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SEXISM AMONG CAMPUS FACULTY?

NEWS P. 04-05

20 THINGS TO DO THIS SUMMER TO COMBAT LAZINESS P. 07

FINDING THE EARTH'S AGE USING METEORITES NEWS P. 04

Things you could say you did this break.

ISSUE.01 VOLUME.110

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MONDAY, MAY 25, 2015

KA LEO O HAWAI‘I: THE VOICE

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KA LEO O HAWAI‘I: THE VOICE

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2015

03

FRONT MATTER  WH AT ’D I MISS?

Men’s Basketball adds to coaching staff The final addition to the Warrior basketball team’s coaching staff was added May 22. Chris Acker was previously the head coach at West Los Angeles College, where he had a successful two-year stint. WANT TO KNOW MORE? TINYURL.COM/KS32LCO

Student athletes may receive stipends Student athletes may start receiving stipends this fall. Beginning Aug. 1, the NCAA governing body can pay student athletes stipends to cover costs such as laundry, transportation and cell phone bills. WANT TO KNOW MORE? VISIT TINYURL.COM/K79D4UR

UH divests from fossil fuels

09

Former Warriors are looking for more than just a job. They’re pursuing their dreams.

04 _UH SCIENTIST STUDY

06_PIDGIN: NO SHAME

A UH Mānoa scientist and other international scientists have used meteorites to predict the age of the Earth and its moon.

Bus’ out da talk: why Hawaiian Creole English is a respectable means of communication that you should embrace.

The university is divesting its $66 million endowment from coal, oil and gas companies, a move that will be completed by June 30, 2018.

Tuition increases to be reduced

WANT TO KNOW MORE? VISIT TINYURL.COM/K25V7CY

Limit your excuses this summer with this bucket list that may hold the cure for laziness.

08_SCIENCE COMMUNICATORS ‘OHANA

WANT TO KNOW MORE? VISIT TINYURL.COM/M4HGOGB

Undergraduate residents can expect to pay less than expected for the next two years as the Board of Regents approved lowering scheduled tuition increases for the 2015-16 and 2016-17 academic years.

07 _TWENTY CHALLENGES TO COMBAT LAZINESS

05_CAMPUS UPDATES BUDGET Chancellor Robert Bley-Vroman unveiled the campus’ financial progress and new goals. What changes will occur this year?

07_ONE PLUS ONE REVIEW Good, large portioned food and cheap prices are just a few perks at One Plus One. Head on over for a quick meal, that keeps you going for your busy summer.

By promoting science through workshops and events, discover why this new group on campus hopes to improve science literacy in Hawai‘ i.

09_NBA TOP FIVE In honor of David Letterman’s final show, we put together a list of top five storylines of the NBA postseason so far.

 MEET THE STAFF

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Noelle Fujii

Ebola vaccine in the works The UH medical school and Hawai‘i Biotech are teaming up to develop a vaccine that will protect against infection of the Ebola virus. The initial vaccine that will be tested in humans will combat only Ebola, but research is underway to formulate a vaccine that will also protect against the Sudan virus and the Marbug virus.

Academic institution or sports league? IN THE OPINIONS SECTION OF OUR NEXT ISSUE ON JUNE 1, 2015

Your guide to surviving summer school sessions

SPECIAL ISSUES EDITOR Nicolyn Charlot

MANAGING EDITOR Brad Dell

SPORTS EDITOR David McCracken

CHIEF COPY EDITOR Wesley Babcock

ASSOC SPORTS EDITOR Christian Shimabuku

ASSOC SPECIAL ISSUES EDITOR

DESIGN EDITOR Joelyn Dalit

COMICS EDITOR Caleb Hartsfield

Christina Yan

ASSOC DESIGN EDITOR Elena Poritskaya

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AD MANAGER

NEWS EDITOR Courtney Teague

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W HAT ’S NE XT ? 

ASSOC OPINIONS EDITOR Amber Khan

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Student Media Board weekly except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising.

Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year.

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04

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2015

KA LEO O HAWAI‘I: THE VOICE

NEWS

news@kaleo.org @kaleoohawaii

Courtney Teague News Editor

Shiwani Johnson Associate News Editor

SOURCE: SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

These meteorites are predicted to be 4.47 billion years old, the same age as the moon.

Scientist uses meteorites to study the solar system Age of collision that formed Earth, moon long been a puzzle TOM LINDER STAFF WRITER

A UH geophysics professor, in collaboration with scientists from around the world, published a study that used meteorites to find more about the Earth and moon’s formation. The findings, published in April’s edition of Science Magazine, studied meteorites that dated to about 100 million years after the formation of the solar system. University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology Professor Ed Scott said these meteorites allow people to look further back in time than what’s possible using rocks originating from the Earth. “[Scott and his colleagues are] trying to relate the impact events in the early solar system to the formation of the moon,” UH Mānoa Planetary Scientist Jeffrey Taylor said. CONSTRUCTING A TIMELINE

Finding the exact age when the

collision that formed Earth and its moon occurred has been a puzzle to scientists for a long time. “The more you learn, the more you should appreciate that there are some remarkable events that led up to the production of humans on the Earth,” Scott said. “The moon probably formed when

after the solar system began to form,” Taylor said. According to Scott, clues about when the moon was formed lie in the asteroid belt. “On Earth ... even the oldest rocks are typically no more than a few hundred million years old,” Scott said. “If you want to go back 4.5 bil-

of different proportions of the parent and daughter species ... you can determine an age when the rock was hardened,” Scott said. “It’s the standard radioactive dating techniques that are used on Earth rocks as well, although they’re a bit more specialized for meteorites.” MAJOR COLLISIONS

It probably took 50 to 100 million years to construct the Earth after the solar system began to form. – JEFFREY TAYLOR UH MĀNOA PLANETARY SCIENTIST

some Mars-sized object hit Earth ... and the moon formed out of this ring of debris.” Scott believes much of this debris can still be found in the asteroid belt and meteorites today. “It probably took 50 to 100 million years to construct the Earth

lion years, you have to go back to the asteroid belt and find the small bodies that preserve this evidence.” To determine the ages of meteorites in the study, Scott and his colleagues used literature values from radioactive dating techniques. “If you’ve got a rock with minerals

