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A K LEO T H E

V O I C E

Ser v i ng t he st udents of t he Un iversit y of Hawa i ‘ i at M ā noa si nce 1922

Checkbook challenged? Focus on your finances Features 4

Cut costs Brew your own beans Opinions 7

W E DN E S DAY, M A RC H 2 to T H U R S DAY, M A RC H 3 , 2 011

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Volu me 105 Issue 77

UH faculty launches first-ever online ‘vog’ forecast H ERTHA AUMOEUALOGO News Editor

A closer look at updated forecasts of volcanic smog, or vog, is now available at your fi ngertips, thanks to the efforts of University of Hawai‘i researchers. Steven Businger, the principal investigator of the Vog Measurement and Prediction Project, said via e-mail, “The model maps show the extent of the vog, they are quite accurate.” For three years, Businger and other researchers have been working to increase public awareness through the website. So far, he said, “people who are sensitive to vog (e.g., get allergic reactions) have been quite vocal in their approval of the site.” When questioned about the beginning of the program, Roy Huff, the lead weather and vog modeler for the website wrote, “The initial template was created by a couple of employees within the department, and I received assistance with graphical output of the meteograms and scatter plots from MS candidate Doug Stolz.” Vog is defined on the VMAP home page as “a mixture of sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas and sulfate (SO4) aerosol. SO2 (invisible) reacts with oxygen and moisture in the air to produce SO4 aerosol (visible).” This has the potential to become a health problem for people with asthma and other respiratory complications. Some of the project’s funding comes

Mohandas Gandhi’s grandson Arun Gandhi speaks today at noon at the East-West Center’s Burns Hall. His lecture, titled “Nonviolence: A Means for Social Change,” is part of an education outreach initiative sponsored by the We Are One Foundation and the Ghandi International Institute for Peace.

TOASTYKEN/FLICKR

Volcanic emissions from Kīlauea make their way down the island chain in the form of vog. from the United States Geological Survey, a federal agency which studies the landscape of the U.S. The sulfur dioxide and sulfate measurements on the VMAP website are provided by the Hawai‘i State Department of Health and the National Park Service. Many Hawai‘i residents have been exposed to vog, claiming it smells like the smoke of burning rubber tires. Physical reactions include irritated eyes, sore throat and burning sinuses. The endless discharge of volcanic gases, in this case sulfur dioxide from Kīlauea’s erupting vents, also causes rainwater to become contaminated with acid, which presents a health hazard. The website not only provides a reliable prediction of vog, but also serves a

I N S I DE : F I N ANC IAL I S S U E

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SC H O L A R S H I P S Wednesday N: 2- 4 f t. W: 1-2 f t. S: 1-2+ f t. E: 2- 4 f t.

larger purpose in House Bill 314, which relates to disaster awareness. A Disaster Preparedness Commission will be established in developing safety plans for natural hazards and emergencies. Although the bill will not be effective for another nine years, UH has taken the initiative. According to Businger, one of the problems of predicting vog is underestimating sulfate aerosol, specifically on the Kona side of the Big Island. “We hope to implement clouds in our dispersion model this spring and that should improve the forecasts,” he said. “Since the original source area is small, minor errors in wind direction can result in large errors in vog forecasts.” “The project is in cooperation with the USGS, and funding is currently slated to

BU DG E T I N G

SURF Report

expire Sept. 30 of this year,” said Huff in an e-mail, “We are currently looking for additional sources of funding.” However, there are currently two main updates in the near future which should improve the accuracy of the model displayed on the webpages. First, plume height algorithms that will better determine exactly where within the atmosphere pollutants are being dispersed. Secondly, a wet deposition algurithm to deal with sulfate conversion rates within the clouds. UH researchers monitor the vog to provide the most reliable information and updates on Kīlauea’s recent activity. While the website’s core purpose has already been laid out, there is still a lot of work to be done. For more information, visit http://weather.hawaii.edu/vmap.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2011

