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Ser v i ng t he st udents of t he Un iversit y of Hawa i ‘ i at M ā noa si nce 1922

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W E DN E S DAY, M AY 4 to S U N DAY, M AY 8 , 2 011

w w w. k a leo.org

Volu me 105 Issue 9 9

Day of reckoning: Hunt for Osama bin Laden ends M AT THEW SYLVA Staff Writer

I AN NAWALINSKI Staff Writer

SAT U R DAY, A P R I L 30

ʻG E RO N I MO ʼ

1 a.m. An R A at Hale Kahawai reported that a female resident was intoxicated and vomiting. Campus Security, Emergency Medical Services and Honolulu Fire Department responded; the resident was transported to Straub Medical Clinic.

On Sunday, Osama bin Laden was killed in a CIA operation, code-named Geronimo, in Pakistan. President Barack Obama made the announcement during a televised address to the nation. “Tonight I can report to the American people and the world that the United p States has conducted an operation that killed Osama m bin Laden,” he stated. ““Justice J stice has Ju been done.”” Bin Lad a Laden is the rea -

3 a.m. Several people were found inside of the fter Duke Kahanamoku Aquatic Complex after hours. All were banned from the property.

F I R DAY, A P R I L 29 5:45 a.m. A Resident Director reported two wo amabandoned mopeds found on the Lower Campus access road. The front panels of both mopeds were missing. Disposition: closed. nd7:04 a.m. EMS notified dispatch about responding to a reported assault at Hale Wainani. hat 11:20 a.m. A faculty member reported that asther car was hit by a skateboarder along EastWest Road.

T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 28 1:22 a.m. An unknown man reported being haale rassed by Star Protection Security at the Hale Wainani parking lot. Star Protection Security rity called CS at 1:24 a.m. requesting assistance reing garding six men harassing them while checking vehicles for parking violations. HPD responded; ed; no report filed.

5:04 p.m. A Sodexo employee reported that a fensmale student fainted in The Market. EMS transWritported the student to a nearby hospital. (Writer’s note: CS will not verify which hospital).

W E D N E S DAY, A P R I L 27 8:13 p.m. A man requested a CS officer to the Law Law aw ken en School parking lot, where someone had broken m. into his vehicle. HPD was requested at 8:24 p.m.

w w w. p o d i u m r a c e w a y. c o m

WEDNESDAY N: 2-3 f t. W: 1-3 f t. S: 1-2 f t. E: 1-3 f t.

son for what is now the longest U.S. war ever. He represents the motivation behind the most devastating attack in American history, where nearly 3,000 people were killed on 9/11. His plea for Muslims to contribute to global jihad has sparked cultural confl ict, intensifying violence between the West and the Middle East. Not since the defeat of Hitler has retribution been so widely sought. Many believe justice is long overdue. The international manhunt is finally over.

A DECADE EARLIER EAR R LIE It’s be b been en a d si decade since 9/11. AlQaid ida, the Qaida, Islamic extremgr ist group headed by Lad bin Laden, claimed responsibi sponsibility for the attack. George Bus W. Bush’s T “War on Terbeg ror” began af shortly afterpropos ward, proposing t e elimination th eliminat the a of al-Qaida and similar terro terrorist cells around the w world. The war beg officially began invas with the invasion of Afghanistan on Oct. 7, 2001. This w was foll fo l low owed by the Iraq War W followed aan nd occupation nd occu oc c up paation in 2003. These Th and wa rrss would wa wou o ld ld come com o e to o defi de efi fi ne ne Bush’s Bus wars pres pr esid esid iden iden ency ency c y aand nd A nd me eri r ica can n’’s fo fforeign ore reig ig n p presidency American’s pol-

SURF Report

THURSDAY N: 3-5 f t. W: 2- 4 f t. S: 1-3 f t. E: 1-3 f t.

icy for years to come. Following the 9/11 attacks, the U.S. military made every effort to “kill or capture” Osama bin Laden. Numerous press reports were issued about his whereabouts or rumored death. Meanwhile, al-Qaida continued to release verified footage demonstrating bin Laden’s survival. In December 2001, the CIA believed that it had pinpointed the position of alQaida’s leader in the caves of Tora Bora, Afghanistan. Following coalition air strikes, which demolished the small, isolated region of the Hindu-Kush Mountains, bin Laden was believed to have escaped into neighboring Pakistan.

P U R S U I N G PA K I S TA N Following the failed capture of Bin Laden in Tora Bora, a letter dated Dec. 11, 2005, addressed to the leader of alQaida in Iraq, al-Zarqawi, indicated that Bin Laden and top al-Qaida leadership had found temporary safe haven in the Waziristan region of Pakistan. Waziristan is part of the country’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas. The previously autonomous region of the country straddles the border of both countries and is governed by Pashtun tribesmen. It is also on a short list of world regions closed to foreign reporters. In 2009, a research team led by Thomas Gillespie and John Agnew of UCLA used satellite-aided geographical analysis to pinpoint three compounds in the FATA where bin Laden was likely hiding. Later that year, the New York Daily News reported that the hunt for bin Laden had centered in the Chitral District of Pakistan, north of Waziristan. However, on Dec. 6, U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates stated the opposite, saying See Hunt, next page

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR HERTHA AUMOEUALOGO ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

Hunt for bin Laden from front page

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the U.S. had not had reliable information on the whereabouts of bin Laden in years. Pakistan’s Prime Minister Yousaf Gillani reiterated this, rejecting claims that bin Laden was hiding in Pakistan, although U.S. intelligence would soon prove otherwise. In the years prior to 2009, at a secret CIA prison in Eastern Europe, al-Qaida’s third in command, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, gave interrogators the nicknames of several of bin Laden’s couriers, personal messengers who bin Laden trusted with his life. Another detainee at the prison, Abu Faraj al-Libi, told interrogators that when he was promoted to succeed Mohammed as al-Qaida’s operational leader, he received word through a courier. CIA intelligence believed that promotion would have come directly from bin Laden; if they could fi nd the courier, they could fi nd bin Laden. It took years of follow-up investigation for intelligence agencies to identify the courier’s real name. When they did identify him, the CIA could not locate him. bin Laden was notorious for not using cell phones or computers, and the NSA found nothing until August 2010. The courier answered a phone call last year and had a chance conversation with a target while being monitored by the CIA. His location was then pinpointed to a compound in the Pakistani city of Abbottabad. The call unknowingly led U.S. pursuers to the doorstep of his boss, the world’s most wanted terrorist.