According to Scott, there have been multiple large-scale impact events throughout the history of the solar system that took place when large asteroids collided with each other. These parent bodies were broken up from the impact, and the debris from them arrived at Earth shortly after. “The point is, big things whacked into each other,” Taylor said. Scott said there is evidence on Earth today of a large-scale impact event like those that once occurred in a younger solar system. “We have evidence for one [large-scale impact event about]

450 million years ago, which we found evidence for by dating these shocked chondrites [samples of asteroids that formed very early in the solar system’s history]. They came up at 470 million years, and then they started finding fossil meteorites at the same level in the fossil record,” Scott said. “So we know there was a big impact in the asteroid belt at that time that broke up the parent body and bits from that impact came quickly to Earth.” Scott has been studying planetary science and meteorites for decades and by learning more about the history and timeline of our solar system, he said he is continually amazed by what science discovers. “The more we learn ... the more regard we have that our planet is pretty special and our solar system is pretty special. We shouldn’t take it all for granted,” he said. Ka Leo O Hawai‘i

Vice chancellor denies allegations UH faculty members allege bullying, sexism RAVEN BELLAMY STAFF WRITER

The complaint of nearly two dozen faculty members involved in a campus pro-transparency group against an administrator has resulted in public outcry and the resignation of the faculty senate chairman. The 23 faculty and I Mua Mānoa members filed a formal complaint on April 6 with allegations of racism, harassment and bully-

ing against Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Reed Dasenbrock, who denies the allegations. “The allegations by the I Mua Mānoa group that I am a racist, and sexist and bully people are simply not true,” Dasenbrock said in an email interview. “Anyone who works with me will testify to that, and I am confident that the investigation that the Chancellor [Robert Bley-Vroman] has initiated … will establish that clearly and unequivocally.”

THE ALLEGATIONS

Women’s Studies professor Susan Hippensteele said Dasenbrock removed her from a strategic planning position as retaliation after a disagreement. “Dasenbrock has deployed UH Mānoa grievance processes to justify terminating several people from positions after they stood up to him,” Hippensteele said. In addition to this, Hippensteele said that she has witnessed Dasenbrock make comments that she

believes are racist and derogatory. Faculty members that have filed the complaint believe that Dasenbrock should be placed on paid leave pending the investigation. However, according to Hippensteele, Dasenbrock will be acting chancellor while Bley-Vroman is on vacation May 21. “This move represents an outrageous statement of bias in favor of Dasenbrock and violates UH precedent,” Hippensteele said. “I believe it confirms

the suspicion many hold that Bley-Vroman is not capable of functioning competently or effectively as Mānoa chancellor.” “Given that there is an active fact-finding regarding allegations involving one of individuals that I supervise, it would not be appropriate for me to make public comment on these matters,” Bley-Vroman said in an email interview. continued on p.05


KA LEO O HAWAI‘I: THE VOICE news@kaleo.org @kaleoohawaii

Courtney Teague News Editor

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2015

NEWS

Shiwani Johnson Associate News Editor

UH Mānoa releases new budget Revamped fiscal plan doesn’t impress everyone

lished by a state statute that governs their usages. The expenditures of these funds are covered through their own income, such as the Student Activities fund. The Research Training and Revolving Fund is a fund established by Hawai‘i Revised Statute § 304A-2253 to enable research and training and help with new discoveries and inventions. Revenue is generated from indirect costs, facility and administrative overhead, grants and contracts. More than 50 percent of fund distributions go to the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology and the John A. Burns School of Medicine, which enroll 22 percent of the entire student population. “It’s very clear that the money is going to medical school and research units. Why is tuition going to support facilities that students never use? Students should demand to know more about how their money is being managed,” Butler said. Ka Leo O Hawai‘i

FILE PHOTO / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I 

State funding for the campus has decreased by $60 million. HENDRICKS HICKS STAFF WRITER

With a new budget revealed, not all on campus are pleased with the new plan to have deans and directors to stay within their allocated amounts. Chancellor Robert Bley-Vroman discussed the campus’s new budget plan for the upcoming 2015-16 academic school year during a May 13 campus conversation. To stabilize the budget, the campus deans and directors are to stay within what was allocated this year. Any departments that went into deficit in Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 need to submit their own plans on how to recover. Campus administration also wants to reinstate centralized budget oversight and accountability by having all units participate in hearings and quarterly

reviews. The budget committee plans to take on a new budget methodology by focusing on long-term sustainability. Although the public presentation aimed to increase transparency, not all were pleased with the campus’s efforts. “Announcement of the conversation is less than 24 hours in advance, making it hard to plan to attend,” said Marguerite Butler, an associate professor in the UH Mānoa biology department and convener of I Mua Mānoa, a group that aims to improve the campus community, in a phone interview. “And questions are not totally answered, we want to know college by college or research unit spending and they gave us aggregate data which came off as disingenuous.“ She felt that the new budget was not much of a change and failed to prioritize students.

05

BREAKING DOWN THE NUMBERS

Bley-Vroman’s budget recap showed a 19 percent increase in undergraduate degrees from 2009

should students have to pay more tuition if it’s not increasing the quality of their education? They’re not a subsidy for administration waste.”

Why should students have to pay more tuition if it’s not increasing the quality of their education?

MORE INFO

BLEY-VROMAN’S BUDGET PRIORITIES ●

Increase efficiency of research by increasing efforts to generate extramural funding and recruit faculty who qualify for nine months of state support;

Reduce spending by having some departments leave certain positions empty, delay recruitment and reduce overtime expenditures;

Renovate facilities such as the installation of a chilled water loop system or rooftop solar panels;

Delay classroom renovations, upgrades and reduce lease expenditures to save money.

