health Display CPR/First Aid: Raven Poepoe and Kailee Tabaco Sai Furukawa – Medical Terminology

By LEXIS VIENA, staff writer

Junior Shane Naeʻole has secured a seat as a state-level historian with Health Occupation Students of America. “Shane has worked really hard, and he deserves this. As a whole, our school will have more kuleana, and Shane, as an individual, will also have to work just as hard,” adviser Ms. Brandy Cajudoy said. To become a state officer, Naeʻole spoke in front of hundreds of HOSA members during the Career and Technical Education Leadership Retreat on February 21 at the Hawaiʻi Convention Center in Honolulu. He also put together posters promoting HOSA and campaign posters for himself.

Photo by LEXIS VIENA

SHANE NAEʻOLE

I asked him about his position. Q: What made you want to become a state HOSA officer? A: “Well, when Mrs. Cajudoy told me that there was no other Kamehameha Schools student in this organization

and that this school never had a state officer, I decided to step up. I felt that since we’re from Kamehameha School, we have a lot of Hawaiian values and beliefs instilled within us that should be shared with other HOSA members.” Q: What qualities will be needed to fulfill your position as Hawaiʻi state HOSA historian? A: “I have a passion for health care professions, especially in Hawaiʻi, and I think that is an important quality of mine. Being that I am Hawaiian, I have a strong connection (NAEʻOLE ConƟnued on page A13)


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Student-run businesses benefit

Photos courtesy of MONICA BORGE, IAN AQUINO By LANDON BALLESTEROS, staff writer

Businesses are everywhere. Just look around. Is there anything around you that wasn’t created by a business? Two KS Maui students are already in the business world. One of those students is senior Monica Borge. Name of business: Cupcakes for Cambodia Type: Cupcake stand Where: Third Fridays in Makawao Since: May 2012 Borge said she loves selling cupcakes at Third Fridays because of the social environment there. She started the business because of her love of baking, and she used her booth for her senior project. Borge says that running the business is far from easy. “Preparation-wise, I have to contact a lot of people,” she said. “I spend roughly, like, 20 hours baking and decorating.” Her booth at Third Fridays

Top: Senior Monica Borge sells her cupcakes at Third Friday in Makawao, with proceeds going towards a Cambodian charity, Asia. Inset: Senior Ian Aquino works at one of his two offices. Aquino provides technology services through his business, IAN Network—ʻEnehana.

Dreams will never come true unless you wake up and pursue them”

— Senior Ian Aquino on starting his own business and pursuing dreams offers vanilla, chocolate, and red velvet cupcakes, as well as a special surprise cupcake flavor. Borge offered her advice to students who want to start their own businesses. “Plan, a lot. Months and months ahead of what you’re going to do,” she said. Senior Ian Aquino is another business owner. He puts his technology skills to use in his business, the Ian Aquino Network (IAN). His business origi-

nally started out as AQZONE in 2007, when Aquino was just in the seventh grade. He renamed it in 2011. “My passion for technology stems from my experiences with [KS Maui technology specialist] Mr. Minh Nguyen,” Aquino said. Mr. Nguyen inspired Aquino to expand his technology and business skills, which he says contributes to his success. IAN-ʻEnehana provides local businesses, individuals,

Name of Business: Ian Aquino Network - ʻEnehana Type: Computer services Where: 532 Komo Ohio Street, Wailuku (Main Office) & 115 South Wakea Avenue, Kahului Since: Opened in 2007

and corporations with information and technology services, with offices located in Kahului and Wailuku. These services include computer maintenance and repairs, data backup and recovery, on-site service, and Web site development. Aquino hopes to expand the services to the entire island. (BUSINESSES ConƟnued on page A8)


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It’s International Women’s Day! By MEHANA LEE, news writer

Today, marks the 103rd International Women’s Day, a day of recognition that is celebrated throughout many countries. On this day, thousands of events are held worldwide to inspire and empower women of all ages to celebrate their achievements. This holiday was started by Clara Zetkin, Leader of the Women’s Office for the Social Democratic Party in Germany. In 1910, she proposed a holiday to press for women’s

rights to work, to be trained, to vote, to end discrimination and to hold public office. Her suggestion was unanimously approved, and thus International Women’s Day was born. Women have come a long way since then, from gaining the right to vote and holding a position in office to going into outer space. KS women like Chief Executive Officer Dee Jay Mailer, Trustee Janeen-Ann Ahulani Olds, Headmaster Lee Ann

DeLima, High School Principal Jay-R Ka‘awa and Middle School Principal Lois Nishikawa are all examples of local women of achievement. Events like political rallies, fashion shows, theater performances, craft fairs, government activities and more are held on this day. To be a part of it, you can post a photo of your feet in high heels tagged as #ConfidenceIsBeautiful on Facebook and Twitter. This

Peer mediation gives back By JAYLIN KEKIWI, sports writer

The Peer Mediation team played Secret Santa to three children on December 18. According to the peer mediation adviser, Ms. Lisa Correa, this was a collective idea from all the mediators. “There was no single person coordinating this. Everyone wanted to do it. We all thought, ‘What do we want to do for Christmas?’ The kids agreed that they wanted to do this, especially if it was helping a family in need,” she said. This is the first year that the mediators have done something of this sort. After calling several agencies, the mediators “adopted” a family of three children for the holidays. Throughout the process, the children’s names remained confidential, but the peer mediation team had the ages of the children and a list of each child’s interests. “We didn’t really have a set price range like you normally would have for Secret Santa,” junior mediator Kela Killam

Photo courtesy of MS. LISA CORREA

The Kamehameha Schools Peer Mediation team treated three specially chosen children to gifts and a Christmas experience Dec. 18 at Pauahilani Counseling Center. For confidentiality, their faces are blurred in this photo.

said. “Personally, mine was about $25. I just really wanted to get things that the kids would like.” Every peer mediator participated in this gift-giving at the Pauahilani Counseling Center, which ended up including over 20 people in all. They met the children while giving their gifts in a ceremony com-

plete with an “elf and a Santa,” according to Killam. “They were really excited, and it just made all of us feel really good about it,” Killam said. Afterwards, the children were treated to the What’s Up, Warriors? broadcast at Keo¯pu¯olani Hale .

event is sponsored by the blog site Confidence Is Beautiful to show that it takes confidence to walk in high heels and to relate the pain that every woman experiences while wearing high heels to the pain women experience in life. You can also get involved by following Women’s Day 2013 on Twitter or ‘liking’ International Women’s Day on Facebook to keep up with the latest news, events and comments year round.

Excerpt from a letter to peer meditation:

It was truly heartwarming to see every detail of your preparation unfold. Arriving to your beautiful campus for the very first time, into the arms of joyous faces to share lunch and scenes from Polar Express was a delightful treat. We had no idea that there was much more to follow...the abundance of gifts was unimaginable.”

—LENI M.H. ENGLISH, social worker on peer meditation’s collective idea


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Potter, Yamada attend 4-H Congress LEXIS VIENA, staff writer

Kyana-Lei Yamada and Kalena Potter went to 4-H Congress, a national convention in Atlanta, Georgia, November 22-28. They were selected based on their community service. Going to Congress is offered only once to each member of 4-H, so it is considered an honor. Though they are juniors in high school, they are considered to be senior 4-H-ers and are required to fill out a senior record book. This book includes all of the activities they participated in. It also includes pictures and a three-to-four page essay explaining what the 4-H-er learned during membership. After the book is completed, it is reviewed by a panel of judges who decide whether or not the 4-H-er should be invited to Congress.

Photos by LEXIS VIENA

KALENA POTTER

In Atlanta, the girls stayed at the Grand Hyatt hotel, visited the Coca-Cola factory, shopped at the Lennox Mall and made friends with other 4H-ers from across the nation. “It was really interesting to

KYANA-LEI YAMADA

get to know the other 4-Hers…4-H-ers from the mainland, especially the midwestern states. Their whole lives are based around 4-H and taking care of animals,” Yamada said.

The 4-H-ers were also involved in a major community service project. Hundreds of teenagers helped the Salvation Army clean and organize their warehouse. Potter and Yamada are part of the Valley Isle Girlz chapter of 4-H Maui. It is their last year as volunteers in the program, and both of the girls say that they are going to miss it, but they are appreciative of 4-H and all that the program has done for them. “4-H taught me to always give back to my community,” Yamada said. 4-H stands for Head, Heart, Hands, and Health. According to their Web site, the organization’s mission is to “empower youth to reach their full potential working and learning in partnership with caring adults.”

Sandy victims receive lei of aloha By LANDON BALLESTEROS

Ms. Deirdre Hassett-Falconer, parent of KSM middle-schooler Taj Falconer (’19), journeyed to New York in December to distribute over 700 lei to victims of Hurricane Sandy as a gift of aloha from Maui. The lei were donated by KS Maui students. Student government officers and Kumu Henohea Kane’s class contributed to the high school’s share of the donation. ʻAha Mele lei from graduated classes were also donated, bringing the high school’s donation to over 300 lei. The middle and elementary schools contributed several hundred lei as well. In New York, the team of volunteers went to Breezy Point where they presented the lei to people working in the area, in-

Photos courtesy of MS. DEIDRE HASSETT-FALCONER

(SANDY ConƟnued on page A11)

A member of a team from Maui, including middle school parent, Ms. Deirdre Hassett-Falconer, surveys Breezy Point, New York, which was severely damaged by the winds, floods and fires of Hurricane Sandy in late October.


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BUSINESSES (ConƟnued from page A5)

“Providing clients with quality service is very much rewarding,” Aquino said, adding that satisfied clients are likely to return and refer other prospective customers. Aquino says it is challenging to balance school and a business. “I go about my life believing that challenges make me stronger,” he said. Aquino offered his advice to people wanting to start their own businesses. “Dreams will never come true unless you wake up and pursue them,” he said. “Also, the application of knowledge

A8 is worth more than the knowledge itself.” Both Borge and Aquino give back from the income they generate from their services. IAN-ʻEnehana donates to charities and contributes to community projects. Borge donates some of her profits to One Degree Forward and the Cambodian Children’s Foundation, which are non-profit organizations that support Cambodian children and send them to school. “The biggest challenge is selling a good number . . . of cupcakes to cover the amount of expenses that I’m paying for the children,” Borge said.

Photo courtesy of SARINA KONG

Senior Sarina Kong (second from left) with fellow Family Career and Community Leaders of America award recipients during a conference held February 20-21 on O‘ahu. It was Kong’s second time receiving a gold medal in the leadership event.

Kong takes gold at FCCLA By MAYA NITTA, features editor

Senior Sarina Kong received a gold medal for the second time at the Family Career and Community Leaders of America conference February 20-21 on O’ahu. Kong competed in the leadership event. To enter, she became a mentor and reflected on that experience and her findings to a panel of judges. “It was the first time anyone in the state did the project, so it was exciting to be the first,” she said. This project was a compilation of reflective essays about her leadership and a profile of her and her mentee. Last year she competed in the job interview event, and she placed first at the state and national level. “I am really hoping to get gold again [at nationals]; there are things that I need to improve on,” she said. Within this program she does a lot of community service projects including collecting food for the Maui Food Bank, working at the Aloha

Cherry Truffle Challenge booth at the Maui County Fair and making Christmas cards for the elderly at Hale Makua. She is now the president of the Maui High School FCCLA chapter. There is no chapter at Kamehameha Schools Maui. Since she was eight years old, she has been going with her mother, the chapter adviser, to the national conferences. To be a member, Kong had to complete a course in Family and Consumer Science. At KSM, she enrolled in Human Development. The FCCLA is a program whose mission is to promote personal growth and leadership through family and consumer education. This program focuses on the roles that people have within a family, such as, community leaders and money earners. It also aims to develop skills for life, like planning, decision making and problem-solving skills. The program has over 205,000 members and about 6,500 chapters or clubs.

Photo by MAYA NITTA

IAN AQUINO

Photo by LANDON BALLESTEROS

MONICA BORGE

Student Poll

If you could own any company, which would it be?

Graphic by LANDON BALLESTEROS

Pollster: Landon Ballesteros Sample: 100 KSM freshmen and sophomores Poll taken: February 2013


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March 8, 2013

A9 Top left: The black team celebrates as they win first place at the first schoolwide Pili Pa‘a, January 12 . Below: Team leader Anuhea Arakawa brings spirit to her yellow team. Below left: The creator of Pili Pa‘a, senior Aydan Lopes, speaks to the student body after the first event. He talked about unifying to perpetuate this year’s school theme, “He ‘ohana kākou.”

