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Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

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Kamehameha Schools Maui — 270 ‘Aÿapueo Parkway, Pukalani HI, 96768 — Phone: (808)-573-7019 — Email: kyhaina@ksbe.edu

iPads may come to kindergarten

Crayons, milk, and ...iPads?

By AMANDA LEE, staff writer

iPads may meet their newest and quite possibly youngest owners in Kamehameha Maui’s elementary kindergarten classes next fall. Dr. Paul Prevenas, elementary school principal, said, “Preliminary plans are being made to integrate the use of iPads into the KSM Kindergarten program at some time during the upcoming 20112012 school year. However, adequate funding may not be available to obtain an iPad for each of the forty students.” Dr. Prevenas said he believes a final decision on the funding will be made soon. “I personally think it’s very exciting. It’s something that is very natural for this generation of kids. You constantly see younger children on the iPad, and they just intuitively move through it,” kindergarten teacher Mr. Edwin Otani said. The iPad is a tablet computer designed, developed and marketed by Apple, Inc. Its size and weight falls between those of contemporary

Kindergartens go high-tech

(Continued on page A2) Photo by AMANDA LEE

Index: News

A1

Aha’ilono

B1

Life

C1

Senior Wills

C9

Sports

D1

Editorial

E1

‘AHA MELE……………………………….A9

HO’OLAULE’A………………………….A3

TRACK & FIELD……………………….D7


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NHS sees record high enrollment By KALANI RUIDAS, staff writer

The National Honor Society now has the most participating members than at any other time in the club’s history at Kamehameha Schools Maui. There are currently 63 members. Even with graduating seniors, there will still be 46 members next year. This is the ninth year NHS has been on campus. National Honor Society is an extracurricular organization that encourages students to be well-rounded individuals. Membership is available to sophomore, junior and senior students with a grade point average of 3.5 or higher. Students submit their applications to be reviewed by a faculty council. A few qualifications that are considered are positions in leadership, special merits received and involvement in school activities. According to the NHS Con(Continued from page A1)

smart phones and laptop computers. Like the iPhone and iPod Touch, the iPad is controlled by a multitouch display screen. Mr. Otani said younger students will have an easier time maneuvering through the touchscreen tablet than computer keyboards. “iPads are better for younger students because the software is more kid-friendly. It is a new exciting generation of technology. I think at this level it [the touchscreen] will definitely be easier for [kindergarten students] to work with,” Mr. Otani said. Apple in Education, a branch of Apple Inc., which specializes in educational applications, says their apps teach students in the classroom setting and are proven to teach students “from preschool to higher levels of education.” These apps claim to teach a variety of lessons appropriate to kindergarteners, such as the alphabet, numbers and colors. The Apple Web site says, “From math games to vocabu-

stitution, “Four main purposes have guided chapters of NHS from the beginning: To create enthusiasm for scholarship, to stimulate a desire to render service, to promote leadership, and to develop character in the students of secondary schools.” NHS advisor Mr. Robert Laxson said KSM’s chapter is especially student-driven. Students decide on the activities they participate in. Last year, guided by President Cayla Morimoto (’10), NHS focused on campus-wide involvement. This year, President Kelly Luis geared NHS toward community outreach projects. “I enjoyed working with everyone, especially the Habitat for Humanity project. This is also the first year we pushed for mandatory tutoring hours,” Luis said. NHS helped with Habitat for Humanity in building a home lary flash cards to anatomy visualizers, there’s an app for every subject and every level of instruction.” Mr. Minh Nguyen, the director of technology at Kamehameha Maui, said the iPad became popular among the

Photo by KALANI RUIDAS

“I enjoyed working with everyone..” —NHS President Kelly Luis

for the Alo Family. As a result of Luis’s efforts, each member of NHS was required to tutor their peers in academic probation for at least 10 hours this school year. Nguyen said. “What I like about the iPad is that it will give [kindergarten students] the opportunities that best fit them. I think that it will eventually become a key in classrooms. The challenge though is to make sure that

“I personally think it’s very exciting. It’s something that is very natural for this generation of kids..” —Mr. Edwin Otani, KS Maui kindergarten teacher younger generations because the apps and games are geared towards their age group. Some of the apps are designed in a game format with puzzles and cartoon characters. The games have levels that the students progress through, and teachers can use the results to manage their students’ learning. “The goal of incorporating iPads into the kindergarten classroom is not to take away from the teacher, but to help students who are struggling in a subject get up to speed,” Mr.

this piece of technology can be reliable and dependable. That’s a big risk with teaching, but it’s a risk that comes with any form of technology,” Mr. Otani said. Some question whether this new technology is worth the effort. Ms. Jessica Prois, a former high school English teacher and associate editor of HuffPost Impact and Education wrote a review on iPads and iTechnology being used in the classroom. “Education content is more appealing when packaged into

A survey of 28 members, showed some of the reasons for joining. Five of the most frequent answers were because they saw it as a great academic opportunity and they wanted to share their knowledge with peers, help their community through service, note membership on college applications and strengthen leadership skills. As a new member, Sophomore Sai Furukawa is looking forward to being in the club next year. “I joined NHS not only because it is good on college applications, but because it was an opportunity that I might not be able to attain later in my high school career. I thought it would further improve my skills of becoming a leader by helping others achieve their goals not only in academics, but in anything by encouraging them to do their best,” he said. a flashy app, so software companies are undoubtedly helping teachers to hook kids into learning. But when it comes to the newest technology like education apps, teachers aren't usually super eager to use it for many reasons, mostly because it takes extra time to research and set up with the potential for technical failures,” she wrote. The iPad craze has spread out around the country with many states adding iPads to the list of school supplies for kindergarten students. Maine, Nebraska, Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, South Carolina, and Arizona have also purchased the up-and-coming Apple device for their students. In Maine, iPads are going to meet their newest, and quite possibly youngest owners next fall. Auburn Elementary School has arranged for their kindergarten classroom to have iPads, taking a spot next to crayons and markers. Tom Morrill, superintendent of Auburn School District, spent approximately $200,000 on iPads in April, each iPad costing about $500.00.


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New fare at 2011 Hoÿolauleÿa By MAYA NITTA, staff writer

Sweet treats, new entertainment, car culture and a rummage sale were just some of the things that were introduced at the 7th annual Hoÿolauleÿa on April 16 at the Kamehameha Schools Maui High School Campus. Junior Sadee Albiar opened a booth called Sadee’s Sweet Shoppe for her Höÿike Nui Project. “My passion is baking, and that is why I decided to put on a bake sale. I thought that incorporating it into our school’s Hoÿolauleÿa would be a great idea,” Albiar said. She donated the proceeds to the Maui Food Bank. She earned $1,329 selling peanut butter and chocolate chip cookies, brownies, Rice Krispie treats and banana bread. She received pastries from Maui Bake Shop and Deli, biscuits and bread pudding from Komoda’s Bakery, cinnamon raisin bread from Jeanne the Bread Lady, cookies from Cook Kwee’s Maui Cookies and 100 cupcakes from Cupcake Love Maui. “I feel that my project was a huge success. I encountered

Photo by HŌKŪ KRUEGER

Sophomore Hulali Brown dances with her halau at the school’s annual Hoÿolauleÿa. Hawaiian music and hula have always been a part of the annual festivities, but this year brought many changes as well.

some speed bumps along the way, but I believe that that’s what made me learn new things. When things went wrong I had to find out a solution and a way to overcome the problem,” said Albiar. Junior Kamuela Borge introduced the first auto show at Hoÿolauleÿa as part of his Höÿike Nui project. Borge’s project was focused on exposing the community to the culture of cars. “I think that everyone that saw the cars took something away,” Borge said. “It was really cool to see the

cars in the condition they were in and the variety of models that they had” Sophomore Kaiÿea Hokoana said. The Blue and White Elephant Rummage Sale was a play on words combining the school colors with a white elephant sale. Kamehameha Schools Alumni Association

Read about the new ka piko at Hoÿolauleÿa on Ähaÿilono B1.

Maui Region ran and organized the rummage sale. The KKSA Maui Region is an association of Kamehameha Schools graduates “The donations we received ranged from clothing and house items to Coach purses and a 27-inch TV. There was definitely something there for everyone,” said Ms. Kris Galago (’89), Human Resources Client Services Administrator. The rummage sale was to raise more money for college scholarships and bring KS (Continued on page A4)

Schaefer Art Gallery features student works By KALANI RUIDAS, staff writer

Seven students’ art works were featured in the Schaefer Art Gallery at the Maui Arts and Cultural Center April 1023 for the annual Celebrating the Artist in Us exhibit. Art pieces were submitted based on the theme for the year, People and Nature. This exhibit includes high school level students only every other year, alternating with students in kindergarteneighth grade. Ten to fifteen pieces of art are submitted by Maui high schools. This art show is significant because it provides students with an opportunity to be

showcased in a professional gallery. The KSM artists featured were Wesley Kïÿaha, Marcus Ferreira, Chad Murayama, Bridgette Ige, Hiÿilei Andrade, Kali Sanico and Piÿikea Karlen. They contributed sculptures, ceramic pieces, computercreated media and photography based on the theme. “I didnÿt realize what a big deal it was. Later, when I found out about all the people that would see my work, I was honored to be a part of the show,” Karlen said. Junior Marcus Ferreira created a ceramic tea set. Its

theme was Japanese cherry blossoms and featured tree branch-like handles detailed with pink blossoms. Senior Hiÿilei Andrade’s collection Ka wä ma mua, ka wä ma hope featured senior hula dancers Kendra Kaÿaÿa and Külia Johnson. Senior Bridgette Ige’s photograph called Cleanse was of feet in a river, captured in black and white. Junior Piÿikea Karlen combined her fashion photography and editing skills to make a scene of the cosmos. Senior Wesley Kïÿaha’s Star Dancer was a digital media

product incorporating art and technology. Senior Chad Murayama’s sculpture, The Hanging Tree, was made of a glass bottle and hangers. “The Hanging Tree represented the growth throughout my life, things I like to do and things that were important to me,” Murayama said. Maui artists Jaisy Hanlon, Jonathan Y. Clark, and Travis Browne held sessions to share their techniques and tips in anatomical drawing. Works from the anatomy drawing workshops were continuously being added to the gallery.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

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Photo by HÖKÜ KRUEGER

Junior Tu’imana Mateaki mans the sound equipment with building tech coordinator Mr. Michael Welch at Hoÿolauleÿa. The job combined his love of his music, his internship experience and his Höÿike Nui.

Tuÿimana Mateaki runs Hoÿolauleÿa entertainment By HULALI BROWN, news writer

Junior Tuÿimana Mateaki spearheaded the entertainment committee at the Kamehameha Schools Maui Hoÿolauleÿa, April 16. Ms. Dancine Takahashi, director of the event, offered Mateaki the job for his senior project. His (Continued from page A3)

Alumni together. Ms. Galago said she would have liked to raise more but they got enough money to help another Native Hawaiian student further his or her education. This year’s elementary sewing club put on a fashion show for the entertainment tent audience. The beginning class showed off bags and clothes for stuffed animals. The advanced students modeled the clothes and hats that they designed. Some made “Stay green” hats; others made baseball caps and two of the members toughed it out making complex “cat in the hat” hats. The student group Kauakanilehua, were part of the entertainment lineup. The group was formed by junior Waytt Bartlett as a part of his Höÿike Nui project. He wanted to show that musicians can and should be charitable. “I have a passion for music,

task included putting together a lineup of entertainment, setting up sound equipment, promoting the entertainment and making sure that the acts went smoothly. “We were certainly pleased with the job Tuÿimana did as our entertainment chair for

especially live performances, and I wanted my Höÿike Nui to be something I could have fun doing. Performing at Hoÿolauleÿa allowed me to have fun and do something for the school,” Bartlett said. The Kauakanilehua members were junior Alex Guerrero on vocals and ÿukulele, junior Ciara Kahahane also a junior on vocals, sophomore Aaron Dela Cruz on guitar and Bartlett on electric bass. There were also changes in the responsibilities of each class. Sophomores and juniors were asked to lead Hoÿolauleÿa this year with each family asked to contribute 24 hours of service. High school students and their families were asked to do more for the Hoÿolauleÿa, since most of the proceeds go the high school. “Everyone reacts to change in different ways so, managing the change is helpful for a smooth transition,” said Lokelani Patrick, parent community coordinator.

May 13, 2011 Hoÿolauleÿa 2011 … He accomplished his kuleana with aloha and haÿahaÿa,” Ms. Takahashi said. Mateaki said he encountered a few minor obstacles, such as the placement of the entertainment, preparing an itinerary for the emcee and planning a leeway time between two performances. “If I could go back, I would change the location of the tent so that everyone could enjoy the performances,” he said. He said he was grateful for the support of his mother, KSM sixth grade English teacher Ms. Sharolyn Pali, and grandfather, Mr. Sheldon Brown. “I thought it [the entertainment] was good … I liked Pacific Vibe … Even though it was raining everyone was still dancing and singing with them,” said senior Dane Dudoit. Many enjoyed the performances and Mateaki received positive feedback from those who attended the event. As part of his qualifications for the job, Mateaki interned with world-renowned singing group ÿEkolu as they produced

Photos by MAYA NITTA

Top: Junior Sadee Albiar trains the workers at her baked goods booth. Above: A 1966 Chevy II Super Sport at the first auto show at Hoÿolauleÿa. Right: Ms. Puni Krueger (’06) helps at the alumni Blue and White Elephant sale, another first in 2011.

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their new CD, Simply for Love. He is proud to say that he was there during its making. Mateaki is a second cousin to ÿEkolu’s lead singer, Lukela Keala. “It was a bonding experience for us, and I enjoyed the atmosphere in the studio,” Mateaki said. “I observed the editing of each track and watched the album develop.” During his internship, Mateaki said he learned how music is produced. He also gave away that ‘Ekolu is in the process of recording another album, only they are straying from their usual reggae to Hawaiian. Mateaki is a music endorsee in the Arts and Communications Academy. He aims to pursue a career in the music industry as a producer. His inspiration comes from his grandfather. He said music has always been a part of his family, and he has been raised around it. “On behalf of the Ho'olaule'a 2011 team, we express our mahalo to Tu'i for the wonderful entertainment,” Ms. Takahashi said, “and look forward to next year's entertainment.”


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

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May 13, 2011

Akaka receives Scholastic Silver By MAYA NITTA, staff writer

Senior Tyler Akaka received a national silver medal from the Scholastic Arts and Writing Awards Alliance for Young Artists and Writers. He was honored for submitting a photography portfolio of his father, who passed away of diabetesrelated complications on January 15 of this year. Akaka said his father encouraged him to become a photographer. His father, Hauÿoli “ÿOli” Akaka, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when he was 20. Within the last 8 months of his death, he was diagnosed with lung cancer, and his leg required amputation Tyler took this time to start his portfolio. The first picture showed his father’s concern for the future. “It was a time for me to grieve and get out all the emotions,” said Akaka. The second photo in the portfolio was of the many medications his father had to take as a part of his daily routine. Although his father was not clinically diagnosed with depression, Akaka took the third picture to show his depression and sadness. Akaka said his father spent most days in front of the television and that the only time he would see his father outside was when he was going to the doctor. Akaka’s father was captain of the softball team Da Braddahs. The fourth picture is of a wheelchair on a field. Since Akaka’s father was in a wheelchair, he could no longer play. Among the other photos there was a picture of a bear, named Rufus, showing the connection between Akaka and his father; a picture of ÿOli Akaka in front of a painting of himself portraying Maui the demigod; and a picture of him in dialysis. Tyler said the last portfolio picture, the only one in color, represents the hope and strength that his father had. His father was looking straight into the camera, the very thing that Tyler used to show his

Photo courtesy of TYLER AKAKA

Hau’oli “Oli” Akaka rests while receiving dialysis. His battle with diabetes was captured photographically by his son, senior Tyler Akaka. Tyler’s portfolio received a silver medal at the national level in the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards.

