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Green films Ecology Club festival Features 6

Ask Liz and Sam Advice column debut Opinions 12

Ser v i ng t he st udents of t he Un iversit y of Hawa i ‘ i at M ā noa si nce 1922 W E DN E S DAY, M A RC H . 9 to T H U R S DAY, M A RC H . 10 , 2 011

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Volu me 105 Issue 80

Fair connects UH students to careers H ERTHA AUMOEUALOGO News Editor

The Campus Center ballroom held this year’s spring Career Fair Tuesday, offering students an opportunity to explore career options with employers from across the island. This year, 61 employers contributed fi ve hours’ worth of interacting with students. The fair focused on UH students and was open to alumni as well. It was organized by the Center for Career Development and Student Employment. CDSE Director Myrtle Ching-Rappa wrote, “ The purpose of the fair is to allow students time to explore career options and get to know employers. It is also a time for employers to meet students.” New additions to the fair included a counselor’s table, which offered assistance for any issue pertaining to the program, computerized evaluations for students to suggest work-related interests, and, most importantly, the fresh idea of career clustering. According to Ching-Rappa, career clustering means “employers are clustered under the different types of industry.” This is a way “to give students a better idea of the type of positions that might be available.” “As a kinesiology major, I was able to take on a broader view of my career options; in that way, my transition into athletic training would run smooth-

SHINICHI TOYAMA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

With employers ranging from Bath and Body Works to the U.S. Marine Corps Officer programs, the Career Fair offered a variety of employment options.

ly,” said undergraduate A lisha L eon. She also said she believed that “more students should attend this event; the information they provide makes job searching a lot less complicating.” For five years, CDSE, in partnership with a variety of local and foreign businesses, has

w w w. p o d i u m r a c e w a y. c o m

Wednesday N: 6 - 8 f t. W: 4 - 6 f t. S: 1-2 f t. E: 2- 4 f t.

been informing students of their occupational optionsthrough this event. Based on a sur vey of students that have participated in the previous fairs, positive re sults supported the efficacy of the annual occasion: • 86 percent gained new in-

sight into career options. 90 percent gathered knowledge about qualifications, skills and expectations of employers. • 78 percent received information that will help with their career decisions. “Many students wait until graduation to make decisions for •

SURF Report

a job,” said political science major Tia Fuimaono. “I realized through this fair that I shouldn’t hesitate to learn about the probability of attaining a career that suits me and my future endeavors.” For more information on their upcoming fairs, log on to http:// cdse.hawaii.edu/fair.

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2 N EWS

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR HERTHA AUMOEUALOGO ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011

The breakdown on housing deadlines M AT THEW SYLVAA Contributing Writer ter

UH Mānoa Studentt Housing Services applications forr Fall 2011 rch 11 by housing are due on March g renewal 11:59 p.m. The housing process is made up of a series of portant of deadlines, the most important which is submitting an n applicaation fee. tion with the $25 application dents ap“For current students plying for renewal, thee applicae must be tion and application fee turned in by March 11. For lottery numbers, students havee to come k in Frear in [to the SHS front desk he lottery Hall] to get a number. The nes when process just determines [students] can choose a place,” irector of said Michael Kaptik, director es. Student Housing Services. ll only be Lottery numbers will assigned from March 15 to 18. ng from 1 Lottery numbers, ranging to 2,500, are randomly assigned.

The lottery starts with the smallest numbers on March 29 and ends with the largest on March 31, with drawings occuring from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. The SHS office is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday to Friday. To participate in the housing renewal process, a stumust: dent submit the renewal application and fee on time; live in the residence halls by March 11; fulfi ll the Spring 2011 housing contract; and be in good academic, fi nancial and conduct standing. Students that do not meet the requirements by

March 11 will be included in the regular process used to assign new applicants. Applications are only to be submitted through the l i n k

on the SHS page online at: http:// manoa.hawaii.edu/housing/current/renew. For additional information or questions relating to the housing renewal process, please contact

Stud e n t Housing Services at 808-956 8177. For a complete breakdown of the lottery timeline and additional information on the SHS housing renewal process, please visit http://manoa.hawaii.edu/ housing/current. SHINICHI TOYAMA/KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Run in the ASUH Spring General Elections! Advocate for the 11,000 undergraduate students at UH Manoa. ALL SEATS ARE OPEN! President • Vice President • Treasurer • Secretary Senator at Large (4) • Senator (31)

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Candidate Packets are available March 7 - March 29, 2011 Application A Ap ppl pi De D Deadline: e Friday, March 11 11, 2011, 4:30pm 30 0pm m Contact Co Con ntact Jay Hartwell H • 956-3217 • hartwell@hawaii.edu rtw tw aw wai ed edu

Pick up your Candidate Packet at the ASUH office in Campus Center 211. Packets are due 03/29/2011.

