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A K LEO T H E

V O I C E

UH M A N O A M A N U A L 2 2013 013

YOUR JOURNEY S TA R T S HERE


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Most students enter college thinking they’ll graduate on time. Unfortunately, it doesn’t happen very often. In Hawai‘i, on average, full-time students take 5.8 years to earn a 4-year degree and 5.6 years to earn a 2-year degree. This means more time and more money. For example, you can save as much as $12,000 on DEDFKHORU¡VGHJUHHIURP8+0Ä…QRDLI\RXWDNH 15 credits per semester and graduate on time. Besides costing more in tuition and fees, not Ă€QLVKLQJRQWLPHDOVRFRVWV\RXPRUHLQKRXVLQJ and living expenses, not to mention lost income!

Take control! You determine how long it will take you to graduate. The ÀUVWVWHSLVWRUHJLVWHUIRUFUHGLWVHDFKVHPHVWHU DQGWDNH(QJOLVKDQG0DWKFRXUVHVLQ\RXUÀUVW\HDU of college. Students who take 15 credits per semester and complete English and Math courses early are more likely to graduate on time.

The next step is to be proactive and ask for help. Meet with your academic advisor, who will help you map out a plan to ÀQLVKRQWLPH.QRZZKLFKFRXUVHV\RXQHHGWRWDNH to graduate. If you can’t take 15 credits a semester, then take summer classes to stay on track.

Shift the odds in your

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favor by taking 15 credits per semester. Students who earn 15 FUHGLWVDUHPRUHOLNHO\WRĂ€QLVKFROOHJHRQWLPH earn better grades, and have higher completion rates. On average, residents in Hawai‘i with a bachelor’s degree earned nearly $20,000 more per year, and those with an associate’s degree earned $10,000 more per year, than residents who did not earn a college degree. It pays to earn your degree, and earning it faster means you’ll make more money over the span of your career!

By earning 15 credits per semester, you’ll not only graduate on time, you’ll also have more options. You could enter the workforce, start your career, and start earning money sooner. You could pursue a graduate degree. You could even take time off to travel or do some volunteer work. The options are limitless if you ÀQLVKRQWLPH


Page 3 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

TABLE OF CONTENT S

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa 2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 Honolulu, HI 96822

0105

GREETINGS

Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-7043 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org

04

EDITORIAL STAFF Interim Editor in Chief Bianca Bystrom Pino Managing Editor Joseph Han Chief Copy Editor Kim Clark News Editor Noelle Fujii Features Editor Jackie Perreira Opinions Editor Tim Metra Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Assc Sports Editor Jeremy Nitta Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Chasen Davis Assc Photo Editor Ismael Ma Web Specialist Blake Tolentino Special Issues Editor Paige Takeya

ADVERTISING E-mail advertising@kaleo.org

Ad Manager Gabrielle Pangilinan PR Coordinator Tianna Barbier

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications.

ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Rebekah Carroll, chair; Nicholas Pope, vice chair; or Mechelins Kora Iechad, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

2126

Letters of Welcome

06 Know These Faces

Your campus leaders say hello

11

18

2733

Meet the most influential people on campus

Tutor Time

Go here to get some help

The Four-Year Plan

Follow this timeline for graduation

HEALTH AND SAFETY

TECH SUPPORT 21

Classroom Hub

22

Portal to Success

24

0620

ACADEMIC SURVIVAL GUIDE

How to use Laulima

Breaking down MyUH

Stay Connected

27

40

Get online and stay online

4246

41

LOCAL CULTURE 101 43

Mālama ‘Āina

44

Demystifying Hawai‘i

46

Mother Tongue

Why Hawaiian culture matters

Local customs, explained

Hawaiian words to know

Breaking Bad

32

Make informed choices

Buddy System

How to stay safe on campus

Campus Clinic

3441

EATING ON CAMPUS

Where to go when you need aid

4764

34 38

Your Meal Awaits

Our complete guide for campus foodies

Economical Eater

Pick the right meal plan

Mānoa Marketing

Buy your veggies here

HONOLULU SCENE 48

Sand and Sun

54

Dress the Part

62

Sports Primer

Listing the best beaches on O‘ahu

How to look (and feel) like a college student

The best in fall UH athletics


Page 4 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

WELCOME ASUH

KA LEO

Hello new students, Welcome to the University of Hawai‘i at M ā noa! You may have watched every movie and read every book or manual about college you could find, but nothing has fully prepared you for the journey which you are about to embark on. I hope that you keep an open mind as you start a new chapter in your life. Remember that everyone around you is different. People have grown up all around the world, have different goals and want to share what they know with others. Keeping an open mind will allow you to see things from a new perspective and enjoy what UH M ā noa has to offer. Provided that you study hard and show that you are driven, you will see many opportunities arise. Seize those opportunities, whether it be leading a club or taking classes abroad. You don’t want to sit in your cap and gown on graduation day regretting all the things that you could have done. Don’t forget to have fun. You will meet new people, try new food and get exposed to new cultures. You are about to make memories that will last a lifetime, so make them happy memories. Everyone has different interests, and the great thing about UH M ā noa is that there is a community, club or program you will fit into. I found my niche at Ka Leo O Hawai‘i, the student newspaper of UH M ā noa. People may think that the student newspaper is all about writing, but it is more than that. We have designers, ad representatives, web developers and more. If you feel that Ka Leo could be the right fit for you too, don’t hesitate to meet the staff at Hemenway 107. You can pick up an application in person or download one online at kaleo.org/jobs. Remember to keep your mind open, seize opportunities, have fun– and don’t forget to do your homework.

Letter from the ASUH president

_

UH MANOA Aloha and welcome to the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa! This Ka Leo New Student Orientation Guide celebrates your first day of classes of the fall 2013 semester. You are beginning the journey to explore, discover and appreciate your second home at UH Mānoa. As you’ll learn from this NSO Guide, we are the most unique universit y campus in the world. Situated in the middle of the vibrant Asia-Pacif ic region, UH Mānoa’s geographic position bridges the U.S. mainland and Far East. Our location results in an impres sively diverse ethnic population of students, facult y and staf f. T hey – along with family, friends, alumni and supporters – all become part of a larger UH Mānoa ‘ohana ( Hawaiian for “ family”). One of my core messages as chancellor is the importance of creating a transformational environment for learning. I want you to discover your own academic passions while being thoroughly immersed in the “Mānoa Experience,” one that is ref lected back upon with great fondness and aloha. Stay informed and keep up-to-date on events, news and important happenings on campus by reading Ka Leo and regularly checking our home page at manoa.hawaii. edu. Follow us on Facebook at facebook.com/uhmanoa and Twitter at twitter.com/uhmanoanews. We’re glad that you’re here! Aloha, Tom Apple Chancellor University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa tapple@hawaii.edu

Sincerely, Bianca Bystrom Pino Interim Editor in Chief ALL PHOTOS BY KENT NISHIMURA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Aloha! Welcome to the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, the flagship campus of the 10-campus University of Hawai‘i system. My name is Richard Mizusawa, and I serve as your Presidentt of the Associated Students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa 101st Senate. On behalf of the undergraduate students of our university, I would like to congratulate you on taking the first steps of your college life by attending New Student Orientation. During NSO, you will learn about the different resources and opportunities you have as a new student to the Mānoa campus. There are countless ways to get involved with your university, and I encourage you to get involved in anything that interests you personally or academically. NSO opened many doors for me when I was a freshman, and it can and will do the same for you. As a brief introduction, ASUH is your student government representing more than 14,000 full-time, classified undergraduate students. ASUH strives to serve students by providing scholarships, funding student organizations and advocating for students’ interests. We want you to know about the various services we offer and that your student government is here for you. The Senate is in its 101st year of serving the student body and will continue to advocate on your behalf and have many upcoming events and happenings this year for you. ASUH will be planning campus-wide events such as the Homecoming Fair and Mardi Gras, but we are also dedicated to advocating current student issues. If you ever feel strongly about anything regarding our campus, do not be afraid to come by our office and let your voice be heard. Again, I encourage you to take advantage of any opportunities that come your way as a new student of UH Mānoa – this is not only a Hawaiian place of learning, but also a place to fi nd yourself as you take part in the “Mānoa Experience.” This wonderful place is where I have found what I am passionate about, and I am confident that it will do the same for you. Have a wonderful freshman year and start to your collegiate career at our university. Mahalo, Richard Mizusawa President, 101st Senate Associated Students of the University of Hawai‘i at M ā noa


Page 5 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

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UH Manoa Manual M . R .C . G R E E N WO O D U H S YS T E M P R E S I D E N T

ERIC MARTINSON B OA R D O F R E G E N T S C H A I R

M.R.C. Greenwood has been system president for four years, where she has overseen the direction and initiatives of all 10 UH campuses. Before coming to UH, Greenwood worked at the University of California as the provost and senior vice president of academic affairs. She will retire at the end of August due to health reasons.

Eric Martinson is head of the Board of Regents and a graduate of UH M ā noa. His term on the BOR will end in June 2014. The BOR controls and manages the entire UH system through policy making, and there are 15 regents in total appointed by the governor. Martinson is also president of the Queen Emma Land Company.

T OM A P P L E U H M Ā N OA C H A N C E L L O R Tom Apple has been at UH since June 2012 and began a series of Campus-wide Conversations in his fi rst year to get input from students, faculty and the community. As chancellor, Apple is in charge of running the UH M ā noa campus. Apple worked previously at the University of Delaware and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

B E N JAY AT H L E T I C S D I R E C T O R Ben Jay was named athletics director on Dec. 7, 2012. He previously worked at at Ohio State University. Since being named athletics director, he made the controversial decision to change the name of all men’s teams to “Warriors.” On May 14, he reversed this decision, announcing that the men’s teams will be referred to as “Rainbow Warriors.”

KNOW THESE FACES

Linda Johnsrud earned a doctorate in higher education from Ohio State University. Her other roles at UH have included interim vice chancellor and acting/interim chancellor of UH West O‘ahu. Johnsrud focuses on academic vision and goals for UH.

K IM CLARK Chief Copy Editor

H OWA R D T O D O VICE PRESIDENT FOR BUDGET AND CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

On a campus with more than 20,000 students and hundreds of professors and support staff, it can be hard to identify the key figures that keep the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa running smoothly. Here are eight people you should be able to identify on sight.

A L B E R TA P U K A H I AC T I N G C H I E F A N D C A P TA I N O F C A M P U S SECURITY

Campus Security is charged with the protection and safety of everyone at UH Mānoa. Alberta Pukahi has worked for CS for more than 25 years and won the “Top Cop” award in 2011. Pukahi served as a sergeant for eight years before being named the first female captain of CS.

L I N DA J O H N S RU D EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS/ PROVOST

Howard Todo has worked at UH for eight years and was inducted into the College of Business Administration’s Hall of Honor in 1995. Todo’s job is to ensure that UH stays within budget while addressing its capital improvement and maintenance projects.

JA M E S GA I N E S VICE PRESIDENT OF R E S E A RC H

GREENWOOD AND APPLE BY KENT NISHIMURA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I; JAY AND PUKAHI, FILE PHOTOS / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I; OTHER PHOTOS FROM UH MEDIA RELATIONS

KNOW THESE NAMES

James Gaines has worked at UH since 1987, beginning as a physics professor and later becoming department chair. He earned his PhD in physics at Washington University. As a research university, UH Mānoa depends on the policies and procedures set by this office.

RICHARD MIZUSAWA • Associated Students of the University of Hawai‘i President • TOM ROBINSON • Graduate Student Organization President • KATHY CUTSHAW • Vice Chancellor for Administration, Finance & Operations • FRANCISCO HERNANDEZ • Vice Chancellor for Students • BRIAN TAYLOR • Interim Vice Chancellor for Research • REED DASENBROCK • Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs


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UH Manoa Manual

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Page 8 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

Stay in line PAIGE TAKEYA Special Issues Editor

College may be perceived as a time of freedom, but the University of Hawai‘i at M ā noa has rules and regulations like any other institution. Here are some commonly encountered policies that you should be aware of as a student.

AC A D E M I C H O N E S T Y The official jargon: “The term ‘plagiarism’ includes, but is not limited to, the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgement. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials.” Real talk: Academic honesty is perhaps the most important policy that you will need to abide by during your time at UH Mā noa. Cheating and plagiarism have nigh-universal zero-tolerance consequences in individual classrooms. Professors will not feel bad about failing you if they catch you stealing the work of others. Avoiding the pain is easy: Cite your work, and don’t copy anyone else.

RESPECT FOR PEERS The official jargon: “Sexual advances, requests for sexual favors or other behavior of a sexual nature that is unwelcome and sufficiently severe or pervasive that it interferes with a person’s academic or professional performance or creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive educational or employment en-

vironment. The behavior can be verbal, non-verbal or physical.” Real talk: You will meet a lot of people in college – and not all of them are going to be like you. The media portrays college as a haven of wild parties, rampant drug use and sexual escapades, but reality is far more mundane. Remember that you remain in a public space where your peers command mutual respect from you. Running around like a rabbit in heat is inappropriate and unacceptable, regardless of what a woman is wearing. Be civil to those you meet, and you can expect the same in return.

I L L I C I T S U B S TA N C E S The official jargon: “Public intoxication is expressly prohibited. Use, possession, manufacturing, or distribution of alcoholic beverages by any person under twenty-one (21) years of age is expressly prohibited.” Real talk: A lot of people will enjoy spending their college years partying hard. That’s fine (as long as you know what your limits are), but one thing to note is that UH M ā noa does not permit illegal drugs or weapons on campus. Don’t bring your guns or your heroin to school. If you’re under 21, you are not allowed to have any kind of alcohol in your possession. Don’t let your degree suffer because you made a few bad decisions on Sunday night. Be responsible.

Scan this QR code to read the Student Conduct Code in full.

Why should you validate your UH ID? NOELLE F UJII News Editor Your University of Hawai‘i student identification card is more than a mere ID. If you validate it at the Campus Center Ticket, Information & ID Office, you will have access to many of the perks that come with being a student at UH M ā noa.

1. U PA S S Students who purchase the UPass pay a fee when they register ($30 per semester) so they can ride TheBus when and where they want. Show the bus driver your ID, and you’re good to ride TheBus as often as you like.

2 . L I B R A RY P R I V I L E G E S At some point, you’re going to need to check out a book from Hamilton or Sinclair Librar y, but you won’t be able to unless you have a validated ID. IDs are also required to enter the libraries after 9 p.m.

3. D I S C O U N T S F O R C A M P U S such as free movie nights and dances, which require a UH ID to enter. S E RV I C E S Many campus services, like the Leisure Center, will offer discounts for students who validate their IDs. At the Leisure Center, students are eligible for cheaper equipment rentals and leisure classes. If you’re a theatre buff, you can get $5 student tickets to Kennedy Theatre productions with your ID. You can also get cheap movie and concert tickets at the Ticket Office.

4. KA LEO UH ID P RO G R A M Your ID can net you deals outside of campus too. There are many restaurants and shops where you can fl ash your ID to receive benefits like a free drink or meal discount. Check the Ka Leo app directory for a complete listing of participating vendors.

5. AC C E S S T O C A M P U S EVENTS Campus Center hosts numerous events throughout the year,

6. AC C E S S T O C A M P U S R E S O U RC E S Want to use a computer lab or maybe head to the Fitness Center? You’re going to need that validated ID to get inside. All Student Recreation Services programs require that ID to participate – so forget about seeing the inside of Klum Gym or playing at the tennis courts without it.

7. U H AT H L E T I C S

Any fee-paying student is eligible for discounted or free tickets to UH Mānoa athletic events. Free T-shirts or prizes are often given out to students who attend games and sit in the student sections.

8 . C L A S S WO R K Were you planning on taking a unit mastery course? You’re going to need a valid ID before you’ll be allowed to take the quizzes that accompany a course like PSY 100.


Page 9 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

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Page 11 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

Use all the tools at your disposal: tutoring resources on campus PAIGE TAKEYA Special Issues Editor College is more than you and a pile of textbooks against the world. The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa offers a number of special tutoring services that will make your life easier.

THE WRITING CENTER Purpose: Writing assistance Location: KUY 415 Hours: Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m. If you’re having trouble thinking of essay topics, writing a thesis or understanding comma splices, The Writing Center is where you need to be. The WC is staffed primarily by English undergraduate and graduate students who are trained to work with students from all majors and language backgrounds. The WC will not edit papers for you, but tutors will work with you on your problem areas as best they can. It is recommended that you make an appoint-

ment, as walk-in availability is not guaranteed.

Scan this QR code to make an appointment at the Writing Center.

L E A R N I N G A S S I S TA N C E CENTER Purpose: General academic and personal learning strategies Location: Sinclair Library, Mezzanine 1 Hours: Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; weekends by appointment The transition from high school to college can be difficult if you

don’t have a game plan. The Learning Assistance Center seeks to help you make one. It offers specialized seminars or tutoring sessions that focus on general learning skills (like time management or note taking) or specific subjects (like math or chemistry). You can also use the LAC to find a study group if you need one. The LAC website also contains a number of useful links for study strategies.

