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A K LEO T H E

V O I C E

Ser v i ng t he st udents of t he Un iversit y of Hawa i ‘ i at M ā noa si nce 1922

The Green Scene Shower with your buddies Features 5

The ringʻs the thing Is bigger better? Opinions 7

W E DN E S DAY, A PR I L 6 to T H U R S DAY, A PR I L 7, 2 011

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Volu me 105 Issue 88

Bicyclist struck by vehicle near campus

DOYLE MOELLER KA LEO HAWAI‘I

The victim’s bicycle, s h o w n here, was trapped beneath the Ford F-150 after the collison. I AN NAWALINSKI Staff Writer A bicyclist was involved in a car accident on the corner of University Avenue and South King Street Monday afternoon. A Ford F-150 pulling out of University Avenue struck a cyclist heading northbound toward the UHM campus. The victim was pinned beneath the truck. HPD officials have identified the victim as an 86 -year-old man, who was treated on the scene for

critical injuries. Paramedics used cardiopulmonary resuscitation, an emergency procedure that is performed on a person in cardiac arrest. Police reported the man was taken to a nearby hospital but would not comment on his immediate condition. The driver of the truck was in custody for questioning, but was not believed to be intoxicated at the time. At 1:25 p.m., nearly a dozen officials from HPD and HFD responded to the scene on the corner across the street from Puck’s

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Alley. Traffic headed northbound on University Avenue slowed to a crawl as vehicles were redirected. A tow truck assisted with emergency efforts. The man’s bike was trapped beneath the pick-up and required a lift to remove it. The victim was reportedly not wearing a helmet when he was struck. The accident occurred less than a mile from the UHM campus, which was recently named one of the top bike-friendly schools in the country.

DOYLE MOELLER/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Police and firefighters responded to a collision between a bicycle and a truck that occurred at approximately 1:15 p.m. Monday.

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2 N EWS

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR HERTHA AUMOEUALOGO ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011

Opportunities in gerontology As baby boomers turn 65, workshop discusses careers in aging LYNN NAK AGAWA Senior Staff Writer

Two gerontology professionals at the University of Hawai‘i want students to understand the booming industry of caring for an aging population. They have planned a workshop on jobs related to the aging population based on the projection that 30 to 40 percent of new job creation in the next 25 years will be in healthcare, according to Businessweek. The workshop, which will feature professionals who work with the elderly, will be held on Friday, April 8 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Queen Lili‘uokalani Center for Student Services, Room 412. Dr. Michael Cheang, an assistant professor in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences,

said students should understand the plentiful and evolving options of the industry. “It’s not just work in nursing homes,” Cheang. “There are a variety of developing careers that will emerge in caring for the elderly.” According to Cheang, an example of this is restaurants that cater to the smaller appetites of the elderly; many older people develop different appetites as they age. Cheang also said there is a need for contractors who cater to the elderly. Marilyn Seely, who has worked for over 30 years in the gerontology industry with a focus on long-term care, helped to plan the event. Seely emphasized the statistics of the industry. “Career opportunities abound in the field of aging. This, combined with the difficulty recent college graduates have fi nding jobs, offers a prime opportunity to match the needs of both groups for a win-win,” said Seely in an email. According to David Peterson,

DOYLE MOELLER / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

“Career Days in Aging,” organized by Dr. Michael Cheang, will feature a round-table discussion by five professionals. former director of the Leonard Davis School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California, graduates with gerontology degrees experience higher rates of employment in the fi eld, report high levels of satisfaction, and receive a reasonable salary. Those who graduate in other

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as those born between 1946 and 1964. By 2030, all baby boomers will be 65 or older. The event will feature a roundtable discussion with fi ve professionals who work with the elderly. Pizza and snacks will be served. For more information, contact cheang@hawaii.edu.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR HERTHA AUMOEUALOGO ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011