Email asuh@hawaii.edu or visit asuh.hawaii.edu for more information.

Or pic Or pick p c up an application pp from Ka Leo or the he BOP PB Business usin sines ess Offic e Office fice e ed oc o de of Hemenway Hall by Ba-le a-le le courtyard urtyard de n rance) (located ocean side entrance)


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR HERTHA AUMOEUALOGO ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011

FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS Waikīkī’s late–night fireworks

SHINICHI TOYAMA/KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Fireworks set off over Waikīkī shoreline every Friday night around 7:45 p.m.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR HERTHA AUMOEUALOGO ASSOCIATE JANE CALLAHAN NEWS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011

Why did you attend the career fair?

K ATE SCHIEFELBEIN Senior, Political Science “To talk to the Navy recruiter. Also, maybe to the FBI and the CIA.”

JASON TSANG Junior, Computer Science “I’m graduating soon, and I want my name to be out there in the workforce. I am also looking for jobs that I am interested in and can tailor my résumé to.”

NANAHO SASAKI Senior, Environmental Studies “To see who is worth working for.”

JENNIFER KUANG Junior, Business “I think it’s well organized, but not toward current undergraduates. They should have more opportunities for younger undergrads for internships.”

JENNA PAK Graduate, Second Language Studies “To gain a wider perspective of job opportunities.”

GILBERT F UNE Senior, Kinesiology “I’m looking for a career opportunty and I feel the career fair is the best place to look and give me an edge.”

M ICHELLE TAGORDA Junior, Biology “It helped me get more out of it than just the website ... it’s nice being able to talk to somebody face to face.”

CAMERON XU Senior, Mechanical Engineering “It’s good to look around and see what is out there, and I hope to discover different jobs I may have not realized existed.”


6 F EATURES

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011

Kuleana: the key to Hawai‘i’s sustainable future? How did Hawai‘i sustain its population, estimated at between 800,000 and 1 million, prior to the arrival of Captain James Cook in 1778? The short answer: kuleana. The indigenous population in Hawai‘i was well-adapted, not only to the spiritual and natural forces of daily life, but also with an ingrained sense of kuleana, or responsibility. This responsibility is for one’s own actions, for ‘ohana, for the ‘ahupua‘a (section of land), and for the extended community, including chiefs and commoners. Within the Native Hawaiian community, rights are tied in to responsibility and rendered meaningless without the active fulfillment of one’s kuleana. Professor of Ethnic Studies and long-time Native Hawaiian activist Davianna MacGregor acknowledges this concept. “Our rights are rooted in taking re-

sponsibility for the lands of our ancestors. … Failure to accept responsibility means we cannot assert rights.” MacGregor speaks to the importance of preserving kipuka, a forest in which tall, old-growth ‘ohi‘a, tree ferns, creeping vines and mosses adapted to the volcanic climate. The regenerative quality and natural beauty of these areas are valuable resources to be preserved and sustained. “These kipuka serve as natural reminders of the origins of our islands,” MacGregor said. “They also serve as a model of our potential as an island society to sustain our way of life, despite global economic and social trends.” This sense of kuleana is embodied in all aspects of life, and remains at the heart of contemporary efforts to revive traditional practices through current sustainable efforts. Since 2005, Kanu Hawai‘i and its organizers have been acting on their collective kuleana by

establishing a network of responsible citizens. Kanu Hawai‘i president and UH Mānoa alumnus Alani Apio, a Native Hawaiian himself, has spent a lifetime working to understand what it means to be Hawaiian. The journey has been long, but clearly well-spent, taking Apio from aspiring playwright and performer to his most important role: committed citizen-activist. Like Apio, many other native activists have found the roots of their kuleana at home, among family and through the teaching of kupuna (elders). Newly elected State Representative Faye Hanohano, a Big Island native, is one of those acting on their kuleana to benefit the community. “As a child, it was standard Hawaiian traditional practice to ho‘olohe (listen), nānā (observe), and ho‘opili (mimic),” Hanohano said. “This traditional practice helped me to be sustainable in living, and to be ready for school.”