A B B O T TA BA D Walls surrounding the indiscreet property northeast of the city, where al-Libi had once lived,

were 18 feet high and topped with barbed wire. There were no Internet cables or phone lines running to the $1 million compound. Unlike neighbors who took their trash out, the compound occupants burned theirs. Intelligence officials had known about the house for years. They suspected a high-value target was sheltered there given the security measures, but they always suspected that heavily armed guards would surround bin Laden. The property was located in the affl uent Pakistani city of Abbottbad, in a residential area, and surrounded by ex-military members. The CIA soon came to believe that bin Laden was hiding in plain sight, in a location designed to go unnoticed. But since nobody besides the courier came or went, there was no way to be sure. Before dawn on May 2, a pair of helicopters left Jalalabad in eastern Afghanistan. The operation was covert; no other intelligence agency in the world had knowledge of it. In fact, only a small room of U.S. offi cials, including the president, actually knew what was about to happen, and was watching live from satellite in Washington, D.C. The choppers entered Pakistani airspace using sophisticated technology intended to evade radar systems. Obama recruited two dozen members of the Navy’s elite SEAL Team Six to carry out a raid with surgical accuracy. The helicopters lowered into the compound, dropping the SEAL team behind the walls. No shots were fired, but shortly after the team hit the ground, one of the choppers crashed for reasons the

government has yet to explain. None of the SEALs were injured, and the mission continued. After securing the property, including members of bin Laden’s family, the SEAL team proceeded to a room where he was hiding. Bin Laden used a woman as a human shield before an American bullet struck him in the head, instantly killing him. “Geronimo, killed in action,” was the call sign from the SEAL team to the situation room in the White House. It was confi rmation al-Qaida’s leader was dead.

A F T E R M AT H

American forces searched the compound and fl ew away with documents, hard drives and DVDs that could provide valuable intelligence about al-Qaida. Bin Laden’s body was immediately identifi able, but the U.S. also conducted DNA testing that identified him with near-100 percent certainty, senior administration officials said. The body was fl own to the North Arabian Sea, a senior defense offi cial said. There, aboard a U.S. warship, offi cials conducted a traditional Islamic burial ritual. Bin Laden’s body was washed and placed in a white sheet. He was placed in a weighted bag that, following religious prayers by a military offi cer, was slipped into the sea. A decades-long search for the world’s most wanted terrorist ended in one decisive hour. “I think we can all agree this is a good day for America,” Obama said. As the attacks on Sept. 11 brought an entire country together in mourning, the death of bin Laden brought citizens together in jubilation; his death offers many Americans long-awaited closure.

B RE AK I N G N E WS The Hawai‘i Legislature approved an $11 billion budget yesterday afternoon. Both the House and Senate approved $600 mil-

lion worth of cuts to government-funded services, and increased taxes on business and personal income.


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR HERTHA AUMOEUALOGO ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

Center receives $2 mil. endowment

WA NT TO SET YOURSELF SHINICHI TOYAMA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

The Center for Korean Studies promotes interdisciplinary study in arts, humanitites and social sciences, as well as sponsoring scholarly conferences, seminars and research projects. PAIGE L. JINBO Staff Writer Just before its 40-year anniversary, the Univeristy of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Center for Korean Studies has much to celebrate, with a recent endowment of $2 million. The endowment will be used to provide a wider variety of Korea-related courses, with a special focus in humanities and social sciences. It has been named the Center for Korean Studies Rotating Chair Endowment. According to Yung-hee Kim, director of the CKS, the endowment will allow the center to work with different departments in four-year rotations to establish new tenuretrack faculty positions in disciplines not currently taught at UH Mānoa. “[The endowment] guarantees Korean growth,” Kim said. “It’s very historic; it’s a landmark event.” A national search will commence to determine who will be UH Mānoa’s next Korea-related specialist. Much like a competition, a committee will be formed to make the decision. However, Kim said this project is still in its early stages; the fi rst step is to advertise the position, which Kim and her colleagues are still discussing. The selected individual will enter into an associate professor position for the following four

years. For those four years, his or her salary will be paid for by the endowment. In the fi fth year, it’s left to the department’s discretion whether the professor will be kept. If so, the department must pay for the salary of the professor. The endowment will then rotate to funding another Korean specialist for four years. In 2006, the CKS began a matching fundraiser with the Korea Foundation. For nearly fi ve years, the Korea Foundation challenged the CKS in its fundraising abilities: If after four years the CKS could raise $1 million, the Korea Foundation would match it. While it took a little more than four years to raise $1 million, the Korea Foundation permitted an extension and honored its agreement, endowing another $1 million to the CKS. Through generous members of the UH community, both current and past, as well as supporters within the local community and abroad, the CKS reached its goal of $1 million earlier this year. Ho-min Sohn, former director of the CKS, traveled to Korea to drum up support for the center. According to Kim, he was very successful. “The enthusiasm was there; they wanted to contribute,” Kim said. “There’s a mobilization of the masses with one aspiration: to

make the Korean presence known on campus.” With the number of Korean specialists and courses offered, the CKS is the largest in the world outside of Korea. According to Kim, that’s why the CKS has received the support of the Korea Foundation since the foundation was established in 1991. “I would like to express our sincere appreciation to the university for the diligent efforts to reinforce its Korea Studies program,” said Byung-kook Kim, president of the Korea Foundation, in a UH press release. “I fi rmly believe that this chair will contribute greatly to the advancement of Korean Studies at the Mānoa campus, and eventually throughout the U.S. academic community. We look forward to our continued partnership with the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.” Next year, the CKS will celebrate 40 years of existence, and this endowment is like an early celebration, Yung-hee Kim said. She said she is confi dent that the center will only continue to grow in the coming years. “Students looking to study Korean studies can tailor their studies to their needs at UH Mānoa,” Yung-hee Kim said. “Here, they will get the best education, as far as I’m concerned.”

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR HERTHA AUMOEUALOGO ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

Twitter breaks the news - again The Osama bin Laden story strengthens the social media site’s reputation for news coverage as it happens ELLISE A K AZAWA Managing Editor

In the hours following the news of Osama bin Laden’s death, the global spotlight didn’t turn only to President Barack Obama or the security team responsible for killing the world’s most infamous terrorist. It also shone brightly on a Pakistani IT consultant who unwittingly live-tweeted the secret operation. “Helicopter hovering above Abottabad at 1AM (is a rare event),” tweeted Sohaib Athar, who broadcasted the events in real time from his home. “Since taliban (probably) don’t have helicpoters [sic], and since they’re saying it was not

‘ours,’ so must be a complicated situation,” he wrote. Athar’s accidental narration of the events surrounding bin Laden’s capture is indicative of how Twitter has not only turned average Internet denizens into news reporters, but also how the production and consumption of news is changing in the Internet age.

SHORT AND TWEET Twitter is a free microblogging website that allows users to post short messages, called tweets, of up to 140 characters. Users can subscribe to the tweets of other users, and all information is immediately updated into one’s personal Twitter feed. The company likens the process to “being delivered a newspaper whose headlines you’ll always find interesting – you can discover news as it’s happening, learn more about topics that are important to you, and get the inside scoop in real time.” Twitter users are diverse, rang-

ing from the United Nations Development Programme to Hawaiian Airlines, and from high school students to the White House.