Students at the forefront of sustainability education PAIGE L. JINBO Staff Writer As Earth Day approaches its 41-year milestone, a group of UH Mānoa undergraduate students have taken the reins in hosting this year’s festivities. While Mānoa has celebrated Earth Day for the last nine years, this is the fi rst time students are coordinating the entire event. “This year, there wasn’t anything planned for Earth Day, no one was taking the lead,” said Erik Knutson, member of UHM’s Earth Day Planning Committee. “Damian [McPherson] was the one who stepped up and started getting everything together.” McPherson and Knutson are two out of about 20 undergraduate students enrolled in a directed reading research course that focuses on sustainability. Together, they’ll organize Earth Day 2011. “If we accomplish this [Earth Day event], we’ll get the credit for the class, and if we don’t then

we don’t get the credit,” McPherson said. However, according to both Knutson and McPherson, it’s not the credit hours that are driving them and their fellow classmates to put on a successful event - it’s the opportunity to educate and interact with the community about the importance of sustaining the environment. “With all this technology stimulation in front of us, it’s easy to lose our role in our environment, but we need to always be conscious of our environment in Hawai‘i,” McPherson said. Mānoa is celebrating Earth Day April 20 and 21. While the specifics regarding vendors are

We just want interaction. We want to build a community of sustainability. still being worked out, McPherson and Knutson have a clear idea of what will be going on both days. On April 20, there will be small workshops teaching at-

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tendees about composting, rain harvesting, and various other sustainable efforts. The goal is to create living labs where people can participate. “We just want interaction,” Knutson said. “We want to build a community of sustainability.” The second day of the event will be similar to previous years, with live music and different vendors. Additionally, it will feature a green job fair. Nonprofit organizations promoting responsible, environmentally conscious business practices will accept resumes. Green workshops will be emphasized over vendors. “Selling a product is great, but we’re an academic institution, and

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we need to focus on empowering and educating the community,” McPherson said. Though the details are not yet finalized, Knutson said they

know what’s going to make a successful event. “We’ve participated in the Earth Day events the last few years, so we have a good idea of what’s going to work and what’s not going to work,” Knutson said. At last year’s Earth Day event, more than 3,000 people participated. McPherson said he expects the same turnout or more. “Ideally, we just want to leave a lasting impression,” McPherson said. “Earth Day is looked at as one day that you do good by your environment, and the next day you forget your responsibility to the environment. If we can change the way just a handful of people think about the environment, then this event will be a success.” Every Wednesday, McPherson and the rest of the Earth Day Planning Committee meet in Dean Hall, Room 105 to discuss and share event ideas. Students, faculty and staff are invited to attend. “We could use as much help from our Mānoa community as possible,” McPherson said.

K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

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Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-3210 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 10,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit the Ka Leo Building. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2010 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Devika Wasson, chair; Henry-lee Stalk, vice chair; or Ronald Gilliam, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.hawaii.edu/bop for more information.

Want to ¿nish your language requirement this summer? Take Immersion French and do two years in 12 weeks!!! *Immersion French 110 (equivalent to French 101/102) CRN 91942 Summer Session I, May 23-July 1, M-F 10:30-1:15

Career Days in Aging are celebrated across the country in April to encourage and promote student interest in the field of gerontology. Come and join us at these two local events on campus: 1. Movie Day in Aging: Watch 2. Thinking of a Career in Aging? two award winning ½lms that high- Meet professionals from law, light the positive images of aging. nursing, policy, research and social work to discuss exciting Thursday, April 7 careers working with older adults. 11:30 AM-1:30 PM Henke Hall Room 109. Friday, April 8, Free popcorn and drinks. 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM. Queen Lili’uokalani Building, Room 411-412.

*Immersion French 210 (equivalent to French 201/202) CRN 91943

FREE PIZZA & SNACKS Sponsored by Sigma Phi Omega and the Center on Aging, with cosponsors from CTAHR, Ha Kupuna and Social Work. Funded (in part) by the Student Activity Program Fund Board. For more information, e-mail cheang@ hawaii.edu.