Photos by SHAYNA HO

Pili Pa‘a becomes reality By MEHANA LEE, news editor

Senior Aydan Lopes, created a high school-wide event called Pili Pa‘a. Lopes had a long road to haul to make the event a reality at Kamehameha Schools Maui high school. In his junior year, he held four meetings with students from all grade levels to brainstorm ideas for the events. These students eventually became the leaders of each of the 12 teams in Pili Pa‘a. Lopes met with administration in April with his proposal, but it took about nine months for Pili Pa‘a to be approved. “From my perspective, he had a really good idea of what he wanted to do. There was just a lot of detail that goes into it, and that was the hard part,” Vice Principal Leo Delatori said. Lopes had to organize everything from deciding how to split the high school into 12 groups to fitting the activities into the assembly schedule. He said that the biggest challenge was staying determined and not giving up since

it was a long process. “There was a lot of adjusting and fixing to fit what the faculty wanted while keeping it fun for the students,” Lopes said. Lopes had one-hour in which to fit the entire event to fit into an assembly schedule. “It was a little difficult dealing with the time constraints. I needed to make sure that it was in the time that we were allowed, and that it wouldn’t be a waste of the student’s time,” Lopes said. Lopes designed Pili Paʻa similar to the television show The Amazing Race. He said he was inspired beginning in his freshman year during class meetings. He wanted the school to unify after hearing what the class had to say about lack of unity at KSM. Lopes thought that it would be a fun and unique way for students in different grade levels to get to know each other. With the help of other students and the administration, Pili Pa‘a became a reality on Friday, January 12.


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Maui bids farewell to Wailuku Post Office By MEHANA LEE, news editor

The demolition of the Wailuku Post Office and Federal Building began January 7. The post office had been closed since 1990 due to infrastructure problems, asbestos and black mold according to Betsill Brothers Construction. Maui County plans to replace the old building with a temporary parking lot for nearby office workers. Currently, some workers need to park several blocks away or move their vehicles every hour to avoid parking tickets. There are 261 people on the waiting list for the structure that will have 106 stalls. In years to come, two buildings — a parking structure with 250 stalls and an art terrace garden— which will replace the temporary parking lot as a part of the county’s master plan for Wailuku town. The February 2000 Wailuku Redevelopment Plan traces the parking problems back to the 1972 Wailuku-Kahului General Plan. At that time the plan stated that Wailuku had suffered for years from inadequate parking and deteriorating structures. It recommended that a special planning area should be developed for Wailuku’s commercial core.

Photo by MEHANA LEE

Betsill Brothers Construction workers tear down the old Wailuku Post Office and Federal Building which has been closed since 1990 due to infrastructure problems, asbestos and black mold.

Time capsule found in old Wailuku Post Office

Photos courtesy of the Mayor’s Office, County of Maui By MEHANA LEE, news editor

Bestill Brothers Construction workers found a time capsule in the old Wailuku Post Office and Federal Building on Tuesday, January 22. They were removing a cornerstone of the building before demolition. The original contractor, Thomas Tanaka, had left behind the metal canister, which was found underneath a cornerstone in the building. Inside the canister was a letter written by Tanaka, blueprints of the Wailuku Post Office and Federal Building and a copy of The Maui News from September 19, 1959, with a story of the new post office featured on the front page. The demolition contractors did not any have records of a time capsule in the building, so it was a surprise for the workers to stumble upon.


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Spring forward, fall back By JAYLIN KEKIWI, sports writer

Daylight savings time. Everyone’s heard of it, but few in Hawaiʻi actually know how it works since Hawaiʻi doesn’t participate in daylight savings time. Daylight savings time is a period of about eight months in which clocks are set one hour ahead of standard time to provide more daylight during the working day. There are two designated days in the year when people adjust their clocks so that evenings have more daylight; whereas morning s have less. Clocks are adjusted forward one hour at the beginning of spring and then turned back in the fall, traditionally on the second Sunday of March and the first Sunday of November. In 2013, daylight savings time will begin March 10 and will end on November 3 at approximately 2:00 a.m. However, instead of waking up that early in the morning, people will generally reset their clocks on the night before so that they can wake up to their

clocks already set correctly. Europe and most of the United States participate in daylight savings time, excluding Hawaiʻi and Arizona. Hawaiʻi doesn’t use daylight savings because it is close to the equator. The days here do not vary in length as much as they do further north. Arizona doesn’t use it since the day would be even longer than it

is already with the sun setting at 9:00 p.m. instead of 8:00. In Arizona, it is possible, therefore, to have one foot in Nevada and your other foot in Arizona and have it be two different times. The idea of daylight savings time was first brought up by Benjamin Franklin as an aid for farmers, who needed more daylight during the summer growing season and

DST begins March 10

(SANDY ConƟnued from page A7)

cluding police officers, firefighters, and Habitat for Humanity workers. “There were hugs and tears, laughter and wonder that peo-

Photos courtesy of MS. DEIDRE HASSETT-FALCONER

Top: Ms. Hassett-Falconer and her team give leis to the neighborhood watch of Breezy Point in New York. Right: Preschoolers of St. Francis DeSales Catholic School.

autumn harvest. Franklin suggested the idea in a thenanonymous letter to a newspaper in 1794. When he brought it up, he wasn’t proposing it for use, but simply saying it was a good idea because he recognized that there were not enough hours in the day. The idea wasn’t actually suggested for use until a New Zealand entomologist, George Vernon Hudson, observed the same thing, according to www.timeanddate.com. Daylight savings time wasn’t officially used until World War I, when it was used by Germany and its allies as a way to conserve coal. After, Britain and their allies began to follow suit. Russia didn’t use it until a year later, and the United States adopted daylight savings time in 1918.It was done away with after the war, but re-instituted for World War II, and eventually voted into federal law in1966. ple so far away cared enough about them to come all the way out to see them and bring such a gift,” Ms. HassettFalconer said. The team also went to the St. Francis De Sales Catholic School in Brooklyn to distribute lei to the faculty and students. “Of course, the kids loved the candy lei,” Ms. HassettFalconer said. The team gave each class a few of the lei donated by the KS Maui fifthgraders, each of which had a picture of the fifth-grader who created it attached. Ms. Hassett-Falconer hoped that the New York children could “put a face on where the lei came from and the kids who made it.”


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Spring spirit week 2013 By SHAYNA HO, staff writer

Kamehameha Schools Maui’s high school campus showed their individuality and pride during their Spring Spirit Week February 11 14. Monday was Warrior Pride Day, and students competed at the Champion of School Spirit Assembly hosted by Wild 105.5 FM. Tuesday was Sports Day, and students represented their favorite sports and athletic teams. The lunchtime activity had students catching fish shot from a slingshot with nets. On Wacky Wednesday, students showed their crazy side, and the Strength Team exhibited their strength by ripping phone books, crushing full soda cans, and breaking bats. Thursday, Valentine’s Day, was all about roses, chocolates and teddy bear gifts and students in pink, red and white.

Photos by SHAYNA HO

February 11: Monday’s dress up day had the Warriors showing their Warrior pride through white, blue and silver colors at the Champion of School Spirit Assembly at Ka’ulaheanuiokamoku Gymnasium. Students cheered, yelled, and did the Macarena, and teachers danced Gangnam style, all to earn points to win the trophy belt.

Left: Ka’ui Harbottle, Sarah Catugal, Kauilani Lonzaga and Ka’ala Corpuz, showed off their favorite sports teams , Tuesday, during Spring Spirit Week. Top: William Greene from the Strength Team, bends a steel bar 2.5 times around just using his hands and body during an assembly on Thursday, February 13.


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Top left: Senior Renee Lee-Agcoaili is all about hearts on Valentine’s Day. Thursday’s dress up day was pink, red and white. Top right: The Strength Team Assembly in Ka’ulaheanuimoku Gym on February 13 had team member Andy Gavin lift freshmen Kailey Kilborn and Ashlee Sawai as they held onto a steel bar to prove its strength. Right: Wednesday was wacky with Kasiyn Lee, Rayne Poepoe, Jonathan Lum Lung, and Bryson Funai dressing up in bright colors.

Corrections In the December 2 issue of Ka Leo o Na Koa, Kauiolaakea Harbottle was incorrectly identified in a photo on page A3. See page D6 for corrections of the varsity football scores on the scoreboard. We regret the errors. Send corrections to any Ka Leo o Na¯ Koa staff member. (NAEʻOLE ConƟnued from page A4)

Photo courtesy of SHAI IBARA

HOSA members Leeana Batungbacal, Shanise Ka’aikala and No‘eau Pereza sit and wait for the results during the State Conference on O‘ahu, February 21-22.

to this land and the people. So, I feel that it is my responsibility to take care of them. I also think that the fact that I am an organized and motivated person will be a help... Having a background in photography also won’t hurt...I think that this position has the potential to get overwhelming, and having the ability to be patient will definitely be a plus.” Q: What will your responsibilities be? A: “I need to be a role model to the Hawaiʻi HOSA members and lead them to success. I also have to do research and keep a record of HOSA Hawaiʻi.” Q: What activity did you

enjoy most during the retreat? A: “My favorite part of the retreat is when the head of the Hawaiʻi Meth Project came to talk to us and educated us about methamphetamine.” Q: What is the process for getting into a HOSA State office? A: “You just need to follow the applications and meet the requirements stated. … you need to have a 2.5 or higher GPA, and the speech that I made was, I think, the main part of the whole process. My speech was inspired by the ‘Bowl of Light’ story that Kumu Akeo had shown us in Seminar. I hope that I inspired people and made more people want to participate in HOSA.”


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Class of 2013 Golden senior ball By HULALI BROWN, senior class president

In this past quarter, I often found myself wishing I could go back in time. If I could, I would go back to four years ago. Oh, the things I would change! I doubt I am the only one who feels this way; however, as easy as it is to dwell on the past, don’t do it. There is one quarter left. Just one quarter, and in 2013 fashion, I say, “Jus’ charge ‘em!” Put your best foot forward, finish those scholarships, and keep up your grades. After all, senior contracts are now in play. This may be a challenge for some of us; myself included. For example, work on getting to school before 7:45AM, getting to class on time, and getting help because F’s no longer stand for “Fantastic.” If senior contract is no challenge to you, then help out a classmate. Just like the Amazing Race, drag your partner with you to the finish line. I have yet to see a team give up, and 2013 will not be the first.

Photos by MAYA NITTA

Above: Seniors Kaleihoku Kubota, junior Shalia Kamakaokalani and seniors Anuhea Arakawa, Raven Poepoe and Iwalani Kaaa enjoy their Neptune Buffet by Stella Blues at the 2013 Senior Ball on February 23 at Keʻeaumokupāpāʻiaheahe. The dining hall was used as the rainy day location. Originally it was to be held in a tent below Kahekili Gym. The night’s theme was Golden Lights. Later in the night, DJ JC of Next Level Entertainment started the party on the dance floor. Left: Senior Billy Ayakawa and KSK senior Tori Cambra stand in line as their plates are loaded with the delicious foods of the buffet.

Class of 2015 By SHAI IBARA, sophomore class president

Sophomores are reaching the home stretch! The third quarter is almost over, one quarter away from the end of sophomore year, but don’t run out of spirit just yet, because everyone knows what’s coming up. That’s right—‘Aha Mele. Please make an effort to attend every practice, and don’t just attend practice, behave as well. Respect and listen to your song leader. Remember that everything counts, starting from day one of song practice. Ho’olaule’a is on April 20. The sophomores are the host class for this year, which means they have a huge kuleana. They are grant recipients with money going to the 2015 Project Grad. Each family is required to work 24 hours, and this can be com-

pleted by working during prep days or the event, or helping with set up and breakdown. The sophomore class also needs help with the silent auction baskets. If you are interested in helping or for more inform a t i o n , e m a i l ksmptso2015@gmail.com. If you need to get a sports physical, Kaiser Permanente is offering a Sports Physical Day on April 27, 6:30-10:30 a.m. Physicals will be done by appointment only. Don’t forget to take your required health forms for them to fill out. As the quarter comes to an end, keep in mind that you only have one quarter left before summer. Don’t stop trying just yet—try even harder.

Photo by REID CAIRME

Sophomores Iotana Tua dances at the aqua-themed sophomore banquet on March 2 at Keʻeaumokupāpāiaheahe Dining Hall.