Photo by Ka Leo o Nä Koa Staff

TYLER AKAKA

weaknesses. It symbolized an unknown future. Akaka said that he was inspired the most when New

York Mayor Michael Bloomberg lit the top of the Empire State Building to honor the award winners. “It was like they were reaching out to my father, and I knew that my father would be super proud of me,” said Akaka The Silver Medal Award is given to the competitors who have already won on a regional level. After he passed the regional level, Akaka’s work was judged on at the national level. Contestants were judged on their unique quality and style, innovation, technical skill, interpretation and use of everything in the photo to explain the meaning behind the pic-

A5 ture. The photos also had to be personal and have meaning for the student who takes them. Akaka’s work will be displayed in New York City in June, and he will also be attending the national celebration at Carnegie Hall on May 31. “Being in New York City itself feels like a dream come true. I always wanted to go there,” Akaka said. “The farthest I have ever travelled to is Las Vegas, so it will definitely be a culture shock, and to be honored at Carnegie Hall seems like a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.” The Scholastic Arts and Writing Awards Alliance for Young Artists and Writers received over 185,000 submissions out of which only 1,300 received national awards. “I am so very proud of Tyler and his accomplishments and growth in the last four years I have known him. I’ve seen great maturity in his portfolio,” said Ms. Angie Abe, his digital photography teacher who will be accompanying Akaka to New York this summer.

Diabetes in Hawaiÿi By MAYA NITTA, staff writer

According to the 2004 Hawaiÿi Diabetes Report by the Hawaiÿi Department of Heath: • In Hawaiÿi, an estimated 72,000-100,000 people have diabetes. • There are an estimated 25,000 Hawaiÿi residents with undiagnosed diabetes. • In Maui County, 5.2% adults have been diagnosed with diabetes. • Native Hawaiians, Japanese and Filipinos have a higher risk of getting diabetes than whites. • Native Hawaiians have the highest mortality rate compared to other major ethnic groups. • 7.9% of the adults in Hawaiÿi who have been diagnosed with diabetes are Hawaiian.


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Band Champs cancelled Annual music competition no longer a shining opportunity for local artists. By HÖKÜ KRUEGER, staff writer

Screenshot of Ka Leo o Nā Koa online

Ka Leo O Nä Koa enters digital age By AMANDA LEE, staff writer

The school newspaper Ka Leo O Nä Koa is now online. At kaleoonakoa.org the news is current. Student journalists

Just in case you missed it… If you missed the debut of our Web site, don’t worry. You can still see all of our past material at kaleoonakoa.org. Here are some stories you may have missed: News: • Senior Ball • Poi Bowl • Tsunami • Journalism Awards Features: • Movie Reviews • Theater Reviews Sports: • Up to date Twitter feed • Track and Field • Judo • Surf Competition • Volleyball

post sports results soon after events and give updates about what is to come. Students can also read about local topics like the March 11 tsunami, school events like the Poi Bowl, and student news like the Meadow Gold milk carton regatta. Student journalists post videos and photos with stories too. The Web site has been a goal for Ka Leo O Nä Koa adviser Ms. Kye Haina for a long time. “I wanted to put our newspaper online because I wanted to share the work of our students with a larger audience and in a different way than we were already doing,” she said. Having the newspaper online has many benefits. “Aside from the broader audience, we’re also able to report school news in a timely fashion, usually within 24 hours of its occurrence,” said Ms. Haina. Students say they enjoy having the newspaper online. “I like the fact that there's everything on there. Plus, it's using technology, which appeals more to us teenagers,” said junior Sadee Albiar. The journalists of Kamehameha Maui have also wel-

comed the modern move because the online paper allows them to post about more topics and cover more events for their fellow students. “I feel that it is a positive move for the future of Ka Leo O Nä Koa because it enables the school newspaper to have a much larger reading audience,” said senior Jeff Clarke, sports reporter. But, having the paper online is a drastic change from the traditional newspaper. Senior Kelsey Carbonell said, “I prefer the print paper. When I read our school paper, I like to have the feel of the actual paper in my hands, and I feel that the online version takes away from that.” Although the newspaper has articles posted on the Web, it will continue to distribute a print newspaper every quarter. With most of the news going to the online version, the print version will have more featurestyle articles. Ka Leo O Nä Koa writers uses data from Google Analytics to track page views to make sure that what they write is targeted to their audience. To experience the online version of Ka Leo O Nä Koa visit kaleoonakoa.org.

Hawaiian teenagers had an opportunity to experience localized fame, but only for what seems like fifteen minutes. The popular band competition Band Champs has been cancelled this year. Band Champs is an annual competition in which bands representing the islands of Hawaiÿi , Kauaÿi, Oÿahu and Maui compete to win a generous monetary prize, along with other prizes and deals that help to promote the band. Two years ago, Kamehameha Maui’s own ‘09 graduate Kalaÿe Camarillo and ‘10 graduate Dane Lum Ho took the title. “I was disappointed because I was looking forward to competing in it again. I did it last year and it was pretty fun,” junior guitarist Wyatt Bartlett said. Bartlett and his bandmates advanced as far as runner up to represent Maui in last year’s competition. He planned to compete with a new group this year before discovering that it had been cancelled. “It’s not only an opportunity for bands on Maui to compete and have fun, but it’s a way for them to get publicity if they make it to Oÿahu or even if people see them play live,” Bartlett said.

What was it like to win first place at the journalism awards? Read all about it with news editor Kaÿio Tubera. Page C1


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Students venture to Ke Kahua, build hale pili By HÖKÜ KRUEGER, staff writer

WAIÿEHU – An off-campus opportunity to serve the community and learn about ancient Hawaiian techniques in construction brought out the physical side of 14 KS sophomore and senior boys who went on a field trip to Ke Kahua on Friday, April 15, under the supervision of Hawaiian Kumu Ulu Kepani. “At the end of the day, the students were tired, sore, excited and amazed; filled with a new appreciation for hale pili,” Kumu Ulu said. Ke Kahua is a resource base for the Hawaiian community in Waiÿehu founded by Maui Economic Opportunity, Inc. They work on preserving the culture through workshops that teach people the ways that ancient Hawaiians functioned in order to create a more sustainable community, according to Project Manager Momi Medeiros. “We try to cover all the aspects of the Hawaiian culture and what has been lost,” she said The students learned about the different woods and plants that were used by ancient Hawaiians to build hale. They also learned about the pro’s and con’s of the different materials and the importance of protecting and caring for hale. Ke Kahua master hale builder Kumu Francis Sinenci taught them how to coil cordage without making any knots. It was important for the students to master that before

moving on to build the ÿolokeÿa, ladder, and the hale pili or house thatched with pili grass, Kumu Ulu said. “The sophomore men were chosen because of their lawena and willingness to learn,” Kumu Ulu said. She invited boys from her sophomore Külia I ka Nuÿu course, along with senior members of the Hui Kükulu Hale, an oncampus club dedicated to the preservation of the art of building hale. “The hale is a very spiritual thing. Our Hawaiian ancestors thought of the Hale Mua as a mother’s womb. There are many other kinds of hale that are important for us to preserve,” senior Jared Kaneshiro said. Kaneshiro was more personally involved in this experience after having tried to build a hale on campus for his senior project. “I really have a passion for this tradition - building hale,” Kaneshiro said. Kaneshiro started out on his project paired up with seniors Chad Murayama and Kainoa Kealoha in hopes of building a hale on campus. When they were unable to follow through with it due to time constraints, the three went their separate ways. “We ended up splitting up to work on different things to set up the foundation so that we can see a hale on campus one day,” Kaneshiro said. “Some people dance hula, some people sing and play

Photo by HULALI BROWN

An ÿolokeÿa, or ladder, at Ke Kahua, a community resource. Students from Kamehameha Schools Maui visited the area recently to learn about the building materials and techniques.

Hawaiian music or chant; this is my own idea of how we can preserve the culture,” Kaneshiro said. “These students represented Kamehameha well through oli, laulima, and aloha,” Kumu Ulu said. Ke Kahua invited the students to return to their operation to complete community service hours, and said that they were willing to help the students with different Hawaiian activities on campus. “The people there made it really inviting,” senior Hanoa PuaÿaFreitas said. Ke Kahua is an open re-

source to anyone in the Hawaiian community who may need different Hawaiian cultural plants. They have free workshops conducted by Hawaiian practitioners available to anyone in the community who wants to learn about Hawaiian activities. People from the community can go to Ke Kahua and harvest the plants they have available, which includes medicinal plants, plants that are eaten, and plants that are used by hula halau. To contact Ke Kahua, call Program Manager Momi Medeiros at 2434317.

Disaster in Japan Here is a snapshot of the aftermath of tthe massive earthquake and ruthless tsunami that hit Japan, March 10, 2011.

$3,000,000,000 2,400 Camps set up for the homeless

26,000 People missing or dead

3,000,000 Gallons of radiation in the Pacific

Cash equivalency to damage done Graphic by DYLAN GODSEY


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Vasconcellos inspires students, shares lessons By NICOLE KA’AUAMO,staff writer

Senior Keanu Franco will be joining the U.S. Air Force August 27 of this year, following in the footsteps of many Kamehameha graduates. KS Kapälama al umn i Vaughn Vasconcellos (’71) spoke about his time in the military and his latest endeavors and accomplishments during Easter Chapel on April 20 As the founder of Akimeka, a Native Hawaiian technology company that serves local and federal governments worldwide, he is no stranger to hard work and dedication. In fact, the Small Business Administration for Hawaiÿi selected Mr. Vasconcellos as Entrepeneur of the Year in 2000. Mr. Vasconcellos empha-

sized that his time at the United States Military Academy at West Point made him a better person. “It’s tough, but it shows you how far you can take yourself,” he said. West Point was physically and academically challenging, he said, but he chose to commit anyway. “Choosing what you want to do for the rest of your life isn’t easy, but you’ll know when you’re ready to make the decision,” he said. Mr. Vasconcellos credits much of his success to his time spent at West Point. He says that without the education and drive that was instilled in him by the military lifestyle, he would not be in the place

Photo by NICOLE KA’AUAMO

KSK alumnus Vaughn Vasconcellos speaks to the entire KS Maui student body at the annual Easter Chapel service. He spoke about his pride in his education, including his time at Kamehameha Schools and at West Point Military Academy.

he is today. Not only did it lead to multiple lucrative businesses, but also memories to

cherish. He said, “The friends that you make there are lifelong.”

We Digress... book

makes first appearance

By KELSIE CHONG, staff writer

Kamehameha Schools Maui students debuted their art and literary works in an 80-page literary publication entitled We Digress…on May 9. Teachers submitted pieces to showcase the work of talented student writers and artists. The variety of works ranged from photography to drawings, poems and short stories, from Creative Writing, art, and English 12 students. “I wanted a way that was enduring and went beyond an art showing or class reading that would be a permanent record to the world of the talents of our students,” said Ms. Kye Haina, Creative Writing and English 12 teacher. Ms. Haina planned to produce a publication for the students a year ago, but she said the Creative Writing class was just in its first year, so she needed a little more time to “flesh out the idea.” The title of the publication was conceived during last

The cover of We Digress...

year’s Creative Writing class. The class had the opportunity to share ideas and possible titles for the publication. The majority ruled, and We Digress… was chosen. “It is exciting to see all of our works published and to see all of our hard work come out in print,” said junior Amanda Lee, Creative Writing 1 student. Art teachers Ms. Angie Abe

and Ms. Levi Mason chose contributions from their 20102011 classes. They selected student works that “exemplify the standards of the assignment,” Ms. Abe said. She said the subject must display deep thought and effort in order to have been selected for publication. “We look at the technical and conceptual proficiency as well,” she said. Third year Digital Photography student Pi’ikea Karlen was one of the 88 students whose works were submitted for the book. “I think the book was a great idea, and I’m really happy I got to be a part of it,” Karlen said. The all-color, tape-bound publication made its appearance in the choir room at We Digress…Live, a pot-luck style reading where family and friends of the writers picked up their own copies. The artists received their books, the day after, May 10.

Photo by DYLAN GODSEY

Kamehameha Maui class ring

2012 get their rings by DYLAN GODSEY, news writer

Academies Principal Jay-R Ka'awa and Kahu Kalani Wong distributed class rings to the junior class of 2012 at Keöpüpolani Hale, April 18. Junior Christopher Kim said, “I’m very excited to get my ring, I really like this kind of thing.” As Kahu Kalani Wong blessed the rings and told the junior class, “Many years from now this ring will bring back precious memories from your high school years.” After the blessing and distribution, students exhibited their new rings among themselves. Kahu Wong ended the ceremony and said, “See this as a precious time for all of you.”


