Issuu on Google+

A K LEO T H E

MONDAY, SEPT. 30 to TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2013 VOLUME 109 ISSUE 14

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

www.kaleo.org

INITIATIVE SEEKS TO EXPAND

LANGUAGES IN HAWAIʻI See Pages 2 and 3

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I AT MĀNOA / FLICKR

Dina Yoshimi and Governor Neil Abercrombie


Page 2 | Ka Leo | Monday, Sept. 30 2013

Twitter @kaleoohawaii | news@kaleo.org | Noelle Fujii Editor | Fadi Youkhana Associate

News

K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa 2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 Honolulu, HI 96822

Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-7043 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org

EDITORIAL STAFF Editor in Chief Bianca Bystrom Pino Managing Editor Joseph Han Chief Copy Editor Kim Clark Assoc Chief Copy Editor Kirstie Campbell News Editor Noelle Fujii Assoc News Editor Fadi Youkhana Features Editor Jackie Perreira Assc Features Editor Karissa Montania Opinions Editor Doorae Shin Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Assc Sports Editor Jeremy Nitta Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Co-Photo Editor Chasen Davis Co-Photo Editor Ismael Ma Web Specialist Blake Tolentino

ADVERTISING E-mail advertising@kaleo.org Ad Manager Gabrielle Pangilinan PR Coordinator Tianna Barbier Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications.

ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Rebekah Carroll, chair; Nicholas Pope, vice chair; or Mechelins Kora Iechad, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

Initiative seeks to expand languages in Hawai‘i workforce,” according to Yoshimi, who is also an associate professor in the department of East Asian Starting this month, the Hawai‘i languages & literatures. “Our goal is a highly eduLanguage Roadmap Initiative will be implemented to promote a multi- cated, multi-lingual population that’s globally competitive,” Roblingual workforce in the state. “What we found is that there is ert Bley-Vroman, dean for the actually so much language in this College of Languages, Linguisstate that is just not valued. It’s tics and Literature said. just not recognized as resources,” Dina Yoshimi, program manager I M P L E M E N TAT I O N for the initiative said in a phone inThe initiative will be impleterview. “And so what we wrote in mented across the state over the Roadmap basically is that we multiple phases. just need to value the resources According to the Roadmap, that we have and value the oppor- raising public awareness about tunities to build them.” the initiative is one of its first The initiative is federally fund- tasks. This will include a pubed and is in partnership with the lic service announcement camUniversity of Hawai‘i at Mānoa paign, a poster series promoting and the Language Flagship, which multilingualism and Multilinis under the National Security gual Career Day activities engagEducation Program in the United ing the employers of the state. States’ Department of Defense. “The goal of the Roadmap of “We need to accept the fact the policy and planning document that it’s time to be able to talk to is to look currently, short, medium the rest of the world as skilled and long term. And long term is workers,” Yoshimi said. 15 to 20 years now,” Yoshimi said. “So that’s long enough for you to T H E I N I T I AT I V E be able to think the trajectory of The Hawai‘i Language Road- economic and educational needs.” map is a planning and policy docuThere will be one overarching ment that contains initiatives that council that will help coordinate “identify what needs to be done the activity on the implementation. to move the state towards multiAccording to the Roadmap, lingualism, so that the state will the council’s task would be to be able to see the benefits of be- “continue the collaboration to iming multi-lingual, especially in the plement the proposed initiatives,

NOELLE FUJII News Editor

Governor Neil Abercrombie spoke at the Hawai‘i Language Summit on March 13. UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I AT MĀNOA / FLICKR