For more information, contact:

Summer Session II, July 5-August 12, M-F 10:30-1:15

Louis Bousquet (lb2010@hawaii.edu) or Joan Debrah (joand@hawaii.edu)


4 F EATURES

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011

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Call for Conference Volunteers Conference on Disabilites April 18th and 19th Volunteer positions include: -Hospitality & Accesibility Staff -Registration Desk -Monitor -Tote Bag StufÀng & Delivery

For more information contact: Genesis Leong 956-9823 prinfo@hawaii.edu http://www.pacrim.hawaii.edu

Volunteer at Hanauma Bay!

Volunteers are needed at Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve to educate park users about proper reef etiquette and to minimize human impact at the Bay.

If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to call or e-mail. Morgan Mamizuka Volunteer Coordinator (808) 394-1374 email: hbvp@hawaii.edu

National Public Health Week celebrated on campus ELLISE A K AZAWA Managing Editor The promotion of healthy lifestyles takes center stage this week as the UHM Department of Public Health (DPH) celebrates National Public Health Week. “This week is about raising public health awareness. It’s about getting the university and the community to become more aware of how public health affects their daily lives,” said Diana Kim, media coordinator of the DPH’s student group Hui Ola Pono. A kickoff event was held Monday, where student volunteers distributed stickers encouraging people to recognize the importance of public health in their own lives. Students are also encouraged to take photos of examples of public health and post it to the Public Health Hui Ola Pono Facebook page. A public health career panel is scheduled for noon today in Biomed 207, which will feature three speakers advising students about the different career opportunities available with a public health degree. The week will conclude with a mixer at Gordon Biersch in the Aloha Tower Marketplace from 5:00 – 7:00 p.m. The event will feature great food and networking opportunities. For more information, email olapono@hawaii.edu

Top 5 Princes H AIYA SARWAR Associate Features Editor With Prince William engaged and off the market, the world’s princess wannabes have shifted their attention to the last of the “relatively single” Windsor princes, Prince Harry. As Jerramy Fine, author of “Someday My Prince Will Come,” explained to the Daily Beast: “Harry is now their last chance.” But to all you Harry hunters, there are other princes! Here are some princes to keep your eye on:

PRINCE D U BA I

BADR

JA FA R

OF

He’s tall, dark, and defi nitely handsome. Now, at the age of 31 and coming from a culture where marriage is a must, this prince might fi nally be settling down. Rich from Dubai’s oil deposits, being Badr Jafar’s princess will not only buy you all your heart’s desires, but will save you plenty of money on gas. Despite Badr Jafar’s party-boy reputation, he is no dumb brat. He’s the Executive Director of Cresent Petroleum, with degrees in engineering and business from Cambridge University.

P R I N C E W E N Z E S L AU S O F LIECHTENSTEIN With a population of less than 40,000, Liechtenstein may be a miniature-sized country, but its prince is a pretty big deal. Looking like a lifesize Ken doll, one look into Wenzeslaus’s pretty blue eyes and you’ll even forget the ridiculousness of his name. Being princess of this European vacation destination will spoil you with access to a land of medieval castles, Käsknöpfle (traditional mini dumplings with cheese), and plenty of classic fairytale charm.

PRINCE AMEDEO OF BELGIUM Rather than spoiling his life

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Prince Carl Philip of Sweden

away with Belgium chocolates and the perks of his title, Amadeo likes to work; he’s currently putting his degree in economics to use at Deloitte, an accouning and consulting fi rm in New York. His productive and disciplined attitude are telltale signs of a great husband and father, and his good looks are telltale signs of great looking kids.

PRINCE CARL PHILIP OF SWEDEN

With a degree in graphic design from the Rhode Island School of Design, he’s artsy and creative. He’s also an avid skier, soccer player, swimmer and car racer. Professionally, he’s a lieutenant in the army. With all that he does, he may not have much time to see you – but if you’re his princess, you’ll be too busy counting your jewels and palaces to care!

P R I N C E A Z I M O F B RU N E I

Prince of one of the world’s few absolute monarchies, if you dream of being a despot, then marrying Azim may make your wish come true. Regarded as the ultimate billionaire playboy, this big haired boy loves grandeur and partying with celebritites. In fact, Sofi a Loren and Mariah Carey were guests at his 26th birthday party.