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‘Aha Mele wins with new scoring system By KA`IO TUBERA, news editor

The class of 2014 received Ka Maka o Ka Ihe at this year’s ‘Aha Mele, but 2011 also brought new changes to the scoring system for the annual song fest. According to Headmaster Lee Ann DeLima, the new scoring system still acknowledges the passion that the students have for their class, just in a different way. Previously, Mrs. DeLima was responsible for the final decision of which class would earn the spear, judging the winning class based on their demonstration of class spirit at rehearsals and at ÿAha Mele. “ ‘Aha Mele is a spirit competition, not so much a music competition,” said Mrs. DeLima. Judging committee organizer Ms. Kye Haina confirmed that the criteria is the same as last year. This year, a panel of five judges made the difficult decision. They were Ms. Kris Galago, Ms. Moani Kekahuna, Ms. Monica Mata, Mr. Kilohana Miller, and Ms. Sheleen Quisquirin, whose identities were kept secret until the end of ‘Aha Mele. “They sound like they enjoy singing,” wrote one of the judges on the official score sheet. Each performance was graded on a 4-point scale in each of six categories: tonal quality, blend, and balance; performance; unity; grooming; participation; and rehearsal. Students welcomed the change. “I think that the new scoring system is more reasonable. Students take the final performance much more seriously than they do rehearsals, so they’re more likely to do their best on ‘Aha Mele night,” said senior Danielle Aruda. Arudaÿs comments reflect a common misconception that the award was given based only on the night of ÿAha Mele. But thatÿs not true according to Ms. Haina. The teachers who supervised the three months of rehearsals leading up to ÿAha Mele scored each rehearsal based on students

Photos by Ka Leo o Nä Koa Staff

Seniors Kaui Krueger and Pua Prones hula to Ka Pilina while the whole high school sings accompaniment. The freshman class of 2014 reacts upon hearing that they have been chosen by a new panel of judges to receive Ka Maka o Ka Ihe at the high school’s ÿAha Mele 2011. This was the first time that the spear was awarded under the new procedure that included a 5-judge panel as opposed to the old single-judge system.

taking instruction well, displaying maturity and respect, and singing when directed. The class with the highest average rehearsal score went into ‘Aha Mele with a rehearsal score of four; the next highest class received a three, and so on until the lowest scoring class, who received one point. ‘Aha Mele is an annual performance by the high school student body that incorporates music, art, and hula. Each class performed a song chosen by Kumu Kalei

Aarona-Lorenzo and Mr. Dale Nitta. The freshmen class’s winning performance song was Keawaiki, led by Madison Vaught. The class of 2013 sang Lanakila Kawaihau, led by ÿIwalani Kaaa. Last year’s winners, the class of 2012, sang E Kuÿu Lei lead by Keala Kama. The senior class wrapped up the individual performances with their rendition of Ua Noho Au a Kupa. At the end of the individual performances, the student body performed two

new songs, Ka Pilina and Kaulana Nä Pua. The Nä Mele choir and Hawaiian Ensemble accompanied various hula performances arranged and choreographed by Kumu Henohea Käne for the hö’ike. ASKSM President Kaui Krueger shared a special moment with guest Uncle Richard Hoÿopiÿi as he sang E Kuÿu Sweet Lei Poina ÿOle in falsetto with senior Külia Johnson.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Ke’ikeokalani Acain Linfield College Jared Alvarez Portland Community College Hi’ilei Andrade Oregon State University Nohea Duro University of Portland Diondra Gomes Linfield College Keone Hurdle University of Portland

Robert Akuna Gavilan College Jeffrey Clarke University of LaVerne Reina Freitas Pepperdine University Kamie-Lei Fujiwara Stanford University Alana Song Loyola Marymount University Kalei Tamashiro Pepperdine University

Alexandria Agdeppa University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa Levi Almeida University of Hawaiÿi, Hilo Arielle Andrade University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Kanoelani Angel-Mawae University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Sidney Ayakawa University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa Daniel Basques University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Mailani Baz University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Jessi Lynne Bista University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa Chastyne Cabanas University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa

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Matthew Ishihara Pacific University Kayla Kahalewai Western Oregon University Leah Santos Western Oregon University Vincent Soberano Western Oregon University Kaea Warrington Western Oregon University

May 13, 2011 Ashely Akima Washington State University Chad Ikeda University of Washington Aisha Jones Seattle University Kai Ka’aukai Washington State University

A10 Beth Onaga University of Puget Sound Kierston Perry Pierce College Kaimalu Stanich Washington State University

Kimberly Chin University of Nevada, Reno Nico Lopes University of Nevada, Las Vegas Kanoa Yap University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Haley Calasa University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa Kelsey Carbonell University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa Aaron DeCoite University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Hinano DeLima University of Hawaiÿi, Hilo Dane Dudoit University of Hawaiÿi, Hilo Kalamanu Endo University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa Kainalu Fonseca University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa Lika Fujihara University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa Chalice Gilliland Chaminade University Brieane Gomes University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College

Kendra Kaaa Brigham Young University Haliaka Kama Brigham Young University

Kaleiopio Guth University of Hawaiÿi, Hilo Brenna Hamman University of Hawaiÿi, Hilo Jayden Hedge University of Hawaiÿi, Hilo Keanu Hill University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa Corbin Iaea Kapiÿolani Community College Bridgette Ige University of Hawaiÿi, Hilo Kūlia Johnson

University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa Kealiÿi Kaÿaikala University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa Tabetha Kaÿaloa University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Ariel Kahahane University of Hawaiÿi, Hilo


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Elise Bal Bryson Souza University of Colorado, Denver University of Colorado, Pueblo Nainoa Bright Vinson Sylva, Mesa State University Mesa State University Kawena Chang Yuen Tanya Tavares Colorado School of Mines Colorado State University, Fort Collins Keola Felipe Mesa State University

May 13, 2011

Where are they going? As the seniors graduate, here is a listing of where everyone is heading next year. Many students have decided to stay in Hawai’i. Some have decided to stay in order to study Hawaiian Language and/or culture. Others have chosen to stay home for financial reasons. Results gathered up to May 6. Kelly Luis Colombia University Ty Nakama Marist University Ka’io Tubera University of Rochester

Danielle Aruda Creighton University

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Kaulana Ane University of New Haven Nahulu Nunokawa Weslyan University

Keanu Franco Air Force

Undecided: Kamahaÿo Barrows Olivia Borge Pono Ho’opi’I Keenan Kaluau Kawika Kong Raychelle-Amber May Cody Pundyke Austin Rodrigues Klayton Silva

Tyler Akaka School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Cole Hendrickson Tarleton State University

Matthew Kahoÿohanohano University of Hawaiÿi, Hilo Jared Kaneshiro Chaminade University Kaleialoha KaniaupioCrozier University of Hawaiÿi Mänoa Keani Kapeliela-Bannister University of Hawaiÿi, Hilo Noelle Kaÿulupali University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa

Kainoa Kealoha University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa Bronson Kehano University of Hawaiÿi, Manoa Wesley Kïÿaha University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Deren Koyanagi University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Kaui Krueger Brigham Young University, Lä’ie

Joshua Kua’ana University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Ginger Long University of Hawaiÿi Mänoa Kawehi Mahuiki Hawai’I Pacific University ‘Iolani Maile University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Ku’ulei Makua Hawai’i Pacific University Maverick Matsuoka University of Hawai i Mänoa Kamalei Medeiros University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Kiana Medeiros University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Shayna Molina Kapi’olani Community College McKenzie Moniz Chaminade University Chad Murayama University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Jaren Paresa-Neizman University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College

Kaydee Park University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Pua Prones University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Wailena Pu University of Hawaiÿi, Hilo Hanoa Pua’a-Freitas University of Hawaiÿi, Hilo Kali Sanico University of Hawaiÿi Mänoa Kaitlyn Taketa Chaminade University Jarred Tavares University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College Pua Tialino-Basques University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa Sean Uyechi University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa Amberlee Watson Brigham Young University, La’ie Jesse Yamada University of Hawaiÿi, Mänoa


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MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT By KAUI KRUEGER Associated Students of Kamehameha Schools Maui president

Photo by ALEXANDRIA AGDEPPA

Aloha students, As the school year dwindles down to a close, let's remember how blessed we are to be a part of the Princess's legacy. I ask that each of you finish the year

Class of 2014

even stronger than you began, especially in your studies. Please make sure that you are exemplifying true Warrior spirit. We don't want to lose any more students, not when we're so close to the end. With few student activities left, take this opportunity to buckle down and improve yourselves in every aspect of your life. Mahalo for being such wonderful students. It has been an honor and truly a blessing being your student body president this past year. I look forward to seeing all the amazing people you become. I MUA WARRIORS.

No news was submitted.

May 13, 2011

Class of 2011 by Elizabeth Higashino, president

This is the last time I will be writing. Senior Bash will be held right after the last day of school, Wednesday, May 25, 2:45-6:30 P.M., on the field below the dining hall. The forms are due to Ms. Frampton on Wednesday, May

Class of 2012 by Marcus Ferreira, president

The year is almost up, and the junior class is trying to complete all the work needed of a junior and are looking forward to their next year as seniors with eyes wide open. School is almost up, so juniors, make it work.

Class of 2013 by James Krueger, president

The Class of 2013 has survived another year of high school! And between getting 2nd place at Homecoming and the fun-filled Sophomore Sleepover, it has been a great one. Do not stop here, though, Class of 2013. There are two years left

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18th. Bring any water toys that you have. This is one of our last events together so please come. Finally! We are almost done! Graduation will be held on the 29th, so please take care of all obligations to ensure that you will be walking. Congratulations, 2011!

Keep in mind that next year will be the last the juniors share as an ‘ohana, so let’s come together and make the best of the time we have left--all the great events, adventures, and learning experiences that come with the senior year. Have a great summer, be safe, and best wishes. in your high school career. There are things like Junior Prom and Senior Ball to look forward to. Also, there are SATs to take and Senior Projects that need to get done as well, so don’t slack off either. Sophomores, your time in high school is half over, so make the most of your last two years. Work hard, have fun, and always strive for the Lei of Victory!

Student body elects 2011-2012 class presidents By KALANI RUIDAS, staff writer

The new student officers for the 2011-2012 school year have been elected and are ready for the year to come. Each of the class presidents and the ASKSM president have changes in mind to improve student life. Next year’s sophomore class president, Aaron Soriano, said he was speechless when he received the news of his presidency. But when he recovered, he said his reason for running was “to make things more fun. Like, add more social events. My plan is to listen to people’s suggestions and try to make it happen.” “Aaron is dependable, I expect he’ll get the job done,” freshman Rachel Smith said.

Soriano still has to convince others like freshman Kaimana Bush who said, “He didn’t tell me what he’s going to do for our class [in his election speech].” 2011-2012 junior class president Hulali Brown said she understands the makings of a good president. She describes some characteristics like “being a leader” and “putting your class as first priority to bring the best out of them.” Her plans include winning homecoming and ÿAha Mele, having an awesome junior prom and creating a subcommittee to support the class officers. She feels the group would bring about more student involvement and ensure more students’ suggestions

are being acknowledged. Sophomore Pono Freitas voted for Brown and looks forward to seeing what she has planned for the year ahead. “I thought she had good ideas and that she would speak up more. That seemed to be lacking this year,” he said. Senior class president for 2011-2012, Tuÿimana Mateaki, has experience to support him during his term. He was class president in his freshman and sophomore years. “To make this year special, I want to do things that have never been done before. I want everyone’s input into plans so everyone is satisfied,” Mateaki said.

“He’s really good at public speaking. He knows how to get our attention in meetings,” Junior Shiloh Haia said. Junior Christopher Kim is next year’s ASK president. Kim realizes the job requires a lot of sacrifice. He looks to this year’s president, Kaui Krueger, as an ideal exemplar. “Kaui’s been a great example of what great leadership is like,” Kim said. Some of the things he hopes to accomplish are to continue school traditions, “pump up” student interaction and incorporate more week-long activities in the school year. The incoming freshman class of 2015 will be electing their president at a later time.


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May 13, 2011

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Paÿi ÿia këia kiÿi e MAYA NITTA

Hana nui kekahi mau haumäna o ka papa ÿölelo Hawaiÿi makahiki ÿehä i ka Piko Hawaiÿi ma ka Hoÿolauleÿa 2011.

Nui nä haumäna ÿölelo Hawaiÿi Na MALEKO LOREZO, ka mea käkau

Ke ulu a nui nei nä haumäna Kamehameha i hiki ke ÿölelo Hawaiÿi! Mai ka makahiki 2009, ua koi ÿia nä haumäna a pau o ka papa ÿeiwa e komo i loko o ka papa ÿölelo Hawaiÿi a me ka papa moÿomeheu Hawaiÿi no ka makahiki holoÿokoÿa. Ma muli o këia koi ÿana, ÿoi aku ka nui o nä haumäna e komo ana i nä papa ÿölelo Hawaiÿi, makahiki ÿekolu me ÿehä. ÿO këia ka makahiki mua i loaÿa ÿelua mähele o ka papa makahiki ÿekolu. I këlä makahiki aku nei, ua loaÿa ma kahi o

iwakäluakümälua mau haumäna makahiki ÿekolu. A i këia makahiki, loaÿa nö he kanakolukümähiku mau haumäna. Eia kekahi, ua hoÿokumu ÿia ka polokalamu hou ÿo Külia i ka Nuÿu i mälama ÿia e Kumu Ululani Kepani näna e aÿo i ka papa ÿumi me ÿumikümälua. Komo ÿo Kumu Ulu i loko o ka papa seminä e aÿo i ka ÿölelo Hawaiÿi i këlä me këia mau pule ÿelua. Mea mai ÿo Külia Johnson, kekahi haumäna ma ka papa ÿölelo Hawaiÿi makahiki ÿehä, “Pono ko käkou kula e lilo i

kula Hawaiÿi. No laila, he mea koÿikoÿi ka ÿölelo Hawaiÿi ÿana ma nä ÿano a pau o ko käkou aÿo ÿana.” Wahi a Poÿokumu Jay-R Kaÿawa, “I koÿu manaÿo, inä hiki iä ÿoe ke ÿölelo Hawaiÿi, e hana ana ÿoe ma ke ÿano Hawaiÿi. A inä pëlä, mana olana au e lilo ana ko käkou kula i kula Hawaiÿi. I këia makahiki kula aÿe, e komo ana iwakäluakümäono haumäna i loko o ka makahiki ÿehä. Ua hana nui ko käkou mau kumu no ke kükulu ÿana i ka polokalamu ÿölelo Hawaiÿi ma këia kula.”

Paÿi ÿia këia kiÿi e Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Eia ka papa ‘ölelo Hawaiÿi makahiki ÿehä ma ÿAha Mele.


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Ka Piko Hawaiÿi… Hoÿolauleÿa 2011 Na MALEKO LOREZO, ka mea käkau

He mau hana hou kä ka Hoÿolauleÿa 2011. Ua hoÿokumu ÿia kekahi papahana hou ma ka Hoÿolauleÿa i kapa ÿia ka Piko Hawaiÿi. Ma ia wahi i mälama ÿia ai nä hui Hawaiÿi like ÿole, e like me nä hui ÿo OHA, Be the Match, Hawai’i Meth Project, Kamehameha Schools Maui Hawaiian Ensemble, Royal Hawaiian Guard, a me Ke Kula Nui o Hawaiÿi ma Maui. Na këia mau hui i hoÿolaha aku i kä läkou hana maÿa mau. Eia kekahi, na nä haumäna o ka papa ÿölelo Hawaiÿi, makahiki ÿehä, i höÿikeÿike aku i nä hana Hawaiÿi like ÿole, e like me ke kuÿi kalo, ke kükü kapa, ka hana lei, ka hoÿokani

ÿukulele, a me nä päÿani Hawaiÿi. No ke käkoÿo ÿana o ka PTSO i ia papa, i ko läkou huakaÿi hele i Molokaÿi no ke komo ÿana i nä päÿani makahiki, ua koi ÿia nä haumäna e hana ma ka Hoÿolauleÿa. He hana nui ka ÿohi ÿana i nä kalo no ke kuÿi kalo, a ma muli o ka ÿoluÿolu o kekahi mau ÿohana, ÿo ia hoÿi ka ÿohana Johnson, ka ÿohana Guth, a me ka ÿohana KanïÿaupiÿoCrozier, ua loaÿa nö ke kalo i hoÿomoÿa ÿia. Pëlä pü ke ÿano o ke kükü kapa. Ua mahalo ÿia ke kōkua o Kumu Ulu Kepani, ka mea näna i kiÿi a hoÿomäkaukau i ka wauke no ke kükü kapa. Wahi a Kumu Ulu, “Luana a nanea ma ka

Paÿi ÿia këia kiÿi e MAYA NITTA

Eia nö ÿo Dane Kekaimalu Dudoit e kuÿi ana i ke kalo ma ka Hoÿolauleÿa.

Paÿi ÿia këia kiÿi e MAYA NITTA

Eia kekahi kämala ma Ka Piko Hawaiÿi ma ka Hoÿolauleÿa.

No nä loina Hawaiÿi ma Kamehameha Na MALEKO LOREZO, ka mea käkau

I Iulai e hoÿomaka ai kekahi wä hou no ko käkou kula. Ua hai ÿia ÿo Kumu ÿEkela Kanïÿaupiÿo-Crozier, ke kahu näna e mälama aku i nä loina Hawaiÿi ma Kamehameha Maui. Ma mua, ua mälama ÿia këia kuleana koÿikoÿi e Kumu Luana Kawaÿa. Akä naÿe, ma muli o kona aloha nui i nä kamaliÿi o ke kula kaiapuni, haÿalele maila ÿo ia no ke aÿo ÿana ma ke kula kaiapuni ÿo Kalama.