identify funding sources, solidify the future workforce of Hawai‘i,” political and community support Yoshimi said. “These are students and move our agenda forward.” who have already made the investment in developing their lanH OW I T A L L S TA R T E D guage skills to a job-ready place In 2002, the NSEP started an so that when they go out they can initiative to create opportunities use that language in their job.” across the country for higher proMathew Tanaka, a graduficiency in key strategic languages. ate student studying Hawaiian, According to Yoshimi, it moved to was one of the student ambasinclude a whole statewide initiative sadors at the event. for the broader population in 2007. “Basically the student ambasAccording to Bley-Vroman, sadors, for that particular event the idea was that language capac- on the launch, were to be like ity is central to national security. someone that important people “I mean national security, who were there could actually broadly understood in the sense speak to, to talk about how lanthat we need strong economies, guage applies to the different a healthy society, as well as lan- industries that we’re in, respecguage capacity for specific de- tively,” Tanaka said. fense needs,” Bley-Vroman said. He believes it was important “And the feel is, within the Nation- for those who attended to be able al Security Education Program, to talk to different students. the NSEP, is that the United States “It was an opportunity for is disadvantaged internationally. them to see what examples of … (We are at a) disadvantage inter- what the product of the initiative nationally because we don’t have would be like,” Tanaka said. “So the capacity of highly proficient that maybe it would inspire some speakers in crucial languages that of them and show how important we ought to have.” this language was too.” Melissa Cotrone, a graduate from UH Mā noa with an M.A. in T H E L AU N C H A N D T H E French literature and language, S T U D E N T A M BA S SA D O R S On Sept. 16, a launch was held said her involvement in the initiafor the initiative at the Halau O tive as a student ambassador was Haumea, Kamakakūokalani Cen- to present to the business community the face of the next genter for Hawaiian Studies. “One thing that’s really fan- eration of interpreters and people tastic about the roadmap launch who use a second language in is that we had over 100 people business. She believed it was cruand it was all by invitation,” Yo- cial for students to be involved. “I think it was not only imporshimi said. “But the 100 people tant but crucial to be involved as a included signifi cant representation from business, from state student,” Cotrone said. “Students agencies, from community orga- today need to realize that the denizations, as well as educational mand in businesses for people with institutions. … Here in Hawai‘i second and third language skills we’ve found that people are very is growing faster than ever. As we move to an ever more increasreceptive to this.” Nine student ambassadors were ing global economy, students who present at the launch as the face of don’t become proficient in a second language are going to find themthe future, according to Yoshimi. “A student ambassador in the selves in a problematic position in case of the launch is the face of the job market.”

FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE, VISIT KALEO.ORG


Twitter @kaleoohawaii | news@kaleo.org | Noelle Fujii Editor | Fadi Youkhana Associate

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Monday, Sept. 30 2013

News

THE PROCESS BEFORE THE LAUNCH COMPILED BY NOELLE F UJII News Editor

Research: According to the Hawai‘i Language Roadmap Initiative website, research was conducted prior to the Language Summit to gather data and insights from businesses and state and local government agencies about their current and future language needs. Dina Yoshimi, program manager for the initiative, said the research was conducted through phone and face-to-face interviews from late December 2012 until late February/early March 2013.

Working groups: From May to August 2013, working groups that were composed of representatives from business, state and local government, community organizations and education met and produced “idea sheets.” Each “idea sheet” contained one project, or legislative initiative, or policy change that addressed an area of perceived need, proposed a timeline for implementation and listed potential resources for enabling the project.

Launch: On Sept. 16, 2013, the Hawai‘i Language Roadmap was launched at an event at the Halau O Haumea, Kamakakūokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies.

Summit: An all-day Language Summit was held on March 13, 2013, to bring together representatives from the business sector and state and local government agencies to delineate their demand for language skills in their workplace. During the summit, stakeholders (the demand side) spoke, and educators (the solution side) listened, according to Yoshimi. “Importantly, the summit also created a strong sense among the participants that there are other like-minded leaders in the community who share my concerns,” Yoshimi said. “Any statewide initiative must have people who are networking and share a sense that they are working towards a collaborative solution to a shared problem.”

Roadmap: The Language Roadmap was produced in August 2013 and, according to Yoshimi, is about changing attitudes, increasing employment opportunities, raising employee compensation, pursuing social justice, increasing the capacity of the state to connect with populations overseas be it for business, technological development or simply getting to know our global neighbors and more.

The roadmap can be read at nflrc.hawaii.edu/languageroadmap/.

Candies & Li HingTreats

WE WANT YOU TO VOTE IN THE ASUH ELECTIONS!