Scan this QR code to visit the LAC website.

U N D E RG R A D UAT E LEARNING EMPORIUM Purpose: Additional assistance in math and science Location: Bilger Addition 209 Hours: Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-5 p.m. (dependent on tutor availability) Math and science come naturally to some, but to others, they are mountains to climb. The Undergraduate Learning Emporium offers students a place where they can do their assignments under the watchful eye of an experienced tutor. The ULE specifically offers help in introductory courses in math, chemistry, information and computer sciences, biology, zoology and physics. Tutors are available for specific hours each week, so visit their website to make sure someone is there to work with you.

Scan this QR code to visit the ULE website.

OTHER OPTIONS If you have needs that go beyond what these services can offer, there are al-

Sinclair Library (top left), Bilger Addition (top right) and Kuykendall Hall (bottom) all house tutoring services geared towards different groups on campus. PHOTOS BY ISMAEL MA KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

ways more options. Athletes can take advantage of the Nagatani Academic Center, a program dedicated to the student-athletes of UH Mānoa. Some departments have their own in-house tutoring options. Additionally, private tutors abound and advertise themselves either through individual departments or on the bulletin boards scattered around campus. Talk to your advisor if you need assistance, and he or she should be able to hook you up with the right person. Don’t forget that if you’re really struggling, the best person to talk to may very well be your professor. No one is better suited, after all, to help you pass a course than the man or woman teaching it. If your class has a teaching assistant or a mentor assigned to it, utilize their expertise too. These are people paid to help you learn – why not take advantage of it?


Page 12 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

Working on campus PAIGE TAKEYA Special Issues Editor

Getting a retail job is always an option for college students, but why go to the mall when you can fi nd work on campus that pays the same (if not better) and is closer to class? Campus jobs have many advantages: Employers are understanding about your class demands and let you off during exam time, you get a mandatory annual pay raise and anyone who is at least a half-time University of Hawai‘i student can work at any campus. Applying for a job is easy: Head to the Mānoa Career Center in QLCSS 212 or go to sece.its.hawaii.edu/ sece, sign in using your UH username and password and shop around. Not sure what you’re going to fi nd? Here are a few examples of the range of available jobs.

Ass Botany Field Research

JIMMY EDENS/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Let your voice be heard at

JACKIE PERREIR A Features Editor You know those little green stands you see around campus? Surprise, there are newspapers in them. It’s Ka Leo, the University of Hawai‘i at M ā noa’s student-run newspaper, to be exact. Whether you’re seeking journalism experience, writing practice or just want to showcase your photography or design skills, Ka Leo is an ideal way to learn the dynamics of working as a team – the foundation of almost every career. Ka Leo is always looking for editorial writers in a variety of subjects: There’s room for movie reviews, hard news, sports pro-

fi les and witty blogs. Ka Leo also has need for those with visual talent, including photographers, designers and illustrators. Work hard enough, and you can even become an editor. No matter what you’re interested in, it’s a chance to get your work published and something to add to your resume. If learning business and marketing strategies is more your thing, Ka Leo has an advertising and public relations team that handles its advertisements, marketing aspects and event coordination. To apply, pick up an application at the Ka Leo office in Hemenway 107, email editor@kaleo.org or apply online at kaleo.org/jobs.

istant

plant a collec tion on native in helpin g with fi eld dat ted res ne). inte shi and or in ing dable, hardwork g days in the fi eld (ra Qu ali fi cat ions: Depen ipment, and spend lon to equ lity g abi ryin and car rs nts pla hou to hike for of native Hawaiian communities. Ab ility m. Sp eci fi c knowle dge tea a of t par as up, gro Go od at workin g in a throughhly des irable. trosideros polym orp ha identif y species are hig ulation dynamics of Me pop the ntal pame ing min iron exa env eld res earch asures of key plant and Dutie s: As sist with fi a team, -native plants and me of t non par as and g ive rkin nat wo of ion . The student will be rain out O‘ahu. Identifi cat ter t cul diffi in es in the fi eld, sometim dents. rameters will be done 2-4 undergraduate stu graduate student and a , sor fes pro any bot inc luding a Hours: 10/ week Pay: $9/ hour

Fire Safety Inspector I

Qua lifi cations: Should be in good health and enjoy walk ing; mus t be able to communicate effec tivel in writing and orally; have a neat y appearan ce. Duti es: Make monthly insp ectio ns of port able fire extin guis hers & fire hose cabinets; perform rout fire safety insp ections to determin ine e operability and condition of fi re protection equipment and systems; prepare reports upon com pleti on of insp ections. Hours: 15-2 0/week Pay: $9/h our

Marketing Assistant III

lthe student community with exce d, actively engaged member of muniCom g, Qua lifi cations: A highly connecte ketin Mar ties. abili ip and written) and proven leadersh lent communicati on skills (ver bal t in Mac OS X Microsof t Offi ce erre d, but not required. Profi cien pref r majo s. cations or Creative Media of leading social media platform erPoint. Well vers ed in the use eras, cam o vide products Word, Excel and Pow and phy ogra phot still ss to professi onal quality digit al iliarity with Exp erien ce with and ready acce as iMov ie, Final Cut Pro, etc. Fam such are, softw ng editi o vide er, selfplay plus work ing knowledge of team A r, Acro bat. s InDesign, Photosh op, Illus trato Ado be CS5 desi gn suite program e. and relia ble. Prior work experienc moti vate d, confi dent, cons cientious ts, products, programs and/ exec uting mar ketin g plans for even and g lopin al Duti es: Assist staff in deve . With staff guidance, create soci rse Campus Services divis ions st Assi . rials mate or initiatives to prom ote the dive e onlin or l tera colla phy and videogra phy for print, al materiotion media content, prov ide photogra prom of nce tena main and ampus distributi on, posting s, in spec ial event staffing and on-c rial (may include nametags, sign in the creation of collateral mate ts artis hic grap . gned assi as gn, als. Sup port staff desi rel appa print and outd oor advertisin g and rs), othe ng amo , yers fl and posters Other duties as assigned. Hours: 15-2 0/week Pay: $10/ hour


Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

Page 13 | Ka Leo | New Student Orientation

MAJOR IN COMMUNICATIONS. As a student, you can take advantage of monthly savings on Sprint service plans. To make it easier to get on board, we’ll even waive the activation fee.

Trade in your old phone from any carrier. Get account credit for eligible devices through the Sprint Buyback Program. Visit sprint.com/buyback for details.

10

%

Send questions/inquiries to: Patty Luckett Wireless Benefits Manager patty.luckett@sprint.com

DISCOUNT FOR STUDENTS OF

ACTIVATION FEE WAIVED FOR NEW STUDENT ACTIVATIONS

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII

Up to $36 value. Req. new two-year agreement.

Applies to select regularly priced Sprint plans. Requires new two-year agreement.

CALL: 866-639-8354 CLICK: sprint.com/save VISIT: a local Sprint Store sprint.com/storelocator Use this code to claim your discount. Corporate ID: GMCTA_UHI_ZST

*GMCTA_UHI_ZST*

Credit approval req. Early Termination Fee (sprint.com/etf): After 14 days, up to $350/line. Individual-liable Discount: Available for eligible university students (ongoing verification). Discounts subject to change according to the university’s agreement with Sprint and are available upon request for monthly svc charges on select plans. No discounts apply to second lines, Add-A-Phone lines or add-ons $29.99 or less. Sprint Buyback: Available at participating Sprint store locations. Limit of three (3) returned devices, per 12 month period, per one active mobile phone number. Phone must be deactivated before recycling. Device will not be returned. To best protect your data, please delete all personal information from your phone. Credit amount depends upon valuation and may vary based on condition. Credit will be applied to in-store purchase or Sprint account within three invoices. Trade-in also available online at sprintbuyback.com. Other Terms: Offers and coverage not available everywhere or for all phones/networks. Restrictions apply. Nationwide Sprint Network reaches over 282 million people. See store or sprint.com for N085774 details. ©2013 Sprint. All rights reserved. Sprint and the logo are trademarks of Sprint. Other marks are the properties of their respective owners.


Page 14 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

What do you DESIRE?

Important locations around campus COMPILED BY BIANCA B YSTROM PINO Interim Editor in Cheif

Campus Center Stop by Campus Center to grab a quick bite or something to drink. You can choose from Starbucks, Jamba Juice, Subway or Sodexo dining. Address: 2465 Campus Road

Computer Lab and Lounge

Top Amenities? es? 100% Student Communiti ions? Hotel Caliber Accomodat

If you answer, “YES!” come experience a home away from home with the largest locally owned and operated private off campus student housing company in Hawaii. We house local, mainland and international students who attend UHM, KCC, HCC, Chaminade, HPU, ESL, culinary, travel and other specialty post-secondary schools.

If you don’t have a printer in your dorm, you can go to the computer lab to work and use the printer. Remember that it is $0.07 for each page you print. Address: Campus Center 316 Hours: Mon-Fri 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Phone: 808-956-8343

UH Mānoa Bookstore You can pick up school supplies and textbooks at the bookstore. Hours: Mon-Fri 8 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.; Sat 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Phone: 808-842-6657 Email: book@hawaii.edu Website: bookstore.hawaii.edu/manoa/home.aspx

Campus Center Board and Activities Council The CCB is responsible for coordinating many of events that occur on campus, like the Mānoa Mixer. Website: uhmccbac.weebly.com/index.html

Library There are three libraries on campus where you can do some research or have a quiet place to study, but you need a validated ID to borrow books and use facilities after 9 p.m.

Gated Buildings • Basic Furnishing • 100% Utilities Pools • Parking • Student Life Activities • and more!

Hamilton Library Address: 2550 McCarthy Mall (by Moore Hall)

VISIT US AT: www.hawaiistudentsuites.com 931 UNIVERSITY AVE #105, HONOLULU HI 96826 808.952.5377 hawaiistudentsuites@hihltd.com

Law Library Address: 2525 Dole Street (by the parking structure)

Sinclair Library Address: 2425 Campus Road (by Hemenway Hall)


Page 15 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual Fitness and sports

Roommate late on paying their share

Work up a sweat at the following locations:

Outdoor Education

AGAIN?!

Address: 1333 Lower Campus Road Hours: Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 8 a.m.-12 p.m. Phone: 808-956-6468 or 808-956-7694

Student Recreation Services Address: Hemenway Hall 213 Phone: 808-956-4830 Email: uhrecsports@gmail.com Want to cheer on our student athletes? Catch the games at these on-campus locations:

Murakami Stadium, Stan Sheriff Center and Kahanamoku Pool Address: 1337 Lower Campus Road

Queen Lili‘uokalani Center for Student Services

QLCSS

Address: 2600 Campus Road

Ground Level Office of the Registrar: Room 010 Pick up your academic transcripts here. KOKUA: Room 013 Get special help and services for disabilities. Commuter Services Office: Room 014 Need info on how to get to campus? Visit this office.

First Floor

Second Floor

Mānoa Advising Center: Room 101 Undeclared majors get advising here. Cashier’s Office: Room 105 Pay your fees here. Financial Aid Services: Room 112 Scholarship and loan HQ. CAS Student Academic Services: Room 113 Arts & Sciences majors are based here.

Service Learning Program: Room 209 If you want to volunteer in the community, come here. Bridge to Hope, LGBT Student Services and Women’s Center: Room 211 These are safe havens for those who need them. Mānoa Career Center: Room 212 If you want to work on campus (or even off ), you need to visit.

Student media Listen, read and watch all the things that student media groups are producing. Don’t be afraid to stop by and pick up an application to be part of the team.

Ka Leo (newspaper) Address: Hemenway Hall 107 Phone: 808-956-7043 Website: kaleo.org

Hawai‘i Review (literary journal) Address: Hemenway Hall 107 Website: kaleo.org/hawaii_review Email: hawaiireview@gmail.com

Third Floor Office of Multicultural Student Services: Room 309 Those from minority ethnicities should come here to get support. Counseling and Student Development: Room 312 If you’re feeling the strains of college, seek help here.

S on Is it making you lose FOCU ly be your studies? Want to on ion of responsible for your port the expenses?

Well at Hawaii Student Suites we do just that! We know the value of an education and aim to remove the common pitfalls of housing. So don’t waste a minute, give us a call today to learn more and take your student housing worries away! Share with us your biggest housing pitfall on our Facebook for entry into our Surprise Prize Raffle! Gated Buildings • Basic Furnishing • 100% Utilities Pools • Parking • Student Life Activities • and more!

UH Productions (video) Address: Campus Center 312 Website: uhpro.org Email: uhpro@hawaii.edu

KTUH (radio) Address: Hemenway Hall 203 Phone: 808-956-5288 Website: ktuh.org

VISIT US AT: www.hawaiistudentsuites.com 931 UNIVERSITY AVE #105, HONOLULU HI 96826 808.952.5377 hawaiistudentsuites@hihltd.com


Page 16 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

Helpful services for freshmen PAIGE TAKEYA Special Issues Editor Freshmen are the hope of the institution, and as such, the University of Hawai‘i at M ā noa is eager to invest in specialized services that can make the transition from high school to college easier. Here are a few of the freshmen-exclusive programs that aim to give you an extra boost.

M Ā N OA A DV I S I N G C E N T E R Where: QLCSS 101 When: Mon-Fri (closed Wed) 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. The MAC is an advising service specifi cally geared toward those who enter college without a major in mind or as a pre-major – a situation most freshmen will fi nd familiar. MAC is staffed with peer advisors who can offer feedback and suggestions based on their own experience that can guide you to choosing the best major for what you need. Once you choose a major, you will continue advising with your particular department, so MAC should be a stepping stone on your way to a degree. Visit their offi ce to set up an appointment. Tip: Seeing an advisor is mandatory every semester for the undeclared, so do it early and avoid the hassle and the rush later. It’s okay to be undecided in your freshmen year, but if you fi nd yourself nearing junior year without any direction, you should start worrying.

FRESHMEN SEMINARS PHOTOS BY ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

The Mānoa Advising Center (top) is located right in the entrance of QLCSS, while the Honors Program is tucked in the back of Sinclair Library in the Commons. Use the door behind the stairs to find it.

Where: Various classes When: Register online during scheduled time It’s a bit too late to sign up for ACE Leaning Clusters – where

groups of freshmen are placed in the same classes to help foster camaraderie and support in their fi rst semester – but Freshmen Seminars are still available. Freshmen Seminars are 10-person classes that only enroll freshmen, so the intention is to facilitate the transition between high-school classes and the demands of college. Most seminars fulfi ll general education requirements. Seminars are marked with section numbers in the 300’s, so keep that in mind when you register.

Tip: Large-enrollment lecture courses are pretty overwhelming if it’s your fi rst semester, so if you feel uncertain about whether you can resist the temptation of sneaking out when there are 200 other peers that will mask your absence, you should take smaller classes to start off.

H O N O R S P RO G R A M

Where: Sinclair Library Commons When: Applications for spring 2014 accepted starting in September If you prefer to excel beyond the norm, the Honors program can offer extra opportunities to ambitious freshmen. It might be too late to apply for this fall, but applications are open for spring starting in September. Being an Honors student has many perks, including smaller, more focused classes; special housing on campus; networking and degree honors later. Freshmen should look at Selected Studies as their starting point to entering the program.

Tip: Honors may seem like extra work, but if you’re a dedicated student with aspirations of graduate school or law school later, this boost may be invaluable. Plus, the priority registration never hurts.


Page 17 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

What advice do you have for incoming freshmen? COMPILED

BY

SAMANTHA BAUMGARTNER Staff Writer

CASEY NAK AMUR A

C OM M U N I C AT I O N S JUNIOR

Figure out a good class schedule because

that makes all the difference during the semester, whether you wake up on time, have breaks to eat, time to get a job or if you’re just not feeling up to it. Make

lots of friends

and get in good with lots of people because you never know who is going to hook it up for you.

H A N A A H YO U C OM M U N I C AT I O N S JUNIOR

Get involved in something, like a club or an on-campus event. Do intramurals; it is a great way to meet

new people, as well as get exercise.

M A R K TRUA X

C H R I S YO U N G

B U S I N E SS JUNIOR

Go to class.

T R AV E L I N D U S T RY M A N AG E M E N T JUNIOR

Hawai‘i has a lot of

Don’t procrastinate – and not just with schoolwork. Make sure to make payments on time, and make sure everything else that needs to be

temptations you can reward yourself with – after you go to class. I wish someone had told me to surround myself with people who will make me a better person.

priorities.

College has

done for the upcoming year is done as soon as possible.