LIVE NEWS As the bin Laden story broke, Twitter usage peaked at 5,106 tweets per second, the secondhighest volume of tweets for a topic in the website’s history. Only the 2011 Japanese New Year celebrations ranked higher, with 6,939 tweets per second. “Osama bin Laden’s death on Sunday was a perfect time to take advantage of disseminating news via Twitter, because the information moved so fast, and you have to be there to seize the moment,” said Gene Park, a Honolulu StarAdvertiser reporter and president of the Hawai‘i chapter of the Asian American Journalists Association. While Twitter has often been criticized for the trivial nature of many users’ posts, the site’s legitimacy has been strengthened by the number of major announce-

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ments made via Tweet. At 9:25 p.m. EST, two and a half hours before Obama addressed the nation, Keith Urbahn, Donald Rumsfeld’s chief of staff broke the story. “So I’m told by a reputable person that they have killed Osama bin Laden. Hot damn,” he tweeted. This generated a buzz of Twitter activity before the major news networks reported the story. Urbahn reportedly received the tip from a TV producer and decided to announce it to his 300 Twitter followers. “I thought, why not put it on Twitter?” Urbahn told POLITICO. com. “That’d be interesting. And certainly Twitter would be ablaze with others who hear the same thing. No way I would be the fi rst.” The ability of any Twitter user to post information without fact checking is a major reason why Twitter has been a medium for breaking news coverage, a fact that Urbahn acknowledged.

“The bar for checking sources is much lower in Twitter and I’m not a journalist.”

A N E W M E D I UM

In addition to breaking news updates, many public figures have used Twitter to make formal announcements previously reserved for press releases or live press conferences. “Newsmakers have embraced Twitter as well,” commented Park. “When former U.S. Rep. Neil Abercrombie formally announced his intention to run for state governor on Twitter, all the political reporters in town said to themselves, ‘Well, now I have to pay attention to Twitter.’” Lance A rmstrong, one of the most celebrated cyclists in recent histor y, announced his retirement from the Tour de France on the site. Last year, Clarence House also formally announced Prince William’s engagement to Catherine Middleton via Twitter.


Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

F EATURES 5

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

Wine bar wind down before finals M AY SALCEDO Staff Writer

A MU S E W I N E BA R Location: Honolulu Design Center 2nd fl oor, 1250 Kapiolani Blvd. Open: 5 - 10 p.m. Monday - Saturday Price: $5-16; cards for wine tasting start at $20 Come in for $5 beers and pūpū during happy hour, Monday through Friday, from 5 to 7 p.m. There is live music on Wednesday through Friday from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Free parking is located in the parking structure complex on the first f loor of the Honolulu Design Center.

THE WINE STOP Location: 1809 S. King street Open: 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday to Thursday 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. Sunday Price: Free tastings; wine bottles are $15 and up A lthough this place is more of a wine

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and beer boutique than a wine bar, it has a selection of wines ranging through red and white, to champagne and dessert wines. The store holds wine -tasting events that are free to the public on certain days of the week according to the occasion, or simply as a day dedicated to a specific brand of wine. Walk-ins are appreciated. During an event, an employee introduces the wine to the guests by providing information on price, years aged, where the wine comes from, and what kinds of food it pairs with. Employees are open to questions from wine-lovers of different levels making this a great place to learn about wine for free. Parking is free, however, since there are only 3 parking stalls at the boutique, other parking may be found along King street.

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Price: $5 and up Formaggio is part of a restaurant and catering service chain. This bar comes complete with live entertainment every Friday and Saturday night, affordable food, and a selection of over 50 wines from Spain, Portugal, Germany, France and other countries. It is tucked away in a shady spot in Market City behind Ben Franklin, but one step into the restaurant leaves you wanting more. Parking is free and available right outside the restaurant, but get there early to avoid the nighttime rush. Come in on the first Monday of every month for Dining in The Dark, a dining experience that shuts out the sense of sight in order to enhance taste. Guests are given the opportunity to dine without the use of their sight to use their other senses to taste the meal. Though expensive for just donning a blindfold, this experience is great for a date. YASHIMA / FLICKR


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

KA LEO HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISM COMPETITION

Earlier this year, we asked the journalism classes of each high school on O‘ahu to submit an article that best represented campus life in their school’s community.

Yi runs the ‘full circle’

CLINTON WINHAM Moanalua High School Student Journalist

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Unlike today’s average teenager, who is completely absorbed in technology and the “cruise” lifestyle, the only time you’ll find Adam Yi kicked back on his couch is when he’s watching his favorite wrestler, John Cena, throw up the “You Can’t See Me!” sign and smash opponents on World Wrestling Entertainment. Otherwise, it would be safe to say that you might catch the highly athletic Moanalua junior going for an hour strong on the elliptical machine at the gym or working on his striking at Taekwondo class. Born with Down syndrome, life has hardly been average for Yi and his family. When Yi was born, his halfsister Nora Gazelle was only 14. “All the thoughts run through your head,” Gazelle said. “You think to yourself, ‘What are we going to do?’ and feel like he will never live a normal life. But he has really grown to exceed everyone’s expectations.” At the age of two and a half, Yi underwent open-heart surgery to repair three holes due to a congenital heart defect, the abnormal development of the heart before birth. Since then, the struggles have been only minor for the charismatic Yi.

“We wanted to get Adam involved in sports as soon as we could. It was just hard because there aren’t a lot of programs out there for kids with disabilities,” Gazelle said. Fortunately, a group called the Moanalua Tigers was just beginning, and Yi was one of three pioneering members who eventually competed in the Special Olympics with a team of over 30 people. “The Special Olympics age requirements state that anyone from the ages of 8 to 99 are eligible. So Adam was competing with men and women of all ages, even as a young kid,” said Gazelle. A great all-around athlete, even as a young Salt Lake Elementary School student, Adam participated every Saturday morning in basketball, soccer, track and field, and swimming. He was highly successful, winning eight gold medals, primarily in track and field, with 12 total in his time as an Olympian. In 2005, Gazelle’s husband Jimmy became disabled and Special Olympics were no longer an option. “You know, at the beginning, we all thought that we would be taking care of Adam his whole life. But it’s really come back full circle,” said Gazelle of Yi’s kind heart and willingness to take care of chores. She is a full-time student pursuing a master’s de-