Ka Leo o Na¯ Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8, 2013

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Class of 2016 Freshmen enjoy ‘starry By OFA-HELOTU KOKA, freshman class president

Ho’olaule’a is on its way, but the freshman class needs more supporters! Students should contact me for more information, and parents can contact Ms. Denise Texeira at (808) 8701397 if you would like to help. As you all know, it is the first year for freshmen to compete in ʻAha Mele. Please take this seriously because we are being judged on our behavior in and out of song practice. Also take note that the class still needs Jamba Juice straws for making the lei. If you have any or know how to get them, see Kumu Ulu or see her in her room. Registration starts on March 6 at 2:45 pm and ends on March 7 pm at 3:30. Make sure you have discussed your classes with your parents and gone over the courses that you will be taking in the handout from Ms. Baum. The quarter ends today, so make sure you have gotten all your wok in on time. There will be one week of fourth quarter before spring break starts, and when we come back, the evaluation will still be going on for ʻAha Mele, so please be on your best behavior.

night’ during banquet

Photo by MEHANA LEE

ASKSM President’s message By KALEIHOKU KUBOTA student body president

Photos by REID CAIRME

Freshmen dance the night away during their freshmen banquet on February 9 at Keʻeaumokupāpāiaheahe Dining Hall.

Class of 2014 By AVINASH SINGH, junior class president

The biggest event for juniors is Prom, which is coming up on April 6. It starts at 4:30 p.m. and promptly ends at 11 p.m. It is located at the King Kamehameha Golf Course in Waikapu. The theme is A Touch of Class, which has a color scheme of black, dark blues, and white or ivory. Remember that girls should wear longer dresses while boys should be wearing tuxedoes, and both should have “a touch of class.” You all should know what to wear and what NOT to wear due to the fashion show, so please adhere to the dress code, and don’t get in trouble with any teachers. Remember that your parents will be setting up Prom on the

Photo by LEXIS VIENA

Juniors Sarah Holter, Kaʻui Harbottle, Lily Higashino, Jocelyn Aipa, and Aubrey Carillo model evening gowns at the Prom Fashion Show, November 30. Junior Prom is coming up right around the corner, on April 6.

day of, due to all of us getting ready for the event, so please remind them to look for emails asking for their help. In other news, we are currently trying to plan an informal social before school ends, so please be aware and on the

lookout for any emails about it. As always, if anyone needs help with any classes, please ask a classmate. I will help if you ask and seem sincere about understanding the idea. Let’s go, so we can have a great rest of the year!

As we are about to go off into spring break please take caution. Remember that we represent Kamehameha Schools and with that comes responsibilities. Just recently the strength team came to our campus and shared a message of setting goals and making wise choices. There have been some complications on campus that are taking us away from our theme of “He ‘Ohana Ka¯kou”. We are a family, and so I love each and every one of you like you are my brothers and sisters. We have been blessed to have been given so much from our princess; do not take advantage of that. As it is the ending of the third quarter and start of the fourth, do not get lazy. This is the time to buckle down and finish the year strong, especially for the senior class as you are about to leave this chapter of your life and embark on a new one. Have a safe spring break and be ready to come back to school ready to finish strong, let’s make it memorable.


Ka Leo o Na¯ Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8, 2013

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Pa‘i ‘ia kēia mau ki‘i e LANDON BALLESTEROS

Pāʻani ʻo Maleko Lorenzo i ka hanana ʻo Hakamoa ma Ka Molokaʻi Makahiki 2013 ma ka ʻāina kahiko ʻo Nāʻiwa ma ka lā 25 o Ianuali.

Lanakila na¯ hauma¯na ʻO¯lelo Hawaiʻi Na LANDON BALLESTEROS, staff writer

Na ʻumiku¯ma¯hiku hauma¯na o ka papa ʻo¯lelo Hawaiʻi makahiki ʻeha¯ o ke kula kiʻekiʻe ʻo Kamehameha ma Maui i hele akula i Molokaʻi no ka hoʻoku¯ku¯ ʻana i Ka Molokaʻi Makahiki ma ka ʻa¯ina kahiko ʻo Na¯ʻiwa a me ka pa¯ka ʻo Kaunakakai ma na¯ la¯ 25 a me 26 o Ianuali. Ma kinohi o ke¯ia makahiki, ua ho¯ʻike na¯ hauma¯na i ko¯ la¯kou ma¯kau i na¯ hanana, no laila, na Kumu Kalei ʻAʻaronaLorenzo i koho pololei i hoʻokahi ka¯ne a me hoʻokahi wahine i hoʻoku¯ku¯ i ke¯la¯ hanana. He ʻike hou ka hana hoʻohanohano i ke¯ia makahiki no ka hoʻokomo i ka lole

kahiko o na¯ ka¯ne i na¯ malo a me na¯ wa¯hine i na¯ pa¯ʻu¯. Ua oli na¯ hauma¯na ia¯ “A Uka Hoʻi¯ Au O Haleakala¯” a me hoʻokahi oli no Kamehameha no ke komo ʻana aku i Na¯ʻiwa. Ua ho¯ʻike na¯ ka¯ne i hoʻokahi haʻa no Kamapuaʻa a me Lonoikamakahiki. Aia na¯ hanana mua no na¯ kula waena a me na¯ kula kiʻekʻie ma Na¯ʻiwa ma ka la¯ 25, a ua hoʻoku¯ku¯ na¯ poʻe a pau, a na na¯ mea lanakila ʻelua i hoʻoku¯ku¯ i na¯ hanana hope loa ma ka pa¯ka ʻo Kaunakakai i ka la¯ aʻe. Lanakila aʻela kekahi mau hauma¯na mai KS Maui, ʻo ia no¯ ʻo ʻIwalani Kaʻaʻa no ka Po¯haku Hoʻoikaika, ʻo Tehani Kama a ʻo wau no ka ʻUlu Maika, a me Kamana Haupu a

me Kaʻaʻa no ka Uma. ʻAʻole nui ka helu o na¯ mea hoʻoku¯ku¯ no ka Uma, aka¯, paʻaki¯ki¯ ka hana o Kaʻaʻa. “Aia ʻelua mau mea hoʻoku¯ku¯ wale no¯; hoʻokahi wahine mai ke kula ʻo Lahainaluna a me hoʻokahi wahine mai ke kula ʻo Ha¯na,” wahi a Kaʻaʻa. ʻIke ʻia na¯ mea lanakila he nui e Kumu Kalei. “ʻO Pololu¯ [Nakanelua] ka mea hoʻokahi i lanakila i kekahi hanana pa¯kahi,” wahi a Kumu Kalei. “Lanakila ʻo Ashley Wendt (KSM ’12) a me Kalia [Tamashiro] i ke Ku¯kini (kekahi heihei ʻeha¯ haneli mika) no na¯ wa¯hine.” Hoʻomaka na¯ hanana hope (MOLOKAIʻI ConƟnued on page B2)

Pa‘i ‘ia kēia mau ki‘i e LANDON BALLESTEROS

ʻO Kalena Lee Agcaoili ka mea i hoʻokūkū akula no ke ʻano koa wahine a nāna i loaʻa ke kūlana ʻekolu ma Ka Molokaʻi Makahiki 2013 ma ka ʻāina kahiko ʻo Nāʻiwa ma ka lā 25 o Ianuali.


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(MOLOKAʻI ConƟnued from page B1)

loa i ka la¯ aʻe me na¯ hanana ʻauʻau. Na ke kula kiʻekiʻe ʻo Molokaʻi i lanakila i luna o ka hui o KS Maui i na¯ heihei; aka¯, lanakila aʻela ka hui i Kaupua, kekahi hanana i ka luʻu iho e loaʻa na¯ ʻo¯keni. ʻO Kekoa Uyechi, Kalia Tamashiro, Mana Aikala, Kama, a ʻo wau na¯ la¯la¯ o ke¯la¯ hui. Aia na¯ heihei i ke¯la¯ la¯, a lanakila akula ʻo Kaulele Paresa-Neizman a me Pono Freitas i ka Heihei Wa¯wae, kekahi heihei hoʻokahi haneli mika. Na Freitas i ʻo¯kupe ma kinohi o ka heihei; aka¯, ku¯ aʻela ʻo ia a ua lanakila no¯. Na Kiana Antonio a me Nakanelua i hoholo i ke Ku¯kini, kekahi heihei wa¯wae ʻeha¯ haneli mika. Alakaʻi maikaʻi la¯ua ma kinohi o ka heihei; aka¯, eo la¯ua ma ka laina pau. A¯lai ʻia ka¯ la¯kou hana no ka maʻi i laha i na¯ hauma¯na i ka huakaʻi. “Na ka huakaʻi i ho¯ʻike mai ia¯ ma¯kou i ka hana i ka pilikia,” wahi a Kumu Kalei. “Pono la¯kou e keʻehi i waho o ko la¯kou ka¯ʻei ʻolu, a ua pono la¯kou e hana i kekahi pae kiʻekiʻe no ka paio i ka maʻi.” Piha me ka manaʻo paha, ua holo ʻelima mau hauma¯na i ka Hoʻoili Po¯haku, kekahi heihei ʻeha¯ haneli mika me ka holo ʻana me kekahi po¯haku ʻekolu kilokalame, a pono la¯kou e ha¯ʻawi aku i ka po¯haku i ka mea holo aʻe. Nui ka pili o ka heihei me na¯ mea holo ʻeha¯ i mua. Na Antonio i ha¯ʻawi akula i ka po¯haku ia¯ Freitas, a ua lanakila ʻo ia me kekahi holo hope loa maikaʻi loa. A laila, ua hoʻomaka na¯ hanana hope loa. Hoʻoku¯ku¯ na¯ ka¯naka ʻelua i na¯ ha¯nana a pau i lanakila no¯. ʻAʻole lanakila kekahi mau hauma¯na, aka¯, ua loaʻa ka hui o KS Maui i na¯ mea lanakila i ʻeono mau hanana no Ka Molokaʻi Makahiki 2013. Ua ʻike na¯ hauma¯na i ko la¯kou hana moʻomeheu a me ko la¯kou ʻo¯lelo ma ka huakaʻi.

ʻO ke¯ia na¯ mea lanakila: Moa Pa¯heʻe (Ka¯ne) – Kekoa Uyechi Po¯haku Hoʻoikaika (Wahine) – ʻIwalani Kaʻaʻa Heihei Wa¯wae (Ka¯ne) – Pono Freitas Heihei Wa¯wae (Wahine) – Kaulele Paresa-Neizman Ho¯ʻili Po¯haku – Pono Freitas, Mana ʻAikala¯, Kalia Tamashiro, Kaulele Paresa-Neizman, a me Kiana Antonio Kaupua – Kekoa Uyechi, Kalia Tamashiro, Kamakana Ballesteros, Tehani Kama, a me Mana ‘Aikala¯

Pa‘i ‘ia kēia mau ki‘i e LANDON BALLESTEROS

Ma luna: Na Shayna Ho i ho'omākaukau a'ela i ka hanana 'o Haka Moa kū'ē kekahi haumāna mai ke kula ki'eki'e 'o Hāna ma Ka Moloka'i Makahiki ma ka lā 25 o Ianuali. Ma ka wēkiu: Na Pololū Nakanelua i hana me kona ikaika i kōkua akula i kona hui i ka hanana 'o Hukihuki ma Ka Moloka'i Makahiki ma ka lā 26 o Ianuali. Ma ka hema: Hō'a'ano ihola 'o 'Iwalani Ka'a'a iā kona hoa paio i ka hanana 'o Uma.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8, 2013

Wackiness welcome By MEHANA LEE, news editor

Have you ever seen something and asked yourself, “Wow, why didn’t I think of inventing something like that?” I probably ask myself that question at least five times a week when I see innovative but practical items all around us. Everything from Post-ItNotes to crazy utensils like sporks to apps like Instagram on smart phones were simple ideas that became tools we now use to organize, eat or just pass some free time. We all have that inner inventor. We just need to dig deep to find that spark of inspiration. We can find inspiration in anything, whether it be in something small you observed or finding a solution to a problem that you have always wanted to fix. So, what’s stopping you from inventing the next big thing?

You may think that inventing something is a lengthy process, and you’re right, it can be if you don’t have help. Thankfully, Web sites like quirky.com, likealandertinvent.com, inventorspot.com and uspto.gov make the invention process easier (for a small fee). We should be the last ones to come up with excuses, because here at Kamehameha Schools Maui, we are given endless opportunities and resources to do what we need to and want to. We all have our own laptops to look up anything. The whole world is literally right at our fingertips. As student of KSM, we are encouraged to help make this world a better place, and what better way to accomplish that than inventing something that would help us all? Princess Bernice Pauahi Bishop sure

Solution to Here comes spring puzzle on page D10

Check us out online! would be proud of us. Ho¯‘ike Nui is already in full swing. This one specifically goes out to you, juniors. Think of something that would tie in with your research paper, and invent something that will change the world. Make the process of recycling ten times faster, build a hydrogen-powered engine for the campus Mules or invent something to make our lunch lines move a little faster (conveyer belt with food on it?)

