Issuu on Google+

A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 4 to THURSDAY, SEPT. 5, 2013 VOLUME 109 ISSUE 4

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

www.kaleo.org

follow our

T W IT T E R : @KALEOOHAWAII for BREAKING

NEWS, UPDATES, WEB EXCLUSIVES & VIDEO COVERAGE.

Making meals ‘mindful’ Page 2

ALOHA

NIGHTS

SPECIAL INSERT: FLIP TO CENTER


Page 2 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Sept. 4 2013

News@kaleo.org |Noelle Fujii Editor

News

K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa 2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 Honolulu, HI 96822

Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-7043 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org

EDITORIAL STAFF Interim Editor in Chief Bianca Bystrom Pino Managing Editor Joseph Han Chief Copy Editor Kim Clark News Editor Noelle Fujii Features Editor Jackie Perreira Opinions Editor Tim Metra Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Assc Sports Editor Jeremy Nitta Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Chasen Davis Assc Photo Editor Ismael Ma Web Specialist Blake Tolentino

ADVERTISING E-mail advertising@kaleo.org Ad Manager Gabrielle Pangilinan PR Coordinator Tianna Barbier

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications.

ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Rebekah Carroll, chair; Nicholas Pope, vice chair; or Mechelins Kora Iechad, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

Items on the ‘mindful menu’ are free of trans fats. PHOTOS BY CHASEN DAVIS KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

I EVA B YTAUTAITE Contributing Writer Sodexo’s “Mindful” program at the Gateway and Hale Aloha Cafés aims to make it easier for students to choose healthier meal options. According to Donna Ojiri, Sodexo’s general manager, the main goal of the program is to “make students aware of healthier choices in our operations. We want students to know that healthy foods can also taste good.” The highlights of the program include entrées that are 600 calories or less as well as higher proportions of vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The “Mindful” soups and sauces are made with less sodium, and desserts are less than 200 calories and focus on using spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg and vanilla instead of sugar to bring out sweetness. The “mindful menu items” can be identified with a green apple icon that appears next to selected entrées.

‘Mindful’ program aims to make healthy choices second nature The University of Hawai‘i at Mā noa Student Affairs and Sodexo partnered in a new agreement three years ago. “We work together to promote ‘a better tomorrow’ for students, faculty and everyone,” Ojiri said. Sodexo’s three main priori-

ents as well as providing budgetfriendly options for students. Although Sodexo focuses on promoting healthy eating among students, many students are not aware of the “Mindful” program or how it is trying to improve the quality of cafeteria meals.

We want students to know that healthy foods can also taste good. - Donna Ojiri,

Sodexo general manager

ties are sustainability, improving the environment; nutrition, improving health and wellness; and community, working together within the university and city. In addition to the “Mindful” initiative in the Gateway and Hale Aloha Cafés this fall, Sodexo also opened “Stir Fresh Stir Fry” venue on the fi rst floor of the Campus Center. This venue focuses on using locally grown, fresh ingredi-

Sophomore Alyssa Pascua said that it is easier to choose healthy options with appropriate guidance, but didn’t know what the green apple icon symbolizes. “A lot of people just grab whatever and don’t really look at nutrition facts of ingredients,” Pascua said. According to Sodexo’s “Mindful” website, Sodexo is hoping that although some students might not pay particular attention to ingredi-

ents and nutrition facts, providing foods with healthier ingredients and satisfying portions will help students make “‘Mindful’ choices become second nature.” Student Austin Wobrock, a senior majoring in sociology, said he didn’t know about the “Mindful” program or what the green apple icon stood for. “But nutrition facts should definitely be available for foods, especially certain packaged foods,” Wobrock said. Ojiri said that although Sodexo would also like to try similar programs in other locations on campus, such as the Campus Center cafeteria; those locations are à la carte, making the programs a little more challenging. Sodexo also has a few more things planned in the near future. They have converted from CBORD system to the Blackboard system to manage meal plans. The new system will soon allow students to check meal balances and purchase dining dollars online. According to Ojiri, a loyalty system using smartphone technology will also be rolling out soon.


Page 3 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Sept. 4 2013

FALL 2013 DINING GUIDE

9.18.13

become an

account executive

2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043 | www.kaleo.org/jobs

See the full schedule of events by

Activities Council and Campus Center Board!


Page 4 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Sept. 4 2013

News@kaleo.org |Noelle Fujii Editor

News

ANY

TIME,

ANY

PLACE. NEAR UHM CAMPUS CENTER...