Making sustainability work for Hawai‘i A NDREA DECOSTA Staff Writer A decade of increasing gasoline and consumer goods prices are reminders that Hawai‘i’s residents need to remain focused on sustainable efforts to manage our natural resources. Tony Kuh, director for Renewable Energy & Island Sustainability, points to how the entire UH system can grow with these efforts. Students within the UH system are encouraged to participate in internships with local businesses and organizations. “We are never going to be completely free from fossil fuels,” said Kuh. “However, Hawai‘i can significantly reduce the dependence on fossil fuels as early as the year 2030 with a focus on clean energy, energy efficiency, and more use of natural and renewable energy.” REIS was established in 2009 with proceeds from a Sustainable Earth Day contest and has since received additional funding for

DOYLE MOELLER / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Renewable Energy & Island Sustainability, established in 2009 through a H Manoa grant, seeks to make scientific, economic and social changes to end dependency and fossil fuels. its approach using an educationbusiness partnership model. The

program seeks to grow a local employee base including future engi-

neers, scientists and policymakers within a matrix that promotes

sustainability through alternative energy sources. Crude is up $0.53 during the last reporting period, according to the latest Energy Information Administration report. Hawai‘i drivers pay more at the pump than the national average of $3.19 per gallon – ranging from $3.49 per gallon for regular to $3.99 for premium. “Transitioning to the use of renewable energy is one of the key ways we can balance energy demands and environmental needs. Through our use of solar, wind, geothermal, ocean thermal and wave energy, we can greatly reduce our dependence on fossil fuels,” Sen. Mike Gabbard said. “This will helps us address climate change. This helps us decrease greenhouse gases, air and water pollution, and our risk of major oil spills.” Recognizing the importance of incorporating sustainable practices into governance, the Hawai‘i state legislature in 2005 passed Act 8, the Hawai‘i State Sustainability Plan. From this plan, a task

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2011

SUSTAINABILITY TASK FORCE force developed, and two years of research and community outreach followed. Task force outreach included feedback from more than 10,500 participants in focus groups and online sur veys, in addition to industr y experts. The culmination is a set of nine priority actions and periodic measurable benchmarks targeted at achieving the five goals established in the plan. Prior to his position as Chair for the Senate Energy and Environment Committee, Gabbard

worked to integrate these practices into the Hawai‘i master plan as a member of the plan’s task force from 2007-08. The task force submitted their completed plan to the Legislature in 2008, which responded by directing the UH Public Policy Center to review and comment prior to the fi nal task force report. “ That report was submitted to the Legislature in January 2010. Last session, SB2532 was introduced to incorporate the definitions, guiding principles and goals of the Hawai‘i 2050 Sustainability Task HAWAI‘I 2020 BENCHMARKS Force report into the state planning act. Increased affordable housing by 140 percent This bill did Enhanced public education not pass,” said Gabbard. Expanded recycling and reuse programs “ This sesIncreased economic diversity sion, SB283 Increased locally grown produce has been introduced to

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do the same thing as SB2532. SB283 is awaiting a hearing in the Senate Water, Land and Housing Committee.” Employing what plan chair Russell Kokubun referred to as the “triple bottom-line,” the plan’s philosophical goals are founded on fi nding balance between community, environmental and economic needs. The 2020 benchmark ranks housing and education as priorities, followed by a reduction in food and energy importation by increasing the amount of food grown and consumed locally. Kokubun, as newly appointed chair for the Department of Agriculture, has charged his staff with enhancing Hawai‘i’s agricultural output to respond to the need to kick the dependency on imported products. Reducing Hawai‘i’s import needs by bolstering what once was a thriving agricultural economy has both its supporters and detractors. Republicans like Sen. Sam Slom are