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Hanohano stressed the importance of indigenous concepts such as laulima (cooperation), pointing to the collective nature of luau and fi shing as perpetuating traditional practices. In contrast, Hanohano mentioned “scare tactics” employed by newcomers with plans to develop Kanu Hawai‘i Commitments: Kept 1,700,205 pounds of trash out of waste stream Conserved 10,831,970 gallons of drinking water Reduced energy consumption by 1,421,194-kilowatt hours (www.kanuhawaii.org)

the isolated and rural Puna area of the Big Island. “This Western concept clashes with traditional practices and protocol,” she said. Ultimately, all these concepts and sense of obligation only gain traction through doing – such as restoring a lo‘i (fishpond) and

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sharing or gaining sustainable knowledge. Danny Bishop comes from a long line of Native Hawaiians. As one of the founding members of Onipa‘a Na Hui Kalo and long-time windward farmer, Bishop has been working to restore traditional practices of agriculture and production. Onipa‘a Na Hui Kalo advocates the legal production and sale of pa‘i‘ai – an indigenous food product derived from kalo. A food staple with traditional meanings, this version is a precursor to the soft table poi many enjoy at home and has enjoyed a recent resurgence in interest by native activists. These efforts include legislative measures to allow for the production and sale of the product. Activists hope to gain approval in just the same way that raw fi sh has been “allowed” at sushi bars across Honolulu. Presently, SB101 has passed See Kuleana, page 8

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011

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Hula Grill proves to be an early morning gem H ARLEY DIVEN Contributing Writer The early bird gets the worm, but the early human can get great deals on delicious pancakes and other breakfast classics. Hula Grill is easy to fi nd, situated up a fl ight of stairs in the back of the Outrigger Waikīkī. A 91 percent recommendation rating on TripAdvisor. com proves this restaurant is worth checking out. Our party of three was seated in under five minutes, a welcome change from the 20 -minute wait times of other, more familiar, mainland restaurant chains. The waiter was pleasant and energetic, especially considering that we came in just before 7 a.m. This restaurant boasts an oceanfront view: turquoise water surrounding surfers, colorful beach towels, and big sun umbrellas lined up on the white sand. Instead of the typical stale syrup

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smell that plagues most breakfast joints, the open-air dining room allows fresh, salty morning air to fl ow through. Unfortunately, food with a beautiful view is often accompanied by a not-so-beautiful price tag. This is not true in the case of Hula Grill. The breakfast menu prices range from a modest $3.50 to $11.75. The menu wasn’t extensive – just two pages – but had a wide variety of choices, which means there will be something to please picky taste buds. Just can’t fuel up without carbs in the morning? Try the traditional buttermilk pancakes, or to truly play up the Hawaiian atmosphere, banana and mac nut pancakes. Protein-fiend? A variety of omelets can satiate the most carnivorous of cravings. The coffee was hot and fresh, and the omelets, accompanied by a choice of home-style potatoes or rice and toast, had the perfect amount of gooey cheese oozing out, the veggies inside grilled to perfection. Combined with the fast service, reasonable prices and ease of location, what more could be asked for in a breakfast? The Hula Grill is open Monday through Saturday 6:30 to 10:45 a.m. for breakfast, Sunday 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. for brunch, and daily 4:45 to 10 p.m. for dinner.


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i FEATURES @ KALEO.ORG

EDITOR REECE FARINAS ASSOCIATE ALVIN PARK ASSOCIATE HAIYA SARWAR

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011

Ecology Club promotes change E VA AVERY Staff Writer

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Every other Wednesday, UH Mānoa students and members of the community gather for an Ecology Club-sponsored environmental fi lm series. Last week, the club hosted “Fuel,” a documentary that discusses the reality of gasoline and oil in the American economy. “There’s prizes and there’s good food, good people and it’s just a good vibe. It’s Environmen-

small step at a time to become more environmentally friendly. “We are in charge of our future. To irresponsibly disregard the real threats and realities is to live against what our values are, especially in Hawai‘i,” said Ecology Club member Keri Namimoto. “Without this land, we would have nothing, so we must respect it and take care of it,” she said. These events are targeted at UH students and community members to promote understanding of environmental issues and possible progressive