– MARGUERITE BUTLER ASSOCIATE BIOLOGY PROFESSOR AND CONVENER OF I MUA MĀNOA

through 2014 during a time of declining enrollment. There was an increase in the four-year graduation rate during the same time period. The FY 2016 budget process to realign current allocations is constant with FY 2015 levels. The 38.5 percent increase in tuition will be allocated based on the degrees awarded, majors declared and students taught. “It’s ridiculous,” Butler said. ”Why

MĀNOA FUND SOURCES

The Mānoa campus is funded by 17 active special funds dedicated by law for a specific purpose. A majority of the funds are restricted and can only be used for their designated purpose, with the exception of the Tuition and Fees fund, which is one of the most flexible funds. There are also eight active revolving funds that are estab-

‘It is time to stop fighting last year’s battles’ from page 04 DASENBROCK’S DEFENSE

FILE PHOTO / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I 

Dasenbrock’s appointment was approved by the Board of Regents in 2009.

Dasenbrock said he is not exactly sure why they made the claims. However, he speculates that the members of I Mua Mānoa, who also opposed the firing of former Chancellor Tom Apple in 2014, are upset with him because they believe he played a large role in the removal of Apple and the appointment of the current Chancellor, Robert Bley-Vroman. “I would submit that it is time to stop fighting last year’s battles,” he said. Dasenbrock says that 14 of the faculty members that filed the complaint report to him directly, and nearly all of them have had a personal stake in the decisions that he has made and

that they disagree with. Dasenbrock said that there are 4,444 employees in all in the various units that report to him, and that the 14 faculty members represent less than one in 300 of those employees. “I handle many grievances and complaints and have to make contentious decisions every day,” Dasenbrock said. FACULTY SENATE CHAIR STEPS DOWN

In the wake of the allegations, faculty members commended Philosophy Chair Ronald Bontekoe for resigning from his position as Faculty Senate chairman. “It’s basically a witch hunt and [I Mua Mānoa is] throwing as much mud as they can at him to bring him down,” Professor and chair of the Department of Philosophy Ronald Bontekoe

said in regards to the faculty members’ complaints against Dasenbrock during a Hawaii News Now interview on May 6. In addition to this, Hippensteele said that Bontekoe claimed that because he had not personally experienced bullying by Dasenbrock, he believes Dasenbrock to be innocent. Days later, Bontekoe resigned from his position as chairman on claims that he made a bad judgement call and should have remained silent on the issue. Hippensteele believes Bontekoe did the right thing and had no basis for his original statement, calling the faculty complaint a “witch hunt.” “As chair of the Faculty Senate Bontekoe should not have taken a position on the complaint against his faculty colleagues,” she said.


06

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2015

KA LEO O HAWAI‘I: THE VOICE

OPINIONS

opinions@kaleo.org @kaleoopinions

Amber Khan Associate Opinions Editor

COVER STORY

MARCOS OJEDA / FLICKR 

First published in 1981, Peppo’s Pidgin to Da Max allowed locals a humorous look into the language they spoke on a day-to-day basis.

No shame fo’ talk Pidgin What’s beyond media portrayal, government indoctrination and bad teaching TOMOKI KOBAYASHI GUEST WRITER

Nobody should feel ashamed of the language they speak. However, speakers of Hawaiian Creole English, commonly known as Pidgin, often experience discomfort about it. Speaking Pidgin is seen as not only unintelligent but also academically harmful. Pidgin is not the cause of “poor” standard English skills; it’s the lack of exposure to written language. Media portrayal, misleading government propaganda and educators’ attitudes have factored in Pidgin’s reputation. Many people believe speaking Pidgin automatically signifies lower income, education and a lower socioeconomic status. This belief is distorted. BAD PERCEPTION

“Hawaiian Pidgin English | Siri vs Hawaiian Pidgin” is a YouTube video with over 450,000 views. It shows a Hawaiian man unsuccessfully trying to communicate with his iPhone’s virtual assistant. He uses Pidgin phrases and discusses topics that may be relevant to local people but nonsensical to most others. For example, he tries to order a pound of octopus poke and refers to Heineken beers as “green bottles.” Siri is unable to articulate what the man says, and he ends up throwing his phone in frustration. Videos like this spread two erroneous ideas: that Pidgin speakers are unintelligent and that it isn’t a real language. The man getting angry at an inanimate object

portrays him as barbaric. Also, the conversation he attempts (ordering seafood and a 12-pack of beer) is trivial and may reflect a sedentary and unhealthy lifestyle. The fact that Siri doesn’t have a “Pidgin-mode” is an overt way to say that Pidgin is not a language and that it’s merely a form of broken English. Although most viewers will understand the video exaggerates Hawai‘i’s culture, not everybody will see the intended humor in it, and many will develop unfriendly attitudes towards the language and its speakers. ‘THE LAND OF BROKEN ENGLISH’

Pidgin was a language first spoken by the sugar cane plantation workers who had begun coming to Hawai‘i from the early 19th century. Due to their various native languages, it became imperative to come up with a means of communication. Pidgin was a language used by Americans, Puerto Ricans, Portuguese, Filipinos, Japanese, Chinese, Koreans and the larger Hawaiian population of the time. Notions of Pidgin as connected to low education, income and class can be traced back to its history as a plantation language. Even now, after more than a century since the first plantations, the image of Pidgin-speakers being poor remains strong. PAST ATTITUDES

Prejudice toward Pidgin today is due to the U.S. government’s attitudes in the past. “Hawai‘i is the land of broken English,” Hawai‘i Educational Review

wrote in 1920. “Tell children that the Pidgin English which they speak is not good English; that it is not spoken by good Americans. Show the children that Pidgin English implies a sense of inferiority.” This article was just the beginning of what was to snowball into our current misunderstanding and discrimination. In 1939, speech specialists tested 21 Hawai‘ i schools and found “defects” in 675 of the 800 tested children, coining the term “Pid-

who have mastered the standard variety would have more opportunities, but the notion that suppressing Pidgin will benefit them is senseless. Failing to respect a child’s native language can result in an uncomfortable learning environment. Students may consciously choose to withdraw from class discussion out of fear that they will pronounce something “wrong” or end up with their feet in their mouths. When you speak Pidgin, you add words