CARTOON

C1

These ideas may be a little challenging, but the point is to get your brain working and thinking of a product that would change our school and possibly the world. For everyone else who isn’t a junior, no one’s stopping you from being an inventor. Take, for example, Peh Yong, a six year old living in Singapore. She invented a cooling umbrella to use in hot weather. The invention imitates the transpiration process that plants go through by using a water container, plastic stars and threads. Water vapor is released through the straws to create a cooling atmosphere. If a six year old can invent something like that, you can surely come up with something as cool…or perhaps cooler. Be creative, be original and be innovative. Who knows? You might create the next Snuggie!

by MEHANA LEE


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VIII

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March 8, 2013

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Komoda’s Bakery

By MAYA NITTA, features editor

MAKAWAO—As voted by our students, Komoda’s Bakery is the best bakery on Maui. To this day, both locals and tourists line up early in the morning, waiting to purchase their favorite pastry. Whether it is the stick donuts, cream puffs, butter rolls, or Long Johns, for 97 years Komoda’s Bakery has had Maui wanting more. “I really love their butter rolls. They taste really good, and you can eat them with almost everything. Their stick donuts are really good, too,” senior Jason Fukushima said. Komoda’s bakery was first opened in 1916 by Takezo Komoda. It stood where Polli’s Mexican Restaurant now stands, but it was not a bakery. It was a restaurant. After Takeo, his first son, took over, the restaurant was moved to where it is now. In 1947, Takeo’s brother Ikuo returned from baking school in Minnesota, and the

Photos by MAYA NITTA

[TOP] Komoda’s Bakery sells a variety of pastries including their cream puffs, Long Johns and stick donuts. [RIGHT] Makawao residents Mark Line and JG Crisafi enjoy their pastry breakfast at Komoda’s Bakery in Makawao. Location: 3674 Baldwin Ave,. Makawao, HI Hours: 7:00 am-5:00 pm -2:00 on Saturdays and closed on Sundays and Wednesdays Rating on Yelp: 4 out of 5 Stars

restaurant was turned into a bakery/grocery store. To this day, Ikuo still works as a parttime baker. Takezo died in 2008, leaving the bakery to his daughter Betty Shibuya and her husband Calvin. Each day, they bake from 30

-100 dozen donuts and pastries and 70-250 dozen butter rolls. Prices range from $1-2 for pastries and donuts, $7.50 for pies, $11.50-15.00 for cakes and $8 for a dozen butter rolls. We spoke to Michelle Shibuya about the bakery:

How many people visit regularly? We don’t really keep count; it really depends on the day. What makes your store so popular? They love the stick donuts and the pastries. When did you open? 1916


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March 8, 2013

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Shopping center: Queen Ka‘ahumanu Location: 275 West Ka'ahumanu Avenue, Kahului, HI 96732 Hours: Monday-Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Web site: www.queenkaahumanucenter.com Yelp rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars

Photo by MEHANA LEE

QUEEN KAʻAHUMANU CENTER By MEHANA LEE, news editor

KAHULUI — The Queen Ka‘ahumanu Shopping Center is located in the heart of Kahului with the only department stores on Maui, complete with a food court, and numerous

clothing, beauty and electronic stores. There are over 100 stores and restaurants at the center. “We’re constantly looking for great local and national con-

cepts to bring to the people of Maui and are currently in negotiations with some wellknown names, some of which are not yet in Hawai‘i,” said Todd Vines, Marketing Manager. Farmers markets are held weekly near the mall’s performance stage. The mall also hosts events like hula shows, business fairs and karaoke nights on a monthly basis. “As the gathering place of Maui, we work with dozens of

community groups and partner on events nearly every week. We typically have more than 250 events each year. This is something we’ve always been passionate about – supporting our community,” Vines said. Macy’s and Sears help drive sales for the Queen Ka‘ahumanu Shopping Center, but there’s something for everyone at the mall. “Forever 21 is my favorite store! They have really cute clothes for reasonable prices,” senior Hope Ostermiller said. The shopping center officially opened in 1974. Since then, Queen Ka‘ahumanu Shopping Center has been at the heart of the community. “It’s our friends and neighbors who have made us successful for the past 40 years,” Vines said.

Dry mein By LANDON BALLESTEROS, staff writer

WAILUKU – Kamehameha Maui students have voted Sam Sato’s as Maui’s best place to get dry mein. Dry mein is a fresh noodle dish with char siu and vegetables. “Everything is the bomb at Sam Sato’s,” senior Kayla Purdy said. Sam Sato started his business in 1933 with his wife Gladys. The original restaurant was located in a Spreckelsville plantation camp, later moving to a Puʻune¯ne¯ plantation in 1963. When the plantation camp was closed there, Sam Sato’s relocated to Happy Valley in 1980. The business then moved to its fourth and current location in Wailuku in 1993. Sato was still in ownership of the restaurant around the time of World War II, and Sam Sato’s was a popular restaurant among the army soldiers on Maui.

Sam Sato’s famous noodles. Location: 1750 Wili Pa Loop, Wailuku, HI 96793 Hours: 7:00 am-2:00 pm, closed Sundays Rating on Yelp.com: 4 out of 5 stars

Sam Sato’s dry mein is a famous local hit here on Maui, earning hundreds of positive reviews by locals and visitors alike. Its noodles are made fresh at the Iwamoto Natto Factory in Pa¯ʻia. Kirk Toma is the grandson of Sam Sato. His parents, Charles and Lynne Toma,

Photo by and courtesy of KIRK TOMA

took over the restaurant around 19801981. “We just try to keep it the same and consistent,” Toma said of the restaurant’s history. How many people visit regularly? “No estimate, but lunch is a pretty steady crowd.” What makes your store so popular? “It’s very relevant [to Maui’s history].” When did you open? 1933


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Photos by REID CAIRME

Above, a variety of musical instruments await customers at Bounty Music Maui. At left, employee Mike Burke tunes an ʻukulele for customers on February 25, 2013.

Maui’s best music store:

Bounty Music Maui By SHAYNA HO, staff writer

KAHULUI - Music is an important aspect of American life and, especially, Hawaiian culture. Maui residents meet their music needs at Bounty Music Maui located on Ha¯na Highway. Since 1979, family-owned Bounty Music Maui has served an estimated100 music customers per day. Owner Paul Weinstein said that Bounty Music is most popular for their high quality ‘ukuleles. “I like their wide variety and

selection, especially their ‘ukulele,” said Chayce Tancayo, senior and ‘ukulele player. The “friendly, knowledgeable and helpful staff,” as Weinstein describes them, makes it both easy and enjoyable to find equipment and instruments. Mr. Weinstein and his wife and co-owner, Avi, say that music and education are linked. “Music education has been shown to be an aid in learning

for school age children. Music relaxes and is fun. Music is a way for people to interact with each other,” he said.

Location: 111 Ha¯na Highway, Kahului, HI, 96732 Hours: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday Web site: bountymusicmaui.com Yelp Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars


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Maui’s best place to buy slippers:

Longs Drugs by LEXIS VIENA, staff writer

PUKALANI — Maui residents of all ages and walks of life wear rubber slippers, and let it be known now that according to our 2013 Maui’s Best survey, Longs Drugs is the best place to get a pair. “Yeah, I like to go to Longs and buy the rubbah slippas. I’ve been wearing Locals since small-kid times, and I still like wearing them,” junior Tevin Jon Tam said. Famous for their “rubbah slippahs,” Longs carries Scott, Surfah and Locals, some of their hottest brands. “I gotta go with the Scotts from Longs. They last forever. They are definitely worth the price,” jun-

ior Austin Kan Hai said. Prices vary from $1.99 to over $19.99. Longs has several different colors, shapes, and sizes of slippers for the comfort of its customers. Jared Kaneshiro (‘11), head cashier at the Longs Drugs in Pukalani, said that they sell a lot of slippers because, “they usually go on sale with our value book sale.” “Everyone comes to Longs,” he said. Location: Kahului: 55 Kiopaa St., Pukalani, HI 96768 Hours: 7:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. SundayMonday Web site: cvs.com Rating on Yelp: 5 out of 5 Stars

Photo by MAYA NITTA

Maui’s best lunch wagon

By MEHANA LEE, news editor

KAHULUI—You wouldn’t expect

Photo by MEHANA LEE

GESTE SHRIMP FOOD TRUCK

to order a delicious dish at the side of the road, but you can! People go to Geste Shrimp in Kahului for savory shrimp plates of all flavors. Dishes like Lemon Pepper shrimp are full of flavors of garlic and green onion. Spicy Pineapple shrimp is a combination of sweet pineapple and hints of garlic. “I like this lunch wagon because I love shrimp, and it’s just amazing!” senior RJ Moku said. Geste Shrimp goes through about 56 pounds of shrimps per day on week days and about 70 pounds of shrimp on

Location: Kahului Beach Road, next to Kahului Harbor Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (or until out of shrimp), closed Sunday and Monday Web site: www.gesteshrimp.com Yelp rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars

weekends. The prices range from $5 to $14. The Geste Shrimp Truck is not only ranked as number one for shrimp on Maui on Yelp.com, a review Web site, but they have also been voted as Maui’s Best Lunch Wagon by Kamehameha Maui students.


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Location: 89 Ha¯na Hwy, Pa¯ʻia, HI 96779 Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. daily Web site: www.flatbreadcompany.com Yelp rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars BY REID CAIRME, sports editor

You decided, and no other pizza on Maui can best FlatPhotos by MAYA NITTA J bread Company’s! There are Flatbread Company worker, Jody Drouin slices up some flatbread pizza before serving it to their customers. [INSET] The Flatonly nine locations across the bread Company sign hangs outside the restaurant in Pāʻia inviting customers to enjoy their all natural pizza. United States, and one of those can be found in our very own Pa¯ʻia. On Ha¯na Highway across from Maui Hands, the Pa¯ʻia fill two people. Toppings ines, meats, and veggies to their order,” Manager Patty Walker Flatbread Company is in the clude cheese, herbs, sausage, order. said, “so there are infinite posbig red plantation building olives, and kalua pork. Flatbread is a simple bread sibilities on how many types of when entering Pa¯iʻa’s center. “Our most popular pizza is made with flour and water, pizzas we can make.” There, you can order salads our Mopsy Kalua Pork,” Walkwhich is thoroughly flattened In addition to the nine pizzas or flatbreads up to 16 inches er said. and rolled into dough. Flaton their menu and two spein diameter. The pizza was named after bread Company’s 16-inch cials every week, customers “We make everything to Flatbread’s neighbor, the ownpizzas are usually enough to may add any combo of cheeser of the Pa¯ʻia Inn, who shared her BBQ sauce recipe with them. The sauce is made from a mango BBQ base, kalua pork roasted overnight, red onion, local pineapple, and local goat cheese. These pizzas are prepared in a custom-made clay oven fueled by wood. It holds up to 10 pizzas at a time. The average time to cook a pizza at 800 degrees Fahrenheit is 10 minutes, 20 minutes when they’re busy.

Maui’s best pizza

Photo by MAYA NITTA . Pizzas fire in the Flatbread Company’s custom-made, wood-fueled clay oven.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8, 2013

D6 Maui’s best hotel pool:

Grand Wailea BY REID CAIRME sports editor

The students at Kamehameha Schools Maui filled out a survey, and the results are in. The best hotel pools on Maui are at none other than the Grand Wailea! The Grand Wailea Resort Hotel and Spa boasts two unique pools for their guests: the 4,850 square foot Hibiscus Pool and the 25,700 square foot Wailea Canyon Activity pool. (WAILEA ConƟnued on facing page)

Maui’s best haircut: Supercuts By JAYLIN KEKIWI and staff

As you look in the mirror, run your hands through your hair, and sigh, one thought comes to mind. It’s that time again: time for a new haircut. Voters decided that when you can’t keep hiding from Kumu Lo¯kahi, Supercuts is the place to go. “I like Supercuts. I like how they’re really clean. They have clean facilities. They’re always very nice, and the lady who washes my hair always makes me feel good about myself,” said senior Dylan Nakoa. Maria Clevhammer, manager of the Kahului franchise, said that she believes Kamehameha students go there because they have “great

stylists and a friendly and happy atmosphere.” “We appreciate our patrons and their loyalty,” she said. Supercuts doesn’t limit their talents to just haircuts. They also offer full services like permanents, straightening, coloring, and hair-dos for formal events, such as weddings of proms. There’s something to think about, ladies, now that prom season is here.