UUGGHH!!

CAMPUS SECURITY? AN UNDERGRAD JUST FELL OFF HIS SKATEBOARD..

New futures studies center open to all the possibilities K ELSEY A MOS Senior Staff Writer The Hawai‘i Research Center for Futures Studies has a new home this semester in Saunders 617 with plans to be used as a graduate student office and collaborative workspace. Brian Gordon, an M.A. student focusing on Futures Studies, said events at the center will include everything from presentations from visiting thought leaders in the ďŹ eld, to science ďŹ ction movie screenings and roundtables geared toward undergraduate students. The center hosted an open house on Aug. 19 for its new Saunders Hall renovation. According to its website, the Hawai‘i State Legislature mandated the creation of the center in 1971.

S T U DY I N G T H E F U T U R E YOU NEED HEALTH INSURANCE! for more information, go to:

WWW.HAWAII.EDU/SHS

6/*7&34*5:)&"-5)4&37*$&48*4)&4:06 ")&"-5):46$$&44'6-4&.&45&3

According to the center’s website, “futures studies encourages the contemplation of many possible futures, and facilitates dialogue between groups with competing or con icting visions.â€? “We can’t study the future because the future doesn’t exist, so what do we really

do? We look at images of the future, which is everything from data (about population, the economy, etc) ‌ or science fiction that imagines what that could be like,â€? said John Sweeney, a Ph.D. student in political science who teaches Futures Studies classes. Futurists also do “backcasting,â€? which means imagining an ideal future scenario and working backwards to think about how to get there. “How do we work toward a preferred future? How do we actually shape the world the way we want it to be instead of just live in the world that we all seem stuck with?â€? Sweeney asked. UH MÄ noa is unique in that it offers political science degrees with a focus in Futures Studies. The center’s director, Dr. James Dator, is one of the pioneers of the ďŹ eld. He came to Hawai‘i shortly before the center was founded in 1971. This happened during Hawai‘i’s ďŹ rst dabbling in futures-informed governing, the Hawai‘i 2000 project, in which local leaders tried to strategize for an ideal future. “Unfortunately, I’d say the worst case scenario is where we are today,â€? Sweeney said, referring to HawaiĘťi’s economy in the 1970’s. “You

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRIAN GORDON

don’t just envision the future once and then let it go. You have to continuously do it.� Consultancy has remained a big part of the center. In 2012 futurists from UH contributed to the passage of Act 286, which set in place state guidelines for adapting to climate change. All of this could make Hawai‘i a leader in futures studies, which is popular in countries such as South Korea, Finland and Australia, according to Gordon. “You can still be hooked into the rest of the world, but have a little more of a bird’s eye view,� Gordon said. “There’s less noise here.� Aside from policy work and serious scholarship, futurists at the center also craft interactive experiences called “immersive futures� to get people engaged with the multiple possibilities that the future might hold, should we chose to pursue those possibilities. “The future isn’t a noun, it’s a verb; it’s a place of radical possibility,� Sweeney said. Check out http://w w w.futures.hawaii. edu or follow @HRCFS on Twitter for information about upcoming events. News Editor Noelle Fujii contributed to this article.


Features@kaleo.org | Jackie Perreira Editor

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Sept. 4 2013

Features

FAST AND HEALTHY DORM RECIPES NOELLE F UJII News Editor For any college student, it’s easy to rely on a stash of food for ready consumption. Load up on these quick, easy-to-make healthy recipes that you can make in your dorm.

BLACK JACK BEAN QUESADILLAS Black beans are a great source of protein. Add in some cheese and whole grain wheat tortillas and you’ll have a great tasting protein source. Whole grain wheat tortillas are also low in fat and have extra fiber and B vitamins.

INGREDIENTS • 1 can black beans • ½ cup low-fat shredded cheese • ½ cup salsa • 4 eight-inch whole grain wheat tortillas

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Combine black beans, cheese and half of the salsa in a bowl. Mix well. 2. Spread the filling on half of each tortilla and then fold each one over once. 3. Put the quesadillas on a microwavesafe plate and microwave for one minute. 4. Let the quesadillas cool for a minute and then fold each one over again so each is folded in fourths. 5. Serve with remaining salsa.

TURKEY CHEESE WRAPS These wraps are low in fat and are packed with nutrients. Turkey is a great source of vitamins and has low fat content. The whole grain wheat tortilla has extra fiber, and spinach provides minerals and vitamins.