SA R A BAU M GA RTN E R P R E - DE N TA L H YG I E N E SOPHOMORE

J AC I E C H A N G K I N E S I O LO G Y SOPHOMORE

Don’t be afraid to invite people to hang out with you, even if you just met them, because it is better to know more people

Buy a lot of fans. The dorms

are really hot. You don’t want to wake up really sweaty, so

the better.

the more fans,

than to not really know anyone. Also,

explore

the island because you’ll fi nd more things than you knew existed. Freshmen don’t get down on yourself for bad grades.

year is hard;


Page 18 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

How to graduate in four years Graduating in four years isn’t easy, and sometimes it feels almost impossible. But with the right steps, receiving your degree on time can be an achievable reality: All it takes is a structured plan and a lot of perseverance. Make a goal to reach every year, whether it’s seeing an advisor to narrow down your major or finishing your general education requirements by sophomore year. Having a step-by-step plan will help you become more organized in school and in life. Here is a timeline to follow as you begin your college career.

well as what upper-level classes you should be taking in your junior and senior years. Many people take classes for fun without realizing they’ve fulfilled the same requirement several times. There’s nothing wrong with exploring your options during college, but don’t waste them by taking similar classes that don’t do anything for your degree. Be proactive in clubs this year, and run for a club or board officer seat to get more acquainted with companies and organizations. Being a member of an independent organization on campus isn’t necessary to graduate, but it’ll help you network with professionals who can get you internships during school and jobs out of college.

D U R I N G YO U R F R E S H M A N Y E A R

D U R I N G YO U R J U N I O R Y E A R

It is essential to see an advisor as soon as possible, and it’s mandatory for students to see one each year, so you should get that out of the way in the beginning. Advising can get you acquainted with any major you want to pursue. Whether it’s medicine or law, planning a schedule that works for your specific major is vital for that four-year degree. Peer advisers are students themselves and will help you off the beaten path and on to a paved and structured one. Most can tell you from experience how easy or difficult certain classes are, which can give you a better idea of which classes to take. Don’t hesitate to ask questions, and take this time to experiment and pursue the harder major now – it may be too late to switch it later. Make a few mock schedules for each semester to get a view of how you’ll fi nish that degree in four years. Since some majors suggest taking summer sessions to prevent a full course load during the fall and spring semesters, students should plan their schedules carefully. Have back-up classes in case you miss some during registration, and plan accordingly around those changes.

Finish up your general education requirements, but start looking for an internship. Devote this year to getting real work experience. Some students think getting an internship is only essential in your senior year, but the longer you are at an internship, the more likely you’ll be hired afterward. The point of an internship is to network with potential employers who’ll give you an insight into a variety of careers. It’s a school all in itself, giving you the inside scoop on what it takes to make a degree into a career.

B OBBY B ERGONIO Staff Writer

D U R I N G YO U R S O P H OMO R E YEAR Aim to have at least half or more of your general education requirements fulfilled. Sophomore year should be the time when you’ve decided which major you’ll pursue, as

D U R I N G YO U R S E N I O R Y E A R Double check on any requirements you’ve missed. The average student can switch majors up to three times during college, and it’s necessary to double check on your requirements for your fi nal major, lest you get surprised during your “fi nal” semester. Don’t be one of those seniors who didn’t realize they were three credits short from graduating. Always review your requirements with an advisor who verifies what you have and haven’t taken and finds you loopholes. Lastly, finish up all the necessary graduation forms. Waiting until the end of your final semester will hurt you, so fill out that goldenrod early. Order your gown as soon as possible before senioritis gets to you. You’re at the home stretch, turning your tassels once again, so don’t procrastinate. A four-year degree should be in your hands in no time.

SACHI KASAHARA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I


Page 19 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

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Page 20 | Ka Leo | New Student Orientation

Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

ur t o y t mee Studen New ntation Orie aders Le Angela Caoili

Katy Ackman Hometown: Honolulu, HI Major(s): Theatre Year in school: Freshman Words of wisdom: “Go confidently in the direction of your dreams.”

HHometown: ometown: AAiea, iea, HI HI Major(s): Political Science Year in school: Sophomore Words of wisdom: “Take advantage of what UH Manoa has to offer to their students. Make an impression and do what you can to stand out amongst your peers.”

Vyvy Hu ynh Hometown: Honolulu, HI Major(s): Biology Year in school: Sophomore Words of wisdom: “No matter how old we are, we still need the love and support of our family.”

Brenden Burk Dulce Ramos Chun a u h s Jo

Hometown: Waipahu, HI Major(s): Pre-Business Hometown: Honolulu, HI Year in school: Sophomore Major(s): KRS Words of wisdom: “Don’t let your Year in school: Senior new atmosphere fear you! Go out Words of wisdom: “Go to class, and make the best out of your take notes, study hard, and don’t experience at UH Manoa.” procrastinate.”

Hometown: Haiku, Maui, HI Major(s): Political Science and Sociology Year in school: Senior Words of wisdom: “College will present you with many challenges, some will be easy and others will be hard. But as long as you put in your all, you will always succeed!”

bler a e D e Roann Hometown: Honolulu, HI Major(s): English (pathway: Prepharmacy) Year in school: Junior Words of wisdom: “Never give in, never give out, never give up.”

Mark Gumtang Hometown: Waipahu, HI Major(s): Kinesiology & Rehabilitation Science Year in school: Junior Words of wisdom: “Establish good study habits and study hard, but don’t forget to have fun and relax.”


Page 21 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

How to use

LAULIMA

PAIGE TAKEYA Special Issues Editor Education is moving online – and the University of Hawai‘i has two portal websites that strive to serve all of your academic needs. However, the labyrinthine MyUH Portal and Laulima are complex in their myriad of features. Use this guide to help you navigate the links and master your tools.

I’ve not, in the five years I have been at UH, ever had any use for this home page. All the things you do on Laulima will be through the individual class pages.

Your professor will post important reminders and messages here. They are typically emailed directly to you but are also archived on this tab.

Some classes like to make use of Laulima’s built-in forums to facilitate class discussion and sharing. You can also directly message your classmates here, but note that there are no email notifications when someone sends you a PM.

All the PDFs and files your professor wants to use for the course are stored here. If you are told, “The readings are on Laulima,” this is where they’ll be.

If you’re lucky, your professor will keep your grades updated and viewable here. Not many professors use this tool, however.

If you want to email your professor or your classmates, and you don’t have their direct email address, you can head to the Mailtool to contact them.

Some professors – not many, but a few – will ask that you submit assignments via Laulima’s Drop Box. You can upload your files here, and your professor can download them directly.


Page 22 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

How to use

My UH Continued from page 21

C H E C K C L A S S AVA I L A B I L I T Y This is a crucial tool during registration. Follow this link to see a complete listing of all classes offered by the UH system as well as how many students are enrolled in each one.

S TA R D E G R E E C H E C K/ TRANSCRIPT STAR will show you two important things: an unofficial transcript with all your grades and a roadmap of your current academic progress. If you’re unsure how far you’ve fulfilled your graduation requirements, STAR has them all listed for you.

MY T O O L S This shows you your current class schedule. You can also find quick access to Laulima, your library account and UH email account here.

MY P RO F I L E Account settings (including password reset and automatic logouts) are here. You can also look at what your student directory entry looks like and set your UH emergency notification settings.

UH LIFE This tab includes bookmarks to websites for all the UH system campuses as well as a SECE job search bar, carpool buddy finder and weather report.

C H E C K R E G I S T R AT I O N S TAT U S V I E W C H A RG E S/M A K E PAYM E N T This is another key page during registration season: You need to head to this page to pay your tuition online and avoid getting unregistered for non-payment.

VIEW GRADES This takes you straight to STAR, so it’s a redundant link.

VIEW HOLDS

This link will tell you what day and time you register and what overrides you have.

A D D/ D RO P C O U R S E S This is where you will enroll for classes. Be sure you pull the course registration numbers off the availability list before you jump in here.

PERSONAL ANNOUNCEMENTS

If you cannot register for some reason, head to this page and find out why. Holds can be due to library fines or unpaid student fees, so take care of the problems right away.

It sounds important, but it’s just your class schedule.

FINANCIAL AID

E V E N T C A L E N DA R

This page will break down all your financial aid information. Any scholarships you’ve won or loans you’ve received will be listed. Sometimes scholarships need to be accepted through this page before you can receive them, so it’s helpful to check at least once in a while.

Many campus and departmental events are listed here, so if you’re interested in getting involved with academic life, it’s a good place to start.


Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

Page 23 | Ka Leo | New Student Orientation

New Student Orientation Leaders

Justin Miyano Allyson Arrieta Hometown: Kahului, Maui, HI Major(s): Social Work and Philippine Language and Literature Year in school: Senior Words of wisdom: “Freshman 155 will happen if you make it happen.”

Hometown: Kobe, Japan Major(s): Biology Year in school: Senior Words of wisdom: “Work Hard Play Hard.”

alli C a r Sier

Kimberly Onishi Hometown: Aiea, HI Major(s): Secondary Education Year in school: Senior Words of wisdom: “Know yourself. If you know who you are, you will never stray far.”

Nikki Atienza Hometown: Bremerton, WA Major(s): Communications Year in school: Junior Words of wisdom: “This is a fresh new start for you. Do things that you weren’t able to do before and take advantage of what UH has to offer.”

leyn K y e Jeffr

er

Hometown: Mililani, HI Major(s): Astro Physics Year in school: Sophomore Words of wisdom: “Get out there, socialize, and have fun. All while studying hard as well. “

han

Hometown: Aiea, HI Major(s): English and Political Science Year in school: Sophomore Words of wisdom: “Explore! Take risks! Have fun! And most importantly, find your passion; once you do, you’ll never “work” a day again in your life because every day will be filled with what you love doing.”

Laura Hanson Hometown: Aiea, HI Major(s): Undecided Year in school: Sophomore Words of wisdom: “Don’t freak out, college gives you great experiences and, although it may seem daunting at first, it WILL get better.”

itkow W n h o J

ski

Hometown: Seal Beach, CA Major(s): Accounting Year in school: Senior Words of wisdom: “Find the right balance between work and play. Don’t get too stressed out over school work.”


Page 24 | Ka Leo

W i-

w

to

e s u Fi

UH

Ho

UH Manoa Manual

CAITLIN KURODA Senior Staff Writer You’ll be glad to know that your admission to the Universit y of Hawai‘i at M ā noa grants you access to its campus -wide wireless net work. T his will come in handy when you need to check your email bet ween classes. Follow these steps and tips to connect to and simplif y your experience with UH M ā noa’s Wi-Fi.

CONNECTING TO UH WI - FI What you need: • Laptop or any device with a wireless network adapter • Supported operating system such as Windows Vista or Mac OS • UH username and password (set up through myuh.hawaii.edu if you do not already have one)

RENZO GONZALEZ / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

What you do: 1. Turn on your laptop’s Wi-Fi (if it is not already on). 2. Select “UHM” from the available networks. 3. A n Internet window should open automatically, but if it does not, manually open your Internet browser. 4. You will automatically be taken to a login page, where you then enter your UH username and password. Once entered, your browsing session is good to go. 5. Go to hawaii.edu/askus/1037 for more clarifi cation and detailed steps if necessary.

Things to keep in mind: • The wireless network is stronger and weaker in certain places. Typically, it will work much better indoors (such as in a classroom or at Campus Center) rather than an outdoor area like McCarthy Mall. • You are responsible (and may be held accountable) for your actions and activity while connected to the network. • You may need to reconnect to the network every time you close your laptop or move locations, which can be a hassle. However, you can get around this by taking advantage of UH’s wireless passthrough.

S TAY I N G C O N N E C T E D T O UH WI-FI WITH WIRELESS PA S S T H RO U G H What you need: • Wireless device’s MAC address • UH username and password • Device description

What you do: 1. Find the MAC address of your device. Go to hawaii.edu/askus/1035, which details the steps to find the MAC address on various types of phones and laptops. 2. Once you have your MAC address, go to hawaii.edu/wireless/pt, where you will need to log in with your UH username and password. 3. Add a new passthrough by entering the MAC address and selecting the type of device from the given menu list. 4. Once you click “Add,” your device will be saved, and you will no longer have to log in every time you connect to the Internet. Things to keep in mind: • Passthrough can save up to 10 devices per username. • Each passthrough lasts for one year, but you can easily renew it on the passthrough website. • The website does not explain how to find the MAC address for newer devices, such as laptops running Windows 8.


Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

Page 25 | Ka Leo | New Student Orientation

attion ntta en New Student Orie a ers ead Le L

Robert Moran Kimberly

Flora Wang Hometown: Honolulu, HI Major(s): Nutrition - Dietetics Year in school: Sophomore Words of wisdom: “Learn how to manage your time wisely! It’s really, really critical to find a balance that works for you.”

Elisabeth Seamon

Turalva

Hometown: Waipahu, HI Major(s): Nursing Year in school: Senior Words of wisdom: “With a positive attitude, perseverance and determination, you will definitely get to where you want to be. Don’t hesitate to ask for help.”

tcher Betty Fle

Hometown: Kapolei, HI Hometown: Manoa, HI Major(s): Nursing Major(s): Psychology Year in school: Junior Year in school: Senior Words of wisdom: “Getting involved Words of wisdom: “Don’t settle for in something that you’re interested the fastest way out. Get the major in is a great way to make friends! you want even though it may set Check out the variety of clubs and you back a year or two.” organizations on campus.”

Hometown: Hilo, HI Major(s): Economics Year in school: Junior Words of wisdom: “Meet as many people as you can! Find the balance of school, work, and extracurriculars that works for you.”

Julia Gomes Hometown: Kaneohe, HI Major(s): Mechanical Engineering Year in school: Senior Words of wisdom: “Try new things! There are so many oncampus and dorm activities that you can participate in to meet new people.”

atacan B n y l e Ra Hometown: Nanakuli, HI Major(s): Communications Year in school: Sophomore Words of wisdom: “Make friends and don’t be shy! There are secretly people who want friends to study and hang with.”

Spencer Scanlan Hometown: Laie, HI Major(s): Educational Psychology Year in school: Second Year Graduate Student Words of wisdom: “Be the good student your mom thinks you are.”


Page 26 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

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Page 27 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

Adult decisions have adult consequences: a drug primer

Marijuana, MDMA and psilocybin mushrooms are considered Schedule I drugs, meaning they have “a high potential for abuse and potentially severe psychological and/or physical dependence,” according to the Drug Enforcement Administration website.

TIM M ETR A Opinions Editor Welcome to one of the first stops on the joyride of adulthood: college. Now that you’re here, you can expect to be exposed to some form of recreational drug use. When it’s put that way – “recreational” drugs – it makes it sound like they’re fun and awesome. The scary part is that they can feel super fun and awesome – until they’re not. You’ve all seen the Meth Project commercials, posters and billboards: Those aren’t lies. The lies are you and your friends telling yourselves things like: That can’t be you, it’ll be ok, you’re not addicted, it’s just a study aid, I don’t need to do this, it’s just to relax and so on. Here’s a breakdown of some of the more popular recreational drugs you’ll encounter.

M A R I J UA N A The high Smoking pot for most people has a relaxing effect. Everything is funnier, food is extra delicious and you feel like your brain is wrapped in cotton. Some people claim that it makes them more creative. Short-term effects Short-term memory impairment, paranoia, anxiety, dry mouth, bloodshot eyes, impaired driving ability Long-term consequences It has been suggested that longterm marijuana use can lead to memory impairment and the development of incipient mental disorders such as schizophrenia or depression.

A D D E R A L L A N D R I TA L I N These two drugs are safe if taken under a doctor’s supervision. A lot of students will fake ADHD symptoms to receive a prescription. If you take these drugs and get hopped up, you don’t need them. If you actually had ADHD, they wouldn’t get you “high.” The high They don’t have the same sort of pleasurable “high” as other drugs; they’re mostly abused as study aids. They’re used outside of prescrip-

PHOTOS BY COURTNEY COOPER KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

tions to stay awake longer and become more focused. Short-term effects Psychosis, suicidal ideation, anxiety, insomnia, dry mouth, dizziness, nervousness, tiredness, headaches, weight loss, diarrhea, hair loss, chest pain, decreased sex drive, rashes, nausea, irritability, mania, stunted growth Long-term consequences Amphetamine psychosis; there is also data that indicates impairment of cardiovascular function.