May 31, 2011

gree in acupuncture. Yi’s warmth truly came alive with the birth of Gazelle’s son Riley, who will be four years old this December. Despite the finesse he shows in sports, Adam also has a power side. In his weight training class with Tony Calvan, a Moanalua special education instructor, he had the highest increase in maximum bench press, starting at 65 pounds and improving to 115, a 50-percent increase. When not playing sports, Yi volunteers at a Salt Lake McDonald’s, where he does everything from lining trays to sweeping the floor. “It’s crazy because at the beginning of all this, the doctors told us that Adam would only reach the scholastic level of a three-year-old,” Gazelle said. “But functionally, he’s so much higher than that. There’s really nothing he can’t do.” “For a long time, I was afraid that people would tease him for what’s wrong with him. But we’ve been fortunate that people have chosen to see what’s good instead,” Gazelle said. Gazelle had one request of the students at Moanalua: “If you see him around, don’t be afraid to say ‘hi.’ He’s a great kid.” But think twice before you challenge him to a race or game of ball; he just might beat you. See Journalism competition, next page


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

JOURNALISM COMPETITION from previous page

It’s not so bad, being trendy L OGAN NOWACK ‘Iolani School Student Journalist

Every Sunday morning, large white vans and storage trucks fi le into the Kapālama Elementary School parking lot. The air begins to fi ll with the scents of fruits and vegetables straight from the farm. The metal clanking sound of tents being set up signals the start of the day like a school bell. By 9 a.m., the parking lot is full of vendors. Fresh tomatoes, avocados, papayas, and guavas are just a few of the items displayed for shoppers in crates and boxes. Hundreds of people buzz through the lane as they check out each stand. The scene of a local farmers’ market is one that has become familiar to the people of Hawai‘i. In the last year, many new farmers’ markets have been opened all over O‘ahu. The concept of a farmers’ market isn’t a new one. However, the recent trend of buying locally grown food has made them the new rage. “The expanded market for fresh produce on O‘ahu has made it worth bringing my tomatoes here,” said Tui Rissa, owner of Wow Farms in Waimea on the Big Island. Rissa ships his tomatoes over from the Big Island of Hawai‘i to sell at various farmers’ markets on O‘ahu. “I have been selling over here for two months,” Rissa said, “and

every week more people come to the markets to buy food.” There are now 15 farmers’ markets on O‘ahu, from Hawai‘i Kai to Hale‘iwa. They all range in size and days of the week, but the two most notorious markets are the Kapi‘olani Community College Farmers’ Market near Diamond Head and the Hale‘iwa Farmers’ Market. “I have been going to the KCC Farmers’ Market for three years,” said Auriel Rickard. A senior at ‘Iolani School, his family enjoys going to the farmers market on Saturday mornings to buy fresh local fruits and vegetables. “We buy anything that looks good,” Rickard said. “We like to try new things.” Guavas, mountain apples, lettuce, tomatoes, and bananas are just some of the produce the Rickard family usually buys. “I feel like it is better for me and for Hawai‘i,” Rickard said. According to the numbers, Rickard is right that local food is better for Hawai‘i and for him. A study in 2009 by the University of Hawai‘i College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, titled Economic Impacts of Increasing Hawai‘i’s Food Self Sufficiency, concluded that if Hawai‘i replaced 10 percent of its imported food with locally grown food, it would generate $247 million in sales, $47 million in earnings, $6 million in tax

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revenues and more than 2,300 jobs. Not only does buying locally grown products help our economy by keeping the money in Hawai‘i, but the consumers know that they are getting fresh produce, and they know where it comes from. The CTAHR study says that fresh food that is grown locally requires less pesticide, less fertilizer, fewer preservatives and doesn’t have to be shipped. That makes it healthier and cheaper. Nong Kindaung, a vendor for Khamphout Farm, commented on the local food movement. “People are now more health conscious and care about what they eat. Locally grown food is healthy, it’s good, and it’s cheap. People are starting to realize that now,” Kindaung said. The CTAHR study reports that Hawai‘i imports roughly 90 percent of its food. Many experts have called for Hawai‘i to be more self-suffi cient. Farmers’ markets are a major way to do it. In the last five years, the number of people at the KCC market has doubled from 3,000 to 6,000 and is still increasing. The Hale‘iwa Farmers’ Market sees over 3,000 people every Sunday compared to 1,000 people just a year ago.

Journalism competition: Farmers markets touch community

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

Solar alternative energy: Coming to a rooftop near you? A NDREA DECOSTA Senior Staff Writer

On average, Honolulu experiences 271 mostly or partly sunny days in a year. With all this sunshine, one would imagine that residents would be attempting to gain access to what is being promoted as a cheap and sustainable source of alternative energy. Proponents of solar energy have recently gained traction in the announcement of a wind-solar project anticipated to supply 25 percent of Honolulu’s energy needs. According to Mark Heilbron of Solar Services Hawaii, The future in Hawai‘i is bright.

D I S AG R E E M E N T S Detractors, such as policy analyst Robert L. Bradley Jr., of the Institute for Energy Research in Houston, Texas, cite “major economic costs and unintended environmental consequences” as barriers to renewable solar energy. According to Bradley, “The nvironmental problems primary environmental present[ed]] by a solar power are related to the use of mirrors and ated land impact.” the associated “Even improved, new-generaable capacity is, on avtion renewable ce as expensive as new erage, twice om the most economicapacity from uel alternative, and trical fossil-fuel ple the costt of surplus electricity,” ey in a 1997 report for said Bradley nstitute. “Solar power the Cato Institute. for bulk generation is substantially moree uneconomic than the average; biomass, hydroelectric d geothermal projects power and economic.” are less uneconomic.” Closer to home, UH Mānoa’s vedouros, who is highly Panos Prevedouros, critical of wind energy and points mes,” when residential to “dark times,” use is at itss peak, considers solar ore viable source of repower a more nergy. newable energy. gh the technology is “Though y improving, solar ... continually has much more potential [than wind],” Prevedouros revedouros said.

“Thirty years later, solar panels are still working as intended.” Similar to the variability of wind energy, solar’s ability to provide a continuous stream of energy is just one fly in the ointment of an otherwise perfect plan to turn what is an abundant natural resource into a renewable source of alternative energy. Hawai‘i, which has a mild climate relative to the continental United States, also receives an abundance of rain in some areas. This includes Hilo on the windward side of Hawai‘i Island, which with only 168 sunny days receives an average of 46 percent sunshine throughout the year. The windward side of O‘ahu currently supplements the water demands of the Ewa Plains residents. These same windward communities on all islands would have to be supplemented by electricity or solar energy from sunnier districts.