INGREDIENTS • 1 whole grain wheat tortilla • 8 slices of turkey • 3 slices of provolone cheese • Spinach • Tomato (about 5 slices)

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Put the tortilla on a plate. Spread 5 slices of turkey on it. Add three slices of provolone cheese. 2. Spread spinach in a thin layer over the cheese and turkey. 3. Add 3 more slices of turkey. 4. Spread 5 slices of tomato over the layer. 5. Roll the tortilla and its contents into a wrap, keeping pressure on the tortilla as you roll. 6. Cut in half or in quarters and serve.


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Sept. 4 2013

Advertising@kaleo.org

TAKE YOUR FIRST STEP TO SUCCESS. YOU’LL QUICKLY LEARN THAT WE HIRED YOU TO EVENTUALLY RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS. AND YOU’LL HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO WORK WITH PEOPLE AS MOTIVATED AND DRIVEN AS YOU. YOU’LL BRING YOUR DEGREE TO THE TABLE, AND WE’LL HELP YOU MAKE CRUCIAL BUSINESS DECISIONS IN NO TIME. YOU’LL LEARN HOW TO RUN A MILLION-DOLLAR BUSINESS, MAXIMIZE PROFITS AND MOTIVATE A TEAM OF PROFESSIONALS, WHILE HAVING FUN ALONG THE WAY.

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICANTS FOR OUR: -FULL TIME MANAGEMENT TRAINEE PROGRAM (GRADUATING STUDENTS) -ACCOUNTING COORDINATOR (GRADUATING STUDENTS) -AREA ACCOUNTANT (GRADUATING STUDENTS)

F OR QUESTIONS PLEASE EMAIL : ROSELANI . A . PELAYAN @ EHI . COM

FOR MORE INFORMATION: - GO . ENTERPRISE . COM - FACEBOOK . COM / ENTERPRISECAREERS

RIGH T OUT OF SCHOOL? APPLY TODAY AT WWW.GO.ENTERPRISE.COM


Page 19 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Sept. 4 2013

WORK IN ADVERTISING

become an account executive

APPLY TODAY

2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043 | www.kaleo.org/jobs

ARRANGEMENTS MANOA

Join the Warrior Football Team As A Video Assistant! August - December 2013 Tues, Wed, Thurs. 6:30am - 9:30am Seeking Camera Operators & video editors. Duties include videoing practice, games, editing videos, & more. Internship & class credit available! For more information contact Dory Kong at #956-9476 dorykong@hawaii.edu

SERVICE LEARNING A Servie Learning Program announcement. For PROGRAM more volunteer opportunities call #956-4641

NG NOW HIRI Voted one of the best places to work in Hawaii. Flexible hours/shifts available. Call for an application & interview.

(808) 988-3784

Fun, dynamic new store seeking outgoing & energetic English/ Japanese speaking sales associate that is filled with aloha. Must have the ability and willingness to work flexible hours including weekends and holidays.

Email info@pedegokailua.com or call (808)261-2453.

ACUPUNCTURE & HERBAL MEDICINE Licensed Acupuncturist  UHM Students $30* (price is with discount applied) Call for an Appointment (808) 391-8028 University Plaza (across Kinko’s parking) 931 University Ave. #104 


Page 20 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Sept. 4 2013

Features@kaleo.org | Jackie Perreira Editor

Features

Best hikes on the island BOBBY BERGONIO Staff Writer Hikes are a must for college students. From Makapu‘u to Papali Ridge, O‘ahu trails provide a picturesque perspective on the island’s coast and valleys. Ranging from the well known to the unknown, the following trails are essential to planning your perfect semester. But don’t try to be Bear Grylls and survive these hikes on your own. Hike with a buddy, and be cautious of heavy rains in case of fl ooding. Don’t wander onto any unmarked trails that may lead to a search and rescue mission. Be safe and happy hiking.

BEGINNER TRAIL Makapu‘u Point Lighthouse Trail

The two-mile paved trail on the island’s east coast is considered one of the easiest hikes on O‘ahu. It takes no more than an hour to finish, and the trail gives time for people to visit the famous Makapu‘u tide pools. Though they require an extra mile down a vaguely marked side trail, the tide pools offer hikers the opportunity to reward themselves with a quick cool down. Hikers can also visit Allen Davis, a deeper swimming spot, located along a dirt road in the beginning of the Makapu‘u trail. Just be cautious of high tides and unmarked trails along the coast. Makapu‘u is a well-known area for hikers needing search and rescue, so know your limits and stay on the trails.