We are in charge of our future. To irresponsibly disregard the real threats and realities is to live against what our values are, especially in Hawai‘i. tal Studies, and it’s a good message that the video puts out,” said UH senior Tron Rale, attending the event for the second time. Since last semester, the Ecology Club, Surfrider Foundation Club, and students from the Environmental Studies program have worked together to put on the biweekly fi lm screening. The events often include prize giveaways featuring items such as board shorts and shell necklaces, with the possibility of a surfboard in the future. On fi lm nights, students are invited to bring their incandescent lights bulbs to trade in for energy-saving compact fl orescent light bulbs, compliments of Blue Planet. CFLs use up to 75 percent less energy and last 10 times longer than incandescent light bulbs. The club believes in taking one

action. By showing these fi lms, the club hopes to broaden knowledge of environmental problems and provide incentives for attendees to consider environmentally friendly practices. “We understand everybody may not have the means to implement several changes in their lifestyles, but we do have opportunities like the free CFL light bulb exchange, beach cleanups, recycling, and just planting our own vegetables – cleaning up after ourselves, that we should all do,” Namimoto said. The next showing and CFL exchange is Thursday, March 10 at 7:30 p.m. at the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, next to the Sustainability Courtyard. Future fi lm showing dates and locations are subject to change.

Kuleana from page 6

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several committees, including the Health Committee, but is in limbo due to Senator Herkes, chair of the committee for the Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs. Herkes cited the inability to enforce the measure as a reason for not allowing a hearing date for the proposal. “We [the community] deserve to have pa‘i‘ai,” Bishop said. “Not only can we get the children at

the board and learning traditional concepts, but we will also allow informed consumers the right to eat what they want.” In addition to traditional agricultural practices, there is a recent surge in Native Hawaiian healing. Visitors from as far away as Finland and Japan have traveled to Hawai‘i to participate in lomilomi workshops and healing retreats.

Native Hawaiian cultural practitioner and kumu Tim Lee has conducted workshops locally and abroad, and he is familiar with the emphasis on learning traditional concepts. “The people out there are hungry for anything related to the Native Hawaiian culture,” Lee said. “They really want to learn and they believe there is great value in traditional knowledge.”


Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

O PINIONS 9

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011

Wisdom through counsel OPINIONS DESK

Wisconsin’s Gov. Scott Walker refused an offer to meet with Democrats from the state on March 7. The Democrats had urged Gov. Walker to reach a compromise on his plan to end collective bargaining rights for public employees. Gov. Walker stubbornly ignored the Democrats, who fled the state three weeks ago amid protests from hundreds of public workers. These protests have ignited ideological flames, as notable individuals such as Michael Moore, Noam Chomsky and Paul Krugman have pointed out that the attempt to end collective bargaining is also an attempt to remove a critical power base for Democrats. Moore eloquently asserted that the confl ict was not just a political one, but one of class confl ict, with the rich exploiting the poor. In his speech to Wisconsin workers, Moore said, “The smug rich have overplayed their hand. They couldn’t have just been content with the money they raided from the treasury. They couldn’t be satiated by simply removing millions of jobs and shipping them overseas to

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exploit the poor elsewhere ... They had to strip us of our dignity.” Gov. Walker continues, however, to insist that this is a necessary measure. How long will this pig-headedness continue, while his approval rating continues to sink? According to the Guardian, Walker’s approval rating is below 50 percent, while those of teachers’ unions are near 60 percent. This is not to say that the antiunion proposal is entirely unwelcome. According to the same Guardian article, Wisconsinites disapprove of Walker’s union proposal only by a slight majority. The more significant figure, however, is the two-to-one ratio indicating that Wisconsinites want him to compromise. This ratio is crucial, as it suggests the importance of dialogue and communication between the people leading a state. In Hawai‘i state politics, Gov. Abercrombie has lost massive amounts of political capital over his package to curb benefits for public employees. Some may have seen the governor as desperately trying to pass the measures he felt were right, without consulting others.

These two examples demonstrate how stubborn and heavyhanded decisions may fail to achieve the desired results. Rather, these measures may only upset the people that these leaders ultimately serve. Wisconsin is only one state to have been hit by such austere measures. Ohio is another state; Gov. John Kasich gave a state speech on March 8 that was met with protestors who are upset over Ohio’s attack on collective bargaining rights. Though the idea of seeking counsel may seem old to some, one may find constant truth in Walter Benjamin’s quote: “Counsel woven into the fabric of real life is wisdom.”