Pidgin was not seen as a language or a culture but rather as something broken and harmful. gin dialectalism” to describe them. Speaking Pidgin was considered a deficiency and listed along speaking and reading handicaps, mental deficiency and cleft palate speech. Pidgin was not only believed inferior to Standard English, but its use was equivalent to having a speech defect from a physical condition. It was not seen as a language or a culture but rather as something broken and harmful. PIDGIN AND EDUCATION

“When I speak Standard English I gotta tink what I going say. ... Pidgin I jus open my mout’ and da ting come out,” one O‘ahu local said. Many educators nevertheless believe standard English is the only acceptable mode of communication, and Pidgin-speaking students need help. It’s true that students

that aren’t necessary and take out words that are necessary in Standard English. This is why students whose native language is Pidgin may be afraid of saying something culturally inappropriate. Students may also develop negative self-concepts, which can reflect on their behavior in and out of the classroom. Overall, this sort of discrimination will only create a counter-productive educational atmosphere. “Writing is a foreign language for everybody,” linguist James Sledd said. “It’s usually more difficult than spoken language because it requires organizing, expanding and making elaborate content explicit. Many officials seem to believe that students who speak Pidgin are automatically poor in their reading and writing abilities.”

A few studies suggest that errors made in Standard English writing by Pidgin speakers don’t reflect the language pattern of Pidgin. This contradicts claims that speaking Pidgin is at fault for lower scores in reading and writing. The studies also show that young writers are not at a disadvantage of becoming good writers because of the language they speak. Good writing doesn’t come from “good” speech, and Pidgin doesn’t hurt the capacity of any student’s writing. What hurts it is the lack of exposure to written language. To accuse someone’s spoken language as the cause of why they are and will continue to be “poor” is an attack on his or her cultural identity. This should not be happening in an educational environment. It’s foolish to expect results that mirror the Standard English skills of public schools in the continental U.S., when the linguistic demographic of Hawai‘ i is more diverse. Hawai‘ i’s Department of Education should work with Pidgin-speakers to create a more nourishing academic curriculum for them, instead of enforcing a system that works against them. Pidgin was created to break down language barriers while connecting the people of the world. Recognizing it as a respectable language and culture goes beyond the betterment of Hawai‘ i: if we could take the values of Pidgin and respect others, perhaps we could all live in harmony. Ka Leo O Hawai‘i


KA LEO O HAWAI‘I: THE VOICE features@kaleo.org @kaleofeatures

r e m Sum The ultimate

SHIINA LOSCIUTO STAFF WRITER

“What did you do this summer?” is a question people who spent their whole summer in bed are afraid to hear, especially after spending all semester coming up with all the cool things to do over break. Every summer, we come up with outrageous bucket lists that are inspired by Tumblr and movies. After a long semester are we really going to do things that require a lot of effort? Here are 20 challenges you can do this summer that will leave you feeling good without changing anything in your daily life. You must never forget that you have the right to treat yourself and be lazy.

bucket list

Twenty challenges e to combat laziness

5.

Buy Starbucks for the person behind you. Not only will this make you feel good, but you’re making a random stranger’s day.

2. Remove the clutter Cleaning your whole room may be a little extreme, getting rid of five things is achievable.

3. Capture the moment Take a picture of something every day, such as food or even a simple photo of the sunset. This is a practical way to remember your summer.

4.

Read a book Whether it be the “Magic Tree House” series or “A Series of Unfortunate Events,” read through that bad boy and reminisce.

Spread your Netflix addiction Your show is the best show ever right? You’ve already watched it twice so make your friend do it too. You will feel like such a great influence to the community.

6.

Contact old teachers Teachers love to hear how you are doing, and this is another way to rack up those karma points.

7.

Go to the gym once Completing this challenge will make you feel really good about yourself, and might even lead to another trip.

8. Try a new drink If you always get a cherry Red Bull, get blueberry. If it turns out bad, at least you are reminding your taste buds why you liked cherry so much.

07

FEATURES

Ben Decastro Features Editor

1. Pay it forward

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2015

9. Watch an old movie

13.

Classic movies are the best, don’t forget about them. Don’t stop at one movie either, the sky’s the limit, you can dedicate a whole night to this.

Relive high school memories Dig out those yearbooks from under your bed. Most of the time, reading those are a reminder of why you love college.

10. Indulge yourself

14. Memorize the 1st Amendment

Eat a batch of cookies you made. Don’t ever let anyone tell you that it’s impossible to eat a whole batch of cookies on your own. Prove everyone wrong – eat those cookies.

Google the First Amendment then reward yourself when memorize it. You never know will be impressed with your knowledge.

11. Reach out to a friend

15. Listen to music

Text your friend that you told “I will miss you” over the summer. Text that floormate or classmate once and say what’s up, this way you won’t be a liar.

Revisit songs that were popular when you were in fourth grade. Google the top hits of that year you were in elementary school and prepare for an emotional roller coaster.

12.

16. Feed your Neopets

No junk food for a day Challenge yourself to one healthy day, and keep going until you complete it.

and you who new

Those poor childhood toys have been starving for years now.

17. Write a review As soon as you buy your item, help out other customers by giving your honest opinion.

18.

Save the environment Pick up 10 pieces of random trash. You have three months to complete this challenge. Slowly but surely, you are saving the world.

19. Read Ka Leo You could do this at a coffee shop to look intelligent and attract the attention of a hipster. If this is too much for you, just follow @KaLeoOHawaii on Twitter.

20. Try a new look Get a new haircut or try out a makeup look you’ve been curious about. No one will see you anyways.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY JOELYN DALIT / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Cheap and delicious: One Plus One Drive Inn review DANIELLA REYES STAFF WRITER

Looking for cheap food and big portions? This hole in the wall on South King Street, across from Longs Drugs, is great for the college student on a budget. One Plus One serves your typical plate lunch meals, ranging from mochiko chicken to beef broccoli to katsu curry. FOOD

DANIELLA REYES / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I 

One Plus One offers a variety of American and local foods.