M DM A (E C S TA S Y ) This drug is one of the most insidious. Because ecstasy is illegal worldwide, its purity is notoriously questionable. Quite often, it’s not even MDMA you’re taking. While a single dose of ecstasy probably won’t kill you, a single dose of something that you think is ecstasy could easily land you in the hospital, especially if you’re drinking on top of it. This problem is compounded because MDMA is easier to overdose upon than other drugs. The high Extreme sense of well-being, mild visual hallucinations, increased

sensuality, euphoria Short-term effects Anxiety, paranoia, depression, impaired focus, dizziness/vertigo, diarrhea/constipation, insomnia, exhaustion, memory impairment to the point of amnesia, convulsions, irregular blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, cardiovascular problems including cardiac arrest, hemorrhage or stroke, organ failure including liver and kidneys, coma, death Long-term consequences Depression, anxiety, verbal memory impairment, serotonergic damage

P S I L O C Y B I N MU S H RO OM S Psilocybin mushrooms aren’t toxic enough to kill you simply from ingestion. The danger with “shrooms” is more psychological in nature. The high Euphoria, subjective timelessness, visual hallucinations, synesthesia, spiritual/mystic connectedness/empathy Short-term effects Anxiety, paranoia, suicidal thoughts, urges and actions, homicidal thoughts, psychosis, depression Long-term consequences Long-term personality changes, depression


Page 28 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

JOSEPH H AN Managing Editor

Drinking with friends and getting really drunk is often seen as a rite of passage, but it can be detrimental without some foresight. Here are a few things to keep in mind so you don’t end up slumped on the fl oor or sick and acquainted with a toilet.

W H AT D O E S A L C O H O L D O? Alcohol gets absorbed in the bloodstream and eventually affects cognitive abilities – coordination, attention, memory, emotions and behavior – and these determine blood alcohol concentration. The personalities of your friends may undergo a transformation – more friendly, agressive or unintelligible – and alcohol consumption can result in everything from euphoria and excitement to confusion, stupor, unconsciousness and death. Common side effects include exhaustion, loss of balance or vision, dizziness,

Think before you drink slurred speech and nausea.

H OW MU C H I S I N W H AT ? Different drinks contain alcohol percentages by volume: beer, 3-10 percent; wine, 8-14 percent; spirits, 20-70 percent. According to the Mānoa Alcohol Project, one standard drink equals a 1.5-ounce shot of 80-proof liquor, 5 ounces of wine or 12 ounces of beer. The recommended medical limits for alcohol for men are no more than four standard drinks in a day and no more than three for women.

ALCOHOL POISONING Alcohol poisoning is caused by excessive consumption and can be fatal. Critical signs include slow or irregular breathing, hypothermia, seizures, vomiting and mental confusion. Address the problem as soon as you notice any of these symptoms in a friend, and take care of the ones that are worst off to prevent any danger. This will prevent a trip to the hospital and possibly save someone’s life.

S L OW A N D S T E A DY Drink in moderation, and set a limit for yourself. This is particularly diffi cult in peer pressure situations (you may feel compelled to keep up with your friends or attempt to outdrink the competition), but you need to know your limits. Pace yourself: Rapid consumption disrupts your body’s metabolic rate and leads to a higher blood alcohol concentration.

RU N N I N G O N E M P T Y Do not drink on an empty stomach. Eat before you have your fi rst drink because food will slow down the absorption rate of alcohol. Snack while you drink, but don’t eat too much because this is how you gain weight. Plus, you don’t want to see it all again in the event that you greet your refl ection in toilet water.

DIFFFERENT DRINKS Beer before liquor, never been sicker? However the saying goes, moderate the

time between taking shots or other drinks. Drinking a variety of liquors with differing alcohol content by volume will have compounding effects on your body and intoxicate you more quickly.

WAT E R Hydrate yourself: Water will dilute the alcohol in your body. It’s good to have a non-alcoholic beverage in between drinks, and since you will get thirsty, don’t drink more alcohol to remedy your body’s cry for water. Avoid malicious friends who may give you vodka instead.

learn more Check out manoaalcoholproject.org to learn more about the health risks of alcohol.


Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

Page 29 | Ka Leo | New Student Orientation

SERVE. LEAD. EMPOWER. Get Involved! Become the leader you’ve always wanted to be!

Welcome We are your Student Government! 101ST SENATE President Richard Mizusawa Vice President Francesca Koethe Secretary Emily Murai Treasurer Jeremy Tomono Senator-at-Large Cassandra Belisario Senator-at-Large Christopher Escalante Senator-at-Large Kendyl Oshiro Senator-at-Large Kelly Zakimi Senators of the Colleges of Arts and Sciences: Brenden Burk Matthew Chung Kelsey Coria Brandon Cox Sonja Dobbs Gary Foresman Jai Eun Kim Rio Kwon Ryan Mandado Sean Mitsui Robert Moran Noriaki Kevin Omokawa Heather Schulz Chantelle Siador Christopher Stump Patrick Tam Dwane Tegman Jennifer Wong Senator of the College of Education – Kimberly Onishi Senator of the College of Engineering – Stephen Nishihara Senator of College of Health Sciences & Social Welfare – Chloe Fonacier (Consisting of Schools of Medicine, Nursing & Dental Hygiene & Social Work) Senator of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources – Krista Ann Lee Senator of the Shidler College of Business – Martin Nguyen

Founded 1912 We work to enrich the student experience by providing scholarships, funding for student organizations, advocating on behalf of student interests. Fall 2013 Special Elections Packets, Scholarship Applications and more will be available in the ASUH Office or online on the first day of school.

VACANT SEATS Senator of the Colleges of Arts and Sciences (1) Senator of the Hawai‘inuiakea School of Hawaiian Knowledge (1) Senator of the School of Architecture (1) Senator of the School of Ocean, Earth Science, and Technology (1) Senator of the School of Pacific and Asian Studies (1) Senator of the School of Travel Industry Management (1) Senator of the Shidler College of Business (1)

Campus Center 211A · 2465 Campus Road · Honolulu, HI 96822 · asuh@hawaii.edu · 808.956.4822 · asuh.hawaii.edu Look for us on Facebook and Twitter


Page 30 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

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Page 31 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

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Page 33 | Ka Leo

Page 32 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

UH Manoa Manual The Bean Counter Coffee, tea, cups of cereal and wraps are part of this small coffee stop. It’s located far from the other food vendors, but The Bean Counter prides itself on its unique homemade bagels, including chocolate, strawberry, taro and banana. Location: Shidler College of Business Accepts: Cash, credit card

Sweet Revenge

Verde Kaimukī

After seeing their huge rotation of 30 sweet pies and 10 savory pies, you won’t be able to resist. This truck only stops on campus on Mondays, so keep your schedule open.

Panda Express Its Chinese lunch plates like its guilty pleasure orange chicken and healthier broccoli beef satisfy. Entrees are huge, yet can be low-calorie with the Wok Smart option.

Location: Behind Pacific Ocean Science and Technology Accepts: Cash, credit card

Location: Paradise Palms Accepts: Cash, credit card

Domino’s Pizza Express Domino’s carries more than pizza: They also have sandwiches, noodles and salad. Grab a pizza (there are plenty of toppings) and soda combo for the best deal. Location: Paradise Palms Accepts: Cash, credit card

Honolulu Gourmet This snack bar carries pesto pasta, focaccia bread and self-serve yogurt. The prices may seem high, but the yogurt is an excellent treat. Location: Paradise Palms Accepts: Cash, credit card

Al’s Express Fifteen years of business have created a friendly coffee stand that also serves lunches of pork or oyako donburi (chicken and egg on rice). Its excellent rapport with customers and good food make a trip here worthwhile. Location: John A. Burns Hall Accepts: Cash only

Da Spot An offshoot of the restaurant on South King Street, this vegetarian food truck serves a mix of curry plates and Middle Eastern specialties. Their 15 smoothies featuring mango, passion fruit juice and more fruit flavors are all worth a try. Location: Sustainability Courtyard Accepts: Cash, credit card

Cooking Fresh for You With lunches ranging from pan-seared steak to Thai curry, Cooking Fresh for You is one of the more interesting food trucks on campus. Chat with the friendly staff – they answer questions about everything from food to manga. Location: Kennedy Theatre Accepts: Cash, credit card

Huge breakfast and lunch burritos come with rice, cheese, eggs, guacamole and other bonuses. Breakfast burritos are highly recommended. Location: Saunders Hall Accepts: Cash, credit card

Simply Ono India Café Its South Indian and Malaysian cuisine includes chicken and lamb curries, roti flatbread and even fresh watermelon juice. Beware anything labelled spicy: It lives up to its name.

Campus dining breakdown

Location: Paradise Palms Accepts: Cash, credit card

Govinda’s This vegetarian vendor is all-natural and often organic. Plates with curry or eggless quiche rotate in their Indian-inspired menu. There are only two entrée options per day. The staff is very friendly.

L&L Hawaiian Barbecue Try chicken katsu, teriyaki chicken, loco moco and other local foods here. Its plate lunches are massive: Get the mini size unless you’re starving. Location: Paradise Palms and Stan Sheriff Center Accepts: Cash, credit card

Laverne’s Lunch Wagon This all-Hawaiian food truck has lau lau, adobo and other plate lunches for sale. The only poi, haupia and li hing pineapple you can find on campus are here.

K IRSTIE CAMPBELL Contributing Writer The University of Hawai‘i at M ā noa hosts a large variety of independent food vendors in addition to its cafeteria and inhouse options. No matter what kind of food you may be craving, you can fi nd it on campus. So many choices can be overwhelming, so use Ka Leo’s guide to get the lowdown on where you can fi nd the best eats.

Location: Sustainability Courtyard Accepts: Cash, credit card

Ba-Le Vietnamese sandwiches, spring rolls and pho come in fair portions here. Enjoy pupus and drinks from the only bar on campus or Thai bubble tea and parfaits.

Location: Behind Pacific Ocean Science and Technology Accepts: Cash, credit card

Le Crêpe Café From meat and veggie crêpes to Nutella and fruit, Le Crêpe Café always delivers fresh crêpes and cheap coffee. Watching your crêpe being made may be the best part.

Location: Hemenway Hall Accepts: Meals/points, cash, credit card

Location: In front of University Law School Accepts: Cash only

Jamba Juice Although often crowded, the convenient smoothies and pastries keep students coming. A 16-ounce smoothie is about $5 – perfect for a meal swipe. Be warned: This Jamba does not take bonus points or gift cards. Location: Campus Center Accepts: Meals/points, cash, credit card

The Curb If you’re rushing to class, the grab-and-go coffee window in the back is for you. Otherwise, come inside for a seasonal fruit iced tea or a lemon bar.

PHOTOS BY PAIGE TAKEYA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I FRONT COVER BY NICHOLAS SMITH/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Location: Paradise Palms Accepts: Cash, credit card

Food here comes quickly. Lunch plates range from spicy ahi poke to smoked meat and come with rice and an option of macaroni, tossed or potato salad. Location: Krauss Hall turnaround and Biomedical Building B106 Accepts: Cash only

Simply to Go This alternative to Starbucks offers coffee, pastries and gelato. Because it discounts its snacks in the afternoon, it can be a cheap stop. Be sure to try the locally sourced Ono Popsicle. Location: Campus Center Accepts: Meals/points, cash, credit card

Starbucks Grab coffee and tea at this franchise. Starbucks is always a pleasure, but be sure to budget time for the line. Location: Campus Center Accepts: Cash, credit card

Subway Subway’s generous hours are convenient. Come early for breakfast combo specials: These are the best deals in the store. Location: Campus Center Accepts: Cash, credit card

Super Gyros This is the only restaurant on campus that specializes in Greek food. Steak plates and sandwiches are recommended by staff. Location: Paradise Palms Accepts: Cash, credit card


Page 33 | Ka Leo

Page 32 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

UH Manoa Manual The Bean Counter Coffee, tea, cups of cereal and wraps are part of this small coffee stop. It’s located far from the other food vendors, but The Bean Counter prides itself on its unique homemade bagels, including chocolate, strawberry, taro and banana. Location: Shidler College of Business Accepts: Cash, credit card

Sweet Revenge

Verde Kaimukī

After seeing their huge rotation of 30 sweet pies and 10 savory pies, you won’t be able to resist. This truck only stops on campus on Mondays, so keep your schedule open.

Panda Express Its Chinese lunch plates like its guilty pleasure orange chicken and healthier broccoli beef satisfy. Entrees are huge, yet can be low-calorie with the Wok Smart option.

Location: Behind Pacific Ocean Science and Technology Accepts: Cash, credit card

Location: Paradise Palms Accepts: Cash, credit card

Domino’s Pizza Express Domino’s carries more than pizza: They also have sandwiches, noodles and salad. Grab a pizza (there are plenty of toppings) and soda combo for the best deal. Location: Paradise Palms Accepts: Cash, credit card

Honolulu Gourmet This snack bar carries pesto pasta, focaccia bread and self-serve yogurt. The prices may seem high, but the yogurt is an excellent treat. Location: Paradise Palms Accepts: Cash, credit card

Al’s Express Fifteen years of business have created a friendly coffee stand that also serves lunches of pork or oyako donburi (chicken and egg on rice). Its excellent rapport with customers and good food make a trip here worthwhile. Location: John A. Burns Hall Accepts: Cash only

Da Spot An offshoot of the restaurant on South King Street, this vegetarian food truck serves a mix of curry plates and Middle Eastern specialties. Their 15 smoothies featuring mango, passion fruit juice and more fruit flavors are all worth a try. Location: Sustainability Courtyard Accepts: Cash, credit card

Cooking Fresh for You With lunches ranging from pan-seared steak to Thai curry, Cooking Fresh for You is one of the more interesting food trucks on campus. Chat with the friendly staff – they answer questions about everything from food to manga. Location: Kennedy Theatre Accepts: Cash, credit card

Huge breakfast and lunch burritos come with rice, cheese, eggs, guacamole and other bonuses. Breakfast burritos are highly recommended. Location: Saunders Hall Accepts: Cash, credit card

Simply Ono India Café Its South Indian and Malaysian cuisine includes chicken and lamb curries, roti flatbread and even fresh watermelon juice. Beware anything labelled spicy: It lives up to its name.

Campus dining breakdown

Location: Paradise Palms Accepts: Cash, credit card

Govinda’s This vegetarian vendor is all-natural and often organic. Plates with curry or eggless quiche rotate in their Indian-inspired menu. There are only two entrée options per day. The staff is very friendly.

L&L Hawaiian Barbecue Try chicken katsu, teriyaki chicken, loco moco and other local foods here. Its plate lunches are massive: Get the mini size unless you’re starving. Location: Paradise Palms and Stan Sheriff Center Accepts: Cash, credit card

Laverne’s Lunch Wagon This all-Hawaiian food truck has lau lau, adobo and other plate lunches for sale. The only poi, haupia and li hing pineapple you can find on campus are here.

K IRSTIE CAMPBELL Contributing Writer The University of Hawai‘i at M ā noa hosts a large variety of independent food vendors in addition to its cafeteria and inhouse options. No matter what kind of food you may be craving, you can fi nd it on campus. So many choices can be overwhelming, so use Ka Leo’s guide to get the lowdown on where you can fi nd the best eats.

Location: Sustainability Courtyard Accepts: Cash, credit card

Ba-Le Vietnamese sandwiches, spring rolls and pho come in fair portions here. Enjoy pupus and drinks from the only bar on campus or Thai bubble tea and parfaits.

Location: Behind Pacific Ocean Science and Technology Accepts: Cash, credit card

Le Crêpe Café From meat and veggie crêpes to Nutella and fruit, Le Crêpe Café always delivers fresh crêpes and cheap coffee. Watching your crêpe being made may be the best part.

Location: Hemenway Hall Accepts: Meals/points, cash, credit card

Location: In front of University Law School Accepts: Cash only

Jamba Juice Although often crowded, the convenient smoothies and pastries keep students coming. A 16-ounce smoothie is about $5 – perfect for a meal swipe. Be warned: This Jamba does not take bonus points or gift cards. Location: Campus Center Accepts: Meals/points, cash, credit card

The Curb If you’re rushing to class, the grab-and-go coffee window in the back is for you. Otherwise, come inside for a seasonal fruit iced tea or a lemon bar.

PHOTOS BY PAIGE TAKEYA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I FRONT COVER BY NICHOLAS SMITH/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Location: Paradise Palms Accepts: Cash, credit card

Food here comes quickly. Lunch plates range from spicy ahi poke to smoked meat and come with rice and an option of macaroni, tossed or potato salad. Location: Krauss Hall turnaround and Biomedical Building B106 Accepts: Cash only

Simply to Go This alternative to Starbucks offers coffee, pastries and gelato. Because it discounts its snacks in the afternoon, it can be a cheap stop. Be sure to try the locally sourced Ono Popsicle. Location: Campus Center Accepts: Meals/points, cash, credit card

Starbucks Grab coffee and tea at this franchise. Starbucks is always a pleasure, but be sure to budget time for the line. Location: Campus Center Accepts: Cash, credit card

Subway Subway’s generous hours are convenient. Come early for breakfast combo specials: These are the best deals in the store. Location: Campus Center Accepts: Cash, credit card

Super Gyros This is the only restaurant on campus that specializes in Greek food. Steak plates and sandwiches are recommended by staff. Location: Paradise Palms Accepts: Cash, credit card


Page 34 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

Meal plan breakdown K IRSTIE CAMPBELL Contributing Writer The many meal plans offered by the university make dining decisions a little confusing. This guide outlines the basics of university dorm dining. Dining plans are comprised of set numbers of meal swipes per week and a set number of Dining Dollars given to students per semester. Meal swipes are equivalent to one meal at Hale Aloha or Gateway House cafeterias or $5 at select campus locations like the Campus Center Food Court. Meals expire weekly, but points last until the end of the year and serve as cash.