HAWAI‘I NUMBERS CRUNCH decrying the benefits of earlier legislative mandates on the use of ethanol-blended fuels, calling these measures “baloney.” Slom submitted a bill this session to repeal the existing statute on the grounds that the statute hasn’t lived up to promises made early on. According to Slom, the ethanol mandate has not saved consumers any money and instead has led to unintended consequences – mainly higher overall consumer prices. For their part, Democrats have focused their legislative efforts at the plan’s intermediary goals, through the expansion of affordable housing using many of tax incentive measures. Responding to the need to reduce imported fuel, Sen. Carol Fukunaga presented a measure that would create a biofuel facility that may well provide the economic, agricultural and technological incentives Hawai‘i consumers demand.

~Hawai‘i imports approximately 90 percent of its food products ~Population in Hawai‘i increased 6.9 percent since July 2000 ~Cost of living 30 to 60 percent above the national average ~10th highest cost of living in the nation ~Per capita personal income below national average

HAWAI‘I FAMILY OF FOUR FACTOID In 2006, a Hawai‘i family of four hoping to rent a housing unit would need a combined income of $111,695, or 55 percent more than the national average of $72,000.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2011

Master your financial life Take control of your spending habits by creating a budget

EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

i O Hawai‘ Nik Seu/Ka Leo

ELLISE A K AZAWA Managing Editor Budget deficits and wasteful spending aren’t just the stuff of newspaper headlines; many students find themselves spending more than they intended and coming up short at the end of the month. Creating a budget is a free and simple way to take control of your financial life.

camera you’ve been eyeing. Your budget can make these decisions for you. Second, establishing good fi nancial habits by making and sticking to a budget will help you in the long run. Once you get out of the collegiate cocoon and into the proverbial real world, solid money management skills will prevent you from getting into credit card debt or taking out loans you can’t afford to pay back.

T R AC K YO U R S P E N D I N G The first step to creating a budget is to track your spending. “Start recording all of your expenses and income for one month,” advised UH finance professor Rosita Chang. This may be the most difficult part of the process. Beginning tomorrow, write down every expenditure you make. This includes your morning coffee from Starbucks, the gas for your moped, and the extra textbook you needed for class. Don’t forget to include any expenses that are automatically deducted from your credit card or

WHY BUDGET? First, creating a budget reduces stress. You don’t need to worry about how you’ll pay for your expenses, or guess if you can afford to buy that Nikon

See Financial life, page 6

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2011

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“INVINCIBLE THINKING: THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS DEFEAT IN LIFE” - RESIST OUTSIDE PRESSURES - OVERCOME ANY DIFFICULTY IN LIFE

JESSICA C RITCHER Contributing Writer College is expensive. To afford a degree, most students bury themselves in debt or live in constant thrift to face the rising costs of higher education. But there is another option that a lot of people overlook: scholarships. I have been awarded over $2000, so while I may not be an expert on the subject, I can offer some advice. First, if you don’t have a job, make applying for scholarships your job. In addition to hours of searching, many scholarships require writing essays, asking for letters of recommendation, and even tedious trips to the post office. The ratio of work required to money offered is usually pretty fair, but remember that scholarships with easy application processes will have more applicants. If you put forth the time and effort to apply for as many scholarships as possible, your odds of winning increase. Second, know where to apply and how to make the most of your unique strengths. To fi nd

scholarships, many people recommend Fastweb.com. I’ve had good personal experience with Zinch.com and Cappex.com, as well as our own UH Banner system. These sites offer thousands of scholarships, but they also have effective fi ltering methods that help you narrow the search by relevance. Don’t be discouraged by oddly specific scholarships for which you are not eligible. You wouldn’t want to take money away from women of color in the engineering field or children of blind veterans. If a scholarship does not apply to you, simply disregard it and keep searching for something that does fit. You might be able to get scholarships through your community. Do you play an instrument? Have a high GPA? Volunteer for a nonprofit organization? Participate in a quirky sport? All of these details about you are relevant. Try fi ltering your search by major, gender or religious preference. Play to what makes you unique. I received $250 from a society of atheists who wanted to support free-thinking