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 10,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit the Ka Leo Building. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2010 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Devika Wasson, chair; Henri-lee Stalk, vice chair; or Ronald Gilliam, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.hawaii.edu/bop for more information.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011

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Nice working women L INDSY OGAWA Opinions Editor Conventional economic theory says that increased salary is an indicator on how much a worker contributes their labor, intelligence and innovation to society. So why are women making 80 cents to a man’s dollar – even if more women are graduating from college? I’ve heard a few logical explanations. Women are more likely than men to take off of work to care for their chickenpox-infected sons and drive their mothers to doctor’s appointments for a broken hip. Also, until recently, men and women have been working at different types of jobs. Historically, the male-dominated fields such as law, engineering and computer science have made the highest occupational earnings. But even in industries that are over 70 percent female, such as education and health care, men have worked in higher-paid positions as postsecondary teachers, physicians and surgeons. Women are prevalent in lower-paying positions, such as teacher’s assistants and dental hygienists. However, a blog post entitled “A Rant About Women” has a different opinion on why women have not broken the glass ceiling. “[Women] are bad at behaving like self-promoting narcissists, anti-social obsessive, or pompous blowhards,” said Clay Shirky, the writer of the blog and a New York University professor. And, strangely, I think he may have a point. Shirky explains in his blog that, in his experience, a man is more willing to take risks in order to succeed. This may include applying for higher positions even if he is unqualified, writing an exaggerated draft about his accomplishments for a recommendation from a superior or simply talking big. Women undermine their accomplishments, if they speak

about them at all. While people may roll their eyes at the overly confident guy in the office and the student who comments on and argues with everything the professor says, the fact of the matter is, we notice assertive people. According to the Journal of Human Resources, men and women bring different personality traits to their work. Men are often more aggressive, which can increase earnings because they are less scared to demand higher pay, lie and steal. Women tend to be conscientious, more agreeable and altruistic, which increases productivity and happiness in the workroom. These traits benefit the larger economy, but not the individual, who is more likely to feel guilty about asking for increased pay and benefits. Shirky does not understand why women can’t be jerks, if only for a little while, when it would be in their best self interest. Teaching selfpromotion and selfadvancement would be much more benef icial than teaching women self-defense. And not caring, he says, works surprisingly well when trying to get ahead. Basically, Shirky seems to suggest that women should stop caring about looking like idiots – something good is bound to happen if enough risks are taken. But there seems to be something inherently bad about Shirky’s suggestions. It’s a bit hard to believe that these positive traits, the ones our mothers and fathers taught us, may be the

very traits that lower a woman’s quality of life – or at the very least, create an economic gap between men and women. Yes, women should learn to speak up. But when I am asked if working women are too nice, I feel the answer should be more than a yes or no. Rather, I question why we are not rewarding nice behavior, instead of allowing the people with the traits we despise to get ahead.

S C A N M

E

NIK SEU/ KA LEO O HAWAII


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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011

Contender for Akaka’s seat will need strong party support

FILE PHOTO/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Sen. Daniel Akaka explains his platform during the Hawai‘i Senate campaign in 2006. Akaka plans to retire, leaving his seat vacant in 2012. SAR AH WRIGHT Design Editor

Following Sen. Daniel Akaka’s (D-Hawai‘i) announcement early this month that he does not intend to run for re-election in 2012, Hawai‘i politicians are assessing their chances of a successful Senate bid. Akaka, who will have spent 22 years in the Senate and 13 years in the House by the time he retires next year, urged fellow politicians to remember that political leaders “work for the people of Hawai‘i, and not the special interests” in a statement on his website. Whether his successor will follow the advice remains to be seen. Likely candidates for Akaka’s soon-to-be-open seat include

Republicans Linda Lingle and Charles Djou and Democrats Colleen Hanabusa, Brian Schatz, Mazie Hirono, Neil Abercrombie and Mufi Hannemann. Although the Republican Party hasn’t won a Senate election in Hawai‘i for 30 years, it will have a good shot at the seat in 2012 unless the Democrats manage to rally around a single candidate. Based on the Dems’ recent history, the odds aren’t in their favor. In the 2002 gubernatorial race, Democrat Hirono lost to Republican challenger Lingle. Last May, Djou snatched the 1st Congressional District seat from Case and Hanabusa in a special election after Abercrombie stepped down to run for governor. The playing field is fairly even