PRIME Amount: 19 meal swipes, $100 in Dining Dollars Cost: $2,250 (Fall 2013) Pros: Three meals per weekday, with brunch and dinner on weekends. Great for big eaters. Cons: Expensive. Many students don’t have time to eat three meals per day, and meal swipes often go to waste. Best for: Out-of-state students

CHOICE

A sampling of Hale Aloha dining options reveals the variety offered by the cafeterias. For more information about meal plans, go to uhmdining. com/plans. ISMAEL MA KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Amount: 14 meal swipes, $175 in Dining Dollars Cost: $1,950 (Fall 2013) Pros: Students will always have two meals and some extra points to pick up retail food. Cons: Lunch is on you. Plus, with most retail restaurants closed on weekends, you’re stuck at the Market or the cafeteria. Best for: Those who stay on campus on the weekend

SELECT Amount: 10 meal swipes; $225 in Dining Dollars Cost: $1,700 (Fall 2013) Pros: This is the default plan for incoming dorm residents. It’s the best value, with a large number of points, while still offering sufficient meal swipe options.

Cons: Balancing out meals to include weekends is a hassle. Best for: Those who go home on weekends

BA S I C

Amount: Seven meal swipes; $250 in Dining Dollars Cost: $1,445 (Fall 2013) Pros: The points will pay for extra food, while the meal swipes will still guarantee you a satisfying meal on campus. Cons: Students who don’t shop or budget their meal points for an entire year will be hungry with one meal per day. Best for: Those who eat a lot on weekdays

DINING DOLLARS

Amount: Any value Cost: Any amount Pros: Purchase only the Dining Dollars you’ll need. Get a fi ve percent bonus for $25 and up, and a 10 percent bonus for $75 and up. Cons: Points are not refunded in cash. If you need fewer points than you buy, you’re better off paying cash for your meals. Best for: Off-campus residents or those who run out of meal points.

A PA R TM E N T C L U B

Amount: 50 meal swipes per semester; $75 in Dining Dollars Cost: $615 (Fall 2013) Pros: Unlike other plans, these meals can be spread out through the entire semester and saved for emergencies. Cons: It’s hard to budget 50 meals throughout a year. This plan also has the least amount of points. Best for: Off-campus and apartment residents

RESIDENT DINING CLUB

Amount: One free meal per fi ve purchased Cost: No entry fee Pros: Purchase fi ve meals in cash at either Hale Aloha or Gateway Café, and get one free. As meals vary in price, you could purchase fi ve inexpensive breakfasts and earn a free dinner. Cons: Five meals range in cost from $37 to $52. If you plan to purchase food regularly, consider a different plan. Best for: Off-campus and apartment residents


Page 35 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

Student

Media W e e k FROM SEPTEMBER 9 - 13, 2013 NEWS

KTUH UHPRO KALEO KTUH.ORG UHPRO.ORG KALEO.ORG

r o d n Ve Fair 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm Thursday August 22, 2013

Legacy Pathway

SEE THE BEST OF UH MANOA’S

NEWSPAPER, RADIO AND VIDEO ORGANIZATIONS! JOIN US @

GROOVE IN THE GARDEN

WHEN: SEPTEMBER 12 WHERE: BALE COURTYARD

noa? a M h U o New t ow you h e e s d n Come a e mix! h t o t n i can get

Featuring Over

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local vendors


Page 36 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

WA N T

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Become a writer for Ka Leo!

Join our team of photographers!

Ka Leo

Voice The ofďŹ ce at Ka Leo wants you.

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EDITOR for Ka Leo! We are looking for highly motivated students interested in gaining real world experience SAVE THE PAPER SAVE THE WORLD

2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043 www.kaleo.org/jobs

2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043 www.kaleo.org/jobs

A P P LY T O D AY !

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APPLY TODAY!

THEN JOIN OUR PUBLIC RELATIONS TEAM!

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Page 37 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

Beyond campus: Head out on a walking-distance food adventure ELIAQUIM R EYES Senior Staff Writer

2334 S. King St. 808-947-3707 Mon-Sun 4 p.m.-10 p.m.

CURRY HOUSE COCO ICHIBANYA

With a variety of rice portions, spice levels and toppings to choose from, this place is a student favorite. Curry House’s Japanese-style curry is smooth and full of flavor. However, because of its huge selection of toppings, it’s tempting to experiment and mix different kinds, and some might not blend well together (or with your tastebuds). Katsu and gyoza toppings are standouts, but if you lean more on the healthier side, spinach and mixed vegetables are also delicious. If rice isn’t your thing, Curry House also serves curry udon and side salads. Price-wise, Curry House is affordable for the everyday college student and worth the money you pay. Fair warning: They do not take credit cards here, so remember to bring cash.

ALL PHOTOS BY PAIGE TAKEYA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

1009 University Ave., Room 2 808-947-2206 Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-9 p.m.

If you like Taiwanese-style hotpot, then this place is for you. Sweet Home Café offers a variety of broths, meats, vegetables and sauces for hungry diners to try. While it is not as cheap as other restaurants, this hotpot venue becomes cost-effective when you dine in with a larger group of friends. Sweet Home’s House Special broth is especially good with an order of beef and mixed vegetables with their spicier dipping sauces. But what completes the dinner is the free shave ice (a mixed variety of pudding, tapioca and jello over shave ice) served after the meal. The only downside to this restaurant is that it’s BYOB, and there is usually a long wait. However, given the quality of the food, it’s worth it.

GRYLT

Keen on eating something different while still staying relatively close to campus? The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa is located in the heart of the Honolulu dining scene. Here are four places that you should try during your college career.

SWEET HOME CAFÉ

2764-A Woodlawn Drive 808-988-7832 Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sun 10 a.m.-8 p.m.

If you enjoy a good steak plate, GRY LT offers a variety of grilled meats, starches, sides and sauces to help you create your own platter. It also offers other items such as salads and sandwiches, but for those who like to stack up on meat, GRY LT’s “double your protein” option is available for an additional cost. The meats range from steak, chicken, ahi and other seafood and tofu for vegetarians. GRYLT’s Angus steak is usually a best seller. Plate lunches are pricey and so are the sandwiches, but the portions will defi nitely fi ll you up.

BUBBIES HOMEMADE ICE CREAM & DESSERTS 1010 University Ave. Phone: 808-949-8984 Mon-Thu 12 p.m.-12 a.m.; Fri-Sat 12 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sun 12 p.m.-11:30 p.m. While the idea of ice cream inside mochi, a Japanese sweet rice confection, may sound a little strange, it tastes anything but. Famous for this specialty as well as its decadent ice cream cakes, Bubbies is the go-to place for those who want to satisfy their sweet tooth and try something new. Bubbies’ mochi ice cream f lavors range from the classic vanilla and strawberry to more exotic f lavors such as green tea and azuki bean. Bubbies’ quirkily named sundaes, pies and desserts (such as Maybe the Bag Broke, Bite Me and Hair by Daniel) may entice an adventurous buyer. While prices vary depending on the order and lines can get long in the evening, its ice cream is definitely worth it. Fair warning: Bubbies’ is also cash-only.


Page 38 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

MARKET BREAKDOWN PAIGE TAKEYA Special Issues Editorr It is healthier and cheaper in the long run to cook your own meals instead of living off campus dining. But where should you go to buy the best and cheapest groceries? Use this handy chart to see what works best for you.

NAME

ADDRESS

D I S TA N C E

PRICE

HOURS

S P E C I A LT Y

DISCOUNTS

Nijiya Market

1009 University Ave., Ste. 81

10 min walking or by bus

$$

Mon-Sun 10 a.m.9 p.m.

If you’re looking for Asian foods and supplies, Nijiya is your closest stop. Japanese drinks and other snacks line every aisle, so you won’t fi nd much American fare here. International students will feel right at home. Nijiya’s bento offerings are also great if you’re on the go.

None

Kokua Market Natural Foods

2643 S. King St.

15 min walking or 10 by bus

$$$

Mon-Sun 8 a.m.9 p.m.

Whole Foods is all the way in Kahala Mall, so Kokua Market is a closer alternative. Whether you’re an organic lover or a vegan (or just a healthy eater overall), Kokua has a selection of healthy products for you to grab. Just remember that with organic and GMO-free food comes a heftier price tag. Walk a little further and Down to Earth is another healthy market option.

None

Foodland

Safeway

The Market

1460 S. Beretania St.

888 Kapahulu Ave.

2585 Dole St.

JOSHUA CUNNINGHAM / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

20 min by bus

15 min by bus or 30 min walking

On campus

$

24/7

Yes, sign up for its Maika‘i This might be the furthest of your nearby market options, but Foodland is consistently program to get one of the cheapest markets on the island. Foodland also stocks a lot of local goods and brands. This particular Foodland is known for its extensive poke bar and wine selection. sizable discounts and free goods.

$$

24/7

As a mainland chain, Safeway usually stocks non-local brands, but it is consistent in what it offers from store to store. This, however, means that it is more expensive than Foodland, generally speaking. This particular Safeway has an impressively large prepared food section and a Starbucks, so it is a one-stop market should you choose it.

$$$

Mon-Sun 2 p.m.12 a.m.

Less of a market and more of a convenience store, The Market should not be your fi rst choice for groceries. Though it may be close, you pay for the distance reduction with a price hike. There isn’t a huge selection here, but it does take dining points and blocks, so if you need to spend them or lose them, you might as well do it here.

Yes, sign up for its Club Card program to get customized discount coupons online.

None


Page 39 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual KENNEDY THEATRE | 1963-2013 BE A PART OF KENNEDY THEATRE’S

50TH

ANNIVERSARY SEASON!

MAINSTAGE

ARE YOU A

maniac? We ARE LOOKING FOR YOU The Manoa Maniacs are commied to inslling, PRIDE, UNITY, and SPIRIT into the student body at the University of Hawaii Manoa. Our goal is to create an atmosphere at athlec events and on campus that is excing, posive and energized. We hope to be the bridge that unites the student body with the University of Hawaii athlec teams and players. Together we will prove to be unstoppable.

WANT TO GET INVOLVED? Email us at uhmaniac@hawaii.edu Don’t want to get involved? Email us anyway, we’ll have some fun

Big Love

Look Back/ / Move Forward

SEPT 27 – OCT 6

NOV 15 – 24

Will Big Love survive?

Anniversary Dance Concert

Lady aMu nd the Yang Family Generals

FEB 20 – MARCH 2

APRIL 11 – 20

Jingju (Beijing Opera in English)

Come get GAPPED!

PRIME TIME

The Winter Wild Party Footholds Oct 23 – 27 Jan 29 – Feb 2 LATE NIGHT Identity Crisis Queens of the Night Sept 27 – Oct 5 Nov 16 - 23 For more info: www.hawaii.edu/kennedy Or call box office at 956-7655 (M-F, 10am–1pm) Tickets available at Kennedy Theatre, at etickethawaii.com, at Campus Center, at Stan Sheriff Center beginning Sept 9.

very still & hard to see March 12 – 16

Spring Footholds April 23 – 27

SPECIALS for UH Manoa Students! validated UHM ID required

-$5 ticket to any production -special buy-one-get-one-free nights

Mahalo to the Student Activity and Program fee Board!


Page 40 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

Stay safe, stay aware JACKIE PERREIR A Features Editor

NIK SEU/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

What is Campus Security?

Whenever I tell people that my father is a police offi cer, the fi rst thing they ask is, “Is he strict?” He isn’t – but since he has more than 20 years of experience under his belt, I’ve chosen to take his advice on safety. He says it comes down to being aware at all times. Here are some common situations where you can increase your awareness.

W H I L E WA L K I N G

PAIGE TAKEYA Special Issues Editor Campus Security is the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s 24-hour on-campus law enforcement. You’ll come to recognize their distinctive green lights and uniforms as you spend time at UH Mānoa. Led by Captain Alberta Pukahi, CS handles theft and vandalism cases, trespassers and any other dangers you might encounter while at school. If something happens, CS is the first group on the scene. They also run an escort service to help you get safely to your car, should you feel unsafe about walking in the dark. Sixtyeight emergency call boxes scattered around campus will connect you with CS if you find yourself in a pinch. These stations are marked with a blue light and red phone box. Pressing the call button will connect you to CS directly. You can also sign up for UH emergency alerts directly to your email and phone via MyUH portal to be warned about campus crime and other island disasters (see page 24). While CS is a valuable on-campus resource, don’t forget that you can always call 911 if the situation demands it. CS will work in tandem with law enforcement to keep you safe.

HOW TO CONTACT CS:

956-6911 956-7233 DIRECT LINE

ESCORT SERVICE

This may seem obvious, but a lot of us text, talk or listen to music while walking. If you can’t refrain from any of that while you’re en route, at least look up every so often. Don’t let it distract you from your surroundings. It’s also smart to walk with a friend. You’re less likely to be approached when you’re with someone or a group of people. The more, the merrier.

W H E N YO U G E T T O YO U R VEHICLE Oftentimes, people who are just sitting in their car (often checking their phones) in a parking structure are the ones who are targeted for mugging or theft. Get in your car and leave the structure as soon as you can. Glance around/under your car before getting in. This is not to say you need to get on your hands and knees with a flashlight to make sure no one’s hiding under there, but look when you’re still far enough away from your car to see under it without bending down.

AT YO U R D O R M Be mindful of who you enter the building with/who you open the door for. It’s difficult to determine who does and doesn’t live in your building, but a simple question may make it easier if you’re

SACHI KASAHARA/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

someone who is polite and holds doors open for people. Casually ask, “Do you have a key?” If they live there, they’ll most likely have a key in hand already or will be able to show it to you quickly. If they’re visiting someone, your question will probably make them wait for whomever they’re visiting to come down – which is how it’s supposed to work anyway.

IN CLASS If we’re in a rush or feeling tired, it’s easy to plop down in class and devote all our attention to our laptops (whether it be to take notes or browse Pinterest). Before you do, though, make sure to zip up your bag and keep it where you can see it, like at your feet, and look down at it every now and then. This makes it easier to keep track of your belongings and avoid theft.

Since you’re probably not the only one in class, be cautious of what you do on your laptop. If you’re chatting with friends on iMessage or looking at any sort of NSFW content (or NSFC in this case), people next to you or behind you only have to glance over to see everything you’re doing. Maintain your privacy by waiting until after class. These tips are not meant to make you paranoid – there’s no need to look over your shoulder during every minute you spend on campus. Instead, they should serve as reminders that being even a little more aware can greatly increase your safety. If you feel at all unsafe while on campus, don’t hesitate to ask for help. Call Campus Security or a friend. Your awareness wil go to waste if you don’t act on it.


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UH Manoa Manual

Stay active BIANCA B YSTROM PINO Interim Editor in Chief Whether you are looking to sculpt a beach-ready body or maintain a steady weight, the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa offers different outlets to be active on and off campus. CHASEN DAVIS/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

University Health Services Colds, sprained ankles and other ailments seem to flourish at school, and even college students are not immune to illness. If you are visited with a nasty bug or injury, be sure to go to University Health Services. Here are a few easy steps on how to get help when you need it.

If you’re uninsured, have no fear. HMSA offers the University Student plan, under which all University of Hawai‘i students can purchase individual insurance. Plans start with basic medical ($1,011.76 in fall 2012), but drug and dental options can be added for a few hundred dollars. Apply by Sept. 17 for fall coverage. Go to hmsa.com/portal/?gid=student to learn more about your options.

1. R E G I S T R AT I O N

3. C OM I N G I N

Incoming students receive a letter in their acceptance packet that includes a health clearance form. This form states that you have obtained all required vaccinations and shots, and it ideally should be turned in by July 15 (go to hawaii.edu/myuh/healthform if you need a new one). Submitting this form via fax or mail (but not email) is what will allow you to register for classes and get future treatment at UHS.

Fee-paying students of the UH system and UH Mānoa faculty are welcome at UHS. Please note that if you’re coming from another campus, you will need to pay a little more for your fi rst two visits. Students seeking relief for colds and other minor illnesses will want to take advantage of the clinic’s walk-in appointments, for which medicine and a doctor’s note for missing class are available. You should also come during office hours if more serious illnesses such as food poisoning, cramps or allergies occur. Women’s services are also available here. UHS offers emergency contraception, Pap smears and pregnancy tests. Nutritionists, dermatologists and a sports medicine specialist are available for consultation. Psychiatrists also assist on Mondays and Tues-

K IRSTIE CAMPBELL Contributing Writer

2. INSURANCE Walk-in clinic appointments at the university are affordable without insurance, but buying insurance and covering more of your medical care is less trouble in the long run. If you are still on a family insurance plan (like HMSA), bring an insurance card when you visit the UHS office.

days, though other counseling issues can be discussed at the Counseling and Student Development Center (QLCSS 312). These specialized services are by appointment only.