C OA S TA L H I K E Lanikai Pillboxes

Located in Kailua on the east side of O‘ahu, the Lanikai Pillboxes have become one of the most popular hikes for students. With a beautiful view of the famous Mokulua islands and Ko‘olau Mountains, the pillboxes are perfect for those who want an easy hike with little effort. The only diffi cult part of the hike is in the beginning, where a rope is attached along a steep hill. But after this point, the trail is simple. The pillboxes along the Ka‘iwi ridge were built between World War I and II as operation posts for the U.S. military. After the war, they were abandoned, leaving the trail accessible for the public.

HIDDEN GEM

POPULAR HIKE

Naohia Falls/Kalihi Ice Ponds

Koko Head Crater Trail

A moderate hike with a three-tier waterfall, Naohia Falls, known as the “Ice Ponds,” is Kalihi Valley’s hidden treasure. A large freshwater pool with two smaller layers above give hikers an icy freshwater swimming hole. One diffi cult point in this hike comes up after the dirt road that leads into the falls. The steep hill leaves hikers muddy and fi lthy. Though a rope is provided going down, it may be diffi cult to traverse without the proper gear. Bring a good pair of shoes and plenty of insect repellent. Avoid going to the falls during and after heavy rains in case of fl ooding. Open cuts and wounds are susceptible to bacteria infections, so swim at your own risk.

Koko Head Crater Trail is a must. With its nearly 1,200 feet elevation, the trail is daunting for those intimidated by heights. It has 1,408 stairs and was once used in World War II as an incline system for the Air Force to transport military supplies and offi cers. Since then, it has been abandoned and now provides a beautiful view of Hawai‘i Kai for the public. Water is a must when hiking this trail because the area can be dry. Heading down from the top may cause injury if you don’t keep a rhythm in your steps. Take the trail nice and slow to prevent injuries. The trail is perfect for cardio and is located above Koko Head Regional Park off Kalanianaole Highway.

A L L - A RO U N D H I K E Ma‘akua Ridge Trail/Papali Loop Trail

PHOTOS BY ISMAEL MA /KA LEO O HAWAI‘I BENFFF85/ FLICKR

As one of the most diverse hikes on the island, the Ma‘akua Ridge Trail, located on the North Shore, provides a mixed terrain for hikers in search of variety. It consists of stream crossings, steep cliffs and low-hanging trees that make it challenging but rewarding. Native plants are found along the trail, as well as ironwood trees, which make this trail serene from start to fi nish. It also provides a nice view of the ocean and Hau‘ula.


Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 21 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Sept. 4 2013

Comics


Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

Page 22 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Sept. 4 2013

Games

FALL

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

2013

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

DINING

CROSS

WORD

GUIDE

PUZZLE

9.18.13

board of

publications Ka Leo // Hawaii Review

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week.

ACROSS 1 Saw point 6 Etching fluid 10 Touches affectionately 14 Prenatal exam, for short 15 Body part that smells 16 Jump in a skater’s short program 17 Legend with an ax 19 Actress Hayworth 20 Dinner pair? 21 Like cough syrup 22 Indigenous New Zealander 23 Legend with a clarinet 26 Alcove 29 Not at all well-done 30 “Let’s Get __”: Marvin Gaye hit 31 Udder parts 33 Jamaican genre 36 Legend with a vine 40 Animal on Michigan’s state flag 41 Coffee shop cupful 42 Fishing tool 43 “Your Majesty” 44 It includes a bit of France 46 Legend with a bat 51 Betting every last chip 52 Hat-borne parasites 53 Toward the rudder 56 Charlatan, e.g. 57 Legend with a bathrobe 60 Sour 61 Actor Morales 62 Dutch pianist Egon who taught Victor Borge 63 Lime beverages 64 Holiday song 65 Important word for 17-, 23-, 36-, 46- and 57-Across DOWN 1 Packer’s need 2 Arab League member 3 Burden