With three locations on Maui, this salon is not only easily accessible, but also relatively inexpensive. Prices for haircuts begin at $18, less for children, and they don’t go much higher than $20. “We have really good products and good monthly promos,” Clevhammer said. For March, Paul Mitchell products will be on sale. Liters of shampoo and conditioner will be

two for $26, tea tree shampoo and conditioner will be two for $34, and Paul Mitchell styling products will be “buy one, get one for half off.” They will also have a March-only Biloage gift kit for under $30. Locations: Pukalani, Kahului and Ki¯hei Hours: Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m., Sunday 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Web site: www.supercuts.com Yelp Rating: not yet rated

Photos by REID CAIRME

Decher Shimabukuro sits patiently as Malia Kaulia makes fine adjustments to her haircut at the Kahului Supercuts on February 25, 2013.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8, 2013

D7

(WAILEA ConƟnued from facing page)

“It’s just a nice and simple place to relax,” senior Kaiea Hokoana said. The Hibiscus pool is named after the flower mosaic at the bottom. Made from Mexican glass mosaic tile, the flower consists of over 630,000 pieces out of the roughly 2.2 million individual tiles that cover the entire pool. The Hibiscus Pool also has two Jacuzzis, which are reserved for guests 18 and over. But, there’s something for the keiki, too. The activity pool rises as high as 40 feet above sea level with nine free-form pools containing 770,000 gallons of water! This pool has many features: four jungle pools, four slides, a whitewater rapids slide, a Tarzan pool (rope swing included), a sand beach, six waterfalls, three Jacuzzis, an infant pool, and a swim-up bar. Because the activity pool is connected by a series of slides, it also features the world’s first, and only water elevator that takes swimmers from the lower level of the pool to the top. Originally built for the handicapped, the water elevator is a circular raft in a chamber that holds up to 15 people. Up to 18,000 gallons of water is pumped in to allow guests to return to the top slides without having to leave the pool. The Tarzan rope and lava slide are popular attractions. “It’s hard to say which one is the best attraction because they are all popular,” said Lori Cuellar, Grand Wailea Recreation Manager. These pools are not availaLocation: 3850 Wailea Alanui Drive, Wailea, HI 96753 Hours: 7:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. Slides are open from 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Web site: www.grandwailea.com Yelp rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Photos by REID CAIRME

[TOP] Sports editor Reid Cairme tests a new attraction at the Grand Wailea, the Fishpipe. [LEFT] Guests who are 21 years or older order from the swim-up bar in the activities pool on February 25. 2013. [BOTTOM] A Grand Wailea hotel guest braces himself before using the Tarzan swing lin the activities pool .

ble to the public. The Grand Wailea uses a wristband system to make sure that the pools are being used by hotel guests only. The wristband colors change daily and are numbered for each individual guest. The Fishpipe is a new attraction at the Grand Wailea. Guests sit in a transparent ball with 15 gallons of filtered water for each rider, for up to three riders at a time. The Fishpipe spins at up to 45 revolutions per minute but riders can request a slower ride. I rode the Fishpipe on February 24, and it was a thrilling experience. I felt nervous climbing into the plastic ball and began to regret my decision when I heard the zipper seal the inner sphere. As it began to rotate, I instinctively braced myself, but the slick surface provided no grip, and I fell on my face. The ball spun so fast that I felt like I

was on a never-ending slide. The ride is like going down a mile-long slide and lasts for about a minute and a half. It was amazing.

The Fishpipe offers four packages: $15 for one ride, $35 for a three ride package, $55 for a five ride package, and $95 for an all-day pass.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8, 2013

D8

Maui’s best mani/pedi:

David’s Happy Nails By JAYLIN KEKIWI and staff

PUKALANI – Show of hands: Who doesn’t like getting pampered a little bit, on occasion? No, we’re not talking haircuts here. We’re talking about a hand and foot makeover. You,

the readers, voted David’s Happy Nails as the best place to go when you want to give your hands and feet a little TLC. “They have good service and have tons of nail polish

options,” said senior Monica Borge, who visits the Ki¯hei branch. David’s Happy Nails has been in business for nearly 10 years on Maui. Owner David Tran said that all technicians are fully licensed and professional. “We do the best from our hearts. We have good designs and give good discounts to students,” Tran said. Students who show their student ID’s will get 10% off. “Come for senior prom. Come show your ID, so we can give you the discount,” he said. David’s Happy Nails specialize in manicures and pedicures; however, they also offer facials and waxing services.

Photo by MAYA NITTA

Ms. Ohua Morando gets an ankle massage at David’s Happy Nails. Locations: Pukalani, Ki¯hei and La¯haina Hours: Monday - Saturday 9 a.m. - 7 p.m., and Sunday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Rating on Yelp: 4 out of 5 stars for the La¯haina salon, 4.5 stars for the Ki¯hei salon, Pukalani salon is not yet rated.

Photo by MAYA NITTA

Ms. Ohua Morando gets her feet scrubbed at David’s Happy Nails in Pukalani

Godspell

resurrected

By JAYLIN KEKIWI, sports writer

The Drama Club is working on their newest production:

Godspell. In this version, except for for the two leading roles, Jesus (James Krueger) and Judas (Ka’ili Mossman), the ensemble cast will be acting as themselves, but reciting the lines of the characters from the musical, Godspell. This approach allows flexibility in the size of the cast. “This allows us to have people play as many or as few parts as we want,” cast member Amber Kama said. Godspell is a compilation of parables primarily taken from the Gospel of Matthew, though a few are taken from the Gospel of Luke. There is a continuous theme of the difference between right and wrong throughout the play. A highlight of this musical is the choreography, done by Ki¯hei Academy of Dance director Erin Kowalick. “It’s really fun,” junior Alia

Photo by JAYLIN KEKIWI

Senior Landon Ballesteros is surrounded by the ensemble Godspell cast as they rehearse for the musical play coming to Kamehameha Maui’s Keōpūolani Hale March 15 and 16. Seniors James Krueger and Kaʻili Mossman play the lead parts.

Hurdle said. “There’s a lot of different people, and everyone’s talented, so it’s a fun thing to be a part of.” Kama said that the play is different from other plays they’ve done. There are more underclassmen involved. “Everyone gets along pretty

well. It makes for a good atmosphere onstage,” she said. People can expect to see “a lot of singing and dancing,” according to Kama. However, due to “spoilers,” she didn’t want to give too much information away about the play, saying that “people will have

to come and watch the show.” The play is being directed by Ms. Alexis Dascoulias, and will be showing on March15 and 16 at 7:30 p.m. with a Saturday matinée at 2:00 p.m. at Keo¯pu¯olani Hale. There is no entry cost, and the play is open to the public.


Volume VIII

Issue 3

Eenie meenie miney...No.

By LANDON BALLESTEROS, staff writer

Decisions, decisions…. Why do they have to be so hard to make? We make decisions every day. Most of them are easy. Which uniform polo do I want to wear today? Should I eat an apple or an orange? Kicking in the front seat or sitting in the back seat to get to school? Okay, let’s not go there, but, these are the easy questions: How are you supposed to make up your mind when it comes to the toughest decisions? It seems that this is one point in the year when we are all making some tough decisions. For the sophomores, it’s their choice in an academy endorsement. I myself was torn between three choices at the time. For the juniors, it’s picking out the components of the senior project. What are you going to do for your internship? Your product? Anything fancy for the presentation? At least the research paper is

Student Survey

done. As for the seniors, it’s narrowing down college picks and scholarship applications, or just plain figuring out what you’re going to do after high school. You should weigh all your options, but you’re in for a battle with that pesky voice in your head. You know, that thing you see on TV where you have the angelic guardian on your left shoulder giving you good advice, but then there’s the devilish mindchanger with a red hot trident trying to urge you into the wrong decision. There are additional things to consider during decisionmaking. Reflect on past decisions, how you made them, and how they turned out. Imagine what will happen after you make the decision. Think about the consequences of every course of action, and look at the decision from all angles. How does the decision affect you and others? Weigh out the outcomes, the if/then chain reaction, and consult your intuition. Follow your heart, and listen to your gut instinct. Keep in mind that the decisions you make today can influence your whole life. One such decision for me was when I was considering applying to KS Maui. I really didn’t want to at the time, but I just told myself, “Just go for it and see how it goes. You can always choose something else.” Well, thank goodness I didn’t choose something else!

March 8, 2013

D9

What’s your score? DVP BY REID CAIRME, sports editor

Do you think you could make movies like they do in Hollywood? Let’s take a quiz! Answer each question; then, score yourself according to the guide at the bottom. Freshman 1. What was the name of the first semester video broadcast? 2. What brand of computers does the DVP class use? 3. What does DVP stand for? Sophomore 4. What color is the screen used for keying out things you don’t want in your videos? 5. What does NKM stand for? 6. A “fish pole” is used with what type of microphone? Junior 7. Moving the camera along with the action is known as ________. 8. What program is used to edit video in DVP? 9. What is the rule that states you must keep important elements out of the middle of the screen? Senior 10. What production stage is “the death of all DVP students”? 11. What tool is used to create stable, horizontal shots? 12. What competition has DVP won five years in a row? Scoring: Score 1 point for each correct answer on the freshman level, 2 points on the sophomore level, 3 on the junior level, and 4 points on the senior level. 30 points – The next Steven Spielberg; 29 to 19 points –a rising star; 18 to 10 points – best supporting star; 9 to 0 points – Hollywood extra Answers: 1. What’s Up, Warriors 2. Macs 3. Digital Video Production 4. A green screen 5. Na¯ Koa Media 6. A boom mic 7. Tracking 8.Final Cut Pro X 9.The rule of thirds10. Post-production 11. The slider 12.ʻO¯lelo Youth Exchange

Ka Leo o Nä Koa

I can’t imagine how totally different my life would be had I chosen the other route. But that echoes my point: if a decision is life-altering, even in a small way, think carefully about it, and keep in mind what’s going to happen in the

long run. In making this decision, what’s going to happen in two days? Two weeks? Two decades? And if you still can’t decide… Well, there’s always Eenie Meenie Miney Mo.

Feature by MAYA NIITTA features editor

If you were solely in charge of prom what would the theme be and why? Danann Mitchell

Ilima Fisher

Daniel Quenga

freshman

sophomore

junior

“Either paranormal prom (where everyone dresses up like a vampire, witch, etc.) or video game prom.”

“Fantasyland with lots of glitter and sparkles and big prom dresses and everyone going all out because it would be so fun.”

Riley Shiraishi senior

“If I were in charge I would make the theme 007 because that would be a really cool and fun theme.”

“Greek Gods! The decorations would be epic, and the outfit possibilities would be endless.”


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8, 2013

D10

Here comes spring By LEXIS VIENA, staff writer

Spring is here—bright colors, Easter bunnies and magical Irish elves. See if you are able to solve the Valentine’s Day, Easter and St. Patrick’s Day clues below as we spring into the season

Photo by REID CAIRME

Aaron Dela-Cruz By LANDON BALLESTEROS, news writer

Academy: Science & Natural Resources – Health Services Times on the Honor Roll: 14 Favorite place on campus: Kumu Kalei’s room Why academics are a priority: “I make academics a priority because I think the more educated you are, the harder it is to be taken advantage of.” GPA: 3.90 How you let your hair down: Lifting weights and playing music. Tip for succeeding in the classroom: Pay attention. Pre-Test Ritual: “I really don’t review anything outside of school. I just pay attention in class and then take the test.” SAT Score: Undisclosed Clubs/Organizations: Hawaiian Ensemble, Boy Scouts of America, Health Occupations Students of America Sports: Football, paddling, weight-lifting Senior Project: Coordinated last year’s HOSA event. Favorite quote: “Running water never grows stale, so you got to just keep on flowing.” Future plans: Go to college on the West Coast, graduate, and “make bank.”

Across 2. Corned ____ and Cabbage 5. Punishment for March 17 scofflaws 7. Patron Saint of Ireland 9. Foil wrapped treat 10. Tulips do this 12. Easter Bunny's fave 13. Ovum 14. Will you be my ____ ? 15. Easters Meaning 16. Magic Irish elf 22. Seal this with a kiss 24. Egg hider 25. Bring May flowers 26. Blue + yellow

Down 1. Marshmallow treats 3. March 11 savings 4. Basket stuffings 6. Hershey's _____ 8. plastic egg innards 11. Easter Colors 15. Green egg accompaniment 17. Romeo and Juliet 18. 4-leafed charm 19. Springtime pest 20. He is risen 21. Finger paint 23. April prankster victim 24. Egg depository


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VIII

Horoscope s Aries (March 21-April 19) Things get easier for a few days, especially at work. A legal opinion is just a phone call away. Something you try at home may fall flat, though. Take the missing action.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Consider new opportunities to increase your family's comfort for the next few days. Avoid risky business, and keep your eyes open. Creative work takes you higher and higher. Stock up on supplies.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) Today and tomorrow are good for travel and romance. Plan a vacation, and choose the perfect spot. Reassure loved ones that you care by sharing your love, time and true feelings.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) To avoid a potential problem, play the game exactly by the book. Career possibilities cross your radar screen. Cut entertainment spending and handle financial matters. Accept a hefty assignment.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) It's easier to delegate now, so develop partnerships. You could be tempted to spend, but stick to the budgeted equipment. Let career decisions wait. Listen carefully and learn.