when it comes to prior public service experience: Lingle is a past governor and the Democratic contenders have all held elected office. In a direct contest between Abercrombie and Lingle, the former would have three advantages: first, as a current office-holder, he’d have greater name recognition; second, he’s a Democrat running in a liberal state; third, and most significantly, he isn’t associated with the Furlough Friday fiasco. In fact, Lingle’s education debacle will be a tough stain to ignore, regardless of who her opponent is. This leaves Djou as the more viable GOP candidate. With no scandals or major political black marks marring his record, Djou, who ran against Hanabusa for the 1st District House seat last November, is a relative newcomer compared to veteran Democratic contenders, but that could work in his favor – less time in office means lower name recognition and a relatively untried fundraising network, but it also means he’s had less time to make controversial decisions. Abercrombie is the Democrats’ strongest candidate, but that depends on his willingness to vacate the governor’s seat – which seems unlikely. Current politicians are unlikely to be favored come 2012 – they’ll be blamed for the recession and budget cuts, leaving room for the opposition to make a move. That said, Akaka’s decision may result in the closest thing this state has seen to a truly contested election since the 1940s. While the Democrats will always have the home-team advantage in Hawai‘i, they’ll be open to attack unless they can manage to unite behind one candidate. But if the Republicans nominate Lingle over Djou, they’d better have proof that she won’t infl ict educational ruin on the nation.

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR LINDSY OGAWA ASSOCIATE DAVIN AOYAGI OPINIONS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011

Ask Liz and Sam L IZ BERRY & SAM COURT Staff Columnists

Answer Absolutely not! He had his friends long before you ever came in the picture, and if he wanted to date one of them, he already would have. He chose you, and you need to respect the fact that he has friends. If he really likes you, as the relationship progresses, he will spend less time with his chick friends and more time with you. Be patient and consider telling him that it makes you jealous, but by no means do you have a right to ask him to get rid of his friends. If I were dating a guy and he asked me to drop my friends, I would drop him instead. Stay positive and work on building trust, not causing problems. If after a while his “friends” are still really bothering you, perhaps you should contemplate ending the relationship.

E-mail advice@kaleo.org to sumbit your questions to Liz and Sam.

Answer

Question I have been dating a guy for about three weeks now, and everything is going great except for the fact that most of his friends are girls. This really bothers me and makes me extremely jealous. Is it OK for me to ask him to get rid of his female friends?

First of all, you need to ask yourself if you’re emotionally capable of a relationship. If you are already demonstrating jealousy so early in the relationship, you are more than likely setting the relationship up for failure. Not only will it take a toll on you emotionally, the guy will eventually realize you’re insecure and break things off. If a relationship is going to succeed, you need to be happy with yourself in any given situation, even if it means your intimate other has friends that are girls. You cannot successfully commit yourself to another if you are not content with yourself; you will continually fi nd fl aws in the relationship. You guys should consider taking a step back and evaluating the situation. It may be a good idea to become closer as friends and eventually become romantically involved, so that you won’t have these insecurities. Then you will be certain he wants you, and only you. No relationship will ever succeed without trust.

The Blood Bank of Hawaii will be on campus the following dates: March 9th from 8:30am - 3:45pm at Campus Center Executive Dining Room March 15th from 8:00am - 3:30pm at the Law School Mall

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR ANN MACARAYAN COMICS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i

AMES

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011 Shelli Huang, DDS

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

By Gareth Bain ACROSS 1 Doughnut shape 6 Doofus 10 “Hi” sign nicknames 14 Furniture wood 15 Circle dance 16 Does a bakery job 17 *Moscow park eponym 19 “__ we forget” 20 Palm Treos, e.g., briefly 21 Tailless primate 22 School orgs. 23 Article for Adenauer 24 Upside-down frown 26 __ Dei 28 __ Andreas Fault 29 Bit of dogma 30 Poppycock 31 Opera setting, for short 33 Outs partners 35 Hops-drying oven 36 Animals who often bear twins 38 Evokes wonder in 40 Asian sea 43 It’s not known for MPG efficiency 45 Soak up 49 Din in the library? 51 One of Chekhov’s “Three Sisters” 53 Big suit, briefly 54 About the eye 55 Elect to take part 56 Hoo-ha 57 Option for Hamlet 58 Exxon Valdez cargo 59 Short run, for short 60 Wimple wearers 61 *“What’s Going On” singer 64 Élan 65 Kindergarten staple 66 Courtroom demand 67 Quite a long time 68 Pair in bunk beds, perhaps 69 Burden bearer

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8 6 Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

4 9 2 8 9 6 2 4 3 9 7 4 8 7 5 5 9 3 8 2 7 9 MEDIUM

# 51

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inventions come from accidents. Open your eyes, look around and appreciate your world.