youth. I won $1000 from a fund for military wives. There are people in your chosen field who want to help you advance, but you have to be persistent enough to search for the opportunity. Third, now that you’ve found the scholarship, apply for it. Apply on time, and follow the directions exactly as specified. This may seem like a no-brainer, but being able to follow directions is a hidden test of your eligibility for the scholarship. A prize from the OP Loftbed Company, for example, told applicants to read the rules section before applying. The rules said to put an unrelated sentence as the answer to one of the application questions. Students without the irrelevant sentence were immediately disqualified for not having read the rules. Finally, don’t sell yourself short. You’re smart enough to have gotten into college, so you have just as much of a chance to win as anyone, as long as you put in the work. Plus, now that I’m about to graduate, you won’t have to compete against me anymore. Good luck!

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2011

K A LEO T H E

Financial life

C AT E G O R I Z E After tracking how you spent your money, divide your expenses into nondiscretionary and discretionary spending. Nondiscretionary spending includes fi xed costs such as rent, student loan payments, textbooks and health insurance. Discretionar y expenses are variable expenses such as clothing, entertainment and take -out meals. “We always have the fallacy that we spend less than we do,” said Chang. “So by tracking these expenses, we can distinguish between

what is necessary and what is not.”

I D E N T I F Y P RO B L E M A R E A S After tracking your spending, you may find that you simply do not have enough cash flow to cover your basic necessities. In this case, it might be necessary to

unnecessary items. For example, if you buy a $4 smoothie from Jamba Juice three days a week, that adds up to $48 per month. If you keep up your habit throughout the academic year, you will have shelled out $432. This doesn’t mean that you

The key to spending less is to find out what is important. take serious action, such as getting a second job or finding less expensive housing. If you do have enough income to meet your expenses, but find yourself frittering away your hard-earned dollars, then start cutting back. While reducing your spending is difficult, small lifestyle changes can translate into big long-term savings. In fact, many students will be amazed to discover how much they spend on

need to forgo your morning Jamba altogether. Instead, opt for treating yourself once a week, or create smoothies at home and bring them to campus. The key to spending less is to fi nd out what is important. “Distinguish among these expenses to determine what is really essential,” Chang said.

C R E AT E YO U R B U D G E T Now for the easy part: create

V O I C E

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i

from page 4

checking account, such as gym memberships or Netflix subscriptions. In addition to tracking what you spend, keep track of all your income. This includes work paychecks, stipend checks and tips, as well as any money received from outside sources such as your parents.

EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

your budget based on your spending. A simple monthly budget for a student living off campus might be $500 for rent, $100 for utilities, $140 for gas, $200 for food, $50 for entertainment and $50 for miscellaneous items. A student living on campus, whose housing and meal plans have already been taken care of, will fi nd that he or she can get by on even less. A sample monthly budget for this student might be $75 for entertainment, $50 for nonmeal plan food and $25 for other expenses. If this student made $400 per month from an on-campus job, then that leaves an additional $250 per month for savings, investing or paying off a student loan.

REVIEW AND ADJUST

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa 2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 Honolulu, HI 96822

Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-3210 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 10,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit the Ka Leo Building. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2010 Board of Publications.

Remember that a budget is ultimately a tool to help you and your fi nances. Don’t be afraid to adjust as you learn more about your spending.

ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Devika Wasson, chair; Henry-lee Stalk, vice chair; or Ronald Gilliam, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.hawaii.edu/bop for more information.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

O PINIONS 7

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2011

Stash and save OPINIONS DESK Students, stop indulging in that cup of coffee, cigarette or leaf y green substance. Ever y dollar earned ne e ed edss to be saved needs

SHINICHI TOYAMA/KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

for a future where the notion of Social Security for anyone 65 and older will be a footnote in the histor y books. It’s clear that the future may not be students’ top priority. Students have a tendency to focus on the costs of parties over saving. This is p e r haps

w h y st udent loan debt is now greater than credit card debt. It ’s a f lawed assumption to believe that students are solely responsible for irre sponsible spending. It is the fault of a societ y that promotes c nsumerism without proper co consumerism f inancial planning. T his leads to individuals f lexing their purchasing power now, instead of saving f unds for later.