This place is definitely one to go to for value. A regular-sized garlic chicken plate is $7.50, comes with two heaping scoops of rice and one serving of salad – tossed or macaroni. Mini plates, which come with one scoop of rice and one scoop of salad, are slightly cheaper at $6.25. There are also beef plates ($7-8), seafood dishes ($6-8). If you’re feeling extra hungry, combination plates are available starting at $9.95. What you see is exactly what you get at One Plus One. Taking advantage of the cheap prices, my party

ordered the garlic chicken, mochiko chicken, chicken katsu curry and mushroom chicken. I can’t emphasize the portion size enough – if you’re not a big eater, you could split your plate lunch into two meals. The garlic chicken was a favorite, as they didn’t skimp on the garlic, covered with a generous amount of sauce and flavorful garlic chunks. The mochiko chicken was crispy and the inside juicy, though on the salty side. The mushroom chicken came with plenty of mushrooms in a thick gravy sauce that was satisfying and tasty. The chicken katsu curry was standard, nothing special but filling all the same. There’s one element of the plate lunch that can make or break the whole dish: the mac salad. Some places put too much mayonnaise, drowning out their few noodles. Some go overboard with the additions, adding too many potatoes and carrots instead of macaroni. It’s a very serious issue. One Plus One hits the Goldilocks spot – not too much mayo, but just right.

The mac salad compliments the chicken and you get enough to balance out the rice. AMBIANCE

Being a drive-in, there really isn’t much atmosphere to comment on – you order your food at the counter, pick a spot at one of their unassuming tables and wait for your order. Most people order-out, so the restaurant rarely gets crowded. Conveniently, they take credit card as well as cash. The food comes out within 5-10 minutes, making this a good place to grab your food and go. There’s even air-conditioning – what more could you want? THE VERDICT

If you’re looking for cheap food with generous portions, look no further than this unassuming spot on South King Street. There’s nothing earth-shattering about the cuisine, but sometimes you just want comfort food at reasonable prices. Do the math, and go to One Plus One. Ka Leo O Hawai‘i


08

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2015

KA LEO O HAWAI‘I: THE VOICE

FEATURES

features@kaleo.org @kaleofeatures

munication in the government, we wouldn’t be in this situation,” Rii said. INCREASING AWARENESS

Science Communicators ‘Ohana Bridging the gap between science and the rest of the world HORIA VARLAN / FLICKR 

In a shift by Republicans, the U.S. Senate voted 98-1 on Jan. 21 that climate change is “not a hoax.” THOMAS LINDER STAFF WRITER

Founded in September 2014 by University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa graduate students, the Science Communicators ‘Ohana (SCO) was created with the goal of improving science literacy among the public. The group is focused on helping scientists at UH learn how to more effectively communicate within their discipline through writing workshops and events. COMMUNICATING SCIENCE

One such event is the upcoming NerdNite Takeover, taking place at Anna O’Brien’s on June 2. Organized by a pair of science majors at UH,

the SCO will be bringing their work to the public by way of “pub speeches.” A pub speech is a quick, jargon-free presentation designed to get people interested in the work that the speaker is doing. For Shimi Rii, vice chair of SCO, the goal is for scientists to get used to speaking off the cuff about their research to the public. By SCO taking a leading role in communicating science, Rii hopes the group will help show how beneficial science communication can be in the public and government. To discover why better science communication is needed, one only needs to observe the actions of the U.S. government. On Jan. 21, the United States Senate held a vote on whether or not climate change was real.

MAY

Conditions that lead to the kind of government action like voting on the validity of scientific research

Another intent of the SCO is to help make the public more aware of scientists and all that they are doing today. A 2009 Research!America poll showed that only 17 percent of Americans were able to name a living scientist. I did my own survey at Campus Center and UH students fared a little better than the people in that 2009 poll. Thirty-five percent of the 100 UH students surveyed were able to name a living scientist. Bill Nye was the most well-known scientist among the students surveyed, named by over a third of the students. The two next best-known scientists were Stephen Hawking and Neil deGrasse Tyson, each of whom were known by about five percent of students. By presenting science in more interesting and more influential ways to the public, the significant boundary between the sciences and rest of the population will be taken down.

Being able to write for a lay audience allows you to look at the bigger picture of your research. – SHIMI RII VICE CHAIR OF SCO

show that there is a clear need for scientists to improve communication methods for addressing the public and political spheres. “If [science] was communicated more effectively, and we had more scientists who are effective at com-

Part of the problem for the SCO is convincing scientists that being able to effectively speak to the public helps them. “Being able to communicate your science doesn’t just mean that you’re leaving science and you’re

CAMPUS EVENTS

Ben Decastro Features Editor

pursuing communication, it makes you a better scientist,” Rii said. “Being able to write for a lay audience allows you to look at the bigger picture of your research.” With recent events in Hawai‘i surrounding the Thirty Meter Telescope, Rii believes an open center for discussion on campus would have been beneficial to getting the correct information out to everybody. Future debates would be intended to include students and faculty from a diverse range of backgrounds. “Not just scientists, but … English majors, and communication majors and social science majors,” Rii said. In addition to events like the taking over of NerdNite, Rii hopes the group will be able to one day host events and debates of their own. With a double major in English and biology, Rii believes interdisciplinary collaboration is valuable in creating a scientifically literate public. Every month, the SCO has a pau hana at Mānoa Gardens to talk about general topics related to events and pub speeches. Students who are interested in the group or attending events can join the group on Facebook at facebook.com/scicomm. ohana. The site posts updates and developments of the club along with articles about science communication on a daily basis. Rii encourages regular practice in discussing scientists’ work. Rii also added that the group is always looking for new ideas, new members and new leaders. “We join because we need to work on it ourselves,” Rii said. “Force yourself to talk about your research.” Ka Leo O Hawai‘i

BEN DECASTRO FEATURES EDITOR

MAY 25 TO MAY 31

5/26

5/27

5/28

HAWAI‘I SPACE LECTURE SERIES UH MĀNOA PACIFIC OCEAN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY BUILDING 544 7:30 P.M. - 9 P.M. FREE

OCEANOGRAPHY SEMINAR: CARMEN BAZUA DURAN MĀNOA CAMPUS, MARINE SCIENCES BUILDING 100 3 P.M. - 4 P.M. FREE

CYBER SECURITY BASICS WITH BRYAN GROSSBAUCH MĀNOA CAMPUS, KRAUSS 12 7 P.M. - 8:30 P.M. FREE

The Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP) is sponsoring a talk called “The Rosetta Mission: Riding with a Comet” by HIGP researcher Peter Mouginis-Mark. The Rosetta, a space probe launched by the European Space Agency, was launched on March 2004 and has performed fly-by missions and deep space studies of comets.