4 Up to, briefly 5 Bindle carriers 6 Former U.N. chief 7 How some flirt 8 Life-cabaret link 9 Place to relax 10 Where to see floats 11 Self-evident truth 12 Flashy tank swimmer 13 Like many characters in Shakespeare’s dramas 18 Catering hall dispensers 22 Dashing inventor? 23 1885 Motorwagen maker 24 Reduce to small pieces 25 Inauguration Day pledge 26 Customary observance 27 Reference list abbr. 28 Bulletin board material 31 Icon on a pole 32 Immature newt 33 Goad 34 “Felicity” star Russell 35 Like the Flying Dutchman 37 “In space no one can hear you scream” film 38 Not, quaintly 39 On the safer side 43 Bypasses 44 Chickenpox symptom 45 Expletive replacements 46 Sicily neighbor 47 Epic that ends with Hector’s funeral 48 County on the River Shannon 49 Pond plants 50 Zero, to Nero 53 Prefix with war or hero 54 Forest floor flora 55 High school math class 57 Feathery layer 58 Club for GIs 59 “... but __ are chosen”

ANSWERS AT KALEO.ORG

Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

Join our modernfamily! We are recruiting board members to help oversee publications and we want students like you!

APPLY TODAY!

2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043 kaleo.org/jobs

Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

COME JOIN US! LEARN LIVE BROADCASTING: PD@KTUH.ORG


Opinions@kaleo.org |Tim Metra Editor

Page 23| Ka Leo | Wednesday, Sept. 4 2013

Opinions

Obama’s strange strategy on Syria

MOHAMMAD ABU GHOSH/XINHUA/ZUMA PRESS/MCT

TRUDY RUBIN The Philadelphia Inquirer If President Obama ever does get around to targeting Syria, with congressional approval, it will be the strangest U.S. militar y strike in recent memor y. The administration has made a convincing case that the Syrian regime gassed 1,400 of its own people to death last month, including 426 children. A nd yes, the use of poison gas violates longstanding international norms. Yet Obama can’t seem to make up his mind if he wants to punish Syria for using chemical weapons or not. On Saturday, he made a strong case for using militar y action to deter anyone from deploying these terrible weapons again. He said he’d decided to strike Syria, then in the ver y same speech said he was postponing the mission until he gets authorization from Congress, which won’t return until Sept. 9. Obama and his spokesmen have already spent a week insisting, over and over, that any strike would be a “limited narrow act.” Missiles would be fired from ships in the Mediterranean for a short time, aimed only at sites linked to the deliver y (not the storage depots) of chemical weapons. Furthermore, the aim would not be to unseat President Bashar al-Assad, or to impact the wider Syrian conf lict. Meantime, his aides have so clearly telegraphed the possible targets that,

according to opposition sources, the regime has been trucking troops, files, and equipment away from those sites. The administration’s litany of limitations already had Syrian opposition leaders comparing a possible strike to “Operation Desert Fox,” the Clinton administration’s much derided four-day bombing campaign in 1998 that aimed to degrade Saddam Hussein’s weapons of mass destruction. A fter Saturday’s speech, this latterday Desert Fox is looking more like Op eration Desert Farce. Obama’s public dithering is confusing both his allies and his foes. “He seems unable to make difficult decisions,” says Hisham Melhem, the veteran Washington bureau chief of al-A rabiya news channel. “ This will embolden Assad and the opposition jihadis and de moralize the secular, moderate Syrian opposition. Obama is gambling with his reputation at home and abroad.” W hy Obama is seeking congressional cover this late in the day is perplexing. He didn’t ask Congress for permission when he backed the NATO operation in Libya in 2011, but he may be feeling lonely after British lawmakers rebuffed their government ’s plan to cooperate in the strike. Now with U.S. ships at the ready in the Mediterranean, there will be days more of debate over should-we, shouldn’t

we. If Congress votes no which is entirely possible Obama will be humiliated at home and abroad. What’s so depressing about this whole mess is that the real rationale for any strike on Syria was to rescue Obama’s credibility especially with Tehran. The use of chemical weapons does violate a hard-won international taboo, and the president has said repeatedly over the past year that Syrian use of chemical weapons would cross a “red line.” Last month’s hideous gas attack came after several previous small ones had gone unpunished; this time the president had to react with more than rhetoric. Secretar y of State John Kerr y made this clear, last week, when he said the U.S. response to the chemical strike “matters deeply to the credibility ... of the United States of A merica. ... It is directly related to ... whether countries still believe the United States when it says something. They are watching to see if Syria can get away with it. It is about whether Iran ... will now feel emboldened, in the absence of action, to obtain nuclear weapons.” I sympathize. The president does have a real credibility problem in the Middle East, the result of an incoherent (or absent) Mideast strategy, especially on Syria. But the administration’s tactical plan for a one-off punitive strike _ divorced from any larger strategy never made sense.