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011 NIK SEU/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Green college living 101

KA LEO O HAWA I‘ I A NNOUNCES AN ADVANCE SCREENING Wednesday, April 6th, 2011 • 7:00 pm Regal Dole Cannery 18

A LVIN PARK Associate Features Editor Even though Kermit the Frog once said, “It’s not easy being green,” he probably wasn’t referring to the myriad ways that college students can live environmentally consciouly. The once-perceived stigma of a greener lifestyle being more expensive is no longer relevant. So what can cash-strapped college students do to live more eco-friendly and sustainably? You can do more than you think.

DITCH THE CAR

class notes on a laptop also ensures organization and convenience.

THE THREE RS It’s a bit cliché, but “reduce, reuse and recycle” is an adage that is tried and true. Reduce your carbon footprint by buying less and using less. Reuse otherwise discarded items to lessen the amount of trash you produce. And fi nally, recycle at the various locations throughout campus or at the designated recycling areas in the dormitory halls.

SKIP THE STEAK

If you regularly commute to and from campus, consider riding a bike or using public transportation to get to your classes. Not only will you save money on gas and not have to worry about parking options on campus, you’ll fi nally be able to get your money’s worth on that mandatory U-PASS fee if you take the bus.

One of the most effective ways to live greenly is to actually start eating your greens. A vegetarian or vegan diet is a powerful way to combat greenhouse gases, lessen your carbon footprint, and feel great at the same time. To accommodate this, UH Mānoa offers great vegetarian and vegan-friendly options around campus and at the dormitory dining halls.

B R I N G T H E M AC B O O K

S H OW E R W I T H A F R I E N D

Every class has at least one – the student that furiously clacks away on his or her laptop to take notes instead of jotting it down on paper like most students. The fact is, typing your notes on a laptop can potentially save hundreds of sheets of paper each semester – a number that defi nitely adds up during one’s college career. Compiling all your

Okay, you don’t have to go that far, but conserving water is a simple and practical way of being more environmentally conscious. With less than 1 percent of accessible freshwater to sustain the world’s 6.9 billion population, it’s probably a good idea to shut the tap off while brushing your teeth and skimp on those hour-long showers.

No purchase necessary. Present your valid UH ID at the BOP Business Office after 10am Wednesday, April 6th to get your complimentary pass!

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6 O PINIONS

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011

UH hosts panel on transgender legal issues Experts and films address sociological pressures, civil and legal rights A ARON HUNGER Staff Writer Last month, the Lambda Law Student Association and Honolulu Gay and Lesbian Cultural Foundation hosted the panel “ Transgender Legal Issues in Hawai‘i and the Pacific.” Everyone involved in hosting the event, including the panelists, did an outstanding job to put forward issues surrounding transgender civil rights. This panel brought together political activists, legal scholars, scientists and artisans. The panel included Hinaleimoana Falemei, cultural director and adviser for Hālau Lōkahi Public Charter School, and founding member and former president of Kūlia Na Mamo, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the empowerment and service of transgender people/māhū-wahine in Hawai‘i; Amy Donahue, treasurer for Pride at Work Hawai‘i; Professor Hazel Beh, who has written extensively on sex and gender and the law; and Tracy Ryan, executive director for Harm Reduction Hawai‘i and board member of Kūlia Na Mamo. They spoke to a audience featuring such distinguished guests as Hawai‘i Supreme Court Justice Sabrina S. McKenna. The discussion began with each panel member presenting her view on a number of legal issues, ranging from Western legal and sociological decisions made for intersexed infants, to cultural differences between Polynesian and Western ideals of what it means to be transgender or māhū. Although the panel began traditionally, Lambda members quickly

