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A K LEO T H E

MONDAY, OCTOBER 28 to TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2013 VOLUME 109 ISSUE 24

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

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REGENTS ENDORSE INITIATIVE TO INCREASE NUMBER OF COLLEGE CERTIFICATES

PHOTO COURTESY OF HAWAI‘I GRADUATION INITIATIVE

Gov. Neil Abercrombie, CCA President Stan Jones and Linda Johnsrud. NOELLE FUJII News Editor The Board of Regents endorsed the Hawai‘i Graduation Initiative at its September meeting for the second time, approving strategies to improve student success and graduation. “What they endorsed this time was actually all the strategies,” said Linda Johnsrud, Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost. “So we’ve got strategies in these three areas, and we just felt it was good to share these with the board and then also get the board’s endorsement.” The strategies included promoting college preparation, ensuring efficient transfer of students and credits, and enabling on-time graduation. The initiative’s ultimate goal is to increase the number of working-age adults that hold a college degree to 55 percent by 2025. The goal was endorsed by the BOR in 2008.

AN INCREASE OF 25 PERCENT Johnsrud said that the university system has increased the number of degrees/certificates awarded by 25 percent. She said the campuses are doing the

work to ensure that students are working toward degrees and certificates. “The campuses are really doing the work to make sure that more students than in the past, you know, take 15 credits, or they declare their majors earlier,” Johnsrud said. “Campuses have defined the academic pathways for all of their programs to make it easier for students to get from their freshman year to their senior year.” The Mānoa campus’ graduation rates have increased. In 2012, Mānoa’s normal time graduation rate increased by almost 55 percent from the previous year, according to Pearl Imada Iboshi, Ph.D., director of the Institutional Research and Analysis Department for the UH system. Its six-year graduation rate is now a little more than 57 percent, compared to 46 percent three years ago. The campus’ four-year graduation rate is now more than 20 percent – almost doubled from 10 years ago. According to Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Reed Dasenbrock, the rate is still low. “But more students are graduating more quickly, so we do believe we’re making more progress,” Das-

enbrock said. “We’ve had some record graduating classes. … We are becoming more successful at getting students to graduate.” Johnsrud said the goal of a 25 percent increase is for the 200815 period, and the university is starting to work on what its goal should be from 2015-20. “And since the census data came out, since we’ve set these goals we realized that even though we were really pleased that we got the increase of 25 percent, we actually need to ramp that up more if we want to obtain the ultimate goal of 55 percent of the working-age population,” Johnsrud said. “So the fact that our enrollment increased really helps. But our focus is on making sure that more of those students succeed than in the past.”

INCREASING COLLEGE CERTIFICATES AT UH MĀNOA Dasenbrock said the Mānoa campus has some of its own initiatives that aim to increase the number of degrees and certificates the campus awards. “So there’s no real dissonance or conflict between what we want to do with Mānoa and with what the

Hawai‘i Graduation Initiative is trying to do,” Dasenbrock said. “But, I think the Mānoa initiatives mostly came out of our own planning around accreditation. And so, the phrase ‘Hawai‘i Graduation Initiative’ is mainly primarily associated with the system effort, but what we’re trying to do matches that perfectly.” Dasenbrock said the Mānoa campus has increased its connectivity to the community college system. The campus offers automatic admission and reverse credit transfer for community college students. “If you’re on track to get an associate’s of arts, you can get an email saying you are admitted to the UH campus of your choice,” Dasenbrock said. “That was a Mānoa initiative. We’ve also started something called reverse credit transfer where if you start at a community college and then you come over here, your credits can transfer back so you get an associate’s of arts.” UH Mānoa has also improved how it connects with students when they first come to the university, including allowing freshmen to register around the same time as continuing students and making sure that students are getting the right credits.

TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE, VISIT KALEO.ORG

“There’s a set of things we’re doing to try to make sure that students have the tools so they know kind of where they’re going,” Dasenbrock said. “Four-year degree plans on the web is an important part of that. We’re asking departments to review their requirements to try to make sure that students can move through more quickly.” The campus is also working on an initiative to help students declare their majors faster. Johnsrud said one of the reasons the university has pushed to increase the number of degrees and certificates is because of a study compiled by the Georgetown University Center on Education and Workforce. “One of the reasons that we have pushed degrees and certificates is there has been a study done across the nation, and it indicates state-bystate the number of jobs that are going to require postsecondary degrees,” Johnsrud said. “And for Hawai‘i, it’s 65 percent. So just underscores the need for more of our citizens to have a degree or certificate.” To learn more about the Hawai‘i Graduation Initiative, go to hawaii. edu/hawaiigradinitiative/.


Page 2 | Ka Leo | Monday, Oct. 28 2013

Twitter @kaleofeatures | features@kaleo.org |Jackie Perreira Editor |Karissa Montania Associate

Features

HOW TO HALLOWEEN-IFY YOUR FOOD K ELLY SLOAN Staff Writer Halloween is a holiday for people to dress up in costumes, go to parties and tenjoy Halloweeninspired treats. Whip up a batch of your own spooky treats to get in the Halloween spirit. Try these recipes and scare your friends with some human-looking foods.