No Oÿahu mai ÿo Kumu ÿEkela. Ua puka ÿo ia mai ke kula kiÿekiÿe ÿo ÿAiea i ka makahiki 1976. I këlä makahiki aku nei, ua puka kāna keikikäne ÿo Kuanoni mai ko käkou kula a ÿaneÿane ka wä e puka aku ai käna muli loa, ÿo ia hoÿi ÿo Kaleialoha Kanïÿaupiÿo-Crozier. He kumu ÿölelo Hawaiÿi ÿo ia no kanakolukümähä mau makahiki a i këia manawa, ke aÿo nei ÿo ia i nä papa ÿölelo Hawaiÿi ma ke kula nui o Hawaiÿi ma Maui. He hope kahu nö hoÿi ÿo ia ma ka ÿEkalesia ÿo Kupaianaha a ma laila nö e mälama ÿia nei nā haÿiÿölelo a me nä haÿawina like ÿole ma ka ÿölelo Hawaiÿi.

Piko Hawaiÿi. Ua paÿahana nä haumäna mai ke kula haÿahaÿa a i ke kula kiÿekiÿe i nä pähana. Nïele mai kekahi keiki e aÿo mai i ka hoÿokani ÿana. Kipa mau nä poÿe e ÿai i ka paÿi ÿai, hoihoi nö i ke kükü ÿana i ke kapa, noho löÿihi nä kaikamähine e hoÿäkea i ko läkou ÿäpana kapa, a aia nö kekahi e päÿani ana i ke

könane.” Mea mai ÿo Külia Johnson, “ÿO kekahi pilikia o ia hanana, ÿaÿole i pili i ka nui känaka, a no laila ÿaÿole nui nä poÿe i hele a kipa i këlä me këia hana. I këia mua aku, ÿoi aÿe paha ka maikaÿi inä hoÿoneÿe läkou i ka piko i waena pono o ke kahua Quad.”

Pïhoihoi a hauÿoli käkou, nä kumu a me nä haumäna, i ka loaÿa ÿana o ia wahine ma ko käkou kula, no ka mea e nui hou ana nä mea Hawaiÿi ma ÿaneÿi. ÿÖlelo mai ÿo Kumu ÿEkela, "Pïhoihoi wale au i ke komo ÿana i ka hana ma ke kula ÿo Kamehameha, ÿoiai he wahi aloha i ke Akua a me kahi mälama i nä loina o ka Hawaiÿi, maopopo iaÿu he ÿoihana küpono ia noÿu e kökua pono ai i ko käkou lähui. ‘O ke au hou makamae o kuÿu ola nö ia." Paÿi ÿia këia kiÿi e KALEIALOHA KANIAUPIO-CROZIER

KUMU ÿEKELA KANIAUPIO-CROZIER


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

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Journey to first place Coverage of Ka Leo o Nā Koa’s success at the Hawai’i State Journalism Awards is posted on kaleoonakoa.org, but what actually happened that day? Here’s an editor’s-eye-view of our day in the sun. By KA`IO TUBERA, news editor

6:45 a.m. I wake up late and have only ten minutes to get ready before I need to head to Kahului Airport to meet Ms. Haina and the rest of the editors, Alex, Ariel, and Kanoa. 9:00 a.m. We arrive on O’ahu and meet up with the bus that will be our transportation for the day. 9:20 a.m. Ms. Haina guides us around Chinatown for a cultural tour and to relax a little before the awards. We eat fresh pork hash and rice cakes from Char Hung Sut. 11:00 a.m. The Pagoda Hotel welcomes us as we walk a koi pond path to the ballroom for a luncheon and the award ceremony. 12:00 noon After a delicious lunch of garlic and herb fish, chicken katsu, salad, pies, and cakes, the 42nd annual Journalism awards kick off with a speech by Mary Vorsino. She s an urban reporter for the Honolulu Star Advertiser and a journalism instructor at Hawai’i Pacific University. She says, “I don’t believe

Photo by KA LEO O NA KOA STAFF

The editorial staff hang out in Chinatown before the Hawai’i Publishers Association awards ceremony on O’ahu.

journalism tomorrow will look like anything today, there is and will continue to be growth in the media world.” Her inspiring words about the future of journalism hit home with us as we anxiously await the awards ceremony. 12:30 p.m. Before the actual awards begin, the most valuable staffers from each newspaper are presented with a certificate. I was the lucky one chosen by my peers at Ka Leo o Nā Koa. My name is called, so I stand up and join the representatives from our sister campuses, receive my certificate and smile for the cameras. 12:35 p.m. The anticipation builds as they announce the first award of the dayԟBest News Writing for private schools. The staff and Ms. Haina wait patiently for the name to be announced. As Ka Leo o Nā Koa has only one previous statewriting award, it comes as

a shock to the group when Mr. Jay Hartwell, announces, “Kamehameha Schools Maui.” Happily surprised, I stand and proudly accept the certificate for Best News Writing in the private school division. 12:45 p.m. After getting two district awards and two state awards, both for best news writing and best single issue, we wait to congratulate the overall winner as the Best Newspaper in State is announced. Mr. Hartwell says, “In third place with $200, Mililani High School.” Cheering and congratulations ensue as Mililani High School accepts their award and poses for multiple photographers. Then it was time for the announcement of the second place winner. “In second place, with a cash award of $300, Hawai’i Baptist Academy,” says Mr. Hartwell. The excitement in the room builds as the first place award for Best Newspaper in the State is next to be presented.

Mr. Hartwell makes a joke about the new laser engraving on the trophy, and while we re all trying to see, he says, “And in first place, Kamehameha Schools Maui!” In shock, Alex darts up before the rest of realize what is going on. Finally we all stand up to join her in the front of the room to collect the award. Ms Haina sits stupefied and is too late to get any photos of us getting the award. 1:30 p.m. After many congratulations and interviews by the media, we head back to Honolulu International Airport, proudly carrying our trophies in tow. 1:31 p.m. Ms. Haina yells at us for texting the news to our parents before she has a chance to announce it to the school and post it on Twitter. With the exhaustion setting in from the long day, I am proud and happy to be a part of the award-winning Ka Leo o Nā Koa team.


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Europe trip: Dachau affects KSM traveler By JEFF CLARKE, staff writer

DACHAU, GERMANY – Going on a trip to Europe was an experience of a lifetime. I went with my father, Scott Clarke, who is an advanced placement European history teacher. Every spring break, he takes students from Baldwin High School to visit historical sites in Europe. This year, we went to Dachau, the first Jewish concentration camp in Germany during World War II. This is where one small plaque burned in my mind and told the story of thousands. It read, “Here rest the thousands unknown,” words that split my soul down the middle. I was standing in the presence of the many that had left the world without a name. In Dachau, 200,000 were kept prisoner, and 41,500 were murdered. Pulling up to the camp, was eerie. The cold air, the dead, winding trees, and the nonexistence of the sun was the setting of one the most wicked places on earth. Once we emerged, from the bus we walked for awhile before coming to the gate of the camp. That is when we saw a sign that read, “You have just walked the walk that the prisoners had to walk to enter Dachau.” Our hearts were heavy as we stood looking at the gate that read in German, “Arbeit Mach Fret” or “Work will set you free.” Crossing the threshold of Dachau, I was stirred by the feeling that years of evil were soaked into the ground we stood on. We were met by our

Photo by JEFFREY CLARKE

DACHAU, GERMANY — This is the crematorium used to cremate bodies in Germany during World War II.

tour guide who took us across the rocky courtyard to the SS headquarters where giant panels of information detailing the story of the camp were lined up from one end of the building to the other, the length of half a football field. In a theatre, we watched a film that depicted the rise and fall of Dachau. The content was indesc ribable. We watched in horror as footage of SS soldiers piling bodies upon bodies rolled by. It was more repulsive and sad than anything I have ever seen. Everyone who entered that theatre left with eyes of pain and sorrow in tears for those who died in the camp. “There has never been anything more tragic and sad than that film. You can’t help but cringe at the thought that people could do something so purely evil,” my dad said.

Peru, not your typical trip By NICOLE KA‘AUAMO, staff writer

Students got a taste of a completely different lifestyle for two weeks on their trip to Peru over Spring Break. Eighth grade science teacher Mr. John Svenson took freshmen Kamalei Batangan and Kamele Ah You, juniors Erika Kekiwi and Christopher Kim and senior Keÿike Acain

on an Explorica student tour. The group did everything from hiking up Machu Picchu to white-water rafting. Kim said they did everything besides the usual “playing tourist.” They got to experience what it is like to live there, including encounters with local merchants. “They were very clingy and even followed us to

The first buildings we visited were the barracks. In one small room were close to 30 bunks, where 100 people would have been forced to sleep. Dachau was famous for its crematorium, responsible for burning thousands. We peered into the chambers. The entire camp, the walls, the bunks and the cast iron were cold and heartbreaking. This building was connected to the gas chamber, though the gas chamber was never used. As I walked down a path that led to a wooded area, I stared up at the trees thinking about the tragic stories of horror they could tell. In front of me was a plaque that read, “Here rest the thousands unknown.” It was a punch to the gut that forced me back four steps and brought me to tears. It was unbearable.

We continued down the path and came to a battered brick wall. “Shooting range,” was what the plaque said. The wall was scarred with bullet holes. In front of the wall grew a rose bush, red roses. Right next to the shooting range, was an old tree with a plaque that said, “Pistol shooting range.” The SS would kneel prisoners in front of this tree and shoot them point blank. The trunk had an area where no bark covered the scars, as if to reveal the terror of the things it had seen. It was enough, and it was time to leave. We headed for the bus. No one could speak. We took the walk that we now knew was made by those who entered the camp as prisoners. Except, we were walking away, a thing that we knew so many were never able to do. They never got to walk away.

the buses,” said Kim What made this trip different from others, he said, was that they spent a lot of time in nature. “On the Europe trip, they saw a lot of buildings and structures. We didn’t do that.” The weather varied all over and it rained for the first time since 2009. Residents were thrilled and shared their excitement with the group, Kim said.

Although the group originally planned to go to Egypt, the riots going on at the time prevented that. However, Mr. Svenson was pleased with the way the trip turned out. “Everybody had a good time and we all learned a lot. [The] trip afforded an awesome adventure for all of us, especially for the chance to visit a place that was not a typical tourist destination,” he said.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

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Iorana Tahiti! Ensemble takes Polynesian trip

By VICKIE PRONES, staff writer

Kamehameha Maui’s Hawaiian Ensemble went to Tahiti to experience cultural exchange during the second week of Spring Break. While there, they were invited to enter, La Nuit Des Talent 2, a renowned talent show in Tahiti. Sixteen students including some chaperones stayed at a beach house in Papeete. The group left on March 12 and returned to Maui seven days later. Along with Kumu Kalei A arona Lorenzo and the Hawaiian Ensemble were Kumu Kalei’s husband Mr. Lorenzo along with their daughter and her mother Ms. A’arona. Mr. and Mrs. Nitta along with their children Nalu (‘10) and Nami Nitta also went. The students have gone on trips to improve their level of performance. In 2009 the Hawaiian Ensemble went to New Zealand. This year Kumu Kalei wanted to go to Tahiti because to keep in the Polynesian triangle, and this helped the

students to become ma a to The Polynesian music. “It wasn’t what we expected, it was more,” Kulia Johnson said. The Hawaiian Ensemble did not know what they were in for. Johnson said she thought it was just going to be a little performance similar to Kamehameha Maui’s talent show, Na Hoku. The talent show was held at an outdoor stadium. The day before the talent show, the Hawaiian Ensemble went to the stadium to rehearse and do a sound check. Performers from all around Tahiti were there. Mckenzie Moniz said there was a huge stage and bright lights. Unfortunately, on the day of the talent show it was canceled due to bad weather. Hawaiian Ensemble performed at various music schools. “Whenever we sang they sang, and whenever we danced they danced,” Kaui Krueger said. Along with various perform-

ances the group also got a chance to learn Tahitian songs, drumming and ‘ukulele. “It’s nice to see how our two cultures are so much alike,” said Madison Vaught, a freshman in Hawaiian Ensemble. “We really got a chance to mingle with the natives,” Olivia Borge said. The group quickly realized that it would be difficult to communicate with the locals because everyone speaks French. Vaught found their French Polynesian accent “cool” and interesting. The most exciting event the group experienced was swimming in the clear waters of Moorea with sharks and stingrays. Maleko Lorenzo, a sophomore, and Nalu Nita also enjoyed swimming and playing among the eels. “They were pretty big and disgusting,” Kendra Kaaa said. Overall Kumu Kalei said the trip was memorable. She also said that it was the people that made the trip awesome. “It felt like home,” Kumu Kalei said.

Photos by HŌKŪ KRUEGER

Top: The Hawaiian Ensemble organizing their own Hawaiian section at Hoÿolauleÿa. Above: Senior Kendra Kaaa dances.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

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“4 cans of Spam for?” By KELSIE CHONG, staff writer

Lähaina resident and guerilla marketer Brad Lovejoy placed this ad in hopes of trading the four cans of Spam “two regular, two 25% less sodium” for other things, which he wants to continue to trade until he gets a boat for his girlfriend, dog and himself. Towards the end of January, Loveyjoy embarked on a “social experiment” after returning from a road trip around the island four cans of Spam richer from a new friend he had met along the way. The two friends met at the drum circle on little beach, he said. His new friend invited Lovejoy back to his campsite and it was there that he scored the four cans of Spam as a gift. “There was quite a bit of it, so I took all I wanted to carry,” said Lovejoy. “but, I ended up not needing it on my trip, and that’s how it (the ad) started.” Born and raised in West Virginia, Lovejoy grew up eating Spam but has recently pursued healthier eating. He recognized how popular Spam is after he arrived in Hawai’i this past January.

“Eh, howzit brah. Still got da kine?” —a response to Brad Lovejoy’s ad on Craigslist

Lovejoy began to ask himself, “Are people proud to eat Spam, or is it really a joke? Do people know it’s unhealthy, or is it more like an indulgence?” In West Virginia, he said, people joke about the poor quality of Spam, while frying it up for dinner, “It’s kind of a love-hate relationship.” This sparked his idea to

Photo courtesy of BRAD LOVEJOY

Lāhaina resident Brad Lovejoy poses with the four cans of spam he’s listed for barter on Craigslist. He’s hoping to exchange them for other objects continually until reaching his ultimate goal of a boat.

produce a documentary video of Craigslist, bartering, Maui and Spam. The documentary was not originally intended to be released publicly, but he is still open-minded about what to do with it. Lovejoy obtained a Bachelor of Science degree in business management and a minor in communications studies. He has had various music industry jobs, such as social media manager and street team manager. Using his knowledge of guerilla marketing strategies, he started this project, and has received a variety of different offers. I asked him some questions about his marketing project. Q: Describe your Spam ad on Craigslist. A: “To me, it’s about creating art and social commentary, it’s a social experiment – but most of all, it’s something I’m doing for fun.” Q: What were some of the offers? A: “Several people have offered lots of things. New re-

Sudoku

level: intermediate

Fill in the blank squares so that each row, column and each 3-by-3 block contains all of the digits 1 thru 9.