COURTESY LAMBDA LAW STUDENT ASSOCIATION

A panel on transgender legal issues in Hawai‘i and the Pacific sponsored by the Lambda Law Student Association and the Honolulu Gay and Lesbian Cultural Foundation featured Hinaleimoana Falemai, Tracy Ryan, Amy Donahue, Hazel Beh. (L-R)

allowed the panel to become a forum for critiquing issues surrounding advocating equal rights within a system constructed on a Western binary concept of gender. Falemei explained that māhū is a Hawaiian word used to describe a concept of gender that Western sociological frames do not allow. “Transgender” is a Western term constructed to label a group of people that the government does not consider male or female. Falemei emphasized that she spoke for silent māhū by using a single unified message: Māhū differs in meaning from transgender, and any attempt to as-

similate the identity of māhū into the Western legal framework of gender identity causes with legal and legislative issues in the transgender movement. Donahue focused on legal frames regarding equal rights and life issues. Donahue is currently working with Hawaiian legislators to support HB546, which prohibits discrimination based on “gender identity and expression.” Beh discussed her research with Dr. Milton Diamond, director of the Pacific Center for Sex and Society, regarding ethical concerns about treatment of nonconforming-gender chil-

dren. This included gender assignment and castration of children to force them to conform to Western gender standards of male and female. Ryan spoke about a number of transgender legal issues, stating that a large percentage of early male-to-female transgender women fi nd themselves outside the system of services designed to aid them. This often leads these women to engage in forms of alternative employment on the streets, due to their limited access to traditional employment opportunities. The audience was active and animated, especially during the

Q-and-A portion of the discussion. The evening ended with two short films presented by HGLCF Rainbow Film Festival committee members. One film focused on Samoan culture and fa‘afafine (third gender), while the other was a short biographical interview with two Hawaiian māhū and their experiences growing up in modern Hawai‘i. Students interested in civil and legal rights for people of diverse sexual orientations should visit the Lambda Law Student Association website at http://www.law.hawaii.edu/student-organizations/ lambda-law-student-association.


7

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011

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www.mark-it2home.com I recently proposed to my girlfriend. She said yes, but has complained about the size of the ring. I thought what is important is love and the commitment. I don’t have a lot of money right now to buy a bigger ring. How important is the size of the ring? Sam: Do you spoil her? You need to take a step back and look at the Liz: Can we say diva? She should relationship. Do you spend excessive money on your girlfriend? If be happy you proposed and that so, she may be expecting something bigger and shinier because you want to spend the rest of your Thehanded team isto16her -6 with Pagaduan she’s used to having the world being on a silver plat- startlife with her. A ring should not ter. Don’t worry, you’re more thaning. likely treating her like a queen matter at all, since it is meant to and her expectations are high, but you’re not necessarily doing be a symbol of your love to share something wrong. It’s a girl’s dream to receive a big engagement with the world. Of course, most ring, but what probably happened was that she didn’t really think women – myself included – would before she spoke up about the size of the ring. My advice would be love the largest rock possible, but to talk to her about it; don’t be afraid to confront your fiancée, as you at the end of the day it really does need to create an open line of communication so if any more speed not matter. It is a material posbumps occur on your long journey of marriage, it will be easy to talk session, but the message behind problems out. If she really does have a legitimate problem with the it is what counts. I would take a size of the ring, consider agreeing to buy a ring she’ll be happy with look at your relationship in genonce you can afford it. But what you both should value is the love eral and see if this symbolizes a that you have for each other – that can never have a price. greater problem.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR H ADAS Z ACHOR President of NOW on UHM Campus Recently, Ka Leo printed a “swimsuit issue” featuring women in bathing suits. On behalf of the National Organization for Women at UH Mānoa, we demand that Ka Leo apologize for printing an issue that contributes to the objectifi cation and degradation of women. The female students at UH Mānoa are not objects of the male gaze; rather, we are talented women who have come to get an education and improve our lives, the lives of our loved ones, and our community. The University of Hawai‘i instills in all of its students values of respect, dignity and tolerance of everyone regardless of race, gender, class or sexual orientation. The “swimsuit issue” did not represent any of these ideals, and actually worked against them. The objectifi cation of women’s bodies has been correlated to distorted body images and eating disorders (college-aged women are one of the risk groups), as well as violence toward women. When women are reduced to nothing more than bodies, or objects, an environment