S O L A R D E C AT H A L O N Working to resolve some of these challenges, a cadre of faculty, students and administrators have joined forces with the private sector to compete in the Solar Decathlon, scheduled for September 2011 in Washington, D.C. Elyse Peterson, communications director for UHM’s “Team Hawai‘i” and MBA candidate at the Shidler C o l lege o f

Business, said she finds great satisfaction in the project. “Our immediate goal is to complete construction on our [project] home, Hale Pilihonua, integrate the skills and innovations from six different disciplines in the University of Hawai‘i System, and present them on the National Mall in the fall,” said Peterson. In addition to improving technologies, these efforts promote collaboration between disciplines, and interconnectedness places education at the forefront of sustainability. However, Peterson did acknowledge criticism over costs and power interruptions. “As we reach out to the community, we often must remind individuals that the high installation costs of photovoltaic systems will be quickly offset with the incredible energy savings they will see in the future,” Peterson said. “Current feed-in tariffs allow photovoltaic system owners the assurance that the variable nature of solar power will not threaten the electricity supply to their home. home.”

SOLAR OPTIONS Kenneth Sheeks, owner of Hawaii Skylights and Solar Fans, fell into the business while researching alternative energy options for his Hawai‘i Island home. e..

Unable to fi nd any local distributors for 3M-trademarked Solatubes, Sheeks travelled to California to purchase the equipment. Sheeks was on a rooftop performing an installation during our interview. “I was looking for low-cost alternatives to my residential energy problem, and found that Solatube were a great way to help reduce my energy consumption. I experienced an approximate 25 percent reduction in my electricity bill within the first months of installation.” “Reducing the demand for fossil fuels is the fi rst step toward saving money and the environment,” Sheeks said. Tori Richard, local producers of fi ne apparel for 55 years, became the fi rst manufacturer in the nation to install PV beds. Since installation in 2008, their electricity costs have been reduced from approximately $10,000 a month to about $500 a month, deferring about 95 percent of energy consumption and costs. “It was the easiest decision to make,” said Tori Richard President With escalating Josh Feldman. “With fuel prices and the array of compelling incentives available ... it was primarily an economic decision.” In addition to making sense economically, the decision by Feldman to install PV’s at the plant was also rooted in their commitment to the environment and the community. “It’s really a win all the way around,” Feldman said. For private owerns, low-cost alternatives such as Solatube skylights inserted into the kitchen, bath, and hall areas of a typical single family home are accessible and economically feasible. “The costs range from $659 for asphalt shingle roofs to $859 for ceramic or tile

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roofs,” Sheeks said, “In addition to reducing their carbon footprint, consumers are able to obtain the truest, brightest light available in skylights.” Still, Feldman and others point to the obstacles currently in place, including HECO’s decision to decouple services. Decoupling has been roundly criticized as a ploy to insulate HECO’s income stream. There is also a fair amount of legislative “tinkering,” such as Sen. Clayton Hee’s proposal to cap the statewide incentives to $7 million. “The real incentives are geared toward business, not residential use,” Feldman said, “Capping incentives not only limits commercial projects, but also acts as a disincentive to residential applications.”

SOLAR ENERGY How it works • Solar thermal electricity is typically produced using curved mirrors which can turn to follow the course of the sun during the day • Mirrors focus the reflected sun’s heat on a tube that contains a heat-absorbing working liquid • Heat is then transferred from the working fluid to water to generate steam used to turn a turbine similar to a conventional steam generator

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10

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

International students need support from UH community The students of ELI 73: Writing for Foreign Students With more than 1,400 international students, the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa has established itself as a strong player in the global marketplace of education. However, the excitement of coming to Hawai‘i from distant places often gets mixed with serious challenges such as language barriers and encounters with a different academic culture. Bich Tran, a graduate student from Vietnam, remembers well the hurdles during her first weeks at UH. “I could not understand others, and neither did they understand me. I was really shocked by the culture, the completely different customs such as how to get food or borrow books from the library,”

she said. “Although I really needed help from others, I tried to solve those issues by myself.” Remaining silent about problems is not unusual. Yoo Ri Park, an exchange student from Korea, said she knows it takes time to get used to campus life. “We do not fi nd solutions easily, and end up making mistakes that sometimes affect our academic life at UH.” Based on her experience, professors and staff are often unaware of the status of exchange students, which complicates the handling of tuition and course credits. “We have to be brave and explain the problems to staff and professors. Some major campus offi ces should share information so that everyone knows about our status,” Park said. The status of being a foreign

student, however, can also deprive students from UH scholarships. “I tried every offi ce, but the answer was ‘no.’ I couldn’t fi nd any scholarships available for foreign students who don’t have U.S. citizenship,” said So Dam Park, from Korea. Dealing with the unknown is often what students face in American academic culture. Thomas Kim, an exchange student from Korea, was stunned with attendance regulations, and said he thinks faculty and students should take attendance more seriously. “The low rate of attendance in my classes reduced my motivation to study. Even if studies are not always interesting at first, there are numerous things that are really interesting once we get to know more.” Other differences in academic

culture are more subtle. Sujin Lee, a student from Korea, looked back with some nervousness at her assignments. “Writing an English essay was the most challenging part for me,” she said. “The fi rst time I received a paper without a grade [requiring resubmission], I didn’t want to go to class at all.” Lee gave advice for other international students: “Do not hesitate asking for help. I got plenty of help from my writing class, professors, the writing center and friends.” Another bump in the academic road can be feeling lost in bureaucracy, which is what Kai Miao Liu, an international undergraduate student from China, has experienced. ”My credit still has not been transferred to the UH system, but while my classmates are discussing which classes they want to take in

the fall, I feel lonely. What if there are no seats left, and my graduation will be delayed for at least one semester or even worse? I’m scared.” Liu is grateful for the support from professors in her department in this situation. Chih-Ting Lu from Taiwan also recommended seeing departmental advisors regularly, especially prior to registration, which can be demanding for new students. The UH catalog provides limited information. “Making an appointment with your advisor ahead of time and making a course plan is especially important in the fi rst semester,” Lu said. “Advisors are greatly willing to help.”

International students: the barriers they still face at UHM. » Full story at www.kaleo.org


Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

O PINIONS 11

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

Why Donald Trump has come so far Business deception: a new level of government opacity

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M ICHELLE BARON Contributing Writer

Upon realizing that Donald Trump is a joke with toupéed f luff on his head, sales-pitch suit on his shoulders, Trump cologne sprayed thick on his sleeves and wobbling political platform be neath him, I’ve wondered why he has become so noticeable in the media. According to the latest polls posted by the New York Times on April 23, Trump is tied with former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee at 16 percent, and leads former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin by three percent. Is it brain-washing, or are Republicans being cynical for a lack of better candidates? It’s clear that Trump is blatantly naïve about politics – his platform is based solely on his sudden support of the “birther” movement, and his qualifications are tied to his success as a businessman, which itself is a mere re-

sult of bailouts and manipulation. When an NBC reporter asked Trump how he is going to uphold his promise to deal with debt while still keeping Medicare intact, he said, “You know how you do it? By stopping what’s going on in the world.” Stopping what? How? Trump can’t answer. He instead deviates from these kinds of questions with vague, cheesy business catch phrases – typical Trump. However, from a sociological standpoint, despite his lack of qualification, Trump’s success is not too surprising. In every society, there are people who are so impressed by their own achievements that every thought comes bursting from their mouths. Sure, these kinds of people offend some, but also arouse loyalty in others. Their followers admire their hero’s disregard of society’s rules of proper conduct and take delight in hearing obnoxious things that most can only fantasize about saying.