Voting Starts

TODAY September 30 th

via MyUH Portal (ASUH Elections Tab) You may also go to the ASUH office to vote as well!

ASUH office is located in Campus Center Room 211 or Contact asuh@hawaii.edu for details! Visit our website: http://asuh.hawaii.edu/


Page 4 | Ka Leo | Monday, Sept. 30 2013

Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

TAKE YOUR FIRST STEP TO SUCCESS. YOU’LL QUICKLY LEARN THAT WE HIRED YOU TO EVENTUALLY RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS. AND YOU’LL HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO WORK WITH PEOPLE AS MOTIVATED AND DRIVEN AS YOU. YOU’LL BRING YOUR DEGREE TO THE TABLE, AND WE’LL HELP YOU MAKE CRUCIAL BUSINESS DECISIONS IN NO TIME. YOU’LL LEARN HOW TO RUN A MILLION-DOLLAR BUSINESS, MAXIMIZE PROFITS AND MOTIVATE A TEAM OF PROFESSIONALS, WHILE HAVING FUN ALONG THE WAY.

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICANTS FOR OUR: -FULL TIME MANAGEMENT TRAINEE PROGRAM (GRADUATING STUDENTS) -ACCOUNTING COORDINATOR (GRADUATING STUDENTS) -AREA ACCOUNTANT (GRADUATING STUDENTS)

F OR QUESTIONS PLEASE EMAIL : ROSELANI . A . PELAYAN @ EHI . COM

FOR MORE INFORMATION: - GO . ENTERPRISE . COM - FACEBOOK . COM / ENTERPRISECAREERS

RIGH T OUT OF SCHOOL? APPLY TODAY AT WWW.GO.ENTERPRISE.COM


Twitter @kaleofeatures | features@kaleo.org |Jackie Perreira Editor |Karissa Montania Associate

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Monday, Sept. 30 2013

Features

‘DON JON’: PLEASURE AND PAIN ART EXHIBITS • LIVE CONCERT • SLAM POETRY • KTUH JAMS • FOOD • & MORE

k a l e o . o r g / a r t s f e s t i v a l

Starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Scarlett Johansson, “Don Jon” grossed $9 million in its opening weekend. DANIEL MCFADDEN / MCT

JOSEPH H AN Managing Editor

Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s “Don Jon” is a worthy, bold and ambitious directorial debut that tackles contemporary issues of our dependence on instant and numbing gratification and what it means to be in love. “Don Jon” blends comedy with tragedy coursing through its heart, exploring how we compensate in toxic habits to cover feelings of emptiness and what it means to be free from the addictions that bind us. Jon Martello (Gordon-Levitt) is a slick womanizer and narcissist who lives off his routines of bedding women, mingling with family, cleaning his home, expressing road rage, going to church and, above all, watching pornography. Jon roams the club with his buddies, rates women and hunts for action until he catches sight of a dime, Barbara Sugarman (Scarlett Johansson), who ends up pushing Jon to rethink his needs. But for Jon, porn is better than the real thing, and his fulfillment only comes from the exhilarating process of finding videos and exposing him-

self to an infinite source of immediate and detached gratification. The phenomenal editing in “Don Jon” splices various clips throughout the film as Jon explains his obsessions of body parts, showing how the jumbling need for pornography overruns and dominates his consciousness. This proves difficult when Barbara catches Jon, who winds up swearing that he’d rather be committed to a real woman than the stars that fill the sphere of his mind. In an interesting parallel, Barbara — Johansson commands screen presence with her sass and allure — also has her own vices and looks toward cheesy romance movies to dictate her ideas of love and what it means to be in a relationship. “Don Jon” ultimately explores the entrapment and the dilemma of constantly being retracted into routines that define and chip away at the forward trajectory of our lives. Jon thinks he can stop, but his laptop is magnetic. Gordon-Levitt captures every comic and dark nuance of Jon’s complex and simply drawn character, portraying his stubbornness and hidden pain behind the muscle. Jon is stuck, doomed to a cycli-