Answers on page E1

(Continued on page C5) Puzzle used courtesy of KrazyDad.com. All rights reserved.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

C5

Video production students in the running

Photos by KANOA YAP, ALEX AGDEPPA, and Ka Leo o Nä Koa Staff

Senior DVP students in action: Jeffrey Clarke getting footage in the DVP classroom. Nico Lopes editing and Pua TialinoBasques videotaping at a football game on the field at Kana‘iaupuni Stadium. By ALEX AGDEPPA, features editor

Seniors Jeffrey Clarke, Nicholas Lopes, and Pua Tialino-Basques placed as finalists in two different video competitions. Clarke and Tialino-Basques both won first place for their videos in the Digital 808 Storytellers Contest. The awards ceremony was held at University of Hawaiÿi, Maui College on April 29. Clarke entered “Rumors” in the High School Advanced Category, and TialinoBasques entered “Happily Ever After” in the High School Beginner Category. According to digital video production teacher Mr. Jay Paa, they won a “top of the line” production kit, which included: a hard drive digital camcorder, a camera bag, an 8 GB memory card, a wireless microphone and a tripod. The contest Web site said this contest provides students the opportunity to “display their visual storytelling skills, share ideas, and gain advice from working professionals.” Clarke’s and TialinoBasques’s entries can be seen at digital808storytellers.com. Additionally Tialino-Basques

and Lopes placed in the top three in the 2011 ‘Ölelo Youth Xchange Video Competition. Final placements are unknown since the two are on Oÿahu at the awards today at the Ihilani Resort and Spa Room. Lopes entered a video entitled Trash Travels Fast in the HI-5 recycling category . “For example,” he said, “a can could go from upcountry to downtown to the ocean in a day. So, we should recycle because the more trash that travels, the more we ruin our land and our ocean.” Tialino-Basques, with the assistance of Clarke, created a mini-documentary about the magnitude of Hoÿomau, which is also the name of her video. “Going to Moloka‘i for Hawaiian 4 and participating in makahiki games and other cultural activities made me want to make my video about perpetuating Hawaiian culture,” said Tialino-Basques. Her mini-documentary stresses the importance of perpetuating Hawaiian culture through the perspective of Hawaiian youth. TialinioBasques interviewed KSM students, about how they perpetuate their culture.

Answers included hula, paddling, and agriculture. Kumu Kapulani Antonio said ho ‘omau means to persevere, to keep going, to not give up on things, and to make things come alive again. “There are a lot of kids today who are doing (Continued from page C4)

sponses keep coming, everything from pork brains to VHS tapes; from a swift kick in the butt to some good advice.” Q: What has been the favorite response you received? A: “My favorite response so far: ‘Eh howzit bra? Still got dakine? Got one pork brains…trade for one ono kine, you know da kine wit da sodiyum… What you like local kine grinds!? No can?”’ Q: What motivated you to begin this documentary? A: “As a lover of documentaries with some home video equipment...it was only a matter of time until I started investigating and presenting issues on film. In business school, we investigated the barter system, and it’s a great way for everyday people to cut costs, create jobs and

things to ho‘omau, to perpetuate culture, and to make it last, keep it going forever and ever so that it doesn’t die,” she said. The winners will have their videos displayed on television and the Internet. lower their carbon footprint.” Q: Define “guerilla street team.” A: “A street team is comprised of dedicated fans who hit the streets to inform the public about a band, venue, product or service.” Q: How long have you been a writer? A: “Writing has always been a part of my life.” Lovejoy coauthored a book entitled, Guerilla Street Team Guide, along with Jay Conrad Levinson, founding father of the term “guerilla marketing,” in 2008. Lovejoy continues to accept trades for the four cans of spam. He has not settled on any specific ones yet. “It’s been so much fun getting new offers!” said Lovejoy. He plans to let friends from on Facebook decide his next move.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

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Celebrate Be Kind to Animals Week By ALEX AGDEPPA, features editor

Last week several KSM students celebrated Be Kind to Animals Week May 2 - 8. This week has been in existence since 1915. It is typically celebrated during the first week of May. Be Kind to Animals Week encourages people, especially children, to be kind to animals by speaking out for animals, reporting animal abuse, appreciating wildlife, adopting a pet from the animal shelter or rescue, and taking care of pets. The American Humane Societ y shares shelter information and resources and recognizes children who try to create a better world for animals during the annual Be Kind to Animals Kid Contest. I asked 20 students from Kamehameha Schools Maui, and 19 of them did not know what Be Kind to Animals Week was. After I explained, they thought of ways to celebrate.

Senior features editor Alex Agdeppa feeds her stray cat, Sir Thomas.

Senior Bronson Kehano planned to tell everyone to be kind to animals, be more loving towards his dog, and buy shirts that promote Be Kind to Animals Week. Junior Pi‘ikea Karlen hoped to let her dog sleep in her room. Junior Alika Sanchez wanted to take his dog for walks on the beach more often and take action when seeing owners abuse their animals. Sophomore Elizabeth Guth intended to play with her animals more and tell everyone else about Be Kind to Animals Week so that they take better care of their animals as well. It’s too late to celebrate Be Kind to Animals Week this year; however, it’s always a good time to be kind to animals. Here are some pictures of Ka Leo o Na Koa staffers spending time with their pets.

Junior Sports Writer Nikki Davis holds her rooster.

Junior news writer Amanda Lee spends time with her two dogs, her Birttany Spaniel named Makana and her Pomeranian named Poochie.

Senior sports writer Jeffrey Clarke sits outside with his black Labrador, German shepherd, sharpei, chow chow mix dog, Koko.

Senior features writer Vickie Prones takes her German shepherd, Ikaika, to the park.

Junior news writer Kalani Ruidas spends quality time at home with her Pomeranian Chihuahua named Buckley.

Junior features writer Nicole Ka‘auamo pets her Pit bull dogs Phoebe and Piper.

Senior news editor Ka ‘io Tubera snuggles with her cat.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

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Unusual beach activities for summer By NICOLE KA’AUAMO,staff writer

When planning a trip to the beach, there are a few things that automatically come to mind: surfing, swimming, and sunbathing. Here are a few tips to make your beach day different from the rest this. 1. Water gun fight: If you don’t like going in when there are waves but still want to get cool, this is the activity for you. There is unlimited ammunition and the results are always unexpected.

Dear Class of 2012, There are eight school days left until the end, when the seniors will be leaving high school forever, and the juniors will become the leaders of Kamehameha Maui. From a senior, here is some advice for the upcoming class. Behavior If you are rude or obnoxious during chapel or walk around out of dress code, others are only going to think that it’s okay. Have pride that you are a senior at Kamehameha Schools Maui. Have pride in the fact that you are the leader and the example. Respect This leads to my next point. Respect is given when it is deserved. As a senior, you may feel it’s your right to have certain privileges. However, in order to receive respect from the rest of the school, you need to show it first.

2. Floatie surfing: Ditch the board for a day and opt for an inner tube instead. It may take a little more concentration, but it’s double the rush. 3. Pictures with tourists: Make a sign and take pictures with everybody you see. Put all of them together at the end of the day and celebrate the different types of people you met that day. Try to meet someone from each state and maybe even

For example, if an underclassman is in distress, help him or her out. If you are given the opportunity to be a leader, take it, and don’t use that opportunity to be a tyrant. Be the leader you would have liked to have. Seniority Do not assume that because you are older, you are better. Take the time to get to know underclassmen. You never know, they could be your best friends. Work Finally, in no way shape or form should you ever procrastinate. This year, not only do you have your senior project to focus on along with your school work and extracurricular activities, but now you also have scholarship and college applications. I have spent way too many nights working on scholarship essays only to get to school and realize I forgot about the essay due for English. BFF’s In your senior year, Ms. Correa and Mr. Akeo will become your best friends, and the teachers who give you recommendations will be your lifesavers when you realize for the third time that you forgot to give them a two-week notice on the latest scholarship. Enjoy your senior year. Spend time with your friends, and don’t forget to thank your parents, teachers, and counselors for everything that they have done for you during your school career.

from other countries. 4. Flashlight tag: Who said the beach is only for daytime? With no boundaries, the beach is the perfect place. 5. Snorkeling: Our reefs are beautiful, but we seldom take the time to actually look at them. Break out the mask and fins and remind yourself why Maui no ka ‘oi.

Horoscopes are for entertainment only. For the answers to life’s problems, consult your Bible! By Nancy Black and Stephanie Clement, Tribune Media Services April 20—May 20 Two days of intense creative work lie ahead. Follow your list methodically and purposefully. Don't take romantic risks. You may need to postpone an outing to get the job done. May 21—June 21 You feel more balanced now. Cash flow improves, and disagreement inspires invention. To focus mirrors on your own blind spots, ask those closest to you for their view.

Oct. 23 — Nov. 21 Don't double-book your appointments. Not a good time to travel. Make sure to take time to yourself and away from the daily noise. You could use the rest.

Nov. 22—Dec. 21 Clean up a mess. Your social life beckons. Handle the chores, and then invite friends over. They'll help out. Your true friends are always there for you.

June 22—July 22 Home is where the heart is today. Clean up any messes there, and then indulge your favorite domestic relaxation treats. Cook something delicious, and invite a friend.

Dec. 22—Jan. 19

July 23 — Aug. 22 Your powers of concentration seem enhanced, and suddenly it all makes sense. Keep studying, and you'll advance dramatically. If choosing between time with friends or family, choose family.

Jan. 20 — Feb. 18

Aug. 23 — Sept. 22

Feb. 19 — Mar. 20

Your capacity to make money just increased. Estimate what kind of investment you'll need to make it happen. You may find the answer in a dream. Be flexible. Sept. 23 — Oct. 22 Meditate for emotional balance. It's all about you now. Reinvent who you are according to your commitments, not your fears. Play with your wardrobe for a new effect.

Travel looks adventuresome for the next two days, once you delegate. At first, it may seem like a challenge. Take deep breaths and relax to avoid tension.

Neither a borrower nor a lender be. Pay off debts first, and conserve resources. All may not transpire as expected. Plan a future trip, but don't get the tickets yet.

Make big plans; you can always pare back. It's a good day to create new income. Surf the waves instead of fighting them. It's easier to ride in the direction it's going. Mar. 21 — April 19 Things just seem easier today. Romance shows up in unlikely places, as you savor your social life. Wear something you feel attractive in, and go with the flow.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

Things you should know

When you turn 18 By DYLAN GODSEY, staff writer

So you’re thinking, “Now I’m 18, I know what happens next. I can buy cigarettes, get a checking account, and pay taxes. Big whoop there’s nothing I don’t know about turning 18.” Well, sorry to be the one to tell you, but the world is filled with rules and guidelines. Some people get it, others figure it out after it’s already too late. When turning 18 there are many things that you should know. Here are a few of them. Voting: With your ability to vote, you are now able to help with your own future by electing who runs your country, state, and city. Watch or listen to the candidates on the news to find out their positions. Without Parental Consent: Here are things you used to be able to do only with parental consent. Now you can do them on your own. Change your name legally.

C8 Banking: You can open up your own savings and checking accounts now, as well as qualify for credit cards. But remember, you are dealing with real money. If you withdraw more than you have there are penalties. Credit cards come with great risk because of their high percentage rates and fines. Check with different banks and credit agencies to find the best rates and benefits. Jobs: Job-wise you can serve alcohol in restaurants and bars or be involved in adult entertainment. For the most part when you turn 18, you are able to work pretty much anywhere, with the exception of trade jobs needing previous experience or jobs needing a college degree.

Graphic by NICOLE KAÿAUAMO

Get married. Give Blood. Join any branch of the military and/ or police, ambulance, and fire department. Get your own passport. Gambling: Yes and no. You can go to Las Vegas and be in all the casinos,

but you cannot gamble. There are no exceptions. In some other states you may gamble and buy lottery tickets, though participating in unlawful gambling in any state could very well land you a stay in jail and a bundle of fines.

Legal Matters: There are many consequences that also come with being 18. You are considered legally an adult and you have to know that the crimes that you commit may land you a stay in prison. You can also be sued. Life insurance and creating a will might be things to consider, especially if you get married or have a job that puts your life at risk.

Student Survey: Seniors, where do you see yourself in 10 years?

Tyler Akaka

Kalei Tamashiro

Leah Santos

Matthew Ishihara

A reality TV superstar who does photography on the side.

I hope to be successful in whatever I’m doing.

Teaching at a Head Start program or at an elementary school as a P.E. teacher.

Alive. On earth. Take that 2012.

Compiled by ALEX AGDEPPA


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

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SENIOR WILLS Photo by MAYA NITTA

Robbie Akuna To the next Queens I leave my “crown and power.” And to my duchesses I leave my lands and estates. Hinano DeLima To Kainalu, Quinn, and Kekoa I leave the volleyball team. To the basketball boys, I leave my height. And to Kahiau I leave the key to Jerusalem. STRICTLY ROOTS Yessai! Bridgette Ige To UMTNT, I leave my head bumper LOL. To errbody else, and thas ERRbody, I leave my ALOHA. and skype: bridgebridge37. Hit me up =) I love you guys! SHOOTS! hehe. Ariel Kahahane To my sister Ciara, I leave the car keys so you can drive yourself to practice now. Oh, and you can have both of my far away parking spots. Leah Santos To Bobbi I leave my NOT broken tailbone; bestESTfriend my SWAAAG; SUNshine my super TALLNESS; and T-TOP my brother for yours! I also leave you all my love :) Tanya Tavares To whoever is staying here: I leave the island of Maui, apparently I canÿt take it on the plane with me. Kawehi Mahuiki To Nikki and Kara, I leave you my senior swag. And to 2012 , good luck next year! Much love. Kali Sanico To all the people I stepped on to get here…I leave my footprints all over your backs :] Make the most of these moments and leave lasting footprints, XOXO! Austin Rodrigues To Tui and Sanchez I leave the wai to Kupono and Kalei my truck styleee also to Kalei my brother on the line I leave you the line. Kamalei Medeiros To my cousin, Kahiau, I leave the great coach Chad to you. Have fun running and other crazy stuff for two more years! Cheee Michael Lacno III Aydan Lopes = my love for football and my “beast mode”

Wailena Pu To Nalei Sampson I leave the joy and excitement of interning with Nature Conservancy that you may carry on my legacy of ‘opihi monitoring with the youths of Lahaina. Keenan Kaluau To Nauka and Kupono I leave my total awesomeness. Bes Represent da twins. To Maile I leave my smoothness. Fly high like da birds in the sky chee. ‘Oiaÿiÿo Gilliland To Kahikina, please don’t eat too many FROSTS. You know what the effects are. Thanks for keeping me squished between you and Kukÿs. Kuuleimomi Makua To my sister, the cookies and I leave you Kumu Kapulaniÿs room for lunch. May it bring you as much fun if not more than what it brought us. Chad Murayama I will leave footprints in the sand and a bread from lunch for the birds. Keani Kapeliela-Bannister To my sister Keohu, I leave my <3 and hope for awesome memories in high school! ALL my baby friends, I love you and thank you for the GOOD TIMES!!! Shayna K. Molina To: Kea and Jaycee I leave you my cheese and cracker day use it wisely. To: daloo lovahhs :) Kaleialoha Kaniaupio-Crozier To my Kela-boo, I leave you my aggressive sly skills in the pool and to my “lozenges” I leave you stale Halls and a peace sign. I love you loofs!!! Kimberly Chin To my water polo ladies, I leave you the best wishes for the years to come. To Anuhea and Liz, keep doing your thing! Lastly, Maile Santiago: stay cool. Alana Song Dear Lindsay and Kamalei, I bequeath you my swag…among other things :) Kawika Kong To my family & friends, I leave my love. P.S. LIVE FREE! Kainalu Fonseca To all the pretty girls, I leave you a blown kiss and a wink! ;]

Klayton Silva To my two Murf bro’s Jordan and Kupono, I leave the control of the dibs to you guys so that you can dominate on defense next year. Cheeeee, let’s surf! Dane Dudoit To Tui and Alika, we go ÿÏao some more! CHEE! To Anu Katsu! Bumbye I show you di way bu! To everybody else… SHOOTS BAH!!! Kalamanu Endo To my cheer sisters, Ashlyn, Jaycee, Kea, and Shaunte I leave my “lisp”, so that next year you can laugh before running onto that blue mat for the last time. Joshua Kuaana To Kaiÿea Hokoana (hope name is spelled right) I leave our spot at lunch, to be shared with my sister, Joelene Kuaÿana. Kaulana Ane I leave my back hand ritual shots to the polowai girls. My smile to bebeh girl to get all the honeyÿs. Lastly my drive to succeed to my volleyball sisters. Jared Alvarez To Jonah Aruda I leave my title of Mr. Aloha. I leave my cheerful disposition and general love for everything and everyone to Maika G. Noelle Kaulupali To my soccer girls, I leave you the determination to beat Baldwin and dominate at States! Kaydee K. Park To Lucas & Marley, I leave you my hope for you to have the amibition to be the best at all you do! Keep moving forward, youngins. :] Keanu Hill To my young bredjrens from up country I leave you my old bike and my skills. Ginger Long Babe, I leave you all my love, haha! Taylor Awai I leave you all the tharpies I own. Sienna my prodigy I leave you my volleyball swagger, make me proud! Corbin Iaea To Alleyway I leave 2 more years of this school. Have fun be successful. I’ll miss you. To Pono, live it up by. To Olivia keep the Iaea steez goin.