These “heroes” get the kind of attention ordinary people only dream of, and seem to live without even a hint of self-doubt. Trump was a member of the upper class his whole life, but in some sense embodies the “American Dream” of capitalistic success. Trump is brassy and goldrimmed, and as a result catches the attention of many obsessed with all things shiny and lavish. He represents, among other things, the national fantasy life, but the last thing our nation needs is a leader who is impressed by no one but himself and who knows nothing more than the life of fattening his own piggy bank and shining his shoes. Trump’s campaign appeals to those who tend to fall for business deception. What we really need is a leader who can deal with complex issues with tact, civility and grounded sensibility, rather than someone who is too easily distracted by shiny, status-symbol trinkets.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

EDITORIAL STAFF

K A LEO

Editor in Chief Will Caron Managing Editor Ellise Akazawa Chief Copy Editor Emily Roberts Ka Leo O Hawai‘i Assc Chief Copy Editor Karleanne Matthews University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa News Editor Hertha Aumoeualogo 2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 Assc News Editor Jane Callahan Honolulu, HI 96822 Features Editor Reece Farinas Assc Features Editors Alvin Park, Haiya Sarwar Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Opinions Editor Lindsy Ogawa Advertising (808) 956-3210 Assc Opinions Editor Davin Aoyagi Facsimile (808) 956-9962 Sports Editor Russell Tolentino E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Assc Sports Editor Marc Arakaki Web site www.kaleo.org Comics Editor Ann Macarayan Design Editors Sarah Wright, Chelsea Yamase ADVERTISING Photo Editor Nik Seu The Board of Publications office is located Assc Photo Editor Regina Zabanal on the ocean side of Hemenway Hall. Web Editor Chip Grozdon Assc Web Editor Patrick Tran T H E

How do you suggest I deal with drama? Is there so much you can take before giving up on someone? I’ve been friends with this girl for a long time and I realized that every time I hang out with her, some kind of drama happens. She gossips a lot and is nosy in my personal life. Liz: She doesn’t sound like a friend to me, but rather a source of drama. She may mean well but not know how to cultivate friends. She is probably insecure and feels the need to live vicariously by causing problems. Life is way too short to waste your time dealing with someone like her. Wash your hands of her and send positive energy in her direction and leave it at that. I don’t deal with drama or negativity in my life. I avoid unnecessary negative situations. These types of people are energy vampires and do not enrich your life in any way. Don’t feel guilty over walking away. Just let it go. She will never be a better person if you continue to enable her behavior.

Sam: Why would you want to deal with drama? There is no way your life can positively function if it is continually injected with drama. I recommend, since she gossips and takes interest in your personal life, that you consider stepping back and pulling yourself out of the friendship to see if she stops gossiping. If she continues to gossip and bring drama into your life, then I sincerely recommend that you stop spending time with her. Friendships shouldn’t be hard work. They should come easily. Most times, friendships should be something enjoyed or shared because relationships are not meant to be that difficult or emotionally harmful.

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V O I C E

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 10,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit the Ka Leo Building. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2010 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Devika Wasson, chair; Henry-lee Stalk, vice chair; or Ronald Gilliam, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.hawaii.edu/bop for more information.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

Abercrombie’s UH Board of Regents applicants rejected Abercrombie’s UH Board of Regents applicants rejected OPINIONS DESK The University of Hawai‘i is governed by the Board of Regents, whose mission is to “formulate policy and exercise control over the university through its executive officer, the university president,” according to their website. The BOR’s members are appointed by the governor via the Regent Candidate Advisory Committee, a panel that identifies candidates. With a Democrat governor and a Legislature controlled by Democrats, one might assume that the process would be simple in confirming the five new BR applicants. Governor Abercrombie may have been surprised when two of his five candidates were unanimously rejected by the State

Senate Education Committee on April 25. This has been the first time that any candidates have been rejected since 2008, when

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the panel rejected Governor Lingle’s appointee Kitty Lagareta. The governor’s strong ties to the university are perhaps what

make this event even more shocking. His master’s degree in sociology and doctorate in American Studies were both earned at UH Mānoa, and he has said numerous times that the university is of great importance to him. When the appointment process for the university failed to deliver what he expected, however, his office declared the Board of Regents appointment process was broken. Senate Education Committee Chairwoman Jill Tokuda agreed with the governor’s sentiments. “It is really clear that the Re gents selection process does not give the governor the ability to put together a cohesive board,” she said. One would hope that the policies revolving around the conductors of the university could remain fairly non-partisan. However, a blatant discrepancy in our state government’s conduct must be pointed out. The Regent Candidate Advisory Committee was created by Act 56, 2007

Hawai‘i Legislature, in conformity with the amendment to Article X, Section 6 of the Hawai‘i State Constitution. This act was intended to curb the power of former governor Linda Lingle, a Republican. Among those that supported this initiative was Tokuda, who now intends to change the process during the next legislative session. It is interesting to see how checks and balances are based on temporar y circumstances that arise in the political arena, and are not permanent entities established for accountability. The intentions to curb the governor’s power have now sub sided with a Democrat in office. The only question that has to be answered now is whether university students, by far the key recipients of the L egislature’s decisions on higher education, want to agree to these expansions of power and thus allow the L egislature to remove a measure of accountability.


14

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

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OPINIONS DESK How much controversy can one slaughterhouse cause for a state? For the Hawai‘i Legislature, it has caused thousands of testimonies emailed in, as well as an ongoing debate about what constitutes a bailout for a failed industry. The Hawai‘i Livestock Cooperative owns the slaughterhouse facility located in Kapolei, while the 6.5 acres the land is located on is owned by the state. The issue here is that the facility is falling behind on paying its lease, and will close down if action by the Legislature is not taken. A closure of this facility will equate to a blow for local agriculture. In one hearing on Senate Bill 249, which would have allowed the state Legislature to purchase the slaughterhouse for $1.6 million, the Department of Agriculture said in written testimony that, “The slaughterhouse is an essential component of the state’s livestock industry. It is the largest slaughterhouse on O‘ahu and one of the most modern in the state.” This was countered by opposing testimony providing by the Humane Society of the United States and the Healthy