Carmen Bazua Duran, an associate professor from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), is giving a talk called “Dolphin Whistles as Communication Signals” that will address her research group’s investigation on how dolphins use whistles to “maintain group cohesion and to broadcast identity.”

Bryan Grossbauch, an experienced computer technician, will lead a free talk on the basics of cyber security for the fast-paced and the computer jargon-heavy world that we live in. Guests are encouraged to bring their laptops.

SUBMIT YOUR EVENT TO KA LEO: TINYURL.COM/EVENTKL

KEN REYES / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I ; FILE PHOTO / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I [2]


KA LEO O HAWAI‘I: THE VOICE sports@kaleo.org @kaleosports

David McCracken Sports Editor

DREW AFUALO STAFF WRITER

The University of Hawai‘ i has seen its fair share of football players make it to the next level in the NFL. It wasn’t too long ago that players such as Devone Bess and Greg Salas were drafted to make an impact on the gridiron on Sundays. As far as the most recent senior class goes for UH football, former starting running back Joey Iosefa and starting offensive lineman Kody Afusia were two players who were given an opportunity in the big leagues. Iosefa was born and raised in the islands of American Samoa. A 2009 graduate of Fagaitua High School in Pago Pago, Samoa, he always succeeded athletically. Iosefa lettered three years in football and played as quarterback, free safety and linebacker. Both his junior and senior year season, his team went 21-2 while winning back-to-back championships. In addition, Iosefa was named the Offensive Player of the Year and led his alma mater to the national championship in 2007. He was also named the season MVP and all-purpose player his senior year, before receiving an athletic scholarship to come and play for the Warriors at the collegiate level. His talents were not overlooked when he arrived in Hawai‘ i. In his freshman year, Iosefa led the team with 548 rushing yards on 110 carries, averaging about five yards

The top five A closer look at this year’s NBA postseason

From bow to pro Only weeks removed from college, two former Warriors try to go pro FILE PHOTO / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I 

Joey losefa was the only Warrior invited to the NFL Scouting Combine and the only player from UH drafted this year.

position in the pros. Last week, the Buccaneers made the deal official when Iosefa signed a four-year, $2.5 million contract with the team, with a $68,000 signing bonus. Iosefa is not the only Warrior trying to compete at the highest level, as offensive lineman Kody Afusia is seeking out the same dream as well. A southern California native, Afusia was a 2010 graduate of Ocean View High School and lettered three years in varsity football. As a junior and senior he was named first team All-American and was named the

league’s Defensive Player of the Year as a senior. After coming to Hawai‘ i to play for the Warriors, he played all four years on the offensive line, alternating between guard and center. In his senior year, Afusia was named Honorable Mention All-Mountain West while starting 11 games. He started four of those games at left guard before switching back to his original position of center for the last seven games. After making the shortlist of the Polynesian Football Hall of Fame College Player of the Year Watch List,

CHRISTIAN SHIMABUKU ASSOCIATE SPORTS EDITOR

that momentum by racing to a 3-1 series lead against the Houston Rockets and looked like the favorite to win the finals. Since that point, “Clutch City” took over with three consecutive convincing wins, with none more devastating than game six. The Clippers had the Rockets on the brink of elimination on their home court in the penultimate game of the series, leading by 19 in the third quarter. Houston responded with a 23-2 run and won the game 119-107. With the series loss, the Clippers have yet to reach the Western Conference finals. Clipper fans everywhere are now left wondering, much like the Spurs, is it time to make some changes of their own?

David Letterman, an American legend and icon, hosted his final episode of “Late Show With David Letterman” on Wednesday night. The Late Show Top Ten List was a regular segment on his show and one of his most popular. In honor of his retirement, here is Ka Leo’s variation of Letterman’s list that we boiled down to the top five events that have shook the NBA postseason. THE DEFENDING CHAMPS GO DOWN

The most anticipated first-round series in this year’s playoffs lived up to the hype. The Los Angeles Clippers eliminated the 2014 NBA champion San Antonio Spurs in a riveting seven-game series. Clippers point guard Chris Paul turned in a gutsy, Isaiah Thomas-esque performance by scoring 27 points on 9-for-13 shooting, all on an injured hamstring. With the loss, the Spurs now face an uncertain future. In addition to nine of their players becoming free agents, franchise legends Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili haven’t decided on retirement yet. Needless to say, some important decisions will be made soon. THE CLIPPERS’ PLAYOFF WOES CONTINUE KEITH ALLISON / FLICKR 

A LeBron James team has never lost a playoff series after taking a 2-0 lead.