McKenzie Moniz To my Hawaiian Ensemble brothers and sister, I leave you Kumu Kaleiÿs classroom. To my favorite soon to be seniors I leave you Mrs. Correaÿs office! I love you all! <3 Kenzie:) Kayla Kahalewai Andrew, I leave my smile so you look good when homeworks gets hard. Nikki, my pong ball! Practice makes perfect! Kylie, my wrestling shoes! Get it girls make me proud! Külia Johnson To my lil sweet & wonderful sassy “tita” I leave you all of my uniforms and whatever else you already have of mine. Love you! P.S. respect ya eldahs! Kendra Kaaa To my crazy tennis team, I leave my 80+ SPF sunscreen for all those hot days youÿll be PLAYING at MILÿs and States! Never give up and hang in there! Nico Lopes To Pono my boy I leave you all the 7s, 11s, and Quixs to take all the tables down. To my cousin Aydan I leave you the pong balls and the Lopes parking stall. Bryson Souza To Kana Pun I leave you the Waiohuli Torch. Keep our flame burning. To Naukz and Big Pono I leave my good vibes and golden arm rolls. Stay up my Braddahz. Elizabeth Higashino To my best friend in the whole wide world… “well obviously” I leave my soccer jersey. “Oh that’s trendy!” And to Kalena, Makana, Mama Yama I leave you “my daddy.” Riley Hunter Kanoa Yap To my brother, I leave you Dreamy; may she inspire you to do great things. Keep the Yap name strong. Alexandria Agdepppa To Pono Freitas, I give you my attitude. Use it well. =] Ka'io Tubera To the water polo girls, I leave the pool to make new memories. To Rachel, I leave all the mustard packets as easy to open. To Makana, have fun.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

Find the differences By NICOLE KA’AUAMO, features writer

Our seniors have left their mark on campus, especially during homecoming week. Although they’re leaving, we can still take a look back and remember them—a really close look. In the photos below, there are 10 differences. Some are pretty small, but you didn’t want us to make it too easy on you, did you? How many you can find?

C10

Potter Club organizes book drive By AMANDA LEE, staff writer

Photo 1: This is the original.

The Harry Potter Club is a newly formed club for the fanatics of the movies and books. Club members participate in authentic Harry Potter activities and community service and use Harry Potter terms to refer to each other. Mrs. Kalena Laepa’a, Minister of Magic for the Harry Potter Club, and the Kamehameha witches and wizards held a book drive March 25April 29. The club received four big boxes of books. All donations will be going to Kula Hospital and St. Joseph’s Preschool. “Both have contributed to the upcountry community that we are a part of. Many of our students have either come from St. Joseph's, or many of our family members have been taken care of by Kula Hospital,” Mrs. Laepa’a said. “Unfortunately, these two places have suffered over the years due to the economic downturn. St. Joseph's had to close every grade level but their preschool because of the financial hardships, and while Kula Hospital still services the community they have seen staffing and finance cutbacks as well,” she said. Club members will be reading with patients at the hospital and pre-schoolers at St. Joseph’s Pre-School on Saturday, May 21, but anyone can sign up to join them. See Minister of Magic Laepa’a in Konia 103.

Photo 2: Can you see the oh-so-subtle changes?

ANSWERS: Photo by AMANDA LEE

One of the four boxes of books collected by the Harry Potter Club for local organizations.

Answer Key: 1. More tape on black poster in the back. 2. G on pants is different color. 3. 1 on poster is wider. 4. Kawehi’s shirt is changed color. 5. Dane has extra body. 6. Kaui’s hair is changed color. 7. Hanoa’s Glove is different color. 8. Sunglasses are added to Ty. 9. Pink design on Kawika’s face is bigger. 10. Bleacher in front of Kali is taller.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

`May 13, 2011

C11 sentenced to three years in prison for blackmail after wearing a clown suit to pick up money from relatives. In 2009 he arrived at his cousin’s house wearing the suit, a wig, and a pirate hat on a child’s bike. He threatened to have his cousins deported for lying on immigration papers if they did not give him $50,000. He wore the outfit to hide his identity. MOUNTAIN OF TIRES APPEARS IN THE NIGHT

900 SPEEDING TICKETS CANCELLED

OHIO − More than 900 Southwest Ohio drivers received letters cancelling their speeding tickets issued by an automatic camera. The Police Chief canceled the tickets because a soccer tournament nearby was attended by non-

Graphic by: ARIEL KAHAHANE

residents who were not aware of the camera. The money collected would have totaled $86,000, at $95 each.

CLOWN SUIT EARNS NO LAUGHS FOR BLACKMAIL

REDWOOD CITY, Calif. − Frank Salvador Solorza was

NORWICH, Conn. − 2,500 tires appeared behind a restaurant May 3, and officials are stumped as to how they got there. There were multiple brands in various states of wear, even some new ones. The night shift did not see them, but they were noticed by the morning workers. Police hope that video surveillance will help find the person who dumped the tires.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

D1

Health moves in on Hawaiÿi public schools

DOE concessions cancel candy, regular soda, fats By HÖKÜ KRUEGER, staff writer

Compare old and new offerings in Nutrition Facts Page D2

First Lady Michelle Obama’s health initiative Let’s Move! is hitting home for Hawaiÿi’s public school students. New nutrition standards from the Hawaiÿi Department of Education are encouraging all public schools to take action in the First Lady’s fight against childhood obesity by creating wellness programs at all school and school-sponsored events, including MIL concession stands staffed by parent volunteers. Kamehameha Maui students, faculty and parents who attend sporting events have already seen the effects in the form of healthier food options at sports events.

“...the hardest has been the snack bars.” —Ms. Glenna Owens, DOE School Food Services Director

The Hawaiÿi Department of Education’s standard two of the new Nutrition Standards says that all food and drinks sold at school or schoolsponsored events must comply with the current U.S. Department of Agriculture Dietary Guidelines. Included in schoolsponsored events are school parties, fundraisers and concession stands. Starting in the 2011-2012 school year, foods of minimal nutritional value, as defined by

Photo by MALEKO LORENZO

Kahu Kalani Wong orders from the concession stand at Iron Maehara Stadium. Thanks to new nutrition standards, the offerings at Hawaiÿi Department of Education snack bars are changing. Customers have been disappointed to find that non-diet sodas and most candy, except for Mentos, have been discontinued.

USDA regulations, are not to be served to students. These are all food and beverage items listing sugar as a first ingredient and foods containing artificial trans fats. Standards for snacks and beverages comply with the criteria made by the Institute of Medicine. According to Ms. Glenna Owens, School Food Services Director for the Hawaiÿi Department of Education, Ms. Obama’s health initiative Let’s

Move! has led to a fastforward of Congress passing bills that combat childhood obesity. In many cases, the language used in these bills has been changed from “recommended to” to “required to,” which will make items that were once suggestions into law. The Hawaiÿi DOE gave a 4year period to create wellness programs and policies that comply with the new nutrition standards. That period ends at

the close of this school year. “We don’t want to have a huge jolt. That’s why there’s been a 4-year rollout,” Ms. Owens said. Ms. Owens’ office has been in charge of helping schools to create wellness programs and policies and carry them through. Their mission is, “to give [schools] healthy options and to model good choices,” Ms. Owens said. Ms. Owens’ office works with schools on all aspects of the rollout, but “the hardest has been the snack bars,” she said, because the public is used to the older food choices. Some examples of healthy options that her office has suggested for snack bars include using low sodium shoyu for shoyu chicken, one scoop of rice instead of two, or using once scoop of white rice and one scoop of brown rice, mixing the two. Maui High School is one of the first public schools on Maui to make noticeable changes in their MIL sporting event concession stand menus. “We saw the policy and we went for it,” Maui High School Athletic Director Michael Ban (Continued on page D2)


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

D2

New, old snack bar nutrition facts By AMANDA LEE, staff writer

First Lady Michelle Obama’s health campaign Let’s Move! is making changes to the nutritional standards of Hawai’i public schools’ food services. As a result, concession stands at public schools have changed their offerings at their sporting events. Below is the nutritional information for some of the pre-packaged items that used to be available at snack bars and some of the new items that were for sale at Iron Maehara Stadium during the baseball season. Old items are shaded in gray. Calories

Total Fat in grams

Cholesterol in mg

Sodium in mg

Carbohydrates in grams

Protein in grams

Peanut M&Ms

250

13

5

25

30

5

Plain M&Ms

230

9

5

32

34

2

Snickers

266

10.92

8

130

36.83

5.19

Starburst Three Musketeers

181 260

3 8

0 5

0 110

38 46

0 2

Kit-Kat

210

11

0

30

27

3

Reeses Peanut Butter Cups Mentos

210

13

4

150

24

5

10

0

0

0

3

0

Doritos Nacho Cheese Doritos Cool Ranch

140

7

0

210

18

2

150

8

0

180

18

2

Lays Barbecue

150

10

0

200

15

2

Lays Original

150

10

0

180

15

2

Lays Sour Cream & Onion Cheetos

160

10

0

120

15

2

160

10

0

290

15

2

Fritos Original

160

10

0

170

15

2

70

1

10

210

18

2

Coca-Cola Diet Pepsi

140 0

0 0

0 0

50 35

39 0

0 0

Sierra Mist

100

0

0

25

26

0

Aloha Maid Juices

140

0

0

15-30

31-34

0

1 serving

Pacific Gold Jerky

(Continued from page D1)

said. Changes have already been made for this season’s sports, including track & field and baseball. “We’re in the process of slowly taking away different things and adding in new items,” Mr. Ban said. Maui High School has eliminated soda from the menu, as well as other items with high sugar contents such as candies, and added in items like Sun Chips. “The intent of the policy is great. It’s getting the kids to eat healthier, but it’s challenging to find things that are within the guidelines of the policy and still make money,” Mr. Ban said. Maui High School MIL sporting event (Continued on page D3)

Editorial Cartoon

by NIKKI DAVIS

Pluses to crackdown on health Public schools across the nation are cracking down on health. First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move! is an initiative for renewing nutrition standards throughout all public schools to help fight childhood obesity. Hopefully, this will help to motivate people to live a healthier lifestyle. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Over the past twenty years there has been a dramatic increase in obesity in the United States.” America is growing fatter. I’m glad that the First Lady is making a move for better health in schools across the nation. We need to start promoting stronger health education throughout Hawaiÿi, and this is the way to begin. Having schools “require” better health will slowly improve health among Hawaiÿi school children. However, not everyone welcomes the change. People at games can be heard complaining that the snack bars no longer carry regular Pepsi or chocolate candy. This is a prime example of what we are currently doing in our society. Students eat what their schools and families offer them without being properly educated about nutrition. Eventually this could lead to an unhealthy lifestyle post-high school. If people are presented with healthy options at concession stands, they will realize that healthy choices are not hard to make, and a little healthy decision can go a very long way toward improving your health for life.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

D3

Baseball boys second in MIL, seventh in state By MALEKO LORENZO, staff writer

The baseball boys finished second in the regular Maui Interscholastic League season. They were led by Head Coach Brandon Kanamu and 6 seniors, shortstop Keenan Kaluau, centerfielder/pitcher Cody Pundyke, third baseman/ pitcher Lika Fujihara, leftfielder Klayton Silva, catcher Pono Hoÿopiÿi, and right-fielder Austin Rodrigues. Also on the team were four juniors, two freshmen and two sophomores. The regular season ended on Friday, April 22. Kamehameha Maui started the season with a win against DII school, Seabury Hall. They pulled out a 3-game win over Maui High, while attaining 2-1 series wins over King Kekaulike and Lähainaluna. (Continued from page D2)

concession stands will hopefully be fully within compliance of the new nutrition standards by next school year, Mr. Ban said. King Kekaulike High School in is still in discussion about the new nutrition standards.

They lost all three games against Baldwin, who became MIL champions and went to the state championships as the first seed. They ended the season overall, including the Division 1 tournament, with a record of 8-6. “The most memorable game was the Maui High game, where a win would send us to states. Cody was pitching and he pitched a good game. Everyone was making plays, and the final out came to me,” Kaluau said. Though they were not first seed, the Warriors attended the 2011 Wally Yonamine Foundation Baseball Championships on Oÿahu. The team played an exciting first game against the Pearl City Chargers. The Warriors got off to a good start with a 1-

0 lead. Despite an awesome pitching performance by Cody Pundyke, they would suffer a 3 -1 loss due to errors in the final innings. The boys won their next match-up against the Roosevelt Rough Riders, 2-1. The five-inning game produced two runs by junior Nazareth

Thibodeaux and senior Pono Ho’opi’i. They would have played Mililani High School for seventh place on Saturday, May 7, but the game was cancelled due to bad weather, and the boys returned to Maui tied in seventh.

“I can understand it because it’s a movement toward a healthier community. I don’t necessarily agree with it because people have a right to decide what they eat,” King Kekaulike High School Athletic Director Kurtis Saiki said. “I think we just have to educate

people, but they have the right to decide for themselves, not the government,” Saiki said. Let’s Move! is an initiative, launched by the First Lady in response to America’s problem of childhood obesity. According to their Web site, if the problem goes unsolved, one in

three children born after the year 2000 will suffer from diabetes at one point in his or her life. The Task Force on Childhood Obesity has been dutied with conducting a review of all programs and policies relating

Photo by KALANI RUIDAS

Sophomore Kevin Goo slides into second in a game against King Kekaulike. The baseball team placed second in the MIL this season.