that tolerates violence against women is created. While I do not believe that Ka Leo endorses any such violence, I would hope that our student newspaper would understand that even without direct endorsement, messages can be conveyed indirectly through practices of objectifi cation. Furthermore, if you must objectify human bodies, and do not view it as tasteless journalism, you do have a responsibility to show a diverse set of bodies in bathing suits, including people of all genders, ethnicities and body types. Women are constantly under pressure to maintain their appearance and conform to impossible beauty ideals. Instead of focusing on our talents, we are often forced to endanger our health and well-being to fit into the type of image your newspaper has showcased as the standard of beauty. Women and men come in all shapes and sizes, and there is no one defi nition of beauty. “Sexism sells, but we’re not buying it.” (Women’s Media Center) Please take action immediately to correct this injustice, and in the future, please show respect for the students at UH Mānoa.

S u b m i t yo u r l e t t e r s t o t h e e d i t o r,

No purchase necessary. Present your valid UH ID at the BOP Business Office after 1 pm Thursday, March 10th to get your complimentary pass!

OP ENS ENS IN TH THEATRE TRESS 4.8.11 First come, first served. A valid UHM student ID is required--valid for Spring 2011; NO EXCEPTIONS on day of giveaway. No phone calls. One pass per person. Supplies are limited. One pass admits two.

e m a i l o p i n i o n s @ ka l e o . o r g .


Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR ANN MACARAYAN COMICS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i

AMES

WEDNESDAY, APR. 06, 2011

Peace Corps: Life is Calling.

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Celebrating 50 Years of Service

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Patti Varol ACROSS 1 *“Bohemian Rhapsody” group 6 *Poet Whitman 10 Exotic food fish 14 Año Nuevo month 15 Irish Spring variety 16 Wife of Zeus 17 Sudoku fill-in 18 Fronded plant 19 Irving hero 20 Starbucks pickup 22 Man with morals 23 *Painfully shy 26 *Tormented by pollen, say 27 Torino time period 28 Good thinking 31 *Cross 34 Overhauls 39 Aladdin’s helper 40 *Medico’s address 41 Red simile words 42 Parent who minds how her kid acts? 44 *Like a quiet town 45 Dojo discipline 47 WNBA position 48 *He won 26 Oscars, including an Academy Honorary Award (consisting of one full-sized and seven miniature statuettes) for the film depicted in this puzzle’s starred answers 52 *Cry of surprise 55 Quarterfinals complement, e.g. 56 Danube capital 58 Like a noted piper 59 Watch 60 Roads scholar? 64 Feminine suffix 65 Corleone family head 66 “We’re out of choices” 67 “Son of Frankenstein” role 68 *Frosted flakes 69 *Chess side

Solutions at www.kaleo.org

Info Session: Thursday 4/7, 4:30PM Hamilton Library, Yap Room 1st Fl

www.peacecorps.gov

Peace Corps Office Hours: Mon 1-3PM 2565 McCarthy Mall, PSB 220 956.0439 or pchawaii@hawaii.edu

5 9 3 9

9 7 8

4

6

1

7

Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week.

Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

3 8

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9.

Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

1

6

5 3

5

4

4

6 7 8

5 4 1 7

2

MEDIUM

# 59

HOROSCOPES HOROSCOPES

your wits about you.