If saving money appears to be a herculean task, start by creating a budget (tips on page 4). For student students looking to invest small amo amounts of money at a time, why no not purchase a silf ver coin, or a few stock shares? Students spend spending $20 -$30 on c a few pizzas can purchase an A merican Silve Silver Eagle for the same price. Th The A merican Silver Eagle is one of the few coins per that is 99 percent pure silver, o metals. This is not a mixture of beca important because the purity of compo a coin’s composition will often determine how much it can be sold for on the bullion market. For stocks, it’s possible to pu make wise purchases through proper research research. Websites such sharebuilder. as sharebuilder.com and tdameritrade.com allow for easy trading. savi These saving methods can habitua if they’re readbecome habitual ily practiced. T The bottom line r for students, regardless of the method, is that now is the time to begin saving fo for a future where no be present. benefits may not

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2011

Loan forgiveness programs OPINIONS DESK Many students fret over student loans. This fear is well-founded; according to a Fastweb.com article titled “Total College Debt Now Exceeds Total Credit Card Debt,” on the national level, “student loan debt outstanding totaled at least $830 billion as of June 2010, with roughly $665 billion in federal education loans and $168 billion in private student loans.” The article continiued to state that “the president’s FY2011 budget reports actual federal education loans totaling $605.648 billion as of FY2009.” This figure of $830 billion exceeds the national credit card debt of $826 billion. With such harrowing figures in mind, loan forgiveness and service payback programs are one way to allay the fears of crippling student

debt. A Congressional Research Report on student loan forgiveness programs reported that, “Service payback programs cover all or a portion of a student’s school costs if the student agrees to work for a specific period of time in a specified field or job after completing his/her education … [while] loan forgiveness programs repay a percentage of a former student’s educational debt in exchange for work in a designated job.” Some of the more popular programs include:

which is in a district eligible for Elementary and Secondary Education Act Title I-A funding. (A lowincome school is defi ned as one in which the percentage of children from low-income families enrolled in the school exceeds 30 percent of total enrollment.)” This program, according to the CRR, “provides qualified teachers up to $5,000 in total loan principal and interest forgiveness after fi ve consecutive years of fulltime teaching.”

L OA N F O RG I V E N E S S F O R T E AC H E R S

P E R K I N S L OA N S F O RG I V E N E S S

The Federal Family Education Loans and William D. Ford Direct Loan Program offer reprieve for loans via the teacher loan forgiveness program. The CRR reported, “Teaching must be in a low-income public or private nonprofit school

Students that obtain federal Perkins loans can work and volunteer to have these loans forgiven. These loans fall into four categories: volunteer service, law enforcement, early intervention and nurse/medical technicians.

Some positions that are eligible for forgiveness include: full-time teachers employed in public or nonprofit elementary or secondary schools; members of the Armed Forces for service in an area of hostilities; volunteer service under the Peace Corps Act or the Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973; full-time law enforcement or corrections officers; full-time nurses or medical technicians providing health services; and full-time employees of public or private nonprofit child or family service agencies who provide or supervise service for high-risk children from lowincome communities.

F E D E R A L A N D S TAT E P RO G R A M S Programs for military and civilian federal employees may

also serve to relieve student debt. The CRR states that, for military employees, “student loan forgiveness programs constitute a small share of the educational assistance programs available to military personnel,” whereas civilian employees “may [receive] up to $10,000 per year, and $60,000 in total, toward … student debt.” Other programs such as the National Health Service Corps offer loan forgiveness and service payback programs to encourage people to become health care providers. The CR R reported that “the NHSC will pay up to $50,000 of outstanding qualified student loans for the first two years of service.” With loan forgiveness and service payback programs, students can both be civically engaged and repay their loans.


Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR ANN MACARAYAN COMICS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH. 2, 2011

9


10

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2011

NOW OPEN IN PUCK’S ALLEY

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Dan Naddor ACROSS 1 Sierra Nevada resort 6 Like some checking accounts 11 Scand. land 14 Observe Yom Kippur 15 Neptune’s realm 16 When repeated, a Latin dance 17 Feature of the answers to starred clues 19 Children’s author/illustrator Asquith 20 Icky stuff 21 Common flashlight power source 22 Endure 23 *Poker holdings 25 Actor Dillon et al. 26 Hwys. 27 Chinese discipline 28 Cut’s partner 31 *Subdued 34 First N.L. 500 home run club member 35 Indictment 37 “__ pales in Heaven the morning star”: Lowell 38 *Prepared to jog 40 Less refined 42 Degree requirements, at times 43 Convert to leather, as a hide 44 Minor cost component 45 *Stained 51 Ship of Greek myth 52 European toast 53 Fit 54 Living in Fla., maybe 55 Feature of the answers to starred clues 57 Morse unit 58 Racket 59 More repulsive 60 Many IRA payees 61 Landlord 62 Really dumb

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03/02/11 DOWN 1 Zesty flavors 2 Leaning 3 __ society 4 Cocktail preparation phrase 5 Sushi fish 6 Tally symbol 7 Large wedding band 8 Strikes one as 9 Viscount’s superior 10 One-third of ninety? 11 *Pocketed the cue ball 12 Obligatory joke response 13 Park Avenue resident, e.g. 18 ER tests 22 Secular 24 Imagines 25 Young food court loiterer 27 Afternoon service 28 Gift shop items on a rotating stand 29 Where to see a caboose 30 *Fortes 31 USC or NYU 32 Prov. on James Bay 33 Amer. currency 36 IV units 39 __ perpetua: Idaho’s motto 41 “__ My Heart”: 1962 #1 R&B hit for Ray Charles 43 Going rate? 45 Coil of yarn 46 Western chasers 47 Ply 48 “¿__ usted español?” 49 Paula’s “American Idol” replacement 50 Steel plow developer 52 Winter forecast 55 John Lennon Museum founder 56 VII x VI Solutions at www.kaleo.org

By Nancy Black and Stephanie Clements Tribune Media Services (MCT) Today’s Birthday (03/02/11). Love is in the air, and money wants your attention ... but don’t waste it. Give attention generously, and save your cash for a rainy day. After all, money can buy an expensive ring, but it can’t buy you love.To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is a 7 -Today you may find your perfect partner, but it will require you to step out of your shell. Be patient, especially regarding your own goals. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is an 8 -Your optimism is contagious. Have you considered a career in public office? Today is a good day to develop your leadership skills. People are listening. Gemini (May 21-June 21) -- Today is a 7 -Be ambitious and willing. Challenge your old self to bring new ideas to flower. Go outside for fresh air, and find inspiration in trees. Spread your roots. Cancer (June 22-July 22) -- Today is a 6 -The dead autumn leaves feed spring flowers. When the day looks dark, imagine a double rainbow in your future. Be patient. Something’s gestating. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is a 7 -- Don’t worry about updating your Facebook status. Get together with friends in real-time instead. You’ll all appreciate it. Add time outdoors