(Continued on page D6)

Slow volleyball season disappoints players By KANOA YAP, sports editor

The Kamehameha Warriors boys volleyball team finished the season with a series of losses, finishing the year with a record of 5-7. The season has been one of struggles for the Warriors, who made a lot of changes during the middle of the season. Impact player Hinano Delima missed 2 games because of a trip to Europe, which resulted in one win over Moloka’i and loss to Maui High for the Warriors. During his absence, younger players assumed his role. “It’s hard because I can’t be in the game the whole time,”

said Delima. “But we did try our best, it just did not work out.” The team was confronted with many obstacles during the season. “It was difficult to make adjustments on the team when players wouldn’t come to practice,” said sophomore Pono Freitas. “I’d say that was one of our problems.” This season has not improved any more than the last. Players have trouble pin pointing why this may be. “I don’t see why we can’t win games,” said senior Kawika Kong. “We practice as hard as we can.”

Photo by ALYSSA McALINDEN

Senior Corbin Iaea gets down and extends for the incoming ball in a volleyball game against Molokaÿi. Despite talented players like Iaea, the team struggled this season.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

Photo by Ka Leo o Nä Koa Staff

D4

Photo by NIKKI DAVIS

BRANDI SILVA

JOSHUA KUAANA

By ALYSSA McALINDEN, sports writer

By ALYSSA McALINDEN, sports writer

Sport: Tennis Position: First singles Height: 5’ 3” Age, Grade: 15, sophomore

Sport: Judo Height: 5’ 8” Age, grade: 18, senior

Workout: “We run and we warm up with stretches. We work out with Coach Tua. We do drills and we play practice matches.” Hobbies: “I like going to the beach, hanging with my friends and family, listening to music, and shopping!” Something others (KSM students) don’t know about you: “I’m not a morning person, I’m a Gemini, I like scary movies and I hate bugs.” What you add to the team: “A positive attitude. I encourage my teammates by telling them that it’s okay and to try again, and to take one point at a time. Challenges the team has faced so far: “Attending practices and getting wins at games sometimes, because we work out a lot more instead of hitting and sometimes the weather gets in the way.” How have you “conquered the hurdles”: “We just keep moving forward and work on our mental game by keeping positive and not stressing ourselves out.” How long have you been playing: 7 years

Photo by KAÿIO TUBERA

Kaitlyn Taketa was one of four KS Maui cheerleaders to place second at the statewide Aloha Spirit cheer competition in April.

All-Star cheer team is 2nd at Aloha Spirit competition By JEFF CLARKE, sports writer

Seniors Kalamanu Endo and Kaitlyn Taketa, along with juniors Ashlynn Ross and Kea Castro made the All-Star Cheer Squad, and scored second place, representing Kamehameha and the island of Maui in the Aloha International Spirit Championships, April 1-2. The Maui All-Star Cheer Squad was composed of girls, ages 12-17, from different schools around the island of Maui. Schools included Kamehameha Maui, Baldwin, Lāhainaluna and Maui High Schools and ÿÏao and Kïhei Charter Middle Schools. Coaches Kealiÿi Molina for Kamehameha Maui and Joann Yap from Baldwin chose 24 girls. The squad practiced 7.5 hours a week for three months before the Aloha Spirit Invitational on Oÿahu, where cheer teams from around the state met to compete. By the end of the invitational, the girls on the

Hawai’i All-Star squad emerged with the second place title. Cheer 808 took first place. “We had a lot of talented girls this year,” Taketa said. “It was just a great experience for all of us, and I felt we all grew from it.” The girls had to go through a tough try-out phase in order to make it onto the team. They were met with competition from all around the island and the best of the best were there. “Practice was crucial and we made the most out of every second just trying to perfect what we had to,” Endo said. “We practiced for hours just making sure everything was crisp and clean.” The girls enjoyed practicing with the other girls from around the island. “It was an unforgettable experience; we just had so much fun together as a squad. I loved it!” Endo said.

Workout: run, pushups, sit ups, crunches; arms, shoulders, and chest in the weight room Hobbies: reading, writing, does cruising count? Something others (KSM students) don’t know about you: “I can chant up a storm when necessary. Seriously, pull things out of thin air and make it seem brilliant, or so I have been told.” What you add to the team: “Laughs, and drive to do better, and energy… sometimes a bit too much.” Challenges the team has faced so far: “Lack of members, which really hurts preparation for meets, doubts and negative karma, and people skipping out on practice.” How have you “conquered the hurdles”: “Luckily, I had some teammates that I could practice hard on this year, so that really helped, but mainly it’s your attitude.” How long have you been playing: since tenth grade Other sports: Football, wrestling


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

D5

Girls water polo thrashes through season By JEFF CLARKE, sports writer

Thrashing through the water, getting hit below the surface, and taking in gulps while being held down would seem like a nightmare to most. But, the water polo team embraces all of these things with open arms. At the end of their season, the Warrior’s record was five wins and four losses. “We had a great team this year, one of the best that this campus has seen over the years,” Coach Leo Delatori said. “I only would’ve wanted a little more time. If the team had more time, they would have jived better.” Throughout the season the girls roughed it out, fighting for a win each time they jumped in the deep end. The girls were challenged in the MIL by Maui, Baldwin, Lāhainaluna and King Kekaulike High Schools, playing each team twice. The girls dealt crushing defeats to the Sabers, 21-7 and 17-7. The team also took complete control both times against King Kekaulike, beating them 17-8, and 18-4. Baldwin beat the Warriors at their first meet on March 29, but the second time around,

Photo by MAYA NITTA

Senior Kalei Guth fends off opponents while she looks for an open player in a match against Lähainaluna.

KSM got the upper hand with a score of 10-9. This victory tied them for second place with the Bears. In both meetings, the Warriors were beaten by Lāhainaluna. Their first game ended with a score of 16-2. Lunas Coach Will Hutchison noted that one of the Warriors’ best players, senior Kaulana Ane, was out due to an injury.

With Ane in the next game, it was much closer, 12-10. The water polo team met with Baldwin for a third time to play a tiebreaker game for second place in the MIL. This incredible game was up-andup, keeping the crowd on the edge of their seats. In the last minutes of the game, the score was tied 11-11. Then, at the last second, the Baldwin

girls scored a goal, making the final score 12-11. This defeat kept the Warriors out of the state competition. “We did our best and that is all we could ask,” Ane said. “We were tied for second with Baldwin and had a great tiebreaker game. I’m proud of our performance as a team but it would’ve been nice to go to states.”

Sylva serves up the season; qualifies for state competition By NIKKI DAVIS, sports writer

Senior Vinson Sylva competed at the Carlsmith Ball Tennis State Championships, at the Royal Lähaina Tennis Ranch, May 5-7. Daniel Yamada from Henry J. Kaiser High School eliminated Sylva, 1-6 and 0-6 in the first round of the best of three tournament. “The season didn’t go as well as it could’ve, but it still went well,” he said. This year the Kamehameha tennis team was made up of young players. According to Sylva, the lack of experience

on the team was the reason he made the sole KSM appearance at the state tournament. With only four seniors leaving, he expects the team to improve next year. Out of all four seniors, Sylva is the only 4-year tennis player currently on the team, and he has played for two different head coaches in his four years. “As a senior, I helped by telling the younger teammates what not to do based on what I've done wrong,” said Sylva Sylva came in fifth for the

singles division at the Maui Interscholastic League tournament on April 24 to qualify for the state tournament. Other players this year were Brandi Silva, and doubles partner Nohea Duro and Devonte Llanes and Kendra Kaaa and Kelcey Lorenzo. Sylvaÿs advice to the underclassmen is, “Play on the off season, so you aren't behind when pre-season practice

Visit KSM sports at kaleoonakoa.org

Photo by NIKKI DAVIS

Senior Vinson Sylva serves up a drop-shot as he practices at the Kamehameha Maui tennis courts for his state appearance.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

D6

3 qualify for Junior Nationals By HÖKÜ KRUEGER, staff writer

Senior Kaulana Ane and sophomores Sienna Davis and Leimana Kane qualified for the 2011 USA Volleyball Girls Junior National Championships over spring break. The three competed in Hilo, Hawaiÿi as part of the Lanakila Volleyball Academy and won in the 18’s division. “It felt good. It was really fun and exciting,” Kane said. They will compete against qualifying teams from across the nation in the 32nd Annual tournament, June 25-July 4 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Ga. The Lanakila Volleyball Academy practiced four times a week leading up to the Hilo tournament doing drills like ladders and jump training. “We scrimmaged ourselves a lot, and we scrimmaged older people, and that’s how

Sports scoreboard: Judo 4/02 Girls:103–Erika Kekiwi (1) 115–Nikki Davis (1) Boys:114–Sai Furukawa (3) 145B–Pololü Nakanelua (1) 178– Keanu Franco (2) 198A– Sean Segundo (3) 198B– Joshua Kuaÿana (1) 4/09 Girls: 115–Nikki Davis (1) Boys: 114-Sai Furukawa (1) 132A–Pololü Nakanelua (3) 178A-Keanu Franco (2) 178B– Dylan Godsey (3) 198– Joshua Kuaÿana (1) 4/16 Girls: 103–Kiana Soloria (3) 129–Anianuku Holt Mossman (4) 139– Hiÿilei Casco (4) 220– Kristin Miyahira-Dumaran (1) Boys: 114-Sai Furukawa (2) 145A-Pololü Nakanelua (3) 178A– Keanu Franco (1) 178B– Dylan Godsey (2) 198– Joshua Kuaÿana (1) – Sean Segundo (3) 4/30 Girls: 98–Kiana Soloria (2) 103–Erika Kekiwi (2) 139– Hiÿilei Casco (4) 220– Kristen Miyahira-Dumaran (1) Boys: 114-Sai Furukawa (1) 132–Pololü Nakanelua (3) 178– Keanu Franco (4) 198– Joshua Kuaÿana (1) -Sean Segundo (4) 5/01– Championships Girls (4th): 98–Kiana Soloria (2) 103–Erika Kekiwi (1) 139– Hiÿilei Casco (3) 220– Kristen Miyahira-Dumaran (1) Boys (4th): 114-Sai Furukawa (1) 132–Pololü Nakanelua (3) 178-Keanu Franco (4) – Dylan Godsey (5) – Keanu Franco (3) 198– Joshua Kuaÿana (1) - Sean Segundo (4)

Photo by Ka Leo o Nä Koa Staff

KAULANA ANE

Photo by NIKKI DAVIS

SIENNA DAVIS

Photo by Ka Leo o Nä Koa Staff

LEIMANA KANE

we got experience,” Kane said. Now, they train five days of the week. “We work on technique and stuff that we might see at the championships. We work on our mental game,” senior Kaulana Ane said. Ane has appeared at the tournament twice before with the Hawaiian Style volleyball club. College recruiters will be at

the tournament searching for talent. “I feel that we’re a pretty solid team even though we’re a young team. I think we’ll show well. Because I’m going off to college, I want to represent well and leave a strong legacy,” Ane said. The Lanakila Volleyball Academy team includes players from KS Maui, Baldwin

High School, King Kekaulike High School and Seabury Hall. The 2011 USA Volleyball Girls’ Junior National Championships will be hosted by the Atlanta Convention & Visitors Bureau and Sports Commission and the Southern Region Volleyball Association. It was formerly known as the USA Junior Olympics Volleyball Championships.

Track Event

Tennis

Girls

Golf

Boys

Girls

7-3 (W-L)

3/08 3/09 3/11 3/16 3/17 3/22 3/24 3/29 3/30 4/01 4/05 4/07

--163 (W) --180 (W) --162 (W) 166 (W) --153 (L) 159 (L) -----

110 (L) --118 (L) --148 (W) ----117 (L) ----133 (W) 136 (W)

Place

5/01 MIL Championships 100 4 200 4 1,500 9 300 hurdles 4 400 relay 2 1600 relay 3 High jump 2 Shot Put 2 3 Discus 2 3

Track Event

Place

5/01 MIL Championships 100 1 200 2 3 400 4 6 800 5 1,500 8 110 hurdles 4 300 hurdles 7 400 relay 2 1600 relay 1 Long jump 2 Shot Put 1 6 Discus

3 6

Girls Makana Pundyke Makana Pundyke Victoria Alakaÿi Raven Poepoe 51.33 4:25.97 Raven Poepoe Jessi Bista Diondra Gomes Diondra Gomes Jessi Bista

Boys Kaimalu Stanich Jordan Nauka Daylan Machado Billy Arakawa Jared Toba Tyler MacArthur Kealiÿi Kaÿaikala Kalaÿi Yap Kalaÿi Yap 44.14 3:39.80 Kaimalu Stanich Nainoa Bright Hänoa Puaÿa Freitas Kai Kaÿaukai Hänoa Puaÿa Freitas

5/06-07 HHSAA Champion Finals Girls Long Jump 3 Ashley Wendt Boys 100-meter dash 4 Kaimalu Stanich Girls High Jump 12 Raven Poepoe Boys Shot Put 8 Nainoa Bright

Water Polo 3/16 MHS 21-7 (W) 3/18 KKHS 17-8 (W) 3/23 LHS 16-2 (L) 3/29 BHS 8-6 (L) 4/02 MHS 17-7 (W) 4/09 LHS 12-10 (L) 4/12 BHS 10-4 (W) 4/18 KKHS 18-4 (W) TOURNEY 4/21 BHS 12-11 (L)

Boys

Final MIL Standings 5-5 (W-L)

Baseball 3/24 KKHS 3/25 KKHS 3/26 KKHS 3/31 LHS 4/01 LHS 4/02 LHS 4/06 MHS 4/07 MHS 4/08 MHS 4/14 BHS 4/15 BHS 4/16 BHS 4/22 D1 Tournament 4/23 D1 Tournament Overall MIL Standing HHSAA Tournament Place

6-4 (W) 2-4 (L) 6-3 (W) 1-5 (L) 9-2 (W) 12-2 (W) 14-3 (W) 5-4 (W) 8-2 (W) 4-9 (L) 7-11 (L) 5-8 (L) 4-2 (W) 0-10 (L) 2 7 (T)

Softball 3/02 LHS(L) 3/07 MHS(L) 3/09 KKHS (W) 3/12 BHS (L) 3/21 KKHS (W) 3/23 LHS (L) 3/26 MHS (W) 3/30 KKHS (W) 4/02 BHS (L) 4/06 MHS (W) 4/13 LHS (L) 4/21-22 D1 Tournament (L) Overall Standing

Boys Volleyball 3/04 Länaÿi (W) 3/05 Länaÿi (W) 3/08 LHS (W) 3/12 BHS (L) 3/18 Molokaÿi (W) 3/23 MHS (L) 3/31 SBH (L) 4/06 KKHS (W) 4/13 BHS (L) 4/19 KKHS (L) 4/26 LHS (L) 4/27 MHS (L) Overall Standing: 5

0-9 2-3 7-2 1-16 8-4 5-7 13-2 4-1 5-2 7-5 1-4 5-6 3

(Continued from page D3)

to child nutrition and physical activity and creating a plan of action in this battle against childhood obesity. Schools that do not comply with the new standards risk losing funding from the National School Lunch program. The National School Lunch program works with public schools, non-profit private schools and residential child care institutions to provide nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free meals to students. It is a federally funded meal program established under the National School Lunch Act.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

D7

Track and field

Photos by KANOA YAP

Raven Poepoe flings herself over the high jump bar above, and Ashley Wendt flies for the sand pit in the track and field state championships held at War Memorial Stadium, May 6-7. Wendt finished in third place and earned the bronze medal for her jump of 17’ 3”.