09

SPORTS

Christian Shimabuku Associate Sports Editor

per carry. He also had 20 receptions for 122 yards, one touchdown and rushed for a season-high of 99 yards. Iosefa started his trek to the top of the depth chart to become one of Hawai‘i’s most important players on the field. Even though Iosefa missed seven games of the season due to injury and suspension, he still managed to get the second most carries on the team with 151 for 641 yards as well as leading the team with eight rushing touchdowns. The Samoan native was named to the Doak Walker Award Watch List and the Polynesian Football Hall of Fame College Player of the Year Watch List this past season, proving his worth to NFL scouts. After graduating in the fall of 2014, Iosefa was ready to take on the big leagues. He was invited to the annual NFL Scouting Combine and was given the opportunity to perform alongside some of the best college football players in the nation for a chance to get drafted. After several grueling weeks of performing for the draft, Iosefa was selected with the 231st overall pick in the seventh round of the 2015 NFL Draft by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Although there are many critics who feel that Iosefa was not a smart pick for the Bucs due to his large size and less than impressive 40 time, the Florida-based team saw potential in the former Warrior. After selecting Iosefa, Tampa has agreed to let him convert to full back rather than a running back, since he is not fast enough to qualify for his normal

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2015

Coming off of their series win against the Spurs, the Clippers rode

STEPPING UP IN CLEVELAND

In lieu of these impact players, the Cleveland Cavaliers in particular have seen breakout performances from bench players who otherwise might not have had the opportunity. Matthew Dellavedova, Cleveland’s backup point guard and a native of Australia, broke out in game six for 19 points on 7-for-11 shooting from the field in 34 minutes played in a 94-73 road victory over the Chicago Bulls. Dellavedova, a product of UH head coach Eran Ganot’s tutelage while at Saint Mary’s College, gave the Cavaliers the spark every team needs in a closeout game.

Afusia graduated from UH but was not invited to the 2015 NFL Scouting Combine like Iosefa was. Instead, Afusia had to prove his ability through his pro day and in private workouts with NFL teams. After going undrafted in the 2015 NFL Draft, Afusia was invited to the Arizona Cardinals’ mini-camp with the hope of signing as an undrafted free agent. Only time will tell whether or not Iosefa or Afusia can make careers playing in the NFL, but each player has been given the opportunity to prove themselves at the next level.

COACHING CAROUSEL

The NBA offseason has seen two head coaches fired so far in Scott Brooks of the Oklahoma City Thunder and Monty Williams of the New Orleans Pelicans. Brooks, who missed the playoffs for the first time in his six years at the helm, is replaced by college basketball legend and now former Florida Gators head coach Billy Donovan. What remains to be seen is who replaces Williams in New Orleans. What also remains to be seen is the future of other head coaches such as Tom Thibodeau of the Chicago Bulls, whose organizations might choose to move on. FOR THE WIN

Three buzzer-beaters from three different superstars have defined the most entertaining playoffs in recent memory. On Friday, May 16, maligned and injury prone superstar Derrick Rose banked in a 3-pointer to give the Chicago Bulls a 2-1 series lead against the Cleveland Cavaliers. On May 17, league veteran Paul Pierce “called game” and saved the Washington Wizards from a monumental game three collapse against the Atlanta Hawks. Pierce banked in a fadeaway jumper from 21 feet after the Wizards blew a 21 point lead. On May 18, LeBron James swished a corner fadeaway shot in the deep corner to tie the series at two against the Bulls.


10

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2015

KA LEO O HAWAI‘I: THE VOICE

COMICS

comics@kaleo.org

Caleb HartsďŹ eld Comics Editor

Thoughts by Caleb Hartsfield

KA LEO IS

NOW

Where is everyone??

HIRING

Ahh yes, finally, summer is here

You guys wanna hang out?

Latin Title by Caleb Hartsfield

Hey, is anyone here at all? Like, anyone???

E C I s t F n F a Ossist

facebook.com/latin-title

Seriously, where did everyone go? Is there really no one here?

Leopold by Caleb Hartsfield Seriously? I emailed you guys asking to hang out over the break...

A

iti n u ort 107 p p /o Hall g r o.o nway e l e ka hem

es

Alright that's enough guys, c'mon, I know you re hiding... Summer Vacation I guess I'll just sit here and wait for someone to show up

Caleb Hartsfield Maybe i should just text them? People check their phone over the break

RAWWWWWWWWR


KA LEO O HAWAI‘I: THE VOICE advertising@kaleo.org

MONDAY, MAY 25, 2015

11

GAMES

Christina Mello Student Ad Manager

the ? o t g n i Head after class beach

LOS ANGELES TIMES

DAILY CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Get the latest surf report on the...

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Ka Leo Mobile App. Available for Download on:

NOW HIRING ACROSS 1 Eugene OʼNeill character? 11 Without gaps in coverage 15 Orbital position nearest the sun 16 Capture, in a way 17 Commercial identifiers 18 “The Tourist” author Steinhauer 19 Run like the wind, e.g. 20 More than equaling 22 Strike setting 23 Confused 26 Oldies syllable 27 “M*A*S*H” dramatic device 30 Graphic designerʼs deg. 33 Spurious 34 King Faisalʼs brother 35 Poetʼs liberty 39 Passing remarks? 40 “__ Plays Fats” (1955 jazz LP) 41 R.I.ʼs Sheldon Whitehouse, e.g. 42 Left nothing in the tank 46 Brown, for one 47 Paul or Lloyd of Cooperstown 48 Hebrew letter before shin 51 Mythical Aegean Sea dweller 53 Short drop-off? 55 Farm hauler 56 Not blown up 60 Bone: Pref. 61 Cleese role in “Monty Pythonʼs The Meaning of Life” 62 Work on a bed 63 Picasso medium DOWN 1 Complex gp. 2 Thin ice, say 3 Slangy advertising

suffix 4 Short stretch of track 5 Air Canada Centre team, informally 6 Peace Nobelist Cassin 7 Ipanema greeting 8 Milneʼs “Mr. __ Passes By” 9 Earth mover 10 Results 11 Overlying 12 Curse repellers 13 Realtorʼs come-on 14 Where gravel may represent water 21 Tuba note 23 NASCAR Hall of Famer Bobby 24 How most maps are drawn 25 Bake 28 Map coordinate: Abbr. 29 Exhaust 30 Balcony alternative 31 Like playing tennis with the net down, to Robert Frost 32 “Be that as it may ...” 36 Novel conclusion? 37 Frankfurterʼs pronoun 38 Bach hymn arrangements 43 Four-yr. conflict 44 Tried it 45 Doesnʼt quite reveal 49 Marsh bird 50 Light golden brown 52 Watched 53 “Flashdance ... What a Feeling” lyricist 54 Head of a PIN?: Abbr. 57 Dernier __ 58 Shop sign word after open, maybe 59 One stationed at a base

K

MARKETING CONSULTANT

Gain real-world experience in a professional office environment. We are looking for responsible & aspiring young professionals to join our team.