03/09/11 DOWN 1 Violent storm 2 Shortest book in the Hebrew Bible 3 Steve Martin film based on “Cyrano de Bergerac” 4 Colleges, to Aussies 5 Mozart’s “Jupiter,” e.g.: Abbr. 6 Noted composer of études 7 Rhine siren 8 Mork’s planet 9 “And God called the light __”: Genesis 10 *20th-century cartoonist who wrote “He Done Her Wrong,” a 300-page pantomime tale 11 “1984” setting 12 Goofs 13 Old JFK arrival 18 Spermatozoa, e.g. 22 Frisk, with “down” 24 Crock-Pot potful 25 Sicilian mount 27 Collector’s goal 32 *“Mad Max” star 34 East African language 37 Sport for heavyweights 39 Israeli diplomat Abba 40 In days past 41 Burst 42 Actor Banderas 44 Vicks ointment 46 Anthem for “eh” sayers 47 Overnight flights 48 Leader of the band with the 1962 hit “Green Onions” 50 Impeccable service 52 “As I was going to __ ...” 59 Fairy tale baddie 60 Hoops org. 61 With “the,” 48-Down’s band (which sounds as if it could have included the answers to starred clues) 62 Poetic boxer 63 San Francisco’s __ Hill

By Nancy Black and Stephanie Clements Tribune Media Services (MCT) Today’s Birthday (03/09/11). The year begins with a bright outlook, although you may find March 30 to April 23 challenging (it’s one of the four times that Mercury goes in retrograde this year). After that, you’ll be on your way to financial growth. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) -- Today is a 6 -Today presents you with sudden changes. Be willing to let go and ride the waves. Or you can counter the current, if you’re willing to put up a fight. Taurus (April 20-May 20) -- Today is an 8 -Carry on with your goals and your ideas. Just make sure that you leave room for other people’s contributions. They really care for you, and you might miss them. Gemini (May 21-June 21) -- Today is a 6 -No pain, no gain. It’s all right if you don’t want to feel pain today, though. Sometimes, it’s good to take time off. Get some rest for tomorrow’s race. Cancer (June 22-July 22) -- Today is a 7 -There may be some bumpy miscommunications in romance today. Brush the dust off, and focus on your long-term goals. You have a lot to look forward to. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Today is a 9 -Emotions run like a river. Trust your intuition for powerful business decisions. Great

Friend

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Today is a 7 -Get out of the house. It’s better to avoid rush hour. Questions don’t always have to have answers. Keep asking them, even if just for the fun of it. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) -- Today is a 6 -Look for freedom in the most unusual places. You’ll be surprised by what you find. Surround yourself by beauty and meditate. Let your mind go where it wants to go. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -- Today is a 7 -Take care of your true friends. They’ll be there to take care of you when you’re not feeling so hot. The most powerful aspect of communication is listening. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -- Today is an 8 -- Great seasonal fruit and vegetables delight you with their deliciousness. If you don’t already have one, it’s a good time now to set up an exercise routine. Health feels good. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Today is a 6 -You were once a young child. Forgive the mistakes of the past, and embrace the possibilities of the future with creative joy -just like a child. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) -- Today is a 6 -Be careful where you step. It’s time to clean up. Create a space in your home that you adore. Don’t hesitate to ask for help from family members. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) -- Today is a 7 -Find inspiration in an old letter, and then write a new one to a loved one -- better on paper than electronically. Be honest. Seal it with a kiss.

on

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011

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Rainbow Wahine riding momentum into WAC Tournament JAKE CAMARILLO Senior Staff Writer

A fter a 72-71 comeback win over Utah State in overtime to close the regular season, the Rainbow Wahine basketball team enters the Western Athletic Conference Tournament as the No. 7 seed. The victor y on Senior Night has kept the ’Bows’ hopes high for the tournament, despite being 11-18 on the season. “It gives us great momentum going into the tournament,” said senior point guard Keisha Kanekoa. “We’re riding on a high right now, and we need to take that energy and use it as a good thing.” Kanekoa said she feels good about making the tournament this year. “It’s awesome. My last year going out, it feels great to have made it,” Kanekoa said. “I think we put ourselves in a good position in the tournament.” The men’s and women’s WAC Tournaments will be played in the New Orleans Arena in Las Vegas. In its fi rst game, the ’Bows face the sixth-seeded New Mexico State Aggies

Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. HST. The team lost at home to NMSU 74-58, but won on the road against the Aggies 57-52. “We feel really confident going against New Mexico State,” freshman point guard Sydney Haydel said. “We went 1-1 with them, and we know we can compete with anybody in the tournament.” Overall, the ’Bows have played better in the second half of WAC play. “It’s great that we’ve made this transition and turned it around,” Haydel said. Head coach Dana Takahara-Dias looks at the team’s play in four separate sections. “The fi rst season was our non-conference; we were 6 -7. Then we looked at the fi rst season of the WAC; we were 0-8,” Takahara-Dias said. “We looked at the second WAC season, [in] which we were 5-3. And now, we’re going into the next season, which is postseason play.” Although the comeback win against Utah State was exciting, Takahara-Dias knows that they won’t be able to keep playing come-from-behind basketball. The ’Bows have trailed at halftime