cal existence unless he can find growth potential beyond the gym and outside his realm of clips, shards of exaggerated intimacy and body parts that only threaten to leave his mind torn away from knowing what romance can really fulfill and his heart dismembered. Esther (Julianne Moore), an older woman who attends the same night class as Jon, winds up helping him to reconcile with his notion of liberation apart from how he handles his daily life. This becomes both unexpected and predictable and yet doesn’t detract from the tone that the film sets. “Don Jon” is a sweet and funny film. It presents how life can be crowded with hyper-stimulation that only blinds the sight of what’s personal, honest and pure. It’s about confronting our devices and striving to find solace in being vulnerable and open to change rather than being one-sided because that front can easily collapse.

R AT I N G :


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Monday, Sept. 30 2013

Twitter @kaleofeatures | features@kaleo.org |Jackie Perreira Editor |Karissa Montania Associate

Features

Hale Vietnam

Hale Vietnam is less than a 10 minute car ride from UH Manoa . ISMAEL MA KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Summer rolls ($5.95) come with shrimp, pork, and noodles. ISMAEL MA KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

DIANA BROWN Contributing Writer

ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Pho is noodles in beef broth.

Nothing can compare to a steamy, gigantic bowl of pho. Its alluring aroma and ability to fill your stomach is what makes pho a comforting dish. It is a staple of Vietnamese cuisine, so when I heard about Hale Vietnam, which translates to House of Vietnam, I expected to find high-quality pho. Tucked away in the neighborhood of Kaimukī, the restaurant has a private lot for validation. When I walked in, there was a group of waiters and waitresses standing around waiting on customers to make their way in. Their uniforms caught my eye as they were wearing festive aloha shirts. We were there at about 11 a.m., and the restaurant was empty.

First, I ordered the imperial roll ($9.95). The dish comes with a salty and vinegary sauce for dipping and includes thinly sliced veggies. The rolls came with noodles, romaine lettuce, julienned cucumbers and carrots and a sprig of mint. The imperial roll was meaty and crunchy, which is a satisfying combination. Then I tried it with the fi xings: lettuce, Thai basil and mint. There was a nice contrast in texture with the fresh lettuce and the crunchiness of the roll. I did not care for the Thai basil as it overpowered the dish. I also ordered a regular, rare steak pho ($9.25). It was steamy and chunks of rare meat were floating to the surface. To my disappointment, it was average, but then again how can anyone mess up pho? I was surprised to find a generous amount of meat, but it did not impress me.

By the time the check arrived, the lunch crowd started making its way in. My check came out to about $30 with tip. A little pricey for a party of one, but I did splurge with the appetizer, which could have easily fed two people. With its pleasant ambiance and smiling wait staff, Hale Vietnam is a place to try at least once. Their generous portions will leave you feeling nice and full.

R AT I N G :

HALE VIETNAM RESTAUR ANT Address: 1140 12th Ave Hours: Mon-Sun 10 a.m.9:45 p.m. Contact: 808-735-7581


Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

http://www.sukomaikari.org | 808-945-9220

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Monday, Sept. 30 2013


Page 8 | Ka Leo | Monday, Sept. 30 2013

Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

GET IT ON

ART EXHIBITS • LIVE CONCERT SLAM POETRY • KTUH JAMS FOOD • & MORE kaleo.org/artsfestival

Saturday, September: 21 2pm vs Nevada Saturday, October: 12 2pm vs UNLV Saturday, November 2: 10am vs Utah State Saturday, November 9: 9:30am vs Navy Saturday, November 23: 9am vs Wyoming For more information: 808-956-7856

For more CCB Events: Visit our website http://uhmccbac.weebly.com/

HOME COMING 2013

10.23.13


Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 9 | Ka Leo | Monday, Sept. 30 2013