Virgo

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Concentrate on your intense workload. It's actually great! Proceed with caution, and get a lot done. Build a solid foundation with facts and organizational structures. Create a new you. (Sept.

23-Oct.

March 8, 2013

D11

Infobox: St. Patrick’s Day

s

Horoscopes are for entertainment purposes only! If you need answers you’ll find them in the Bible. By Nancy Black, Tribune Media Services

Libra

Issue 3

22)

You're very lucky. Don't touch your savings. Reaffirm commitments, and stay active on them. Begin planning at home. Deflect criticism with humor.

By LEXIS VIENA, staff writer

Saint Patrick’s Day is celebrated throughout the world. People of Irish origin and non-Irish alike enjoy the festivities and fun that this holiday brings. Here’s a little background on the day. Who: Saint Patrick, patron saint of Ireland What: Converted Ireland to Christianity from pagan worship Where: Ireland When: St. Patrick’s Day is held on March 17, the anniversary of the saint’s death (sometime between 461 and 500) Why: Americans celebrate St. Patrick’s Day due to Irish influences brought by immigrants and travelers. How: Feasts (normally consisting of corned beef or bacon and cabbage), Irish festivals, parades, a visit to a local pub Fun Facts:  The first recorded St. Patrick's Day parade was staged in Boston in 1737.  On St. Patrick’s Day in Chicago, the rivers are died green.  The three-leafed shamrock was used by St. Patrick to explain the Holy Trinity.  The original color of St. Patrick’s Day was blue. The color green was adopted because Ireland is green and lush; thus, it has been nicknamed the Emerald Isle. Also, Irish legends told of pixies, fairies and mythical creatures that wore green.

Sudoku Fill in each box with the numbers 1-9. Each row, column, and 3 x 3 box must have the numbers 1-9, no repeats.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Enforce household rules, and focus on home improvement. Expect cash to flow like water. Keep high standards. You're gaining admirers. It's not a good time to travel or sell.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) You're in study mode in an intensive learning phase. You have what you need. Leave your money in the bank, except for something you've long wanted.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) There's money coming in, so keep your budget in mind before spending. Consider travel plans. Don't overextend, and keep others on course. Join a knowledgeable group. Stick to your principles.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You're eager to go, and the cash rolls in. As you gain strength, you also gain options. Your friends can show you how. Be patient with bothersome regulations.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Conserve resources, and don't worry about the money. Provide encouragement without losing faith. You're under a bit more pressure now. Study with a partner. You'll enjoy being with friends.

Puzzle used courtesy of KrazyDad.com. All rights reserved.

Photo by LANDONBALLESTEROS

Kalia Tamashiro By LANDON BALLESTEROS, news writer

Academy: Science & Natural Resources – Health Services Times on the Honor Roll: 14 Favorite place on campus: My lunch table in the cafeteria Why academics are a priority: “Having a good academic foundation allows you to pursue the tools and resources needed for a brighter, successful future.” GPA: 3.99 How you let your hair down: Online shopping Tip for succeeding in the classroom: Pay attention Pre-Test Ritual: Sleep with the textbook. SAT Score: “Secret, why?” Other Academic Honors: Student Spotlight in Maui News, 1st place in Medical Photography at Hawaiʻi HOSA State Competition Clubs/Organizations: ASKSM Secretary, National Honor Society, Health Occupations Students of America, Teens Under Construction, Interact Sports: Soccer Senior Project: Healthy living campaign Favorite quote: “If God brings you to it, he will bring you through it.” ~ Author Unknown Future plans: Attend a 4-year university or college on the West Coast to study biology


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8, 2013

D12

Look no further, site makes inventing simple By MEHANA LEE, news editor

A tool that brushes out dust bunnies from a broom? What about a device that lets you spray fruit juice directly from the fruit? Or a power strip that will fit all of your bulky adapters in each outlet? All of these products can be found on one site: Quirky.com. Quirky, a Web site launched in 2009, changed the future for many wannabe inventors by making the process of financing, engineering, distributing and legal maneuvering fast and convenient. In a little over three years, the site has helped develop 298 products and partnered with 188 retailers, including Office Max, Barnes & Noble, Target, and Ace Hardware. Here’s how it works. Inventors submit their product ideas to Quirky along with a fee of $10. From there, the Quirky community of about 221,000 votes for their favorite invention submissions. The products with the most votes are then reviewed by a panel of Quirky’s team experts. One to two products that have design potential and originality

Photos used courtesy of QUIRKY

"Innovative products such as the Loopits (top), Pivot Power (above right) and Stem (above left) became a reality after original ideas were submitted to Quirky.com, a Web site to help with product development..." —Quirky.com

are picked for production each week by the team experts. The Quirky team then puts the product ideas through a process of researching, designing, engineering, and branding before advertising the product in the market. It takes about 120 to 180 days for products to reach retailers’ shelves. The inven-

Missed Steps

tors who submitted the original ideas get their share of 35% of revenues once their products hit the shelves. One of Quirky’s most famous products is the Pivot Power. It is a flexible power outlet that can be easily adjusted, so bulky adapters can fit on the same strip. Jake Zien, inventor of the Pivot Power, earned

by REID CAIRME

IN AN ALTERNATE UNIVERSE

about $290,000 from submitting his idea to Quirky. Zien conceived of this product at the age of 17, and the idea became a reality with the help of Quirky. The Quirky team has about 120 products in the development cycle at any one time and about 75 products on sale in retail outlets.

Solution to Sudoku on D11


Ka Leo o Nā Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8

E1

Boys soccer takes MIL title Varsity team advances to state competition, places third in state of Hawaiʻi BY REID CAIRME, sports editor

The varsity boys soccer team claimed their spot as Maui Interscholastic League champions after a victory against the Seabury Spartans on January 29 with a score of 2 to 1. The Warriors continued on to the Hawaiʻi High School Athletic Association state tournament on Oʻahu for the first time since 2009, the last year in which they were MIL champions. “I believed we could go to states with no problem,” Coach Kimo Correa said. “I was very confident in the varsity team.” The Warriors left for the state competition with excitement and the drive to come out as not just MIL champions, but state champions as well. They won their first game against Iolani High School on February 7, when the boys won after a second overtime and a penalty kick shootout. The Warriors matched Iolani point for point during the fiveman shootout with three penalty kicks scored on each side. Senior Devonte Llanes blocked the last two of Iolani’s attempts, while Iolani’s Josh Adachi blocked the first Warrior kick, but allowed freshman Brennan Joaquin to make the tie-breaking goal. The freshman forward made several goals over the season leading up to his playing in the tournament. He had also for 11 years before joining the varsity team. “I was sure that I would make the varsity team,” Joaquin said, “but playing this

Photo by REID CAIRME

Junior Chandler Alo keeps the ball out of the Hana Dragons’ possession on December 22, 2013.

Photo by REID CAIRME

Junior AJ Owan weaves the ball past King Kekaulike’s Na¯ Aliʻi on January 11, 2013. The last game between the two teams ended in a tie.

season was better than expected. Winning MIL and placing third in states was just amazing.” The Warriors then played against Kalani High School in the semifinals. The Warriors and Falcons were tied for most of the game until the Falcons scored within the final five minutes. The Warriors’

chance to be state champions was gone, but they advanced to face the Kealakehe Waveriders, and they were victorious, winning 3-1 and placing third in the state. This was the first year of soccer for seniors Taylor Kaʻaukai and Llanes. Three other seniors, Acer Pahukoa, Stephen Barut, and Kainalu

Kealoha were returning athletes and co-captains. Llanes was heavily encouraged to join the team by his peers. He posted the question on the senior class page on Facebook before the season started. “My classmates that played the sport, along with other plays, urged me to come out this year,” Llanes said. “I felt honored to be playing with the best when it came to states.” “Devonte and Taylor were awesome!” Coach Correa said. “They added more leadership to the team despite playing varsity soccer for their first year.” The five seniors have enjoyed their last year as high school soccer players and are looked as role models for future years. “We will build on their legacy,” Coach Correa said. “I wish them the best of luck in their future. We will always remember them.”


Ka Leo o Nā Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8

E2

Photo by JAYLIN KEKIWI

Freshman Quinn Williams takes a shot at the Sabers’ goal on January 22, 2103. The girls took the title of MIL champions for the first time in four years.

Girls soccer is MIL

CHAMPS By JAYLIN KEKIWI, sports writer

When the girls soccer season drew to a close on January 22, 2013, the girls weren’t exactly finished with soccer for the season. For the first time in four years, they went to the Outrigger Hotels and Resorts Girls Soccer Championships as the Division 1 Maui Interscholastic League champions. The girls had gone in 2011 and 2012, but as secondplace holders. “It wasn’t looking too good in the beginning,” sophomore outside midfielder Brandy Takiguchi said. “We lost some games, until we realized that we couldn’t go to states unless we won the rest of them.” The girls were proud of their overall standings, finishing with 12 wins, 2 losses, and no ties. They ended the season with 36 points overall; whereas King Kekaulike, the second -place MIL team, had 32 points. At the tournament, the Maui Warriors came in fourth after a

3-0 loss against Punahou School, a 4-3 win against Kahuku High School, and a scoreless tie against Konawaena High School. The Maui Warriors ended their overall season with a record of 14-3-1. “In the beginning of the season, I promised the parents and the girls that I would take them [to States],” Head Coach Steven Mau said. “They had to work hard for it, but the girls pulled through.” Junior defender Kaitlin Barcoma thought that they had a good run. “[States] was exciting,” she said. “Just being there as first place was fun.” Senior midfielder Kaylee Correa said that the entire season went well, and she will miss playing soccer with the Warriors. “I’m going to miss bonding with my team,” she said. “We had a lot of great girls, and I’m going to miss playing [soccer] with them.”

Photo by JAYLIN KEKIWI

Freshman Taira Lucas attempts to steal the ball from a Saber, January 22, 2013.

Scoreboard Boys Soccer 11/29 12/11 12/14 12/18 12/21 12/22 1/3 1/5 1/8 1/11 1/15 1/22 1/25 1/29 2/7 2/8 2/9

vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs.

SAS 9-1 BHS 3-1 KKHS 1-2 LLHS 2-1 HANA 9-1 HANA 7-0 SBH 4-0 SAS 6-1 BHS 0-3 KKHS 1-1 LLHS 2-1 MHS 5-1 MHS 3-0 SBH 2-1 Iolani 2-1 Kalani 1-2 Kealakehe 2-1

Girls Soccer W W L W W W W W L T W W W W W L W

11/29 12/1 12/4 12/11 12/14 12/18 12/21 12/29 1/3 1/5 1/8 1/11 1/15 1/22

vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs.