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is a 9 -Too much work and no play can make Virgo very dull. Make sure you get plenty of rest. Sitting down looking at a screen can be strenuous. Take a break. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a 7 -- A child has the answer. You were one once. Love the memory of that kid, and forgive everything. Your time is too precious to spend it on regret or bitterness. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Today is a 7 -You don’t need to rearrange all the furniture to make your home feel like new. It may just require a new plant or some new music. Enjoy your nest. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Today is a 7 -- Use technology wisely to communicate your thoughts. There are people out there who want to hear them. Celebrate diversity, and share words for all. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today is a 9 -Wealth comes easily when you’re open to receiving and sharing it. Pay special attention to your insights today. They’re golden. Give back to get more. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is a 9 -You’re on top of the world, looking down on creation. Celebrate singer Karen Carpenter’s birthday. Celebrate music. Use your vantage point to look ahead. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is a 6 -Today you may encounter the biggest monsters to fight in the most difficult level of this game called life. Learn from the battle, and rest up.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2011

No backspin for men’s tennis ’Bows playing top teams GLENN VER ASCO Senior Staff Writer

John Nelson, the University of Hawai‘i men’s tennis coach, is not concerned with the Rainbow Warriors’ 1-5 record. “I’ve never been about wins, losses. That doesn’t mean anything to me,” Nelson said. “I’m not doing my job if they’re not learning.” A nd they have learned by playing the best. All six teams they have matched up against are currently ranked in the top 65, including No. 4 Texas (10-1) and No. 6 Duke (9-4). UH’s only win so far came against No. 54 San Diego State (1-7) on the road on Feb. 22. Despite their record, Nelson doesn’t plan on making any big changes. “I never, ever put pressure on winning, but I put pressure on doing the right thing,” Nelson said. “Every single day is just a test.” But just because winning is not Nelson’s top priority doesn’t mean his expectations are low. “I honestly feel we can go [to the] Sweet 16 [of the NCA A Championships],” he said. The team has made three straight appearances in the NCA A Tournament in the

FILE PHOTO / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Junior Dennis Lajola is the team’s No. 1 singles player. The Rainbow Warriors will host LMU today and Michigan State tomorrow at the UH Tennis Complex. last three years by winning the Western Athletic Conference Tournament. Nelson said the team benefits from playing tough teams early in the season. “I purposely set up a schedule where I don’t care if we win or lose,” he said. “I

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want them to see what the best are doing. If you want to be good in life, you’ve got to do what the good ones are doing.” Senior Dennis Lajola, the team’s No. 1 singles player, anticipates success because of the team’s depth.

Senior Jeremy Tweedt and juniors L eo Rosenberg and Daniel Llarenas provide experience, but the team has also received contributions from five underclassmen including freshman John Brooklyn, Lajola’s doubles partner. “I believe this is the best depth we’ve had as far as how many good players we have on this team,” Lajola said. “Now it’s just time to prove ourselves.” Lajola and his teammates will have a chance to do that as they host back-toback home matches against unranked Loyola Marymount (3- 6) today at 3 p.m. and No. 23 Michigan (6 -3) at the same time tomorrow. Both matches will be played at the UH Tennis Complex, and admission is free. Aside from a focus on learning and a positive outlook for the season, Nelson said he has one more mission for his team. “My goal is that after people play us, they hope to God they don’t have to play us again.”

Rainbow Wahine host LMU The UH womenʼs tennis team (3-6) will also host Loyola Marymount on Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. before the menʼs game at the UH Tennis Complex.


12 S PORTS

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2011

Tinnin inspired by mother’s strength COMING TO AN END

JAKE CAMARILLO Senior Staff Writer Overcoming adversity is one thing Rainbow Wahine senior guard Megan Tinnin knows how to do. A fter all, even after her mother Jamie passed away, Tinnin continued her education and basketball career at the University of Hawai‘i. “What made me get through everything was her strength,” Tinnin said. “I believe that’s shining in me, because of the decision I’ve made to come back.” Last season, Tinnin redshirted and took a semester off school when her mother passed away after her battle with breast and ovarian cancer. Then she was faced with a diffi cult decision. “I was stuck in between giving up and stop[ping] what I loved to do [basketball], or keep going and keep fi ghting,” she said. Tinnin chose to fight – for her mom. “Playing basketball was something that she loved watching me do,” Tinnin said.