4 . T R E ATM E N T Over-the-counter medicine is available at UHS for a small fee. Other drugs can be prescribed by a doctor and obtained either here or at Longs for a fee, as the UHS pharmacy does not accept drug insurance. You can also get general vaccinations, from tuberculosis to travel vaccinations. UHS is an excellent place with plenty of resources. Hospitals are further away when illness strikes, so take a walk to UHS and check out the clinic if you fi nd yourself in need. Missing class without a doctor’s note when you are legitimately sick and suffering will otherwise just add insult to injury.

WALK-IN CLINIC Location: Next to Kennedy Theatre Hours: Mon-Tues, Thurs-Fri 8:30 a.m.-12 p.m., 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.; Wed 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Contact: 956-6221 (for appointments)

M

Be sure to check the website before you go so you don’t miss any deadlines to sign up to participate.

Scan this QR code to sign up to play intramural sports

FITNESS CENTER Open daily, the Fitness Center is a great place to work out. Because the gym is equipped with a variety of different machines and free weights, you can get a complete workout. Remember to come to the gym prepared: Read the rules and regulations so you know how the gym is run, and don’t forget your validated UH ID, a towel, shoes and workout apparel. There are lockers to store your stuff, but there are a limited number. If you do plan on using a locker, remember to bring your own lock.

O U T D O O R R E C R E AT I O N Student Recreation Services allows students to get involved in different outdoor activities. There are classes where you can learn to surf, stand-up paddle, body board, hike, kayak, sail, SCUBA or snorkel. To participate, stop by the SRS offi ce in Hemenway Hall to sign up. Remember to bring your valid UH ID and money to pay for the classes. If you are missing the equipment to do outdoor activities, you can rent some from SRS as long as you have a validated UH Mānoa ID and a credit card.

X

Scan this QR code to read the Fitness Center’s policies before you go to the gym.

I N T R A MU R A L S P O R T S Do you miss playing team sports? Do you want to stay active in something more stimulating than lifting weights at the gym? Join intramural sports. Student can play basketball, flag football, indoor/ outdoor soccer, kickball, dodgeball, volleyball and softball. The competition can get fierce, but many of the leagues are welcoming and open to newcomers and firsttime players.

O

Scan this QR code to see the cost of rentals at Student Recreation Services.

GET FIT AND GET CREDIT UH Mānoa’s Kinesiology and Rehab Science department offers a variety of classes to keep you fit in a pseudo-classroom setting. Students can take classes in aerobics, swimming, basketball, weight training, Olympic power lifting and yoga. Each class is one credit. Taking one of these classes will help you keep a steady fitness schedule and let you make new friends who are trying new things just like you.


Page 42 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

How to avoid the Freshman 15 BIANCA B YSTROM PINO Interim Editor in Chief No one wants to succumb to the Freshman 15 – the traditional weight gain that hits most students when they enter college. But it is easier said than done to maintain your weight when you have school and your social life to worry about. Here are a few simple ways to avoid packing on the extra pounds.

You may be tr ying to save money, but it doesn’t pay off to be cheap when it comes to food. If you fuel yourself with quality food, it will give you the boost you need to do well in school and provide you with enough energy for the gym. In the long run, cheap meals will catch up to you via a hef t y medical bill.

D O H AV E A F I T N E S S PA R T N E R

D O N ʼ T K E E P S N AC K S T O O CLOSE

If you have someone that is also trying to avoid the Freshman 15, you two can keep each other in check. At the beginning of the year, you should agree on a schedule that determines when you will work out, when you will eat and what you will stay away from. W hen picking your buddy, remember to pick someone that is motivated but also on a similar page as you.

T H I N G S T O T H I N K A B O U T: Meals: It’s important for you two to pre-plan your meals when you intend to eat together. It will prevent you from getting to the dining hall and picking up things you don’t need. Water: Buy a reusable water bottle and vow to drink at least two liters a day. Drinking water helps to energize your muscles and will keep your skin looking good.

NICHOLAS SMITH / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

D O S P L U RG E O N H E A LT H Y FOOD

Workout: Before going to the gym, plan out which exercises you will be doing and what machines you will be using. Have your partner push you to complete your exercises, and do the same for him or her.

It’s harder to say no to tempting treats when they are close by. Keeping candy, chips or cookies in your dorm room will make it harder to say no. Invest in healthy snacks like fruits or whole-grain bread. This way, if you do get hungry for a snack, you won’t damage your diet.

D O M I X U P YO U R WO R KO U T RO U T I N E

If you are not a fan of fitness centers, there are other places where you can work out. Make your dorm room a private gym. Using your own body weight, you can do a variety of strengthening exercises. For example, you can stand against the wall with your feet about a foot or two from it. Slide your back down the wall until your thighs are parallel with floor. Contract your abs and extend your arms overhead. Complete three sets of 25 reps three times a week. If you can’t fit that in, you can work out on campus without people knowing. Once a day, use the stairs to get to your dorm room. Eventually, when the climb gets easy, start taking two or three steps at a time.


Page 43 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual DAVID JORDAN / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

‘Ua Mau ke Ea o ka ‘Ā ‘Āina i ka Pono ‘IOLANI A NTONIO Staff Writer If you’ve just arrived in Hawai‘i, it should take you little time to fi nd that aloha ‘āina, the value that is the essence of Hawai‘i, is imbued in Hawai‘i’s state motto: “‘Ua Mau ke Ea o ka ‘Āina i ka Pono,” which is translated as, “The Life of the Land is Preserved in Righteousness.” The reason that this value is so signifi cant for Hawaiians can be traced back to the beginning of Hawaiian history. Kumulipo is the traditional Hawaiian creation chant that explains the origin of life. All life forms and creatures of the sky, ocean and land come from the same source. A miniscule piece of coral and a bird soaring in the

sky share the same origin as the tallest tree and mankind as well. Because we Hawaiians believe that all life comes from the same place, we have a strong connection to the natural world. Many of the key values of Hawaiian culture grow out of the foundation of aloha ‘āina. Aloha ‘āina means “love of the land.” Here, not only does ‘āina signify the land herself, but the earth in its entirety, which includes the ocean and sky as well. To love the land means to nurture and nourish her just as she nurtures and nourishes us. Hawaiians inherently believe that we have a kuleana (responsibility) to mālama (care for) the ‘āina. Hawaiians of old realized that the ‘āina and the creatures who inhabit the earth are not

here for the taking, but rather, that existing in a pono (harmonious, balanced and reciprocal) relationship with nature was crucial to fl ourishing as a people. Hawaiians understood that life fl owed smoothly if all living things worked together (laulima) to kōkua kekahi i kekahi (help out one another).

G E T I N VO LV E D For recent transplants to Hawai‘i, and even for those who have grown up in the islands, there are ways to get involved and feel more connected to Hawaiian culture. Every fi rst Saturday of the month, people volunteer to spend a few hours maintaining the taro patches, meeting new people and

practicing their ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i at Ka Papa Lo‘i O Kānewai, which is a part of the Hawai‘inuiākea School for Hawaiian Knowledge. There are also a few clubs and organizations on campus that work with and learn from nature. Consider joining one of the many community hiking groups that help to preserve trails and native wildlife – or gather a bunch of friends together and start your own. Think about checking out a copy of “Place Names of Hawai‘i” from one of the libraries on campus for a better understanding of the meanings behind names of areas, not only on O‘ahu, but around the rest of the island chain as well. The simplest way to be connected is to get out there and aloha the ‘āina. Head down to

the beach, swim with the fi sh and enjoy the feel of sun on your face and sand between your toes. Mālama ‘āina and pick up any ‘ōpala (trash) you might come across. Head up to the valleys for a hike, get caught in the rain, laugh and dance. Kōkua and beautify the ‘āina as much as possible. It’s always best to leave the area in better condition than it was when you found it. Most importantly, be thankful that you live in Hawai‘i.

Scan this QR code to access a complete Hawaiian dictionary online.


Page 44 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual A QUICK PIDGIN PRIMER K IRSTIE CAMPBELL Contributing Writer “Local kine” words are part of Hawaiian Creole English, more popularly called Pidgin. This unique language may be bewildering to newcomers, but don’t worry – you’ll soon be able to follow the conversation. This handy guide will help you understand a few basic words. AR ARE Defi nition This salty brown rice snack, also known as kakimochi, is eaten plain or with popcorn. Small and crunchy, it will keep well in your dorm room. Example “Arare is on sale at Longs – get some for your friends on the Mainland.” BR AH Defi nition Literally “brother,” this is a friendly term of address. Example “Ey, brah, what’s up?” BUMBAI Defi nition Meaning “eventually” and “some time,” this is occasionally associated with “or else.” Some people associate this with bachi, a karmic concept. Example “No turning your back on the ocean, bumbai wave gets you!” CHOKE Defi nition This is easily interchanged with “a lot,” “many” or “much.” This may also be substituted for “plenny kine” if needed. Example ���He got choke food there!” “Yeah, plenny kine.” DA KINE Defi nition This literally means “that kind.” “Da kine” is a catch-all phrase for when you can’t think of the word you want or when the topic is mutually understood. “Kine” is often substituted for “kind” or used in conjunction with “local kine,” mean-

ing anything done Hawaiian style. Example “I picked up da kine yesterday, but it was small kine – not worth it.” GRINDZ Defi nition This word for “food” is associated with casual eating and hanging out with friends. It sounds almost exactly like “grinds,” making it an easier Pidgin word to pronounce. Example “How ‘bout we go get some grindz after the beach?” HAPA Defi nition Literally “half,” this typically refers to race or gender. People with half-Caucasian blood are thus termed hapa haole, or halfwhite/foreigner. Example “Since you’re half Scottish and half Chinese, you’re hapa haole.” MAINL AND Defi nition This refers to the continental United States and usually includes Alaska. A person from the mainland is a “Mainlander,” regardless of his or her state of origin. Example “I’m from the mainland, but Hawai‘i is really cool.” SHAK A Defi nition Use this easy hand-wave to mark yourself as a local. Stick out your thumb and pinky, swivel and smile. One origin theory attributes it to Hamana Kalihi, who always cheerfully waved at Kahuku Sugar Trains on duty at work after his middle three fi ngers were cut off. Example “Photo time! Everyone look here and shaka!” SHOOTS Defi nition This is a cheerful way of saying “Sure, all right” or “I understand” to requests. It can also mean “That’s good” in conversation. Use this to end a conversation. Example “Hold these for me?” “Shoots.”

COURTESY OF RIE MIYOSHI

Graduates bedecked with dozens of leis are a common sight at Hawai‘i graduation ceremonies and other events.

ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Remove your shoes before going inside someone’s house.

Understanding local culture and customs BRINGING FOOD

D R E S S I N G D OW N

Hawai‘i is a unique place in terms of its history, landscapes, food and people. As such, it’s developed a distinct local culture, filled with customs and unspoken rules of etiquette that can both fascinate and puzzle a newcomer to the state. Take note of these common local practices to save yourself the confusion and look like a local.

Another thing to keep in mind when you visit someone’s home is that it is polite to bring a gift with you. An offering of food is most common, and something homemade will show the greatest sincerity, but anything is appreciated. If you’re stuck and can’t think of what to bring, try Leonard’s malasadas or cream puffs from Liliha Bakery – your host will love it, and they’ll offer you some as well.

Hawai‘i attire is generally more casual than in other states or countries. Slippers (not fl ip flops) are acceptable footwear for both men and women, and the weather allows for spring and summer clothes almost year-round. Even in the bustling streets of downtown Honolulu, business casual (no suit) is the staple attire of most businesspeople, and a conservative aloha shirt is acceptable for businessmen.

R E MOV I N G S H O E S

GIVING LEIS

CAITLIN KURODA Senior Staff Writer

When you enter someone’s abode, whether it be a house, apartment or dorm room, it is normal to take off your footwear and leave it outside or in a designated area near the entrance. This practice comes from Asia and is said to promote good health (walking barefoot can be good for you) while keeping the carpet or floor free of outside dirt. Keep your footwear on in hotel rooms, though, as most visitors do not follow this custom.

Leis make a regular appearance at celebratory occasions, from graduation ceremonies and birthday parties to bridal showers and Mother’s Day brunches. These garlands adorn a person’s shoulders and honor the recipient. Traditionally, leis are made of fresh flowers but have expanded to include ribbon, candy and even money. When giving a lei, a fresh flower lei or a homemade lei is best. When receiving a lei, accept it with a hug.

RESPECTING OTHERS

Even if you forget the other rules listed above, the most important thing to remember is respect. Hawai‘i is a melting pot of different people and their cultures, and all of these cultures have some kind of influence on the practices here. Being open to these practices and respecting them and the people who follow them is the best way to learn the ways of the locals and become a part of this island community.


Page 45 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual “Volunteers don’t necessarily have the time; they have the heart.” - Elizabeth Andrew

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Mass Schedule: Mon: 12:10PM (Eucharistic Service) Tues-Fri: 12:10PM Student Wednesday Night Mass: 9:00PM Sat: 5:00PM / Sun: 9:00AM, 11:00AM, 5:00PM Student Mass & Dinner: Sun, 5:00PM


Page 46 | Ka Leo

UH Mano Manoa oa Manua Manual ual

Words and phrases for the new student to know in ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i A H U P U A‘A Traditionall land l division. In 2011, the moko (district) o off Ko‘olau Poko began placing signage e throughout to formally recognize the trad aditional divisions. traditional

‘Ā I N A Land d. Land.

AKAMAI Smart.

KĀ ĀFAKAFA FAKAFA TĀ ĀSONI SONI Senior Staff Writer p “When in Aloha haumāna! Ever heard the phrase Rome?” It is usually followed by “do as the Romans do.” When moving to a new location,, it is imperative ernacular. that you learn the local language or ve vernacular. versity of Hawai‘i Now that you have come to the Univ University learn ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i at Mānoa, it is imperative for you to learn (Hawaiian), especially because Hawai‘ii is the only U.S. He ere is a small list state having two official languages. Here used on island. of some common terms and phrases used

A L I‘I

MAHALO Sign of gratitude. “Mahalo nui loa” means “thank you very much.”

M A I‘A Banana.

M A I K A‘I Often expressed as the feeling of doing well or good or something being done right.

MĀLAMA

Traditio o nal chief. Traditional

K A H A KŌ

ALOHA

The diacritical mark used in in standardized Hawaiian orthographyy known as the macron ( ¯ ). Used to lengthen length hen the sound of the vowel it accompanies, providing proper spelling and pronunciation. pronunciation n. Ex. Malama, light or month; Mālama, to o care for.

Commonly us used in greetings such “G as “Hello” and “Goodbye”; it also comp ompassion. means love and compassion.

ALOHA K AK AHIAK A

To take care of or to preserve; for example, “Mālama ‘āina” means “care for the land.”

MAUNA Mountain.

‘O K I N A

Good morning.

K AI

‘A‘O L E P I L I K I A

Sea or ocean; Makai, for example, means seaside.

No worries/no problem; an acceptable response to questions.

K ALO

E KO M O M A I

d Taro. Staple food dating from ancient times.

Welcome. Please enter.

K A M A‘Ā I N A

H AO L E

Native born.

The term commonly used for a Caucasian; formerly it referred to anyone foreign to the islands.

KEIKI Child.

The diacritical mark used in standardized Hawaiian orthography commonly known as the glottal stop ( ‘ ), similar to an apostrophe ( ’ ) but different in appearance. The second-most common consonant in the Hawaiian language. Separation.

‘Ō L E L O Language, to speak.

‘Ō PA L A Trash or rubbish.

P E H E A ‘O E ?

H A U ‘O L I L Ā H Ā N A U

K A N A K A M AO L I

How are you?

Happy birthday.

Native Hawaiian. The plural form is spelled Kānaka Kān naka Māoli.

PONO

H A U ‘O L I M A K A H I K I H O U

KUPUNA

Happy New Year.

Grandparent or ancestor. an ncestor. The plural is Kūpuna.

H AWA I‘I Correct pronunciation and spelling of “Hawaii.” ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

King Kamehameha I was the monarch who originally unified the Hawaiian islands.

That which is good or has moral qualities, right or proper is considered to be pono.

‘ULU

L I L I KO‘I

Breadfruit.

Common fruit used d in deserts and beverages

WIKIWIKI Very fast. Wiki alone means fast.


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UH Manoa Manual

Hit the cinema: five fall movies to watch for

1

2GUNS.NET

JOSEPH H AN Managing Editor

With summer blockbuster season at a close, there is less to anticipate until winter. Here are a handful of notables that are worthy of a ticket price, and be sure to check out Ka Leo every week for the chance to nab free advanced screening tickets.