Hawai‘i Coalition. Following that hearing, the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals encouraged members of its organization to write to the state House of Representatives, a process that resulted in thousands of emails flooding the inboxes of the House and slowing down the Internet throughout the entire day. SB249 died this legislative session as a result of not being heard during Conference. Replacing it is a provision in House Bill 200, the budget bill, that spends $750,000 to provide the slaughterhouse with photovoltaic cells to reduce its maintenance costs. Sen. Donovan Dela Cruz, co-author of SB249, said of the provision in HB200, “From my standpoint, we’re paying for the PV system, and that would reduce their energy costs so they can make the payments – so it is a subsidy. But agriculture is a priority, and I want to make sure we can really support growing cattle locally.” Sen. Mike Gabbard offered a different opinion. “I’m scratching my head because it doesn’t make sense to me for the state to keep bailing these guys out ... I hope the governor

will take a hard look at this and not release the funds.” Students can look at this with some level of criticism in mind. With the state barely having resolved its $1.3 billion shortfall, how can it still have enough in its budget to subsidize a failed business? What guarantees that as a result of state funding, the business will suddenly become a successful venture and be able to pay its debts? Aside from the specific issue at hand, a broader question can be asked. We recently published the article, “Uncertainty looms with talks of tuition hikes for UH,” in which it was described how the university is preparing for tuition hikes to offset reduced funding received from the Legislature. Does the Legislature really think that funding a slaughterhouse in any manner is more important than say, another $750,000-$1 million for the university? Is fresh pork more tantalizing to the tastes of our legislators than the promise of a future for the state? While $1 million wouldn’t greatly offset the problems of the university, it would be foolish to think that it wouldn’t make a difference.


Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

S PORTS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

Three Warriors go pro JOE F ERRER Senior Staff Writer

After all the weighing, measuring, testing, questioning and critiquing of the NFL Draft process, three former Warriors earned the right to call themselves professionals. Alex Green, Greg Salas and Kealoha Pilares were chosen in the 76th installment of the draft this past weekend. Running back Alex Green, the fi rst Hawai‘i player selected, waited 96 picks before getting the call from Packers general manager

we’re happy to have him.“ Before signing with the Warriors, Green won a junior college national championship for Butte College in Oroville, Calif., the same school that produced last year’s Super Bowl Most Valuable Player – and Green’s new teammate – Aaron Rodgers. Sixteen picks after Green was off the board, Salas learned he would be starting his pro career in St. Louis, as the Rams made him the 15th pick in the fourth round early Saturday morning. “It’s crazy when dreams be-

It’s a great honor to be part of a great organization ...

Ted Thompson telling him Green Bay would draft him as the 32nd pick in the third round. “I’m very excited,” Green said. “It’s a great honor to be part of a great organization, and to play for the defending Super Bowl champions.” Green had the second best season by a UH running back in school history last year with 1,199 yards and 18 touchdowns. “He’s certainly an impressive physical specimen,” Thompson said. “He’s going to be a good addition to our group.” Green will compete for carries in the defending Super Bowl champions’ crowded backfield. Starter Ryan Grant sat out last year with an ankle injury, but is expected to return along with last year’s surprise breakout back James Starks. “In this league, you can’t have enough good running backs,” said Green’s new position coach, Jerry Fontenot. “[Green is] a good kid, a joy to be around, and he’s excited as heck to be a part of the Packers organization – and

come reality,” Salas said. “You can’t even put it into words.” Salas, UH’s all-time leading receiver, will be given the chance to compete for playing time. All but two of the Rams’ receivers have less than three years of professional experience. Kealoha Pilares, who played opposite Salas as a Warrior slot back last year, was the fi rst selection in the fi fth round by the Carolina Panthers. “I’m just so grateful for this opportunity,” Pilares said. “I feel so blessed right now.” Both Salas and Pilares will be catching throws from young Heisman Trophy-winning quarterbacks who were selected fi rst overall in their respected drafts. The Rams starting quarterback is former Oklahoma star and NFL Rookie of the Year Sam Bradford. Cam Newton, who led Auburn to the Bowl Championship Series championship last season, was selected fi rst overall by the Panthers on Friday.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

Rainbow Wahine: CLOSING THE SEASON ON THE ROAD from page 19

been common for the ’Bows the past two months. Starting with a 5-0 victory over Miami University of Ohio at home on March 12, the ’Bows won six in a row. They then lost four, won three, lost three, won five, lost four, and are currently riding a three-game winning streak. Majam, who has a perfect fielding percentage and leads the team with 31 walks so far this season, said she believes the cause of their inconsistency is their mentality. “Doubt and fear have gotten a hold of us when we start playing lower than our capabilities,” Majam said. “We need to maintain positive attitudes throughout the rest of our season and we will go far.” The series against the Spartans this weekend ends the regular season. And while a regular season WAC title is out of reach this year, the ’Bows still have a chance to earn a higher seed for the WAC Tournament later this month. Majam said being the No. 1 seed is not a priority for the ’Bows.

gionals – which is what we want.”

H OM E C OM I N G Q U E E N

BRIAN TSENG / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Junior second baseman Dara Pagaduan swings at a pitch against South Dakota State at the Wahine Softball Stadium on March 5. The ’Bows are currently in fourth place in the WAC standings. “It would give us so much momentum going into the WAC tournament if we finished the regular

season on a high note,” she said. “Although we may not have the No.1 seed going into the tour-

nament, we still have a great shot of winning the tournament and getting the automatic bid to re-

The trip to San Jose State will be special for junior pitcher Stephanie Ricketts, who is from San Jose, Calif. “I’m really excited to play in front of all of the people who have been with me and helped me before college,” Ricketts said. The last time Ricketts faced off against SJSU on the road, she pitched 12.1 innings in relief. The ’Bows came away with the win in a 16 -inning marathon on April 4, 2009. Ricketts was credited with the win. While another double-digit inning performance is unlikely for Ricketts, another challenge will be in the stands when she toes the rubber. “I have some girls coming out who I am helping to [teach] how to pitch. So I’m really going to want to set a good example for them,” she said.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR ANN MACARAYAN COMICS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i

AMES

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Fresh and Tasty Homemade and Hawaiian Syrups

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Don Gagliardo ACROSS 1 Work on, as a part 5 Donald, to his nephews 9 Polite title 14 [Turn the page] 15 Indian flatbread 16 Monterrey girlfriend 17 *Checking, as books 19 Plymouth’s county 20 *Like some ovens 22 Expand operations 25 Expand one’s belly 26 Goose egg 27 Hard work 28 Activist with Raiders 31 1987 Masters champ Larry 32 61-Down resident 33 Versatile, powerwise 34 Subdivided 35 *Field action 39 Flat-topped formation 41 Boston or Baltimore 42 Blame, slangily 45 Blame 46 Flower girl’s path 48 Geologic procession 49 Bert Bobbsey’s twin 50 Little devil 51 Lunch time 53 *Part of many a magic act 57 Place to play 58 New York resort area, and what the answers to starred clues are 62 Best Buy squad members 63 Busy as __ 64 Toned-down “Awesome!� 65 Ferber and a Dame 66 Mama __ 67 Plucky Solutions at www.kaleo.org