Comics


Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

Page 10 | Ka Leo | Monday, Sept. 30 2013

Games

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

OPEN LATE ACROSS 1 Cpls.’ superiors 5 EMT’s skill 8 “Cultured” gem 13 Spy novelist Ambler 14 Bread buy 16 Exhorts 17 __ IRA 18 SeaWorld attraction 19 Fathered 20 Exhortation to the engine room 23 Prepare, as tea 24 Down Under runner 25 Had some wallop 33 Dreamer’s acronym 36 House division 37 Loud cry 38 Inventor’s starting point 40 Princess’s headgear 43 Worry 44 Ford of the ’70s 46 Festive affair 48 Cause of Cleopatra’s undoing 49 Self-important sort 53 Brother in a monastery 54 Phi Beta __ 58 Interviewer’s booby trap 64 Kind of jacket named for an Indian leader 65 Ambiance 66 Way to get out 67 Send payment 68 Give some lip to 69 Shine partner 70 Test for purity, as gold 71 Doris who sang “Que Sera, Sera” 72 Burpee product DOWN 1 Feudal workers 2 Tile installer’s need 3 Information on a book’s spine

4 Carry with effort 5 Hoofbeat 6 Minute skin opening 7 Event at a track 8 Exercises done in a prone position 9 Southernmost Great Lake 10 Indian tourist city 11 Clarinetist’s need 12 Drug “dropped” in the ’60s 15 Lost luster 21 Train in a ring 22 Dr.’s group 26 Simple bed 27 Colorful Japanese carp 28 Some Kindle reading, briefly 29 TV dial letters 30 Romance writer Roberts 31 Sticks by the pool table 32 Web address letters 33 Tears 34 Work on a column, say 35 Restaurant host’s handout 39 Justice Dept. enforcers 41 Part of a cheerleader’s chant 42 Baba of folklore 45 Taxi’s “I’m not working now” sign 47 Ships like Noah’s 50 Prior to, in poems 51 Mamas’ mates 52 Spuds 55 Impish fairy 56 Model’s asset 57 Tossed a chip in the pot 58 Popular jeans 59 Units of resistance 60 Soprano’s chance to shine 61 Campus area 62 __ Minor: constellation 63 “No problem” 64 Second Amendment backer: Abbr.

ANSWERS AT KALEO.ORG

$8 Menu

We’ll Deliver To Dorms 2424 S. Beretania St. 808.744.2283

Hours: Sun-Thurs

10 am - 1 am

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

board ofpublications Ka Leo // Hawaii Review

We are recruiting board members to help oversee publications and we want students like you! Board members receive stipends!

APPLY TODAY!

Fri-Sat

10am - 2 am Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043 kaleo.org/jobs


Twitter @kaleoopinions | opinions@kaleo.org | Doorae Shin Editor

Page 11 | Ka Leo | Monday, Sept. 30 2013

Opinions More than one million people reside in Hawai‘i, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

E D IT Work as an

EDITOR

RS for Ka Leo!

MCCUN934 / FLICKR

We are looking for highly motivated students interested in gaining real world experience

A P P LY T O D AY !

Should Hawai’i adopt a two- child policy? K AHALI’A FOX Contributing Writer

The U.S. Census Bureau has estimated that we have already reached a world population of 7 billion people and will reach 8 billion by 2025. If the population continues to rise at an exponential rate, all of the world’s social, economic, political and environmental problems, including Hawai‘i’s, will become unsolvable. No amount of brainstorming alternatives will have any meaningful effect unless we fi rst address the issue of long-term population reduction, stabilization and control. There are two realistic possibilities for achieving this in Hawai‘i.

T H E V I S A S YS T E M

Though Hawai‘i is a part of the United States, its geographic isolation puts it in a unique logistical predicament. On O‘ahu, there is simply no room to expand laterally to compensate for population growth, but we could theoretically expand vertically. Even so, there is not enough room for adequate transportation, sanitation, fresh water, electricity and economy to support such growth. Transient populations such as tourists, temporary workers, students, homeless, military personnel and freelance entrepreneurs