This one is the easiest to make because it doesn’t deviate from the regular cupcake-making process. The goriest and most intricate aspect of this recipe is making the icing look like brains. INGREDIENTS: • Cupcake mix of your choice. Try red velvet to resemble blood. • Decorating icing in a light pink or salmon color to make the brain design. DIRECTIONS: 1. Bake cupcakes and let cool. 2. With decorating icing, draw zigzags along top of cupcake to make brain-like design.

FEAR VERDICT

PHOTOS BY JESSICA HOMRICH / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

RICE KRISPIE EYEBALLS

Making cookies look like fingers is no easy feat. Part of the trick is to shape this treat’s dough into slivers as thin and rickety as possible. INGREDIENTS: • Sugar cookie dough • Sliced almonds DIRECTIONS: 1. Preheat oven to 300°F. 2. Shape sugar cookie dough into “fingers” and place on cookie sheet. Use a knife to lightly score the fingers to resemble knuckles. 3. Place a sliced almond to represent a finger nail. 4. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until dough is lightly brown. 5. Take cookies out of the oven, let cool and serve.

IK AIK A SHIVELEY Staff Writer A mother and her two sons move to Santa Carla for a new start. The two boys (Jason Patric and Corey Haim) decide to check out their new neighborhood by heading down to the boardwalk, where they learn local legends about vampires. Skeptical at fi rst, they eventually begin to believe the tales when they encounter what has been terrorizing the town. “Lost Boys” was the fi lm that ignited the friendship and collaboration of actors Corey Haim and Corey Feldman.

BRAINY CUPCAKES

HUMAN COOKIE FINGERS AND TOES

‘LOST BOYS’ (1987)

They won’t be as mushy as real eyeballs, but they’ll probably taste better. INGREDIENTS: • 2 Tbsp. butter • 10 oz. bag of marshmallows • 4 cups Rice Krispies cereal • 11.5 oz. bag white chocolate chips • ¼ cup chocolate chips • Red decorating gel • Parchment or wax paper DIRECTIONS: 1. In a saucepan, melt butter over low heat. Add marshmallows and continue to stir until marshmallows are completely melted. Remove from heat. 2. Add Rice Krispie cereal and stir until cereal is completely coated in the melted marshmallows. Set aside and let cool. 3. While the mixture is cooling, pour chocolate chips in a separate bowl and place in microwave for tone minute. Stop and stir mixture every 10 to15 seconds, until chocolate chips are melted (Note: Be careful when melting the chocolate chips because chocolate burns easily). 4. Once everything is cooled, form Rice Krispie mixture into eye-sized spheres. Dip them into white chocolate mixture until evenly coated. Place them on parchment/ wax paper and repeat process. 5. Place a dark chocolate chip in the center of each sphere to represent a pupil. 6. Once cooled, draw vein-like lines with red decorating gel. 7. Let gel dry and serve.

As a teen-horror film, “Lost Boys” isn’t terrifying, but is still great to watch around Halloween. Vampires are seen flying in the film, which was rarely shown before its initial release. The special effects in the film are mostly traditional props and makeup, such as death scenes of vampires, which are realistic and creepy. If viewed on Blu-ray, the visuals will drastically increase as one of the best looking converted ‘80s films. “Lost Boys” simultaneously scares and excites for an overall fun experience.

CHANGE YOUR PANTS!

COVER YOUR EYES

Because moving to a town overrun with vampires would be terrible.


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Page 4 | Ka Leo | Monday, Oct. 28 2013

Twitter @kaleoopinions | opinions@kaleo.org | Doorae Shin Editor

Opinions

THINKING BACK TO THE FUTURE

DBAKR / FLICKR

According to UN-HABITAT, the urban population grows by two people every second. CARTER K OCH Staff Writer The classic film “Back to the Future” illustrates the future with hoverboards and the famous time travel car fueled entirely by garbage – all innovative ideas that would certainly better our future. Oftentimes, we do not think or even plan for the future. Political and economic plans have us thinking ahead 10, maybe 20 years, but we rarely think 50 to 60 years into the future, and this may present serious problems down the road.

I N D U S T RY VS . T H E E A R T H Fossil fuels, freshwater, agricultural soil and lumber are all finite resources that fuel our economy and our lives. In the ruling industrialized countries like the United States and China, there is

no limit to the amount produced or consumed. This is an unsustainable way to live, and it shows through recent global climate changes as our natural systems react to such severe imbalance. In the U.S., people are captivated by the culture of consumption. Whether it is the amount we eat, the amount we buy, how long and how hot our showers are or how much energy we use per day, the majority of people in the U.S. are utterly addicted to materialism, pleasure and convenience. This mindless consumption has devastating effects on the earth, and it is necessary to make changes in our daily lifestyles to preserve the environment for future generations. According to statistics gathered by the United Nations, about one-third of the world lives on less than a dollar a day. It is unnecessary for Ameri-

cans to continue to live this way, and change is imperative.