SAS MHS SBH BHS KKHS LLHS HANA SAS SBH SAS BHS KKHS LLHS MHS

9-0 3-1 3-0 0-2 0-2 6-1 8-0 9-0 2-0 4-0 4-2 2-0 8-0 1-0

W W W L L W W W W W W W W W


Ka Leo o Nā Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8

E3

Kane takes second at swimming state tournament By MAYA NITTA, staff writer

2013 MIL champion swimmer Mikaʻele Kane placed second in the HHSAA State Swim Tournament at the Duke Kahanamoku Aquatic Complex on February 15-16. Last year, he placed sixth. “I was stoked that I managed to get second in a meet with so many fast and talented swimmers,” Kane said. He placed second with a time of 54.39 behind sophomore Makoa Alvarez from Campbell High School on Oʻahu. “Mika [Kane] swam great in his backstroke event all season. Now he can set a new goal and become even faster,” said Coach Leighton Hao, who has been his high school coach for the past two years. Kane started swimming with Hawaiʻi Swim Club when he was six. He said he swims for several reasons. “It’s a challenging sport. You meet great people and get to travel, and it has always been in the family,” he said. He has also participated in

Scoreboard Swimming 2/16 State Finals Results Girls: 200-yard freestyle 8th Boys: 100-yd. backstroke Mika Kane 2nd Kyle Mauri 4th

Photos by MAYA NITTA

Above, Sarina Kong dives in at the start of her race. Left, junior Mika Kane, receives his medal as MIL champion in the 100yard backstroke. He went on to place second in the state meet.

numerous meets off island and across the country, including many championships and two regional meets. In the Maui Interscholastic League meet, both he and fellow junior Kyle Mauri qualified for the state tournament in

Nakoa signs with Notre Dame College BY REID CAIRME, sports editor

Senior Dylan Nakoa signed on to play football with Notre Dame College at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel on February 6, 2013. “I remember seeing all the giant chandeliers and the clamor of the people in the crowd,” Nakoa said. “I just felt a sense of pride.” He was the only outer island player at the signing. “I realized that it was a true honor to be there,” Nakoa said. “I was blessed to be there.” He will receive a deal paying for over half of his college’s cost for committing to the school. These costs include tuition, books, room, and board. Nakoa put his name out to different colleges with the help of Ms. Dorris Sullivan of Pacific Island Athletic Alliance. Through the Alliance, he gen-

Photo courtesy of DYLAN NAKOA

Senior Dylan Nakoa signed to Notre Dame College at the Waikiki Sheraton on February 6, 2013.

erated interest from many schools, such as Menlo College, Valley City State University, and Valparaiso University. “I was mostly waiting for the coaches to offer me deals. Then I could choose which

one I would sign for,” Nakoa said. Coach Reilly Murphy with Notre Dame contacted the senior in November. Coach Murphy was interested in Nakoa’s grades and highlight film, a requirement if an athlete wants to be recruited by any school. “When I did some research him, I found that he was a good player,” Coach Murphy said. “When we started talking, I learned that he was even better as a person with his attitude and work ethic.” “It started to become hectic in December because I was talking to a bunch of different colleges,” Nakoa said. After receiving a deal in January, he was ready to sign. “I’m looking forward to meeting new people, building relationships, and start[ing] my training for football,” Nakoa said.

the 100-yard backstroke and Mauri placed fourth in the state final with a time of 55.89. Also qualifying for the finals was the girls 200 yard freestyle relay, with seniors Sarina Kong and Riley Shiraishi, sophomore Mia Czerinski and freshman Erin Lim. They placed eighth overall. Of the 24 events in the HHSAA tournament, the KSM swim team had qualified to compete in eleven semi-final events, but aside from the boys 100-yard backstroke and girls 200-yard freestyle relay, no other KSM athletes qualified for the final round on Saturday.

Nakoa is the first Hawaiian athlete to join the Falcons, and he has already inspired several other Hawaiian students to join Notre Dame. “I am looking forward to him bringing his optimistic attitude and passion to the team,” Coach Murphy said. He will be working with Maui Sports Conditioning for the next few months in preparation for his new season. He looks forward to playing the sport he loves in the fall of 2013. Like many people going to college, Nakoa is filled with anticipation and says he is already in “college mode.” He has some advice for students aspiring to pursue their favorite sport in college. “The thing I would say for athletes is to focus all of your energy on the field, in the weight room, and in the classroom. You need to focus on a goal and always work for it,” he said.


Ka Leo o Nā Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8

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Photo by REID CAIRME

Senior RJ Moku, one of eight basketball seniors, finds a path between Na¯ Aliʻi defenders for a point while senior Kamaka Keawekane blocks.

Senior boys improve varsity basketball BY REID CAIIRME, sports editor

The varsity boys basketball team struggled throughout the 2013 Maui Interscholastic League season with twice as many losses as wins, but their season of 4 wins and 8 losses, was an improvement over last year’s 3 wins and 10 losses. “Our focus wasn’t on becoming champions or winning,” Senior Billy Ayakawa said. “It was more on becoming stronger as a team.” The team’s main focus this year was on teamwork, communication, and becoming closer. The Warriors did not focus on just the defense or offense, but becoming a more balanced team. “I feel closer to my team this year than I have in previous years,” Ayakawa said. “If we wanted to play effectively, we needed to actually feel like a family.” The Warriors struggled to rise to meet the level of their

Scoreboard Boys Basketball 12/28 12/29 1/2 1/4 1/10 1/12 1/15 1/17 1/24 1/26 1/31 2/2

vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs.

MHS LLHS BHS KKHS LLHS MHS BHS KKHS LLHS MHS BHS KKHS

51-34 36-54 30-57 29-47 40-45 51-34 49-64 27-48 56-52 68-57 28-47 46-51

W L L L L W L L W W L L Photo by LANDON BALLESTEROS

competition, despite having skilled players on the team. Three of the Warriors’ games ended with less than a 10-point gap between scores. “I thought that our knowledge of the game was better than in years past,” Head Coach Chad Kalehuawehe said. The team was senior heavy with eight members of the class of 2013: Ayakawa, Kahiau Andrade, RJ Moku, Kolby

Senior Kolby Ah Sau leaps over a Saber to score on January 12, 2013.

Ah Sau, Luke Batoon, Kamaka Keawekane, Micah Mossman, and Aydan Lopes. “Thank you [seniors] Although we didn’t reach our goals, the memories I have with you young men will always be a part of me.” Coach Kalehuawehe. Coach Kalehuawehe said his plan for next year is to focus on the offensive fundamentals of the game.

The varsity boys basketball team’s post-season ended during the second round of the MIL tournament when the Warriors ended in fourth place out of five teams. The Na¯ Aliʻi of King Kekaulike came in first. The team lost 41-28 to the King Kekaulike Na¯ Aliʻi on February 7, 2013 at the La¯haina Civic Center.


Ka Leo o Nā Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8

KSM paddling ends season at state races By MEHANA LEE, news editor

The Kamehameha Schools Maui boys, girls and mixed paddling crews all earned spots at the Hawai‘i High School Athletic Association state tournament finals on February 1, 2013, at Ke‘ehi Lagoon, O‘ahu. The boys crew placed fourth, girls came in fifth, and the mixed crew finished sixth out of eight canoes. Previous to the state tournament, the KSM boys crew had finished their Maui Interscholastic League season as MIL champions with a perfect season, coming in first place for every regatta. “It started from the get go. The crew had the right combination of chemistry and power. Power was distributed evenly throughout the canoe, and that was very effective. It goes hand in hand,” Head Coach Robert Brede said. Traditionally, the coaches of the MIL champions are allowed to select a paddler from the winning crew as Paddler of the Year. This year, Maleko

Photo by MEHANA LEE

Junior Kauanoe Vanderpoel and seniors Maleko Lorenzo and Bryce Takabayashi dig in and finish first at the MIL Championship regatta.

Lorenzo was selected by his coaches. “We picked Maleko because he was so dedicated and committed to paddling. That separated him from the rest. Eventually, everyone got on the same page, and they did their work,” Coach Brede said. The four All-Stars chosen for KSM were seniors Bryce Takabayashi, Maleko Lorenzo and Ku¯pa‘a Luat-Hueu and junior Kauanoe Vanderpoel for outstanding paddling and

Girls basketball moving on up By MEHANA LEE, news editor

Sophomores Jayden Almeida and Kelia NeSmith and freshman Rebeka Revelle got a taste of what varsity girls basketball had in store for them after being moved up at the end of their junior varsity season. The original varsity team had only six players, so Head Coach David NeSmith brought up three of the junior varsity girls when the varsity season started. Almeida quickly became the team’s favored point guard, but she sat out for the last two games of the season after spraining a ligament in her left knee during a heated game against Baldwin High School on January 15. In addition to playing more because of the small team, NeSmith and Revelle also had to adjust to the faster pace of varsity games and different playing style.

Scoreboard Girls Basketball 12/13 12/15 12/20 12/22 12/28 12/29 1/2 1/4 1/10 1/12 1/15 1/17

vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs.

LLHS MHS BHS KKHS MHS LLHS BHS KKHS LLHS MHS BHS KKHS

15-72 L 21-59 L 34-32 W 43-59 L 34-66 L 11-72 L 30-32 L 36-56 L 23-84 L 36-50 L 39-46 L 20-50 L

MHS LLHS BHS KKHS LLHS MHS KKHS BHS

12-50 L 5-82 L 16-33 L 11-57 L 0-78 L 14-36 L 8-28 L 6-31 L

JV Girls 11/8 11/10 11/13 11/17 11/19 11/21 11/27 11/29

vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs. vs.

“It [moving to varsity] required a lot of mental and physical strength. The game goes by a lot faster, and it’s more physical,” Kelia NeSmith said. The players said that it was difficult.

teamwork. As champions, the boys crew went to the state races with high expectations of taking the title, but placed fourth instead. “Racing crews from around the state was a lot more competitive than MIL because they are much bigger and stronger. Plus, they do different types of training than us,” Takabayashi said. Though the Maui Warriors girls and mixed crews didn’t “Playing on varsity definitely had its challenges. Since we were a small team, we really had to trust each other with everything we had and just believe that we could accomplish anything we put our hearts to,” Almeida said. They overcame one of their biggest challenges: keeping a full roster with only nine players on the team. Despite their small numbers, the team managed to play every game with minimal injuries and no one out due to academic probation. They ended their Maui Interscholastic League season with one win and 11 losses. “We would have liked to win more games, you know, everybody does. But, I think that we grew as a team,” Head Coach David NeSmith said. Coach NeSmith said the players came to all the practices, and by the end of the season, the team had grown close.

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place in the top three at the HHSAA state tournament either, one of the season highlights for the mixed crew was when they broke Seabury Hall’s winning streak during the fourth regatta at Hanakao‘o Beach Park. Seabury Hall went on to win the next regatta and become MIL champions. “We beat Seabury Hall in the mixed race once, which is pretty good knowing that everyone in our mixed crew was doing two events every regatta,” Vanderpoel said.

Scoreboard Paddling 12/15 Meet 1 Girls Boys Mixed 1/5 Meet 2 Girls Boys Mixed 1/12 Meet 3 Girls Boys Mixed 1/19 Meet 4 Girls Boys Mixed 1/26 Meet 5 Girls Boys Mixed 2/1 HHSAA Girls Boys Mixed

2nd 1st 1st 2nd 1st 1st 1st 1st 2nd 3rd 1st 1st 3rd 1st 2nd 5th 4th 6th

Photo by MEHANA LEE

Freshman Rebeka Revelle dribbles the ball down the court.

Previous to the varsity season, the junior varsity team had a winless season. This was the first JV team in five years. The team consisted of both players who had never played on a team before and players who had played on either a middle school or club team.


Ka Leo o Nā Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8

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JV Baseball ends season, some prep for varsity By LANDON BALLESTEROS, staff writer

Photo by REID CAIRME

The boys volleyball team warms up with some stretches before starting practice in February. The team expected a large turnout this year, almost adding a junior varsity team, but only a few freshmen came for tryouts. The team welcomes three new seniors to the team.

More seniors on boys volleyball BY REID CAIRME, sports editor

Rumors flew through the Kamehameha Schools Maui student body about a first ever junior varsity boys volleyball team forming this year with approximately 15 freshmen alone signing up. These rumors were extinguished when only roughly 20 people showed up to the volleyball tryouts. “It was exciting to see that so many freshmen signed up,” Head Coach Robert Brede said, “but when they didn’t show up at tryouts, we had no other choice but to not have a JV team.” Tryouts for the varsity team were full of mostly seniors, followed by freshmen. Most of the seniors that signed up made the cut, while three freshmen also made it through. Of those seniors, Pono

Corrections Varsity Football 8/24 vs. MHS 10-7 L 8/31 vs. LLHS 36-0 L 9/8 vs. KKHS 11-8 W 9/15 vs. BHS 62-18 L 9/29 vs. MHS 21-14 W 10/6 vs. LLHS 35-3 L 10/12 vs. KKHS 19-7 L 10/19 vs. BHS 42-40 L

Freitas is returning to the court after taking a break in his junior year. “I took a break last year and ran track,” Freitas said. “I decided to come back because I missed the game and wanted to be involved with a team sport.” Christian Martin Chu, Kahiau Andrade, Kawelau Yen, and Kekoa Uyechi are seniors that have been a part of the varsity team since their freshman year. “This is their last season as a high school athlete. They need to put out [a lot of effort] to help the three freshmen on our team,” Coach Brede said. RJ Moku, Kolby Ah Sau, and Makoa Medeiros are seniors that have joined for their first year as varsity volleyball players. “They’re amazing athletes, so that’s why I decided to add them,” Coach Brede said. Athletes were given a week of optional conditioning before tryout week, February 11-14. They did core workouts, distance running, and stair running.