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Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

Student

05/04/11 DOWN 1 Cheap pipe material 2 Ooplasm containers 3 Blanc who voiced Bugs 4 Sergio Mendes & __ ’66 5 Relax, as one’s fist 6 Greenhorn 7 Call off an appt. 8 “Hulk� director 9 Ticked off by 10 Word of agreement 11 Water shower? 12 Fret (over) 13 Really botched up 18 Pince-__ 21 Poor listener’s in-and-out organ 22 One wearing black at home 23 Island dish 24 Trusting way to purchase 29 Descriptive wd. 30 Bra choices 31 Day for the fair-of-face child: Abbr. 33 Some do it gracefully 34 Teen omen 36 “__ for me to know ...� 37 Kind of biol. 38 Bases for arguments 39 “Of Human __� 40 Like some TV pilots 43 Nostalgist’s suffix 44 Future therapist’s maj. 46 Band booster 47 Medicinal syrup 48 Garden container? 50 “None for me, thank you� 52 Publicity 54 Songwriter Paul 55 Rhyme scheme in Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening� 56 Hwys. with nos. 59 Thompson of “Back to the Future� 60 Flee 61 32-Across home

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# 70

HOROSCOPES HOROSCOPES By Nancy Black Tribune Media Services (MCT) Today’s Birthday (05/04/11). You’re in the zone for your birthday! You’ve got the power and know where to apply it. This is an excellent year for exercise, sports, play, and for exploring practical creative projects. Quick, tangible results will be the most rewarding. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is a 9 -- It seems easier to concentrate, and a solution to an old problem is becoming obvious. Allow those ideas to gel, and get opinions from experienced friends. Things come together. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is an 8 -Changes seem abrupt to others. You seem to feed off of them. A friend provides spiritual direction. Practice increases skills. Listen and learn. Gemini (May 21-June 21) -- Today is a 7 -- You feel powerful and are ready to make positive changes. Your natural planning talents are primed, so let loose and invent. Then jump into action. Cancer (June 22-July 22) -- Today is a 9 -- Follow through on details for the next few days. Think out different options and make plans. Don’t travel yet. Manage your deadlines, and stay thrifty. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is an 8 -- Your friends are really there for you, and for the next two days you’ll want to go play with them. Why not? Clean up any messes and invite folks over. Let go of a scheme that lacks soul.

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Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is an 8 -- Take your ideas for a walk. You’ll think of something brilliant, and your heart will thank you later. You don’t need to venture far. In fact, stay close to home. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a 7 -Business interferes with fun. You have to call the shots and decide what’s best. Trust your intuition. Calling for reinforcements may be a good idea now. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Today is a 9 -Transformation is right around the corner. Start researching ways to invest in your future. Save a windfall for a rainy day. You’re sharp with finances. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Today is a 7 -Work with a partner, and share decisions. Find an antique treasure. Reject a far-fetched scheme in favor of a practical solution (even if you don’t know how yet). Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today is an 8 -Time to get to work. No more putting off what you’re committed to. Focus on making money, not spending it. Sort through the feelings as they arise. Chop wood; carry water. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is a 9 -- A little surprise would be nice. Romantic odds are in your favor now. Make sure what you build is solid, rather than based on fantasy. Practice and play by the rules. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is a 7 -Neatness counts double for the next three days. It’s a great time for interior decoration. Surprise friends with a new idea, and add a splash of color.


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

’Bows swinging for momentum Rainbow Wahine hoping to find consistency GLENN VER ASCO Senior Staff Writer Following a home sweep of then-Western Athletic Conference leader New Mexico State, the Rainbow Wahine softball team (33-16, 11-7 WAC) has a showdown at San Jose State (19-32, 5-13 WAC) this weekend. Sophomore centerfielder Kelly Majam said last weekend’s victories over NMSU will boost the ’Bows for their California confrontation. “[We] gained our confidence back,” Majam said. “And we will definitely be able to take that positivity and momentum with us on the road.” While Hawai‘i sports a respectable 33-16 overall record, momentum has not been a factor lately. Winning streaks followed by losing streaks have

BRIAN TSENG / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Sophomore centerfielder Kelly Majam gets a hit against South Dakota State on March 5. The Rainbow Wahine will close the season on the road against San Jose State beginning Friday.

See Rainbow Wahine, page 16

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20 S PORTS Sister, sister

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2011

Rainbow Wahine brought siblings together JAKE CAMARILLO Senior Staff Writer

A S H LE E J IME N E Z

JA MI LE E J IME N E Z

Although the Jimenez sisters are on the same team, the practice times for their respective events don’t allow them to see each other much. Ashlee Jimenez, a sophomore on the Rainbow Wahine track and fi eld team, is a middle-distance runner who competes in the 400 and 800-meter runs. “Last year we got to room with each other when we traveled a lot,” Ashlee said. “Since she’s switched events, she’s still working on it to get better, so it’s a lot different this year than last year.” But the sisterly bond is still there. Jamilee supports her younger sister at meets on the road. “I see her [Jamilee] cheering me on at meets, so that’s nice,” Ashlee said. Ashlee’s last-minute decision to head to UH for school not only satisfied her older sister, but their parents as well. “They were really happy b e c a u s e then they could watch me,” Ashlee said. “Since high school, they haven’t really watched me in a real competition.” The Jimenez parents will attend the Western Athletic Conference Championships, which UH will host May 10 to 13. “I’ve been focusing around the 800 and the 400 [meter], so it’s twice as long as my normal,” Ashlee said. “My goal is to hopefully make it into fi nals for the WAC Championships.”

Jamilee Jimenez, a junior, switched from the long jump event to the javelin this season. She looked forward to the new position’s challenges, and within the last four months, found a new love for the sport. “I recently switched events last semester, so I haven’t competed anywhere in the mainland,” Jamilee said. “I’ve just been doing a lot of the home meets.” Jamilee hopes to compete at the upcoming WAC Championships in the javelin throw. “If the coaches allow, I’ll compete,” Jamilee said. “I’ve been doing it all of four months, but it’s kind of weird going from long jumping for six years and [then] switching events. We’ll see how it goes.” Jamilee said she enjoys her family ties on the team. “We’ve never competed against each other in high school,” Jamilee said. “Being out here, being in the same uniform, [and] being able to just see her compete and see her excel is a really good thing.” Jamilee went to Kaua‘i High School and Ashley graduated from K a meha me ha Schools - Kapālama. They never planned on coming to the University of Hawai‘i together, but Jamilee convinced Ashlee to give it a shot. “She actually wanted to go to Oregon State University, and I’ve always wanted to come here,” Jamilee said. “I remember telling her, ‘Just come to UH, we’ll be sisters, we’ll be on the track team, it’ll be a really good thing.’”

BRIAN TSENG/KA LEO O HAWAI‘I


May 4th 2011