04/06/11 DOWN 1 Proof abbr. 2 Cycle prefix 3 Hosp. test 4 “Love Story” novelist Segal 5 __ this world: bizarre 6 Hem and haw 7 On the safer side 8 Passed-down stories 9 Downing Street number 10 “My goodness” 11 “__ porridge hot ...” 12 Paella ingrediente 13 *All smiles 21 Faulkner’s “The Sound and the __” 22 Like some reports 23 His 3,000th hit was a homer 24 Stop in Québec? 25 Healthful hot spot 26 Cry noisily 29 Starbucks pickup 30 NYSE overseer 32 “Top Gun” foe 33 Didn’t wait for Christmas 35 “May __ of service?” 36 Hanger-on 37 Pool statistic 38 Start to foam? 40 Palme __: Cannes film award 43 Has the okay 44 Spotted 46 Market index, familiarly 48 *Not very bright 49 Best part of the cake, to some 50 Shorthand pro 51 “Unsafe at Any Speed” author 53 Attached to a trailer hitch 54 Brooks of C&W 56 Vital thin blue line 57 Passionate about 59 RCA products 61 Sushi bar tuna 62 Congregated 63 Not post-

By Nancy Black Tribune Media Services (MCT) Today’s Birthday (04/06/11). New business opportunities abound this year. Don’t delay putting ideas into action. Continue evolving and be willing to make mistakes. Each one comes with a lesson, and some can be learned at a bargain. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is a 9 -- Great business opportunities arise. Find out where to get the best deal. Make your move. Put the money you save in the bank. Your luck has just improved immensely. Contemplate recent revelations. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is a 9 -- It’s easy to take life with a sense of humor today, which is always useful, even when projects move along easily. Rely on a trustworthy person. Discover abundance at home. Gemini (May 21-June 21) -- Today is an 8 -- It’s a good time to tune out the din of the conversation and just focus on something you really want to learn. Get lost in study. Don’t expect immediate results. Cancer (June 22-July 22) -- Today is a 9 -- Today you make a deep connection with a partner and discover a hidden treasure. Share the load to get to it, and prepare to take advantage of a lucky break. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is a 9 -- Your confidence seems limitless, so let it rip. It serves you well. Count your blessings, and get ready to switch directions. Keep your sense of humor and

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is an 8 -- You have more than expected. Go ahead and make people laugh, but don’t try too hard. Just be yourself and share your brilliance. There are lots of reasons to smile. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a 7 -- You’re especially sensitive now to the little things that make life special, and this attention magnifies how abundant they are. Accept a generous offer. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Today is a 7 -Others are saying nice things about you. Now is a good time to cultivate your relationships and take things to the next level. The action is behind the scenes. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Today is an 8 -Laughing at oneself is the best therapy for long days of work. Remember to take breaks so that you don’t lose focus on your goals. Get enough sleep. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today is a 7 -Continue your creative streak. Use your sense of humor to help you surpass obstacles. Your assets grow. Listen carefully to the challenge, and take charge. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is a 9 -Abundance is available. Build a cozy nest, and line it with comfort. Upgrade your home to support your future dreams, and be supportive of the dreams of others. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is a 9 -- It’s a good time to take a short trip, or maybe just a hike up the trail. Find satisfaction in your career. Success is almost inevitable. Exceed expectations.

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11

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011

’Bows hope to get back on track against Nevada GLENN VER ASCO Senior Staff Writer The Rainbow Wahine softball team’s road trip last week did not go according to plan. The ’Bows (25-12, 3-3 Western Athletic Conference) were swept by conference rival Fresno State (22-8, 6 -0 WAC) in Fresno, Calif., and were held to just one run over the three-game series. The ’Bows are on a six-game losing streak away from home. But the Rainbow Wahine are looking to get back on track this weekend as they host the Nevada Wolf Pack (10-22, 1-5 WAC). The teams play a single game on Friday at 6 p.m. and a doubleheader on Saturday beginning at 4 p.m. at the Rainbow Wahine Softball Stadium. Admission to all three games is free. Home field advantage has been benefi cial for the ’Bows so far this season. The team has an 18-5 record at RWSS this season – nearly an 80 percent win rate.

That’s in contrast to the team’s 7-7 record while playing on the road or at a neutral ballpark. Starting sophomore center fielder Kelly Majam said she believes that a portion of the team’s winning ways at home is owed to the fans. “Having the support behind you is so important,” Majam said. “And having people cheering for you helps the morale of the team tremendously.” Despite the comfort of playing in Hawai‘i, the ’Bows will have to keep their eyes on Nevada’s hothitting freshman Karley Hopkins. The second baseman started all 32 games for the Wolf Pack and leads them in batting average (.365), runs scored (25), hits (42) and doubles (13). But for Hawai‘i, second base has been a rotating position all season. Junior Dara Pagaduan has started 22 of the team’s 37 games at second base – the most on the team. The team is 16 -6 with Pagaduan starting.