further exacerbate the problem by putting a strain on our precious and fi nite resources. One alternative to increase transient population effi ciency is to implement the visa system, treating Hawai‘i as a foreign country even though it is one of the 50 states. Potential students, workers, etc. will need to come here, supply proof of the validity of their visit and comply with time limits imposed. Like an international visa, when the time limit is reached, visa holders would have to reapply for an extension with proof that they have a valid reason to be here. If school is out or the temporary job is over, then it will be time for them to return to their permanent home. Also, if a transplanted homeless person were arrested on a minor misdemeanor (non-violent crime) such as possession of a controlled substance, it would be less expensive to fl y him back to his home of record than to pay the annual $60,000 per inmate cost to keep him here. The details of this system are quite elaborate, and the terms and conditions warrant their own piece of legislature along with much more discussion. But, the overall goal is simple: hold people accountable for their physical presence in Hawai‘i. If you weren’t born here or if you don’t have a legitimate reason to be

here when your visa is up, then you must go. Native Hawaiians, legal state residents and active duty military would, of course, be exempt from this policy.

2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043 | www.kaleo.org/jobs

You’ve been studying hard. Here’s your reward!

T H E T WO - C H I L D P O L I C Y As stated before, there is a fi xed amount of physical space and fresh water by which these islands can support a healthy population. In addition to the visa system, a twochild policy would further stabilize population levels for the future. It is simply irresponsible for families to have three or more children when living in such a finite ecosystem. Each human life, from birth to death, represents a measure of resources consumed over the course of that lifetime with respect to food, water, electricity, commodities, textiles and social benefits. We cannot treat Hawai‘i like the mainland, which has vast amounts of open space to expand and grow. We must mindfully manage our resources for the best long-term plan. Putting limits on the number of children families can have is a debated topic, but keep in mind where we are. This state is the most isolated landmass on the planet. We are severely limited, and regulating family size is an achievable and realistic strategy for maintaining a healthy and happy population for generations to come.

Monday 9/30 — Thursday 10/3 8pm — 10pm (Only at UH Manoa Campus Center Starbucks)

©2013 Starbucks Coffee Company. All rights reserved.


Twitter @kaleosports | sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor | Jeremy Nitta Associate

Page 12 | Ka Leo | Monday, Sept. 30 2013

Sports

SHANE GRACE / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Junior forward Tiana Fujimoto has scored four game-winning goals this season.

'Bows travel to California for Big West openers SYDNEY C HESTNUT Senior Staff Writer The University of Hawai‘i women’s soccer team hits the road this week to take on Cal State Fullerton and UC Riverside to open up Big West Conference play. Based on preseason performances, the ‘Bows are currently tied with UC Irvine for a fourthplace standing within the BWC. Cal State Fullerton poses a signifi cant threat to the ‘Bows with a current 5-4 record after a challenging preseason. Tiana Fujimo-

to is starting the season off well with a second place position in the Big West for goals scored at six, but still has only accumulated about half the total of Cal Poly’s Elise Krieghoff, who currently holds the number one spot with 11 total goals. The ‘Bows’ offense will have a tough time sneaking goals past Cal State Fullerton’s goalie Lindsey Maricic, who currently leads the conference with a .891 save percentage. ‘Bows’ freshman goalie Monk Berger is close behind Maricic with a .774 average, currently

ranked fourth in the Big West. Berger’s shutout against Northern Arizona two weeks ago was her third of the season, which already matches UH’s total number of shutouts for the 2012 season. While UC Riverside’s 3-7 overall record is less impressive, the team is coming from a competitive preseason in which two losses and a tie were the result of aggressive overtimes. UC Riverside goalie Elizabeth Silas could also give the ‘Bows offense some trouble because she is currently ranked fourth in the

Big West for saves at 37, only allowing 11 shots to get past her in nine games and credited with one shutout so far this season. This week’s away games will be the third road trip of the season for the ‘Bows. The fi rst venture across the Pacific proved to be successful, ending with two wins against Oregon and Oregon State. However, the ‘Bows hope this trip will redeem them after their second trip, from which they came home with one loss and one win against Arizona and NAU, respectively. The ‘Bows will face Cal State

Fullerton to open the road trip Friday at 4 p.m. HST before traveling to UC Riverside on Sunday for a 10 a.m. HST match.

UPCOMING GAMES Hawai‘i at Cal State Fullerton Friday, 4 p.m. Hawai‘i at UC Riverside Sunday, 10 a.m.


2013, september 30