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in each of their last four games. “ We cannot afford to get back into a deficit at halftime, because we might not be able to dig ourselves out of that hole while we’re on the road,” Takahara-Dias said. “One of the advantages of playing at home [is] having the crowd and fans behind us – like a sixth man. That might not happen at the WAC tournament.” Still, the ’Bows have learned a lot about themselves this year. “We come out and play hard, put two halves together and it shows that we have a lot of grit,” Kanekoa said. Haydel also shared what the team learned. “We don’t give up as a team, I think we all have realized,” Haydel said. “When it comes down to it – and the game is on the line – we’ll all be there for each other, and we’ll fi ght for each other until the end.”

WACHHOONNOORRS S WAC

Freshmanforward forward Kamilah Kamilah JackJackFreshman son and freshman guard Shawna-Lei son and freshman guard Shawna-Lei Kuehu were were named named to to the the all-WAC all-WAC Kuehu Freshman Team. Freshman Team.

ALEC FULLER / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Senior forward Allie Patterson goes for the shot in her final home game against Utah State before the WAC tournament.


16 S PORTS

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i EDITOR RUSSELL TOLENTINO ASSOCIATE MARC ARAKAKI SPORTS @ KALEO.ORG

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9, 2011

Rainbow Warriors want WAC crown Team believes it is champion material JOE F ERRER Senior Staff Writer

It’s normal for a team to shout its team name at the end of practice or when breaking a huddle. By doing so, it can create a sense of unity and vision. This season, the Rainbow Warrior basketball team has gone by one mantra: “We are champions.” “We want it embedded in our heads that no matter what – win or lose – as long as we play hard and execute ... we played like champions,” sophomore forward Joston Thomas said. Of course, merely stating you’re a champion doesn’t make you one in the public eye, but first-year head coach Gib Arnold instilled this mindset into his players for a reason. “Since day one, that’s the only thing we say when we come together,” Arnold said. “It’s how we start and end every meeting we’re in.” Arnold took a team that was picked to fi nish last in the preseason Western Athletic Conference rankings and made them into title contenders. Now, the fifth-seeded ’Bows (18 -11, 8 -8 WAC) have a chance to make their mantra a reality as they open the WAC Tournament Wednesday. They play the eighth-seeded San Jose State Spartans (15 -14, 5 -11 WAC) at 10 a.m. HST in the New Orleans Arena in Las Vegas. The ’Bows swept the season series against the Spartans, but know not to overlook a team with nothing to lose. “We can’t take them lightly, even though we’ve beaten them twice,” senior Bill Amis said. “We know we need to bring it for the whole game.” Still, Arnold’s players have bought in to his coaching philosophy. ���Champions don’t get beat [off of] wide-open screens. You get back on defensive transition, you rebound and you take charges. That’s how champions play,” said Thomas, who is third on the team in both points and rebounds. “They play good, hard-nosed basketball.” Junior point guard Jeremiah Ostrows-

NIK SEU/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Freshman guard Bo Barnes looks to make a pass in a game against Boise State on Jan. 8. Barnes is second on the team with 54 3-pointers. ki, who has seen signifi cant playing time in the absence of injured Hiram Thompson, said he doesn’t take Arnold’s motto lightly. “We take that statement [we are champions] real seriously,” Ostrowski said. “It’s what we want to be.” Hawai‘i has lost its last fi ve WAC Tournament games, dating back to 2005, but this year’s squad is confident. “We feel like we have a great chance of going in there and being champions,”

Ostrowski said. The ’Bows will have to win four games in four days to do so, but if they do, it will be the program’s fi rst WAC title since back-toback championships in 2001 and 2002. The players know it’s within reach. “All these teams in the tournament and in the conference are really even,” Amis said. “We just gotta bring it every night.” “We’re gonna go out there and play hard,” Thomas said. “We’re gonna play

like champions.”

WAC H O N O R S Amis was named to the all-WAC Second Team. He finished the regular season averaging 15.1 points and 7.5 rebounds per game. Junior guard Zane Johnson also made the all-WAC Honorable Mention and all-WAC Newcomer teams. His 3.36 3-pointers per game is fourth nationally.


March 9th 2011