Freshman catcher Sharla Kleibenstien hits a homerun against BYU on March 17. She is second on the team with 10 home runs on. NIK SEU / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

She is followed by senior Jasey Jansen, with eight starts and freshman Kaile Nakao, with seven. Second base is the only position on the team with at least three players with three or more starts (other than designated player).

But the starting lineup is not the only pressing issue for the ’Bows. While Nevada makes for a formidable opponent on the fi eld, the atmosphere in the Hawai‘i dugout is one the team’s larger concerns.

“Nevada has always played us tough,” Majam said. “But I think our team needs to focus on how we are doing and what’s going on in our dugout, rather than focusing on who is going to be in the other dugout.”


12 S PORTS

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011

No. 1 Trojans headed for Hawai‘i Hawai M ARC A R AK AKI Associate Sports Editor

Senior outside hitter Joshua Walker has 326 kills on the season ERIC ALCANTRARA KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

The Mountain Pacifi c Sports Federation men’s volleyball playoff picture is slowly forming. The Warriors only have two matches left, and they know they need to win to move up in the standings. Hawai‘i is currently fourth in the MPSF – a half game ahead of the UC Irvine Anteaters. The top four teams in the final standings host the first round of the MPSF Tournament. “[It’s] always an advantage playing at home,” junior libero Nick Castello said. “For us to play at home in the playoffs, hosting first round, that’ll be huge for us.”

T H E M AT C H U P No. 8 Hawai‘i (14-11, 12-8 MPSF) will host the No. 1 USC Trojans (18-1, 17-1 MPSF) Friday and Saturday night at the Stan Sheriff Center. First serve for both matches is set for 7 p.m. The Warriors are coming off two victories against the Cal State Northridge Matadors last Friday and Saturday. Hawai‘i hit .353 in the first match, and followed that with a season-high .543 in the second. “ You got to be pleased with the progress that our team has made throughout the year,” head coach Charlie Wade said. “ We got a lot of people contributing. We’re doing a lot of things – the best that we’ve done all year [now], so we’re playing good at the right time of the year, for sure.” USC has a 12-match winning streak and is coming off a win over Pacific. The Trojans have already clinched home-court advantage in the MPSF Tournament as the No. 1 seed. “ They’re just playing really

consistent,” senior setter Nejc Zemljak said. “ They’re a tough opponent, but they’ve played a few matches where they went to five games, so they’ve showed their vulnerability.” USC’s lone loss was to the Pepperdine Waves, who the Warriors swept twice in early March. Hawai‘i’s focus, however, is on its side of the net. “Every game, we’re showing more of how we want to play,” Zemljak said. “We’re on an upward trend, and I think we’re going to keep going upwards. That’s where we want to be.”

SENIOR NIGHT Zemljak, A ll-A merican outside hitter Josh Walker and senior middle hitter Brennon Dyer will play their final regular season home game this Saturday night. However, they said they’re not focused on the annual Senior Night festivities that will follow Saturday’s match. “I’m thinking about [USC],” Walker said. “[USC] on Senior Night. There’s no more motivation [to make] you want to win a game than that kind of situation.” If the Warriors manage to pull out t wo victories against the Trojans, Senior Night will be less of a goodbye, and more of a hello, to the postseason – at home. “For us, if we win out against [USC], we get to host a playoff round,” Zemljak said. “It’s a big difference if you’re the team that actually gets to stay at home, or if you have to go on the plane and travel for six hours – plus waiting at the airport and going to the hotel,” Zemljak said. “ There’s a lot of perks to staying at home, plus you get the home crowd and playing in an environment where you’re used to.”

April 6th  

Ka Leo O Hawaii

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