Track and field ends with 4 state competitors By NIKKI DAVIS, sports writer

The KSM track and field team earned 11 spots in the Island Movers Track and Field State Tournament, located at War Memorial Stadium in Kahului, May 6-7. Five competitors qualified for the finals on Saturday, and Ashley Wendt placed in the top three in the state placing third for the long jump. Kaimalu Stanich came in fourth for the 100-meter dash, Nainoa Bright came in eighth in shot put and Raven Poepoe came in twelfth for high jump. Both Wendt and Stanich broke existing school records for their events. Alternate Jordan Nauka did not get a chance to compete. This year’s track and field team was filled with many returning seniors, but was smaller than in previous years. “This season we have a lot less members on the team than last year, but the quality is still good,” said Nainoa Bright, senior shot putter and discus thrower. A main struggle the team

faced this year had to do with students keeping their grades up to remain academically eligible. “A big struggle was a lot of the sophomores getting on AP (academic probation). They

are a big asset to our team, and it hurts us if they can’t compete,” said Ka’ea Warrington, senior discus thrower and 4X1 runner. April 15-16 the freshman and sophomores of the junior

Photo by KANOA YAP

Kainalu Stanich pushes over the finish line of the 100-meter dash. He finished fourth in the state with a time of 10.11 seconds.

varsity team competed in their JV championship. The junior varsity girls won 1st place, and the boys came in 2nd. The boys relay team also broke a record. “I see a lot of great performances. I’m excited with the sophomores, and the freshman class is pretty strong,” said Coach Bala Spencer. Two weeks later, the varsity boys team placed second, and the girls came in third at the Maui Interscholastic League championship. There were some strong competitors throughout the entire season. Junior long jumper/triple jumper Ashley Wendt was one of them. According to Spencer, she was ranked 4th for long jump and 3rd for triple jump in the state. Another competitor was sophomore, Raven Poepoe, who was ranked 4th in the state for high jump. “I think it’s exciting that these young kids are stepping up and turning out to be Warriors,” said Coach Bala.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

D8

Pole vaulting program begins 2011-2012 By KALANI RUIDAS, staff writer

The athletic department is bringing a new pole vaulting program to track and field in the 2011-2012 school year. According to Track and Field Head Coach Bala Spencer, one of the reasons pole vaulting was not offered in previous years was because there was no pole vault coach available to train students. Next year, that coaching position will be filled by Ms. Kellie Suttle. Ms. Suttle was born and raised in St. Louis, Mo., where she attended Francis Howell High School. She was a gymnast for twelve years. She is a former world record holder for pole vaulting and is a two-time Olympian, having competed in Athens and Sydney. Ms. Suttle said, pole vaulting requires a good amount of general athleticism, agility and gymnastic skill. She said that the training for pole vault includes the same running and weight exercises needed for long jumping. The track and field coaches will be holding a pole vaulting clinic this summer to introduce the sport and get students

Photo by KALANI RUIDAS

COACH KELLIE SUTTLE

interested in participating in the event. “It looks like a challenge. Our coach has a lot of experience and knows workouts to train us for success,” junior Jared Toba said. He is one of the students on campus who has expressed interest in the new program. Sophomore runner Stephen Barut looks forward to the advantages the program will bring to the team as a whole. “I think it’s cool. It’s a good opportunity for our track team

Photo by Ka Leo O Na Koa staff

St. Anthony senior pole vaulter Ethan Kim launches off the ground.

to get points. The more events our school participates in, the more chances for points we have,” he said. Coach Bala is looking for-

ward to having Ms. Suttle as part of the coaching staff. “She’s on fire; it’s exciting,” he said. “She’s also a great competitor.”

How is pole vault scored? By KALANI RUIDAS, staff writer

Pole vaulting is one of the four jumping events in track and field. The others are long jump, high jump and triple jump. Athletes launch themselves over a high bar with the help of a long, flexible pole. Participants have three attempts to clear each height. If cleared, the height of the bar is raised, and the athletes will have three more attempts to clear it. Athletes having three consecutive misses, either knocking the bar over or scratching, are out of the competition and the highest height cleared will be their result. In addition, if two misses occur at a height, jumpers

can pass to the next height, where they will only have one attempt to clear. The jumper with the highest height cleared is the winner. If two or more participants finish at the same height, the tie is broken by comparing the amount of misses at the final height. If those participants have the same amount of misses, the tie is then broken by the total amount of misses in the entire competition. Each athlete has a limited amount of time to make an attempt. The set time depends on the level of competition and the number of athletes competing. If the time limit is exceeded, a foul will be called, and the attempt is a miss.

Photo by Ka Leo O Na Koa staff

St. Anthony’s senior pole vaulter Ethan Kim hurls himself over the bar at the 13 foot mark.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

D9

Four surfers to compete nationally By NIKKI DAVIS, sports writer

Lea Arce, Kapälama surf club advisor, recently invited senior Levi Almeida, sophomore Justice Patao, freshman Raymond May, eighth grader ÿImaikalani DeVault and other middle school surfers to join with the Kapälama surf team and compete in the National Scholastics Surfing Association Competition at Dana Point, Calif. The students will travel to Oÿahu to meet with the Kamehameha Kapälama Campus surf team to compete for a national title this summer. The competition will be held June 12-20. “The mission is to establish teams on the other campuses, so we're like the start of the Maui one, and we're going with the Kapälama team to represent Kamehameha as a whole,” said longboarder, Levi Almeida. According to Coach Dale Nitta, this is the second year the Oÿahu team will be com-

Photo by KANOA YAP

Sophomore Justice Patao walks his way up to the nose of his board at the Maui Interscholastic Surf Competition at Hoÿokipa Beach Park.

peting in the national competition. He also mentioned that this year the goal was to create a “super team” of all three Kamehameha School campuses. So far, he said, they have not gotten a response from sister campus, Keaÿau. Justice Patao, a young

surfer, who started at the age of 9, has gained a lot of recognition throughout his surfing career. He took first place in the Häna Surf Classic, competing in the Open Men’s division in September. He is sponsored by Mauithing, DaKine, Duck Divers surf wax, Duane

Ignacio Surfboards, Maui Rippers, and Hawaiian Airlines. “I practice surfing about twice a week in order to be ready to surf the competition and know which board I am going to use,” said Patao. Almeida said they will train this summer by “surfing as much as possible and occasionally going running and lifting weights.” The coaches will give pointers on the surfers’ style and technique. The four surfers will have to cover their own costs for the trip. One way they will fundraise is by selling fleece jackets provided by the team’s sponsor, Volcom. Almeida said he is also selling his old surfboards and kayaks, and he is considering getting a summer job before going to O’ahu. “We just have to think of ways to fundraise, but it’s difficult because only a few of us are going,” he said.

Miyahira-Dumaran brings it at states By ARIEL KAHAHANE, features editor

Sophomore Kristin MiyahiraDumaran placed sixth in her division at the Hawaiÿi High School Athletic Association Judo Championships at the Stan Sheriff Center May 7. Miyahira-Dumaran was not expecting to place at all due to the strict competition. “The other competitors were heavier and taller than me,” the sophomore said. “My biggest challenge this year was making my weight division.” To prepare, MiyahiraDumaran spent extra time after school to practice and condition. She competed in only three of the MIL matches including the MIL championships. She struggled to make her weight division, which caused her to miss qualifying to compete several times. She was the only KSM student to place at states. At the MIL Championships

held at Kaÿulaheanuiokamoku Gym April 30, five students qualified for the state championship, 3 as MIL champs. The only senior, Joshua Kuaÿana, said he breezed through the regular season.“MIL competition was easy, because I had no real competition,” said Kuaÿana. His main opponent suffered an injury and did not compete for the rest of the season. Sai Furukawa, sophomore and MIL champ, competed last year as a freshman and had a goal for this season. “I think the coaching was good because I reached my goal, which is to at least win one match,” said Furukawa. He did win at least one match. He won more than seven, with only three losses, also winning his only MIL championship match. According to him he definitely will be returning again next year because he loves judo.

Photos by MALEKO LORENZO

Top: Sophomore Kristin Miyahira-Dumaran dominates her opponent at the Maui Interscholastic League Championship Meet. She went on to place sixth in the state at the judo championships May 7. Bottom: MIL champion senior Joshua Kua’ana has his opponent trapped.


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

D10

Junior golfers go to Ishii championship By ALYSSA McALINDEN, sports writer

Junior Shannon Abarra represented the Warriors girls varsity golf team at the HHSAA David S. Ishii Foundation Hawaiÿi High School Girls Golf Championship Tournament at Waikoloa Village, Hawaiÿi, May 3-4. Juniors Aaron Kunitomo and Kyeton Littel represented the Warriors boys varsity team May 10-11 at the HHSAA David S. Ishii Foundation Hawaiÿi High School Boys Golf Championship Tournament at Waikoloa Village. At the HHSAA tournament, Abarra placed 9th. She shot a 74 on Tuesday, May 3, and an 81 on Wednesday, May 4. Littel and Kunitomo’s scores were unknown at the time of this printing. “The wind was blowing, and it was super windy,” Abarra said. “I could’ve been more focused towards the end of the round to get through.” To qualify for the HHSAA tournament, MIL golfers participated in a 90-hole playoff where every MIL golfer played five rounds of 18 holes, at different courses around Maui. Head coach of the ladies team, Makana Eleneke, said

Photo by HÖKÜ KRUEGER

Senior Arielle Andrade putts on the green during the MIL golf season.

that this season “went wonderful and far exceeded my expectations.”

It was Coach Makana’s first year with the girls. He said the individuals tournament was, “a real cool sight to see competi-

tion that way. It’s very nerveracking.” Kaydee Park is one of the two seniors on the girls golf team. The other is Arielle Andrade. This season there was “a lot of pressure because we really wanted to do well,” Park said. The boy’s team did well this season, winning all of their matches in the beginning of the season. By the last tournament, they were tied for first in the MIL, along with Seabury Hall and Lāhainaluna High School. The three teams played 18 holes at the Kapalua Bay Course to determine who would place first, and the Warriors came in third in the regular season behind Lāhainaluna High School and Seabury Hall. Last year, the boys came in second. Coach Kihune said it was “their passion for the game and team effort” that made the season successful. The girls did better this season, tying for second with Lāhainaluna High School, behind Baldwin High School, compared to last year when they came in third.

Softball takes season third after fierce battle By ALYSSA McALINDEN

Photo by DYLAN GODSEY

Uluwehi Young rounds second base in a game against King Kekaulike High School.

The Warrior softball team placed third in the regular MIL season and third in the MIL tournament. Kahea Arietta, a sophomore on the softball team who plays second base, played for Kamehameha last year. “We’re doing alright, not as good as last year,” Arietta said. “We’re third, and our record is worse than last year. Not by much though.” Lāhainaluna High School is first in the MIL, with Baldwin in second. In the MIL tournament game against Baldwin High School, the Warriors went into overtime and a 12th inning, until the sprinklers went on and the

game needed to be postponed to the following day. The game ended at the bottom of the 15th inning with the Warriors losing to the Bears 56. Senior Kierston Perry pitched through the entire game, and freshman Madison Vaught hit a homerun for the Warriors. Sophomore catcher Kaleihoku Kubota said, “It was an intense game. We really had to come together as a team.” Assistant Coach Angus Peters said the team “did a great job.” He along with senior short stop Chastyne Cabanas, said it was probably “the best game played this season.”


Ka Leo o Nä Koa

Volume VI

Issue 4

May 13, 2011

E1

iPads in the hands of children Ka Leo o Nä Koa Contact: 270 ÿAÿapueo Parkway Pukalani, HI, 96768 Phone: (808)-573-7019 Email: kyhaina@ksbe.edu Twitter: @kaleoonakoa Editorial Staff: News: Kaÿio Tubera Life: Alexandria Agdeppa Ariel Kahahane Sports: Kanoa Yap Staff: Hulali Brown Kelsey Carbonell Kelsie Chong Jeffery Clarke Nikki Davis Dylan Godsey Nicole Kaÿauamo Hökü Krueger Amanda Lee Maleko Lorenzo Alyssa McAlinden Maya Nitta Vickie Prones Kalani Ruidas Matthew Spenser Faculty Advisor: Ms. Kye Haina Grades 9-10 Principal: Mr. Lance Cagasan Academies Principal: Ms. Jay-R Kaÿawa

According to Tech News Daily, a school district in Maine recently approved a $200,000 initiative that would give each of its 285 kindergarten students a revolutionary hands-on tool: their very own iPad 2. The tablets will be placed in classrooms starting in the fall with the aim of increasing literacy rates from 62 to 90 percent. That sure is a lot of money being invested in the hands of five-year-olds. But is it worth the cost? A school district in Maine seems to think so. $200,000 invested toward improving literacy rates among kindergarteners sounds like a good idea on the surface. The world we live in is on the fast track to advancing technology and the younger generations will benefit from education with interactive technology such as the iPad. However, when I was growing up things were much different, which brings me to my next point.

Editorial Cartoon

Wire Services: Some material courtesy of American Society of Newspaper Editors /MCT Campus High School Newspaper Services Editorial Policy: The staff of Ka Leo o nä Koa is dedicated to objective and balanced coverage of campus and community news. We welcome comments, corrections, suggestions and letters. To have your letter considered from publication, limit the text to 100 words or less, include full name and grade, and email to: kyhaina@ksbe.edu. Letters may be edited for length and propriety. Disclaimer: Ka Leo o Nä Koa is a student publication of the journalism class of Kamehameha Schools Maui. The views expressed represent the views of the individual student writer and editors and does not reflect the views of KSM, KSBE, or its affiliations.

Sudoku Answers:

Kids used to put paint on their fingers and create art, grab giant crayons and scribble, and roll clay around in the palms of their hands. And it has been that way forever. Will a touchpad take away from those experiences? Today’s children will have a different childhood from ours, that’s for sure. However, I have to admit that if I had an iPad to work with in school right now, I am sure that I would be more motivated to do work. The question is would a kindergartener be motivated to do the same, or see it more as a toy? "Overall, we think we're going to make some remarkable discoveries and believe this is the next- step tool in helping literacy,” said Auburn school district superintendent Tom Morrill. “We also received great comments and feedback from all over the world from supporters and experts saying that the device is indeed instrumental in helping young

children learn.” Although the goal of the iPad is to increase literacy rates among youngsters, there is not data to prove that this will happen, and in Maine, the $200,000 that is being used for the iPads could be going to teacher salaries in a time of budget cuts. Keeping good teachers by paying them well could be just as effective. But, since Maine and other states have already made the commitment, I would remind them that iPads should not be a substitute for a teacher. And if improving literacy rates early is the goal, then the iPad is a risky, if possibly effective tool in the hands of young minds, but it could just as easily go the way of other educational trends that didn’t pan out. As I leave my days of finger painting behind for good, it will be interesting to watch and see how the new technology will affect the students of tomorrow.

By Dylan Godsey

Ka Leo o Na Koa: May 13, 2011  

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