1. ʻ2 G U N S ʼ (AU G. 2) When Marcus Stigman (Mark Wahlberg) and Bobby Trench (Denzel Washington) fi nd out that

2

ITSBETTERUPTHERE.COM

one is a Naval Intelligence Officer and the latter is a Drug Enforcement Administration agent, they realize that they need to investigate one another while stealing from the mob has a deeper conspiracy attached. After being discovered, both must go on the run and team up to stay alive.

2 . ʻE LYS I U Mʼ (AU G. 9) In 2154, the rich live on the space station Elysium while the rest of the population inhabit a desecrated Earth. With poverty and violence abound, Max De

3

KICKASS-THEMOVIE.COM

Costa (Matt Damon) may be the only man who can bring equality to these separate worlds through a mission that puts his already atrisk life in danger.

3. ʻK I C K - A S S 2 ʼ (AU G. 16) Heroes emerge after being inspired by self-made vigilante Kick-Ass (Aaron Taylor-Johnson), who joins Colonel Stars and Stripes (Jim Carrey) and others to patrol the city, with the exception of the retired Hit-Girl (Chloë Grace Moretz). However, the former Red Mist (Christopher

4

RUSHMOVIE.COM

Mintz-Plasse) returns to exact revenge for the death of his father, and the heroes must band together and fi ght for justice.

4 . ʻRU S H ʼ (S E P T. 2 0) Formula 1 racing in the 1970s requires no mistakes or else death overpowers any chances of winning. This biographical film follows the rivalry of James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth) and Niki Lauda (Daniel Brul) and their 1976 standoffs at the German Grand Prix in Nurburgring and the World Championship at Fuji in Japan.

5

SONYPICTURES.COM

5. ʻC L O U DY W I T H A C H A N C E O F M E AT BA L L S 2 ʼ (S E P T. 27 )

An unlikely sequel looks promising for this franchise. After being asked by his idol Chester V ( Will Forte) to join The Live Corp Company, Flint Lockwood (Bill Hader) discovers that his machine from the previous film is still functional and creates food beasts on an island; expect many puns to dine for. Flint and his friends must stop the machine once again before havoc wreaks the planet.

No cable, no problem: how to watch TV on the cheap With the academic year in full force and no cable television in sight, students must seek new go-to sources for their downtime. Here are some worthy investments to ensure that you’ll always be entertained.

With various movies and television shows streaming for anytime access, you can pick anything to watch on your own schedule. In addition to blockbusters, check out independent or foreign fi lms, or indulge in original shows from Netfl ix like “House of Cards,” “Hemlock Grove” or the return of “Arrested Development.”

NETFLIX

HULU PLUS

Cost: $7.99/month Chances are that someone you know will have an account and be willing to share access so you can avoid paying the monthly fee.

Cost: $7.99/month Hulu Plus offers access to a library of episodes from recent network shows, which allows you to catch up on a series or watch

JOSEPH H AN Managing Editor

globe and features fi lmmakers such as Ingmar Bergman, Akira Kurosawa and Charlie Chaplin.

T VMU S E . E U WIKICOMMONS

exclusive fi lms that may not be available on Netfl ix. Its biggest incentive is access to the Criterion Collection, which brings together contemporary and classic fi lms from around the

Cost: Free Best for those prone to binge watching, this website serves as a directory of online streaming fi lms and television shows. The search engine and database link to other video websites that are ranked according to stream quality. This alternative to Netfl ix or Hulu Plus is free but requires patience for videos to load, abrupt halts and also sacrifi ces quality.

A M A ZO N I N S TA N T V I D E O Cost: $2.99-$4.99/movie or show or $79/year for Amazon Prime You can basically fi nd anything to purchase at Amazon. com, including movies or television shows to rent. You are allowed to stream the content for 48 hours, with 30 days allotted to begin watching. But an even better deal may be to enroll in Amazon Prime. Though you have to cough up a heftier yearly fee, you also gain access to Amazon’s selections of streaming movies and television for free, as well as free Kindle Books and other perks.


Page 48 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

O‘AHU BEACH GUIDE ELIAQUIM R EYES Senior Staff Writer

HANAUMA BAY NATURE PRESERVE Location: Hawai‘i Kai, by Kalaniana‘ole Highway Highlights: One of the most popular tourist spots on the island; once a volcanic cone, now a nature preserve ideal for snorkeling and diving Amenities: Showers and bathrooms, rentals for snorkel gear and lockers, lifeguards on duty, parking available, picnic areas Surf: Not ideal for surfi ng because of the sea creatures that live in the reefs, but some surfers swim far beyond the cone to catch waves Crowd level (scale of 1-5): 5; heavily populated by tourists, hobbyists and divers

Island newbies may be familiar with Hawai‘i’s white beaches and blue surf, but knowing what the best spots are may be beyond their expertise. While Hawaiian beaches might all seem picturesque, they have different features and landscapes. Sure, you can go online and look it up – or you could use this quick guide to get the inside scoop as to where you should spend your sunny weekends. SUNSET BEACH BY TONI SALAMA / CHICAGO TRIBUNE /MCT; ALL OTHER PHOTOS BY ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

WAIMEA BAY

SUNSET BEACH

Location: On the North Shore, along Kamehameha Highway Highlights: This site became famous when surfers from the 50’s began to ride big waves; also known for its 25-foot “jump rock” Amenities: Showers and bathrooms, lifeguards on duty, parking available, picnic areas Surf: A surfer’s paradise for its huge waves during the winter; the swell subsides during the summer, making it better for swimming and diving Crowd level (scale of 1-5): 4-5; more popular for locals, but tourists who visit the North Shore often stop by

Location: Hale‘iwa on the North Shore Highlights: Known for hosting big surfi ng competitions as well as the big waves that come in winter; a great spot for viewing sunsets Amenities: Showers and bathrooms located across the street, lifeguards on duty, parking available, picnic areas Surf: Known for its huge surf and swells for experienced and pro surfers; the surf diminishes a bit during the summer, but caution must be taken Crowd level (scale of 1-5): 3-4; experienced and aspiring surfers are everywhere, as well as tourists and locals alike, but not as crowded as south shore beaches

LANIK AI BEACH Location: Kailua, by upper-class residential area, connected to the Kailua Beach Park stretch Highlights: This small half-mile beach has been ranked among the best beaches in the world; it is known for its clear, warm waters and fi ne sand Amenities: No showers, bathrooms or lifeguards, but there is street parking Surf: Relatively fl at, not ideal for surfi ng or body boarding; great for swimming, kayaking and windsurfi ng Crowd level (scale of 1-5): 3; crowds peak during the summer, especially on weekends, but not as populated on weekdays


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UH Manoa Manual

Island tour PAIGE TAKEYA Special Issues Editor

Whether you’re new to Hawai‘i or just interested in getting off campus and out of the house, there are plenty of things to do on O‘ahu besides going to the beach. Here are seven suggestions to consider the next time you fi nd yourself bored and with time to spare.

1

ALOHA STADIUM SWAP MEET

Description: A smorgasboard of more than 400 vendors that gather at Aloha Stadium to hock their wares. Aside from the usual heavily discounted clothing and merchandise, you can also find unique art and other ethnic and local goods. Hours: Wed, Sat 8 a.m.-3p.m.; Sun 6:30 a.m. -3 p.m. Cost: $1 admission Address: 99-500 Salt Lake Blvd. Transit time (from UH): 20 minutes by car or one hour by bus (Route A) Contact: 808-486-6704 or alohastadiumswapmeet.net/index.asp Local take: You’ll feel like a sardine slowly roasting in the sun, but you can find a lot of gems if you take the time to look. Given its vast size, it will take you all day to explore the swap meet thoroughly.

ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

2 TANTALUS AND ROUND TOP DRIVE Description: If you have time and plenty of gas money, driving (or jogging) along Tantalus should be on your to-do list. The twisting curves, lush greenery and sweeping views are both a testament to your driving ability and the grandeur of Hawai‘i. Hours: 24/7 Cost: Free Address: Tantalus Dr. Transit time: 15 minutes by car or one hour by bus (Routes 4 and 15) Contact: None Local take: If you’re not the one driving, Tantalus is fun and laced with a hint of danger when you catch a glimpse of the dropoff. If you are driving, your full energy will be devoted to navigating the twisty turns, and you won’t be enjoying much of the sights.


Page 51 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

3

4 HONOLULU MUSEUM OF ART

JESSICA SWENSON / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

VOLCANIC ROCK GYM

Description: If you like hiking and climbing but would rather avoid risking your life on one of Hawai‘i’s more treacherous hiking trails, Volcanic Rock Gym offers a safer indoor alternative. It’s also an excellent place for beginners to get used to climbing before hitting the real trails. Hours: Mon-Sun 12 p.m.-10 p.m. Cost: $15 for a daily pass ($3 for shoe rental) Address: 432 Keawe St. Transit time: 10 minutes by car or 35 minutes by bus (Route 6) Contact: 808-397-0095 or volcanicrockgym.blogspot.com 7 Local take: The experience is unique enough to warrant the price, but in Hawai‘i, avoiding outdoor hiking seems counterintuitive. If you’re worried about getting hurt on a real hike, stopping here first seems wise.

Description: If you want to demonstrate your cultural prowess, the Honolulu Museum of Art should be your first stop. In addition to a substantial collection of both Asian and European art, the museum also hosts the Doris Duke Theatre (which shows indie films) and the Pavilion Cafe. Hours: Tues-Fri 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; Sun 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Cost: $10 Address: 900 S. Beretania St. Transit time: 10 minutes by car or 30 minutes by bus (Route 4) Contact: 808-532-8700 or honolulumuseum.org Local take: If you want to visit a local art museum, this venue has by far the most impressive collection on the island. Its variety of programs and activities aside from art viewing make it good for repeat visits.

1

6

KENT NISHIMURA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

5

HAWAIIAN BRIAN’S

2 3 5 4 6

Description: If you like playing billiards, Hawaiian Brian’s is cheap and located conveniently close to UH Mānoa. This venue also plays host to concerts by local performers and a bar. Hours: Mon-Sun 10 a.m.-2 a.m. Cost: Varies, can be as low as $1 per game Address: 1680 Kapi‘olani Blvd. Transit time: 10 minutes by car or 20 minutes by bus (Route A) Contact: 808-946-1343 or hawaiianbrians.com Local take: The billiards and other offerings are solid, but the venue itself is a bit rundown and grungy. If you don’t mind the atmosphere, it’s affordable and a good place to socialize with friends.

‘IOLANI PALACE Description: The only official royal residence in the United States, ‘Iolani Palace was once occupied by the Kalākaua dynasty of the former Hawaiian Kingdom. The king’s one-time home has since been turned into a museum that commemorates his glory days. Hours: Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $21.75 for the guided tour; $14.75 for the self-led tour Address: 364 S. King St. Transit time: 10 minutes by car or 35 minutes by bus (Route 4) Contact: 808-522-0832 or iolanipalace.org Local take: Seeing how royalty once lived is exciting for some, but others might find the stately mansion lacking in excitement. Given its significance in Hawaiian history, however, the museum should be stop for every newcomer to the state.

7

JESSICA SWENSON / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

KUALOA RANCH Description: Kualoa Ranch, a huge cattle ranch located on the Windward side of O‘ahu, is known for its variety of outdoor activity options, including horseback riding tours; its longtime local legacy and prominence in various Hollywood films and shows like “Jurassic Park” and “Hawai‘i Five-0.” Hours: Varies depending on tour Cost: $9-$69, depending on tour Address: 49-560 Kamehameha Hwy. Transit time: 40 minutes by car or 90 minutes by bus (Routes 4 and 55) Contact: 808-237-8515 or kualoa.com Local take: There are a lot of fun things to do at Kualoa Ranch, but the major drawback will be the drive and, if you prefer to gallop horseback, the price.


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UH Manoa Manual

What do you do for fun as a college student? COMPILED BY SATOSHI SUGIYAMA Contributing Writer

RYA N TA N A K A C OM M U N I C O LO G Y SENIOR

SYDNEY CHAR B I OM E D I C A L E N G I N E E R I N G SUMMER STUDENT

I would like to go surfi ng and reading . If I could, I would surf every day. It de-

pends on what time I have class. … I just try to fit it into my schedule. A lot of times, I just go

I go to a school in Boston. With my friends, I go

with my friends to

by myself because it’s easier, but when I can

shop, sometimes for clothes and

sometimes not, or go to restaurants. A lot of my friends

read non-

just like to go to Goodwill and see what is there. Other

fiction books, anything about business,

times, we go to Forever 21. I go once or twice a month.

I go with my friends. I like to psychology or communication.

If it’s not good outside, I would like to stay inside, watch movies. I [also] like to bake a lot with my friends. I just

hang out with my friends, talking and it’s not

M A RY J OY H I S TO R I C A L P R E S E RVAT I O N G R A D UAT E

really doing anything.

J E R E M Y K I YA B U DE N TA L H YG I E N E JUNIOR

I like to do a lot of things. I

like to watch

movies, go hiking and do some volunteering . I like action

I like to go

hiking

with my

friends and cruising with them. Dur-

movies. I go to a movie theater whenever a new action movie

ing summer, it’s pretty much every

is released. For hiking, I like

day. I go to beaches with friends.

them [hiking trails] all. I try to

When school is in session, it would

go to a different one each time.

be every weekend. I go Waikīkī

As far as volunteering, I usual-

Beach. For hiking, I go Koko Head.

ly go Kāne‘ohe and volunteer

I usually go there because it’s con-

venient; sometimes I go to Kailua

at a fishpond.

Beach.

M AT TH E W M E N D OZ A E L EC T R I C A L E N G I N E E R I N G JUNIOR

A L E X A VA N D E R H O O F T U N DEC I DE D FRESHMAN

I go

to the beach for fun. Usually I swim or simply

lay out on the beach with my friends. I go every weekend and two to three times after class on weekdays. I have been to Waimea Beach, Sunset Beach, Turtle Bay and Waikīkī.

I usually go to the gym and work out . I do that every day, maybe for an hour or so. I usually go there with my friends.


Page 54 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

Dressing like a college student COMPILED

BY

High school prepares the average student for college in many ways, but there are some aspects that get lost in the transition. After all, teachers don’t talk about the fashion changes one endures from high school to university. Here are a few easy tips and looks for new students to try.

SAMANTHA BAUMGARTNER Staff Writer

1. Know the weather before heading out the door. Mānoa is known for its sporadic rain, and this can cause you discomfort if you’re unprepared. Always have an umbrella or hooded sweatshirt available or on hand. Rain boots or closed-toe shoes are widely seen on rainy days.

3. Campus is not a runway, but if you insist on making a fashion statement wherever you go, make sure to keep the last tip in mind. A mini-dress and wedges for women will keep you stylish and comfortable; for men, boat shoes with a collared shirt and khakis will keep all eyes on you. 2. Dress comfortably. It is usually humid and hot on campus, so the go-to outfit for students is a Tshirt and pair of shorts and sandals. Make sure to wear sunglasses too, as Mānoa is bright.

Do you like clothes? Are you intent on looking your best all the time? Ka Leo provides weekly fashion tips and trend insight in print or on kaleo.org.


08 CALENDAR

N APRIL C A L E N D A R

ALOHA NIGHTS

5

HAWAII INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

ELECTRIC PALMS MUSIC FESTIVAL THE REPUBLIK: 8 PM 1349 KAPIOLANI BLVD.

ALOHANIGHTS.COM

Featuring a collection of 30-35 international award-winning films, this week-long film festival is a can’t-miss.

10

RENEWAL KTUH BALLROOM TAKEOVER UHM BALLROOM: 9 PM 2500 CAMPUS RD.

Nine of Hawaii’s top EDM DJs will perform in University of Hawaii’s ballroom in Campus Center. 18+

13

METRIC

THE REPUBLIK: 8 PM 1349 KAPIOLANI BLVD

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 3

International rock group Metric performs new wave mixed with electronic music. All ages.

THE 3 KINGS ALOHA TOWER WATERFRONT: 7 PM 1 ALOHA TOWER DR.

13

DJ BL3ND

SUNSET ROOM AT ALOHA TOWER: 9 PM 1 ALOHA TOWER

THE REPUBLIK: 8 PM

Dr. FELGUK performs, featuring Dirty Secret, Errrick, Fortune Cookie, Rich Viceroy, Sonufi, Stretto and Superstar Nikki. 18+

Come watch this Los Angeles DJ spin his tracks. 18+

1349 KAPI’OLANI BLVD.

1450 ALA MOANA BLVD.

20

KAKA’AKO WATERFRONT PARK: 5:30 PM 102 OHE ST. Be sure to catch SOJA 2013 spring tour with special guest Atmosphere. 21+

27

ANNUAL WAIKIKI SPAM JAM 4 PM KALAKAUA AVE. Featuring entertainment, crafts, food and lots of SPAM, this street festival has it all.

10 DIRECTORY

$1

ALOHANIGHTS.COM

ALOHA NIGHTS

MANOA MARKETPLACE 808 988-4310

off

$5 purchase

Authentic Nepalese & Indian Cusine

15% Off w/ UH ID

WITH THE RESUME! NOW HIRING FOR INTERNSHIPS.