LEAN ON ME The Rainbow Wahine coaching staff and players supported Tinnin throughout the hardships. “When she lost her mother, we were right there for her,” head coach Dana Takahara-Dias said. “She knows that we’re her family away from home and we’ve always got her back.” Freshman guard Shawna-Lei Kuehu grew close to Tinnin, and also supported her. “I felt that if she wanted to talk about it, she would, and eventually she did,” Kuehu said. “I was just that listening ear ... I guess sometimes you just need that person to listen to what you have to say – and that’s exactly what I did.” In return, Tinnin’s actions

Senior guard Megan Tinnin will finish her career on the Rainbow Wahine basketball team as the career leader in 3-point shots made. RUSSELL TOLENTINO KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

also inspired Kuehu. “She’s shown me that anything is possible,” Kuehu said. “She’s shown me a lot in a sense to just try and ... look for the positive in things and keep pushing for that person or the thing that means the most.” In fact, the team was moved by Tinnin’s ability to push through and focus on finishing her business degree and contributing to the team. “We celebrate Megan, because she could have easily said that basketball was not for her,” Takahara-Dias said. “She remembered her commitment to herself, to her mother and to the team.”

MAKING HISTORY Tinnin’s return to the court has been big for the ’Bows.

This season, she is averaging 9.1 points per game and has hit 46 3-pointers. She also helped the team to its first road win since 2009 and, most likely, a Western Athletic Conference Tournament berth. She also wrote her name in the UH women’s basketball record books by setting the record for career 3-point shots made. “Her legacy will be a woman that has overcome so much adversity,” Takahara-Dias said. “For losing a mother during the season, to actually coming back her senior year and breaking and shattering the record ... it has a lot to do with her upbringing and what her mother meant to her.” Kuehu, who redshirted in the 2009-10 season as well, said she noticed the difference in the team without Tinnin.

“She is one of our key players, a 3-point threat,” Kuehu said. “We missed her last year – it would have been key if she was here, but this year turned out to be really good, especially in the second half of the WAC.” Her return has also brought leadership and infl uence. Kuehu called Tinnin a role model. “She’s very quiet, so she leads by example,” Kuehu said. “And she does that on and off the court very well.” Takahara-Dias sees those characteristics as well. “She’s like a rock that you can count on,” Takahara-Dias said. “You look at her and she’s very steady and level-headed, and she plays hard every day. “She works hard in the classroom, on the court and she works hard on being a really good person.”

Looking back, Tinnin is content with the years that she’s spent as a student-athlete at UH. “There were a lot of ups and downs, but nothing’s perfect. And everything happened for a reason,” said Tinnin. “I wouldn’t trade these five years for anything else. I wouldn’t have transferred, and I’m glad with the way things turned out.” The process of dealing with her mother’s passing has also changed Tinnin’s outlook. “It made me appreciate everything in life, and the fact that I had one more year to come out and compete and do what I love to do,” Tinnin said. “That situation made me who I am today.” And fittingly, Tinnin dedicates all of her accomplishments this year to the memory of her mother, who still has an impact on her daughter. “I’ve come back to continue what I’m doing, to get my degree and to finish what I started five years ago,” Tinnin said. “What I’m doing now, I’m definitely doing it for her.”

SENIOR NIGHT The ’Bows wrap up their regular season with a game against Utah State this Thursday at the Stan Sheriff Center at 7 p.m. Tinnin and fellow seniors Keisha Kanekoa, Allie Patterson, Julita Bungaite and Mai Ayabe will be honored following the match during the Senior Night festivities.

C H E C K O U T H T T P :// W W W. K A L E O. O RG F O R A V I D E O I N T E RV I E W W I T H M E GA N T I N N I N

Mar22011  

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