Now Obama has to sell that limited concept to Congress. He will argue that Syria’s chemical weapons threaten us, which they do not. The real danger to U.S. security interests lies elsewhere in a Syria collapsing into chaos and providing new havens for jihadis who could threaten the region and beyond. Over the past two years the White house chose not to arm moderate, nonjihadi Syrian rebel commanders who had been vetted by the CIA. These commanders have been pushed aside by new al-Qaida affi liates and other radical Islamists. Flush with supplies from rich Gulf Arabs, they are now setting up a new Afghanistan in eastern Syria and western Iraq. The administration says any strike will not address this bigger problem; it will not be aimed at breaking the current Syrian military stalemate between regime and rebels, or at scaring Assad into entering serious peace talks. Not is there any sign it will be accompanied by a new policy of seriously arming moderate rebels. This kind of tactical strike, divorced from any larger strategy will leave Assad in power, crowing that he survived A merica’s aggression. Yet a failure to punish Assad after threatening to do so for weeks will be a terrific blow for Obama, and undercut A merica’s standing and inf luence abroad. This is the Hobson’s choice to which the president’s indecision has led him. Operation Desert Farce is already heading our way.


Page 24 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Sept. 4 2013

Twitter @kaleosports| Sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor | Jeremy Nitta Associate

Sports ‘bows looks for road improvement

Freshman foward Justine Olotoa and UH’s offense are still looking for the first goals of the season. SHANE GRACE KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

JEREMY NIT TA Associate Sports Editor The fi rst matches of the Rainbow Wahine soccer season have been rough. Following a heartbreaking opener, which they lost in double overtime, Hawai‘i was beaten 2-0 against nationally ranked UCF. But the team is not frustrated with its start to the season. Instead, the R ainbow Wahine are pleased with their progress and conf ident in moving for ward. “ That weekend was an educational weekend,” junior midfielder Krystal Pascua said. “It was our first time playing together, so we were learning how we play in a real game situation. We were learning what to do, and what not to do – mostly what not to do. So we’re going to take what we learned into our next game and not make the same mistakes again.” But t he season isn’t about to get a ny easier for Hawa i‘ i, as it pre pa res to head on t he road for it s f i rst pa i r of away ga mes t his sea son. T he ‘ Bows w il l be t ravel l i ng to Eugene a nd Cor va l l is to t a ke on Oregon a nd Oregon St ate. “ We feel really good, better than any other year,” Pascua said. “ We feel a lot more prepared, more excited and a lot more ready. She (head coach Michele Nagamine) has been telling us not to worry about anything but the game. We have to focus on how we play, and not the other team, no matter their ranking or anything.” Hawai‘i also feels it is prepared to take

on the challenges of playing on the road. “We prepared a lot for playing under travel conditions because we did a lot of that when we were in training camp,” senior defender Malé Fresquez said. “We’re not really worried about distractions on the road. We’re more focused on how we play on the road and keep a high level of intensity and focus under pressure. I think we’re just prepared to stay alert and alive and on our toes on the road because it’s easy to get fatigued.” That confidence should only help Hawai‘i as it searches for its first win of the season. “We’ve actually played really well and got pretty comfortable with each other,” Fresquez said. “ We possessed the ball when we needed to, so now we’re focusing on getting out of pressure situations and putting that pressure on other defenses. The first two games really gave us the confidence that we can compete against these top teams. So now we’re going to play two Pac-12 teams on the road, and we’re not scared or threatened. We know we can handle business and take that momentum with us.” Nagamine has also made it a point to keep her team focused as it battles adversity early in the season. “She tells us to step up and be accountable,” Fresquez said. “We have to stay confident. A lot of people aren’t going to expect too much of us, so we have to ‘Kill them with aloha.’ That’s been our motto this season. We let them believe that they can beat us, and then we’ll surprise them.”

VISIT HAWAIIATHLETICS.COM FOR SEASON SCHEDULE S

ADMISSION RAINBOW WAHINE VOLLEYBALL #HawaiiWVB Hawaiian Airlines Wahine Volleyball Classic

Thursday vs. New Mexico State @ 7:30 p.m. Friday vs. Santa Clara @ 7:30 p.m. Sunday vs. #10 UCLA @ 7:30 p.m.

AND FOLLOW US ON

@HAWAIIATHLETICS


2013, september 4