Lunch:Tues-Fri 11AM-2PM Dinner: Mon-Sun 5PM-10PM st

rd

IN THE NIGHTLIFE AND EMAIL PRIYA@KALEO.ORG

1137 11th Ave. and Waialae

Live Entertainment & Belly Dancing every 1 and 3 Sunday of the Month

DAVE AND BUSTERS: 10 PM 1030 AUAHI ST.

Every Wednesday, Dave and Busters has DJ K-Smooth and Jimmy Taco perform with Big Koa as the MIC. 21+

Enjoy great bars and entertainment on the first Friday of every month in Chinatown. All ages.

• LULU’S HALF-OFF EVERYTHING SIN DAY

POSITIONS AVAILABLE: WRITERS PHOTOGRAPHERS GRAPHIC DESIGNERS PUBLIC RELATIONS REPS WEB DEVELOPERS FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM & TWITTER @alohanights

Every Monday Lulu’s offers 50% off everything at their bar, perfect for broke college students. 21+

• LAST SATURDAY ROOTS IN JAZZ: ABE LAGRIMAS JR. QUARTET DORIS DUKE THEATRE: 7:30 PM 900 S. BERETANIA ST.

PAID ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

DINING HONOLULU BURGER RC CO. O. 1295 S. BERETANIA ST 808.626.5202 HONOLULUBURGERCO.COM OM

343 SARATOGA RD. 808.538.3477 EGGSNTHINGS.COM

SUSHI KING 2700 S. KING ST. 808.947.2836 SUSHIKINGHI.COM

ALOHA CREPES 3620A WAIALAE AVE 808.734.0803 LECREPECAFE.COM

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 4

B Book it at Buca or Order our Party Pans To Go.

WHAT IS ALOHA NIGHTS?

Los Angeles drummer and virtuoso ukulele player Abe Lagrimas Jr. returns to Hawaii joined by Reggie Padilla, Dean Taba, and Matt Politano.

THROW A BUCA-STYLE

GRAD PARTY

NIGHTS

LULU’S BAR AND GRILL: 7 AM 2586 KALAKAUA AVE.

EGGS ‘N THINGS INTERESTED IN WORKING ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY?

BYOB No Corkage Indoor & Outdoor Seating Reservations for Parties

• LITE THE ROOF ON FIRE

CHINATOWN: 6 PM N. BERETANIA ST.

This dressy lounge features three live bands, three bars and a huge dance floor. 21+

SOJA

Every Monday this hip spot features guest soloists’ along with their usual jazz performers. 18+

• FIRST FRIDAY: APRIL 5

12

PEARL ULTRA LOUNGE: 6 PM

Performances by Katchafire, Common Kings and Rebel Souljahz are sure to be sensational. 18+

WEDNESDAY MAR. 20, 2013

12

FELGUK

APRIL FOOLISH PARTY

OTHER EVENTS AROUND TOWN

• PROJECT MONDAY JAZZ MINDS ART & CAFE: 9 PM 1661 KAPIOLANI BLVD.

WWW.HIFF.ORG 1001 BISHOP ST

BAMP Project and Collective Effort put on a music festival featuring Australian DJ Tommy Trash. 18+

6

5-11

HIMALAYAN KITCHEN 1137 11TH AVE #205 808.735.1122 HIMALAYANKITCHEN.NET

As a college student living away from home, or at the very least, further from the family sphere, you’ll want to take full advantage of your newfound freedom. But how will you decide what to do? The first thing you should do is grab Aloha Nights, Ka Leo’s paid entertainment guide that focuses on Honolulu dining, drinking, partying, style and more. Aloha Nights will keep you up-todate on the hottest trends, the coolest clubs and the best of the best in…well, basically everything. We have eight issues a year and a constant presence online at alohanights.com. Stay with us, and you’ll always be in the know. Look for our first issue on Sept. 4.

BOSTON’S PIZZA

WEDNESDAY APR. 24, 2013

3506 WAIALAE AVE 808.734.1945 BOSTONPIZZAHI.COM

LIFESTYLE HONOLULU H 1030 AUAHI STREET 10 808.591.0800 BU BUCADIBEPPO.COM

JASE BOARDS

In every issue of Aloha Nights, you’ll find ...

56-565 KAMEHAMEHA HIGHWAY JASEBOARDS.COM PAID ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

SE ES O M TO EL S IS B SA Y W

PH

HONOLULU NIGHT MARKET WHERE: 683 AUAHI ST. WHEN: MAY 18, 2013 TIME: 6:00PM-11:00PM

PRIYA SINGH ALOHA NIGHTS DIRECTOR

WEDNESDAY APR. 24, 2013

Photos by Jimmy Edens PAID ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

DIRECTORY Listings of popular restaurants, bars, lounges and more for your quick reference. FEATURES In-depth coverage that will help you build a better lifestyle.

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 4

HUNGRY HUNGRY HIPSTER If you’re on the prowl for something tasty, and trending that won’t break your bank, check out Karai Crab. They have delicious combo lunches, a clean and crisp ambiance, and most importantly, their food makes for great Instagram posts! Enjoy and filter away.

ALOHANIGHTS.COM

When you walk through the market, you’ll see people of all ages engulfing themselves with creativity and originality. Bookstores, coffee shops, and a large warehouse are open to the public so that one can explore the vendors and art. There is no entrance fee, which is great for those who want to explore but not spend. Live music performances can be heard while you dance around, lounge on curvy benches set up on a platform of fake grass or chairs and tables set up by the food. To really understand the Honolulu Night Market you have to go and see it for yourself. There are constant additions of art and food to the market, as well as events and music headliners. It is a perfect place to hang out and explore the newest and latest events with a trendy crowd.

ALOHA NIGHTS

L

EMILY BENECKE ADVERTISING STAFF WRITER

07 The Honolulu Night Market is one of the liveliest, most expressive street fairs in Honolulu. Every third Saturday artists, musicians, foodies and artisans alike come out to display their work and encompass visitors with creativity and inspiration. Visitors can expect to see vendors selling their creative pieces, from jewelry and art to clothing and food. Top restaurants from all over the island set up booths to satisfy your evening munchies and spike your interest in new and evolving menus. One can expect to see a plethora of cuisines and foods. The art at the Honolulu Night Market is expressive and passionate. When I went to the market in February, I saw small exhibits, people painting on the streets and even a trailer decked out in the beautiful images and colors. Street performers could be spotted all over as were stations set up for visitors to get creative with pens, pencils and markers provided by the market and/or artist managing the station.

DINING

HONOLULU N NIGHT M MARKET

CALENDAR A rundown of the month’s must-attend events and shows.

alohanights.com


Page 56 | Ka Leo | New Student Orientation

Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

ADMISSION WITH VALID UH MANOA ID

VISIT

HAWAIIATHLETICS.COM FOR SEASON SCHEDULE S FOLLOW US ON

@HAWAIIATHLETICS


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UH Manoa Manual

The scoop on tailgating

Although tailgating is traditionally associated with alcohol consumption, students should not feel pressured to partake. Tailgating can still be fun whilst sober. FILE PHOTO KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

JER EM Y NIT TA Associate Sports Editor

Everyone has heard of tailgating and the associated tales of parties and extravagant demonstrations of school spirit. But all that “excitement” might seem a bit intimidating for an incoming college freshman who just wants to enjoy a good football game. The question remains: What makes tailgating fun? “ Tailgating is like the whipped cream on top of ice cream,” said Leon Sheen, a senior in travel industry management, in an email interview. “The ice cream is the football game that is full of flavor and the main part of the meal,” Sheen said. “The whipped cream makes you question yourself since it can be unhealthy (tailgating can pose risks to your liver and stomach), but you accept it anyway because it’s delicious (tailgates are fun).”

FRIENDSHIP FIRST There is a “civilized” side to tailgating, which involves simply having a great time with some friends. “When I tailgate, I get together with a bunch of friends before a game to eat and get hyped about the night’s event,” ASUH President Richard Mizusawa said. “Sometimes students will grill and BBQ or just bring platters of food to share with each other. It is also a time where students can get spirited and prepare to support their team,” Mizusawa continued. This theme of friendship seems to be a recurring one for both tailgaters. In fact, both mention it as a favorite moment. “Last fall 2012 at the UH Homecoming game, I got together with a bunch of close friends, and we all enjoyed each other’s company and made a ton of college memories while showing our Warrior pride in the stands

at the game later that evening,” Mizusawa said. “I’d say one of the great ones was seeing one of my former New Student Orientation protégés and reconnecting with her,” said Sheen. “We both came from different tailgate ‘camps,’ but were able to chat and catch up on life over food and drinks. It’s great to meet new people but also great to see old faces.” So how would these two veteran tailgaters describe tailgating in one word? “Zestful,” Sheen said. “Tailgates are full of hearty laughs, excitement and social interaction.” “Camaraderie,” Mizusawa said. “It brings the students of Mānoa together in one place to cheer on our team as one body of students and proud UH Warrior supporters.” Start your tailgating journey by heading to the Warriors’ first home game on Aug. 28 against USC. All UH Mānoa students get in free.

FOOTBALL HOME GAME SCHEDULE Aug 28 at 5 p.m. - USC Sept. 28 at 6 p.m. - Fresno State Oct. 5 at 6 p.m. - San Jose State Oct. 26 at 6 p.m. - Colorado State Nov. 16 at 5:30 p.m. - San Diego State Nov. 30 at 6 p.m. - Army All UH Mānoa students with a validated ID will receive free admission to any home football game.


Page 58 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

Support UH athletics SAMANTHA BAUMGARTNER Staff Writer Thousands of people surround you, all with the same thought in mind: “Get the win, Rainbow Warriors!” You watch with anticipation as the Rainbow Wahine and Warriors face their opponents. You experience their mistakes, as well as their triumphs, and as the fi nal seconds tick down, cheers erupt from all around. For students at the University of Hawai‘i, athletic events are a part of the college experience. But if this situation does not seem appealing to you, there are other reasons to attend a sports game. UH Mānoa is home to a wide array of sports teams, including baseball, basketball, football, golf, swimming and diving, tennis, volleyball, cross country, sailing, sand volleyball, soccer, softball, track and field, cheer and water polo. If sports aren’t your “thing,” go to meet new people. There will be someone to meet at every event. Home games are a great way to meet people and a fun way to get away from the dorms or apartments in a refreshing environment. If you need a study break, check the UH athletics website to see if there is a home game. If you live for the excitement

of a live ball game, you are in for a treat at a Rainbow Warriors or Wahine event. To see the sweat, determination and excitement of the athletes up close is different than viewing it from a television screen, especially if you are friends with an athlete. To cheer a fellow ‘Bow along feels amazing, and when you’re in the stands with others who share the same desires, the unity is magical. Another reason to support UH athletics is because the support means a lot to UH athletes. “The crowd plays a huge factor in gaining and keeping momentum,” said sophomore football defensive back Dante Johnson. “The size of the crowd can shock an opponent, and in most sports, the noise of a crowd can mess up the communication needed to execute plays or motions. Also, having a lot of people watching you makes you want to perform well so that you don’t let everyone down.” Your support can help boost the Rainbows to victory and beyond. UH athletics bonds together different types of people and brings all attendees a little closer. Incoming students should attend at least one UH sporting event before their fi rst year is done because the time spent there will be something to remember.

UH Athletics info Ka Leo publishes previews and recaps for every major UH sport in print and online. Download our Ka Leo app or visit kaleo.org to keep posted.

VICTORIA DUBROWSKIJ / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Sophomore forward Isaac Fotu will be a key player on the Rainbow Warrior basketball team following the graduations of Vander Joaquim, Hauns Brereton and Jace Tavita.

You can also follow @kaleosports for live-tweeting during specific games and other UH sports updates. Scan the QR code to the right to see our Twitter now.


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Page 60 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

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Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week.

ACROSS 1 Pearl Harbor mo. 4 Pearl Harbor presence 8 Cuts into 14 Singles out 16 League of Nations home 17 “Right back atcha!” 18 Came down and delayed the game 19 Capital on the Dnieper 20 Bay window 22 Prepare for an attack 25 Words on some blue balloons 30 Ruler in un palacio 32 Story including a time and place 34 “Finished!” 35 Bring down the curtain on 36 Almond __: candy 37 Quran religion 38 Antilles native 40 Penny prez 42 “Affliction” Oscar nominee 43 Name on a range 44 Berserk 46 __ vivant 47 Chinese menu promise 48 Hag 49 “Wish you were here — __ were there” 50 Cirque du Soleil staple 52 Medium’s medium 54 Longtime Chicago Symphony conductor 56 Organ knob 59 Seattle ballpark, familiarly 63 Forgo accomplices 66 Sinuous course 67 It bodes well 68 Table no-nos 69 Bygone blade 70 Watched kids DOWN 1 Frisbee, e.g.

2 Hollywood’s Morales 3 “Ally McBeal” genre 4 “Forget it!” 5 Took the cake? 6 Riverdale High brunette of comics 7 North Sea feeder 8 Wetlands nester 9 Skunk, literally and figuratively 10 Secretive maritime org. 11 Cozy retreat 12 Anticipatory time 13 In a funk 15 Strauss of denim 21 Sundial number 23 Harbor hauler 24 U.N. anti-child-labor agcy. 26 Nodding words 27 Popular ’60s-’70s pants, and what can be found in 3-, 9-, 23- and 33-Down? 28 Henry Clay, for one 29 Sana’a citizen 30 Eat one’s words 31 Fill with love 33 Pachyderm friend of Zephir the monkey 39 Javert’s rank: Abbr. 41 :-( is one 45 “Not __ bet!” 48 Animation still 51 Speeds 53 Capital formerly named Christiania 55 Puts (out) 57 __ Day vitamins 58 Cooped (up) 59 Leeds-to-London dir. 60 Without exception 61 “Groovy!” 62 “Out of the Blue” rock gp. 64 Pump part 65 Lime ending

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Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.


Page 61 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual


Page 62 | Ka Leo

UH Manoa Manual

UH Athletics 101: a primer for freshmen

ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Junior Scott Harding ranked second on the Warrior football team last year with 20 receptions and 321 receiving yards. JEREMY NIT TA AND BLAKE TOLENTINO Associate Sports Editor and Web Specialist Eager to dive into the wide world of University of Hawai‘i athletics, but unsure where to start? Here is Ka Leo’s handy primer to the biggest sports and games of the fall semester.

W H I C H S P O R T I S A MU S T WAT C H? Jeremy: Women’s volleyball The Rainbow Wahine are perennially one of the better programs in the country, having made the NCA A Tournament 31 times in their 32 years of existence as a Division I program. Hawai‘i returns fi rst team All-American outside hitter Emily Hartong and All-American honorable mention setter Mita Uiato from last year’s 11th ranked team.

Blake: Football While the women’s volleyball team will be a national contender again, it is far from unexpected. On the other hand, the football team is still a relative mystery after the fi rst season of the Norm Chow era, with promising recruits and a new offensive coordinator arriving to rejuvenate a struggling offense from last season. Watching the team grow in its second season should be exciting.

FILE PHOTO / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Senior outside hitter Emily Hartong was voted Big West Player of the Year last year and is expected to repeat her dominating performance for the Rainbow Wahine.

major event where school pride reigns and energy levels from the fans are at their highest. Even with last year’s struggles, the energy level at Homecoming was electric. This season promises to be better, and even if it isn’t, any UH UH SPORTS MEDIA RELATIONS UH SPORTS MEDIA RELATIONS student should go Taylor Graham Emily Hartong and experience the energy and exciteveloping its identity at this point ment only present at in time, and any upgrades in tal- a Homecoming game. ent will have made themselves apparent. Whatever improvements W H I C H AT H L E T E S H O U L D WHAT IS A CRUCIAL GAME FOR STUDENTS TO AT TEND? we see from the team next sea- W E WAT C H O U T F O R? Homecoming football game (Oct. son should be on display during B: Emily Hartong (volleyball) the Homecoming game, and you 26 vs. Colorado State) Reigning Big West Player of B: While the early half of the should be there to see it. the Year and fi rst-team All-Amerschedule does the Warriors no J: Regardless of your alma ma- ican Emily Hartong returns for favors, the team should start de- ter, Homecoming is always a her fi nal season in a UH uniform

after a dominating junior season in 2012. The dynamic outside hitter will be one of the most explosive players on a talented team looking to fi nally win an elusive national championship under her leadership. Look for Hartong to surpass last year’s performance.

J: Taylor Graham (football) Last year’s offense was wildly inconsistent, largely due to streaky quarterback play. Graham, a fourstar recruit coming out of high school and transfer from Ohio State University, is one of the most touted players to come to the UH football team in recent memory. The comparisons to former UH standout and Heisman Trophy candidate Colt Brennan may seem premature but, with Graham’s perceived talent level, perhaps not farfetched. Have more questions about UH athletics? Email sports@kaleo.org


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