GO TO: kaleo.org FOR THE ANSWERS TO OUR WEEKLY CROSSWORD

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E I C V O

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kaleo.org/opportunities Hemenway Hall 107

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12

ADVERTISING

Careers begin here... Mānoa Career Center:

INTERNSHIPS & COOPERATIVE EDUCATION Co-op

EMPLOYMENT ON-CAMPUS PART-TIME GENERAL CLERICAL ASSISTANT TRAINEE Mānoa Career Center $9.55/hour Close Date: When filled

HELP DESK STUDENT ASSISTANT School of Medicine - Information Technology $10.60/hour Close Date: 5/31/15 or when filled

Staff and manage the QLC kiosk, which includes providing information and directions to students & visitors; manage and restock materials; maintain statistics; make recommendations to improve services to clients & building residents; make deliveries & pickups around the UH campus; create and post flyers; photocopy, file and shred documents; assist staff with various special projects and events.

Provide help desk support for School of Medicine users (primary Windows desktop users) including installation and configuration of new desktops computers. Duties may include web site support for School of Medicine departments. Work with and assist the Office of Information Technology on various projects. Perform other technical work involving initiative and independent action.

Job Number: 323

Job Number: 12936

LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATE TRAINEE Student Life & Development $9.55/hour Close Date: When filled Assist the Campus Center Building and Grounds Utility Workers with care (including repair of irrigation system and grounds-keeping tools and equipment), maintenance and landscaping projects. The position involves mostly working outdoors, but may include indoors as needed. Once trained, the associate is expected to provide information about the facility and services to the public. Assist Custodial, Maintenance, Meeting & Event Services, and other units when requested. Job Number: 98303

OFF-CAMPUS PART-TIME Delivery Driver Hawai‘i Pizza Hut, Inc. $15.00/hour Close Date: 9/30/15 or when filled

LIFEGUARD Palama Settlement $10.00/hour Close Date: 7/31/15 or when filled

SALES SPECIALIST/FASHION STYLIST Valerie Joseph Boutique $9.00/hour Close Date: 6/30/15 or when filled

Valid U. S. Driver's License with minimum 6 months licensed driving experience. Delivers customer’s order in a timely and safe manner within accordance of our guidelines and compliance with State and Federal traffic laws. Delivers products in a timely manner with accuracy and courteousness. Collects any checks, cash or credit card slips to properly tender order. Perform secondary duties such as washing dishes, cleaning, prep and cooking duties.

Qualifications include knowledge of life guarding and pool safety; High School diploma or GED (required); Red Cross Lifeguard Certification (required); CPR for the Professional Rescuer/AED/ and First Aid (required). Supervise patrons at a community swimming pool, providing safety and enforcement of facility rules. Other duties include assisting with swim lessons and other aquatic classes. Please submit resume if interested. Works under the supervision and guidance of the Aquatics Manager.

The ideal candidate has enthusiastic team spirit, builds positive relationships that can meet customer demands, has strong selling skills, and is a Fashion Leader. Are you a fashion enthusiast? Do you enjoy inspiring confidence in others? Are you looking to be a member of a successful and progressive team? If so, we want to hear from you! Must be available to work nights, weekends, and holidays.

Job Number: 141725

Job Number: 141734

Job Number: 141704

OFF-CAMPUS FULL-TIME I N T E R N AT I O N A L P RO G R A M S COORDINATOR Hawai‘i Tokai International College Salary: $28,078.00 - $40,904.00 Close Date: 6/30/15 or when filled

HUMAN RESOURCES ASSISTANT Advantage WEBCO Hawai‘i Salary: $24,000.00 – $28,000.00 Close Date: 6/5/15 or when filled

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT McClone Construction Company Salary: TBD Close Date: 5/29/15 or when filled

Essential functions include: Organize all short-term programs: create budgets and schedules; arrange activities and transportation; reserve classrooms and equipment; Work closely with the Fiscal Office to ensure the accuracy of budgets, purchase orders and allocation of funds; Communicate with teachers and coordinators, and coordinate to pass necessary information or messages to other staff members; Arrange special meal requests that fall outside the cafeteria’s daily procedures etc.

College Associate Degree in Business Administration/Human Resources or equivalent business experience. At least 2-3 years administrative experience. Responsibilities include processing I-9 verifications, new hire packets, payroll assistance, monitor on-line applications, post in-house job openings on-line at various websites, maintain new hire personnel files, filing,conduct random drug testing activities, schedule applicants for screenings, assist in processing benefit billing statements,etc.

Typical Duties Include (but are not limited to): Answering incoming calls and communicating information; Managing office organization and appearance; Ordering of office supplies and general filing of materials; Arrange traveling Team member’s accommodations; Managing office vendor contracts; Assist with new project start-ups; Managing new hire paperwork; Electronic folder management.

Job Number: 141863

Job Number: 141882

To apply for these jobs, go to:

hawaii.edu/sece

Job Number: 141862

WHAT IS Co-op? Like internships, Co-ops are education-based and careerrelated. It is a nation-wide program comprised of a partnership between the employer, the student and the university. Co-ops are paid and require a two semester commitment. CIVIL ENGINEERING CO-OP ESH, Inc. Compensation: $10.00/hour Close Date: 7/17/15 Assist engineers in performing calculations and layout for roadway and utility projects. Perform field surveying work, calculate and plot topographical maps. Become familiar with local design standards and review agency requirements. 2nd semester Sophomore, Junior, or Senior level student enrolled in the civil engineering program & in good standing. Minimum 2.5 GPA, and two semesters remaining before graduation. Job Number: 52481

VISUAL DISPLAY INTERNSHIP Anthropologie Compensation: $7.75/hour Close Date: 7/20/15 or when filled Candidates must meet the following qualifications to be considered: Currently Enrolled in Accredited College or University Must receive College Credit Monday – Friday daytime availability Must work a minimum of 12 hours a week (90 day maximum) Job Number: 141722

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