A M E R I C A T H E B E AU T I F U L? To start, we need to change the ideological structure of our country. It is unacceptable to consume the amount we do, and it is crucial for people to understand the consequences that our current lifestyles will have on future generations. It is irrational to try to justify overconsumption. In the early 1900s, Edward Bernays, the father of propaganda, introduced America to the concept of a wants-based economy. By convincing the public to buy things for pleasure and status rather than for functionality and necessity, Bernays changed the course of our nation’s culture and habits to the one that has become so prevalent today. Of course, we are the land of

the free, and it should stay that way, but before we call ourselves citizens of this great nation, we must acknowledge fi rst that we are creatures of this beautiful, generous earth. Our planet is warming, sea levels are rising and pollution is increasingly severe. In 50 years, the world may be so polluted that people will be incapable of growing food in the ground. It is important to think about the long run of future growth. What inconveniences we face now may require a drastic lifestyle change, but it will also preserve life for others 50 or 100 years down the line. Too often we think selfishly and make short-term decisions based off our own desires or “necessities.” It is time to abandon this way of thinking if we are to make the necessary changes for our future. If we don’t, there will be

dire consequences. Future generations will find themselves left with contaminated oceans that they are unable to swim in, soil they are unable to grow with, air that is no longer safe to breathe and beautiful landscapes covered with clouds of smog. For years, Americans have set the westernized standards that may very well lead to that frightening future, so the weight of opportunity has fallen upon our shoulders. It is our job to set a new standard – a standard that preserves and guarantees a beautiful future. What we love and enjoy now may not exist if we continue down this destructive pattern based around desire. We can set a new standard, and we can go “back to the future” through mindfulness of how every choice, every purchase and every action affects us.


Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Monday, Oct. 28 2013

Comics


Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

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Games

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

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1 Up-tempo Caribbean dance 2 River of Grenoble 3 Kids’ imitation game 4 Vietnam neighbor 5 Part of USDA: Abbr. 6 Multiple Grammy-winning cellist 7 Catchall option in a survey question 8 They’re related to the severity of the crimes 9 Caveman Alley 10 Summoned as a witness 11 Novel on a small screen, perhaps 12 “Falstaff” was his last opera 13 Wipe clean 18 Tax pro: Abbr. 22 Cyclades island 24 Nothing to write home about 25 Applaud 27 Feats like the Yankees’ 1998, ’99 and 2000 World Series wins 29 Opposite of NNW 30 6’3”, 5’4”, etc.: Abbr. 31 Close associates 32 Roadside assistance org. 34 Preparing to use, as a hose 35 Tampa Bay NFLer 36 RR stop 38 Jamie of “M*A*S*H” 39 Arabian leader 44 Play a part 45 Discern 46 Take by force 47 “Is anybody here?” 48 Quran religion 49 Underlying reason 50 Relatives 52 Mrs. Eisenhower 53 Snide smile 56 Sicilian volcano 58 French vineyard 59 Earth chopper

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Twitter @kaleosports | sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor | Jeremy Nitta Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Monday, Oct. 28 2013

Sports Longo led Penn State in digs (397) and digs per set (3.39) during her sophomore year.

Longo leads as libero

SHANE GRACE KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

M ADDIE S APIGAO Senior Staff Writer One player on the volleyball court wears a different jersey. This player earns that right because she is the best at what she does: defense and effectively running the back row of the court. This player is the libero, and for the Rainbow Warriors, this player is senior Ali Longo. “Ali is one of the most caring and inspirational people I know,” junior defensive specialist Sarah Mendoza said. “She leads by example every single

day. You always hear the quote ‘Leave everything on the court,’ but she really does. I know I can count on her to bring her best every single day, and she pushes me to be a better player.”

BEFORE THE ʻBOWS Longo lettered all four years at Chatfield High School in her hometown Littleton, Colo. She was captain for three years and earned three-time first-team all conference honors. She was also a four year member of honor roll and two-time academic all state selection.

PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

LEADERSHIP ROLES

This Colorado native wasn’t always a Rainbow Wahine. After her high-school career, Longo committed to play for the Nittany Lions of Penn State University. There, she played her freshman and sophomore year as a libero and defensive specialist. When she was given the coveted spot of starting libero at PSU, she decided to transfer to Hawai‘i. The ‘Bows already had five defensive specialists, but that didn’t stop Longo from coming into the program and seizing the starting role.

Longo is described as a fair and supportive leader. She puts in work behind the scenes, taking extra reps and pushing everyone else to work as hard as she does, according to her teammates. “She is always there to give you some encouraging words,” said Longo’s beach partner junior Karlee Riggs.

FILLING THE GAPS After All-American Kanani Danielson graduated in 2012, Longo came in and picked up the

defensive slack. She led the team last year with 385 digs and 39 service aces. Currently she leads UH with 296 digs and is third on the team for aces with 10.

SENIOR YEAR

Longo is one of seven seniors but stands out among them, not only by wearing a different jersey but also in her knowledge and strategic play. She knows the game inside and out and utilizes her experience as a standout player in the ‘Bows lineup that other teams know to look out for.


Page 8 | Ka Leo | Monday, Oct. 28 2013

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2013 october 28