The Kamehameha Schools Maui junior varsity baseball team finished off their MIL season. “Being on JV baseball was a great learning experience,” second base player Rylie Velez said. “It helped me adjust to the fast pace that high school demands.” The team had gone through some fairly long games, most notably their second-to-last game against Lahainaluna High School on February 2 when the Warriors lost to the Lunas 15-19 after an exhausting game that lasted three hours and 20 minutes. “It [long games] is always hard with big-scoring games like this,” Head Coach Jason Kane said. During that game, freshman Jordan Marciel exhibited some amazing pitching skills, shutting out the Lunas on the sixth inning, and thinning the score gap. Freshman Velez

also had strong fieldwork skills, throwing out multiple Lunas at first and second base. Though the JV season is over, many of the players have transitioned over to the varsity team, including sophomores Brennan Aloy, Cody and Kyle Fushikoshi-Wago, Josh Hiwatashi, Shae Johnson-Eugenio, Aaron Kokubun, Buddy Santos, and Keoni Keanini; as well as freshmen Kamuela Kaniaupio, Jordan Marciel, and Velez. “Some challenges that we have are keeping up with the varsity. That requires a different level of intensity than JV,” Velez said. “I look forward to spending time with the upperclassmen and being able to learn from them.” The varsity team’s first game is next Thursday, March 14. They will play against Lahainaluna High School at Iron Maehara Stadium at 1:30 p.m.

Scoreboard JV Softball 12/29 vs. BHS 2-11 1/2 vs. MHS 14-10 1/5 vs. LLHS 8-2 1/9 vs. BHS 12-16 1/12 vs. MHS 6-7 1/19 vs. BHS 0-4 1/23 vs. MHS 7-9 1/26 vs. LLHS 2-10

L W W L L L L L

Photo by LANDON BALLESTEROS

Brennon Aloy prepares for the wind-up by taking a deep breath before pitching on February 2, 2013.


Ka Leo o Nā Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8

Track welcomes Coach Rudy Huber By LANDON BALLESTEROS, staff writer

Kamehameha Schools Maui welcomed Coach Rudy Huber to their track team for the 2013 MIL. season. The Warriors started their season with excitement at what Huber can potentially bring to the sport. “He definitely has a passion for track,” junior Kiana Antonio said. “He participated throughout his teenage life, and he did everything so that he knows the basics of track, and he knows what you need to do to get better.” Hired in mid-February, Coach Huber has been coaching track since 1991. Antonio said that hard work

is a focal point in Coach Huber’s coaching. He likes to work hard so that the team can better their skills, and he focuses on the basics instead of starting with advanced tactics or skills. The team has also responded well to Coach Huber’s intent of making sure that everyone is on the same page. “Although he’s all about work, he truly knows that we want to have fun at the same time,” Antonio said. “He tries to make some of the workouts fun.” With the change in coaching staff and the Warriors’ new training regime, the team is hoping for the best results.

Photo by LANDON BALLESTEROS

Coach Rudy Huber was welcomed by KS Maui as the new track coach for the 2013 MIL season.

“The talent on this team is extraordinary,” Coach Huber said. “I see a really great future in the track program.” Baldwin High School is the current MIL champion in track, but the KS Maui team is determined to make an impressive

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showing this year. “It seems like he knows what he’s doing, and he knows what it takes to be a champion,” Antonio said. “I’m looking forward to hopefully taking the title away from Baldwin, as a team.” Antonio also said that the team has responded well to Coach Huber’s professionalism. “They take him seriously, and they respect him because of his past experience with track and how much he knows about it,” she said. The team is looking forward to a multitude of ideas that Coach Huber has to offer in terms of training, improvement, and becoming a champion. “It’s just going to take some time,” he said. The track team has a meet today at 4:00 p.m. at War Memorial Stadium.

Coach Ramirez jumps in, heads water polo By MAYA NITTA, staff writer

Coach Kaylan Ramirez, previously the assistant coach for the girls water polo team, steps into a new position this season as the head coach. “I had so much fun with the team last year that I am hoping for a repeat season. I want to coach because I played the sport, loved it, and figure it’s my turn to give back,” Coach Ramirez said. In high school, she played for the Kahuku Raiders. In her time at Kahuku, she usually played in the wing position, the outside position This will be her first year as a head coach. Vice-Principal Leo Delatori had held the position for 4 years. “I have really big shoes to fill, since [Mr.] Leo Delatori stepped down. I’m worried that I won’t be good enough because [Mr. Delatori] was such an amazing coach,” Coach Ramierez said. In time, she hopes to get the girls into shape for the season and make sure that they know the basics. She said that they will be doing a lot of swim-

Coach Kaylan Ramirez swims during practice with the KS water polo team. Ramirez was an assistant coach last year and has now taken the position of head coach. Photos by MAYA NITTA

The KS water polo team rushes to the ball during pre-season practice.

ming. “This is a learning year, so I’m hoping to teach and learn at the same time,” she said. According to Coach Ramirez, being on a team is not just about the game. It is also important to work together and have friends on the team. “I like our coach. It was nice

that she was willing to take over for Coach Delatori,” said Co-Captain Liana Lewis, “I liked working with her last year because she was so energetic and ready to work.” Lewis and fellow senior Elizabeth Guth have been playing water polo since they were freshmen and hope to guide the team as captains this year.

After qualifying to go to the state tournament last year, the team was invited to participate in the ʻIolani Tournament on Oʻahu last weekend. There they competed against various teams across the state. The Warriors lost four of the five games they played, but gained experience to bring to the regular season.


Ka Leo o Nā Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8

JV softball hangs in

Scoreboard JV Boys Basketball 11/13 vs. BHS 14-44 L 11/15 vs. SBH 31-14 W 11/19 vs. LLHS 15-35 L 11/21 vs. MHS 48-40 W 11/29 vs. BHS 28-42 L 12/1 vs. SBH 20-22 L 12/4 vs. MHS 31-56 L 12/5 vs. LLHS 29-54 L

BY REID CAIRME, sports editor

The junior varsity softball team ended their season with two wins and seven losses this 2012-2013 Maui Interscholastic League season. “It was an enjoyable season,” Head Coach Tony Arrieta said. Mahie Kama was consistent as catcher, and she, Kahea Andrade, and Kaala Corpuz were all promising as allaround players who could both pitch and catch. Tea Kauhaa-Po “was awesome at the plate and probably our best hitter for average,” Coach Arrieta said. Megan Miguel was also valuable as a fielder and in her position as short stop. The three sophomores on the team welcomed the nine freshmen who made up the bulk of the team. Of these freshmen, Sarah Ikioka, Sarah Catugal, and Kaitlyn Castillo were new to the game. “I was nervous at first,” Castillo said. “Everyone was very encouraging and supportive.” “They all performed well this year,” Coach Arrieta said. “You couldn’t tell who played before, and who just started.” There was the risk of not fielding a team this year with sophomores Sami Hill and Macie Tawata on the disabled list at the start of the season, but they cheered from the dugout and returned to the active list midway through the season. With two players out, there was a chance that there would not be enough players, but everything worked out. “It was a major concern,” Coach Arrieta said. The team focused on getting the basics down. As the season went on, Coach Rayna Allosada-Singson incorporated new plays and complexity into their arsenal. “I will most definitely come back next year,” Castillo said. “I was just starting to get the hang of the sport. It is fun and exciting to play.”

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Photo by LEXIS VIENA

Sophomore Dayson Damuni finds a path between two Spartans on November 15, 2012.

JV lays foundation By LEXIS VIENA, staff writer

Junior varsity boys basketball wrapped up their season with 2 wins and 4 losses. “I think that this season was very promising, it showed the potential of the young guys on the team this year,” Co-Captain Zackary Lopez said. Coach Mo Lau Hee moved up from assistant coach to head coach of the team at

the beginning of the season. This season, fundamentals were heightened. Things such as special plays and platoons were implemented into the games as the season progressed. Coach Mo encouraged and guided the warriors each game, and after every game gave feedback and made the team aware of what they needed to

work on. “I think that the boys were comfortable working with me because I was the assistant coach the previous year,” Coach Lau Hee said. As a whole, the team used this year as a starting point to set goals and lay a foundation for next year and the years to come. “I think that being a part of this team really helped me when I moved up to varsity,” Lopez said. “There was definitely team chemistry between the players this year, and it will make for a successful team next year with, hopefully, all of the freshmen returning and we will work from there,” Coach Lau Hee said.

Younger paddlers push limits, grow By MEHANA LEE, news editor

The Kamehameha Schools Maui junior varsity paddling team finished their Maui Interscholastic League season satisfied for a team that consisted of many new paddlers. “You could see as we got further along in the season, everyone started to train harder, and it really showed in our races,” sophomore Jessica Mendiola said. Throughout the season, some of the crews moved up from last place to fourth place. Overall for the MIL season, the boys crew placed fourth, the girls crew placed fifth and the mixed crew placed fourth.

Photo by MEHANA LEE

Lilia Lorenzo runs through a tunnel of her team’s arms after finishing her race at the MIL championship regatta on January 26, 2013.

This is a combination of the crews’ finishes throughout the season. According to sophomore Temoani Moe-Keahi, almost half of the girls and two boys were new paddlers who had

never paddled before. “The JV team really progressed throughout the season. They grew as a team, especially the beginner paddlers,” Head Coach Josie Prieto said.


Ka Leo o Nā Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8

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Stephen Barut Sport: Soccer Position: Right fullback Jersey Number: 5 Age and Grade: 18, senior Workout: “Run ‘em hahd.” Hobbies: Eat, sleep, bodyboard, and sports Something others (KSM students) don’t know about him: “I thought I was gangster in elementary because I could rap all of 50 Cent and Eminen’s songs.” Best thing about soccer: “When you step on that field, it’s a place to free your mind and forget about your worries, the feeling of creating beautiful combinations with your teammates to put the ball in the net, and becoming part of a whole new family of brothers.” What he adds to the team: “Being a captain, Stephen adds leadership by encouraging the team and working himself hard to set an example.” - Kapahanau Palakiko, midfield defender Challenges the team has faced so far this year: “Trying to stay disciplined and consistent.” Most memorable game: “Defeating Iolani and moving on to the semifinals for states.” How long he has been playing: 13 years Sports Idol: Junior Daniel Quenga Pitch Perfect or Glee: Pitch Perfect Cake or Pie: Pie

Kiana Soloria Sport: Wrestling Position: Team Captain Age and Grade: 17, senior Workout: Hell miles Hobbies: Diving, hiking, skimming Something others (KSM students) don’t know about her: “I like to dive for octopus.” Best thing about wrestling: “Watching my teammates push themselves.” What she adds to the team: “Motivation and inspiration to push themselves past their limit.” – Senior Alika Ostermiller Challenges the team has faced this year: “...skin diseases.” Most memorable game: “My match at the Officials’ Tournament. I never worked so hard in my life.” How long she has been playing: 3 years Sports Idol: Austin Bolch, 2012 state wrestling champion Pitch Perfect or Glee: Glee Cake or Pie: Cake If you could bring only one thing to college, what would it be: “My dive gear.”


Ka Leo o Nā Koa

Volume VIII

Issue 3

March 8

E10

HHSAA Wrestling: Kahalewai 2nd, Soloria 6th Photo by LEXIS VIENA

Senior Kiana Soloria contorts her Hana Dragon opponent at the Maui Invitational Tournament at King Kekaulike High School, December 17-18, 2012. By LEXIS VIENA and staff

Seniors Andrew Kahalewai and Kiana Soloria both made it to the second day of the state wrestling tournament, with Kahalewai eventually coming in 2nd, and Soloria fighting her way into 6th place. At the Maui Interscholastic League championships on February 23, both had earned a ticket to the Chevron state championships, March 1-2, at Blaisdell Arena. MIL champion Kahalewai was seeded second. After defeating his first opponent, Kahalewai faced his toughest first-day opponent in the quarterfinals, Gabriel Strait. “I dug really deep and thought that I know I can beat him, so that changed everything,” he said. The competition was just as much a mental game as a physical one. “You get in their

Scoreboard Wrestling Andrew Kahelewai 152 lbs. MIL 1st State 2nd Kiana Soloria 97 lbs. MIL 2nd State 6th Rusty Hue Sing 162 lbs. MIL 3rd Siaosi Ngalu 217 lbs. MIL 3rd

minds,” he said. Relying on this strategy, Kahelwai advanced over Kainoa Marumoto in the semifinals on Saturday and faced off against Pearl City’s Blake Cooper in the finals. He lost in three decisive rounds, 11-3. “He’s not human,” he said about Cooper, reigning 2012 HHSAA champ in the 145-lb. bracket. “When I got taken down in the first round, I felt the power that he had, and I thought to myself that this kid was something else,” Kahalewai said.

Photo by LEXIS VIENA

Senior Andrew Kahalewai maneuvers for a pin at the MIT in December.

Kahalewai has fond memories of his final year, “The highlight was when my coach (CJ Elizares) said he was proud of me, and he loved me, and that me and Kiana Soloria were the foundation to the whole wrestling program.”

Kahalewai credits his success to his team. “Wrestling, even though it seems like an individual sport, it’s a team sport. My team helped me to get to the place I am right now,” he said.

March 8, 2013 Ka Leo o Na Koa  

Best of Maui 2013, winter sports, student business, Spring Spirit Week, Molokaʻi Makahiki