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FRIDAY, OCT. 4 to SUNDAY OCT. 6, 2013 VOLUME 109 ISSUE 16

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

www.kaleo.org

GRIDIRON

A K LEO T H E


PAGE 2 | KA LEO | FRIDAY, OCT. 4 2013

SPORTS@KALEO.ORG | TWITTER: @KALEOSPORTS | JOEY RAMIREZ EDITOR | JEREMY NITTA ASSOCIATE

GRIDIRON

From the Editor’s Desk

Hawaii Vs. San Jose State Saturday, 6 p.m.

All Rainbow Warrior home games are played at Aloha Stadium. Admission is free for students with Valid UH IDs. Free bus transportation will be provided in front of Frear Hall on Dole Street at 3:30 p.m. for UH students.

Joey Ramirez Sports Editor

It’s tough to pick the best part about tomorrow’s football game. It could be the fact that football is one of the most exciting sports in the world, as evidenced by Hawai‘i’s nearmiracle comeback last week when it rallied from 39 points down to nearly win the game on the final play. It could be that Rainbow Warriors’ rally against Fresno State has them hungry for victory, which should result in an intense battle with San Jose State on Saturday (Page 3). It could be because the Spartans (1-3) have struggled this season after finishing No. 21 in the nation last year, which gives UH a shot at taking down a beatable yet talented team (Page 11). It could be that senior quarterback Sean Schroeder has proven he is one of the toughest players in the country by fighting his way past physical, mental and emotional adversity (Page 10).

It could be that the Rainbow Warrior wide receivers have started clicking and are looking to make even more crucial, electrifying plays this weekend (Page 12). It could be the game day atmosphere that wouldn’t be complete without the UH marching band, which lives to make noise for its hometown heroes (Page 4). There are hundreds of reasons UH football places are the place to be. In fact, see for yourself (Page 2). But the real reason to go is you, the student. There are only six days in the entire year you can head down to Halawa with your best friends, grill some mouthwatering tailgate food, prove you’re the best beer pong player on this island and watch your Rainbow Warriors represent your school under those Aloha Stadium lights. Now there are only four days left. Better make the most of them.

ALL PHOTOS BY ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Go to kaleo.org/photos to see photos from the game.


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PAGE 3 | KA LEO | FRIDAY, OCT. 4 2013

GRIDIRON

For the Hawaii Food Bank Drop off ff cans ans @ hemenway hall 107

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LAST DAY: NOVEMBER 14TH RAFFLE WINNER WILL BE PICKED @ GROOVE IN THE GARDEN (NOV 14th, 2013)

ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Freshman running back Steven Lakalaka leads Hawai’i with 158 yards and two touchdowns on 39 carries this season. GABRIEL ESTEVEZ Contributing Writer Coming off an electrifying fourth quarter comeback in last week’s game against Fresno State, the Rainbow Warrior football team (0-4, 0-2 Mountain West) is hungry for a win against San Jose State (1-3, 0-1 MWC) this weekend. By competing in a close game against a nationally ranked Mountain West team last Saturday, Hawai’i showed it has the ability to record a win this time around. “We want to build on that momentum, but at the same time there are no moral victories for us,” senior linebacker Brenden Daley said. “We need to expect to come out every day and work just as hard” Keeping up the pressure during defensive situations seems

to be a trait of the Rainbow Warriors. With a defensive unit that forced five turnovers in last week’s game, Hawai’i poses a crucial threat for the Spartans. The team specializes in pressuring almost every play to the last down. UH will also have the energy of the home crowd working in its favor. Last week, the Spartans fell apart with a 40-12 loss to Utah State. Due to many errors offensively, such as throwing the ball away for three interceptions, the Spartans weren’t able to execute as well. The Rainbow Warriors look to finish hard and strong through the whole game. “What we did in that second half is what we should we do throughout the remainder of every game,” freshman running

back Steven Lakalaka said. Going from a strong team to a weaker team might sound easy, but Hawai’i wishes to keep up its intensity, no matter whom it faces. “We have to work harder than ever and focus on our mistakes, as well as ourselves,” Lakalaka said. “We need to execute.” Firing up their offense against FS, the Rainbow Warriors are confident and poised for their next mission. Having senior quarterback Sean Schroeder in the mix produced an effective offensive output, adding in 321 yards and three touchdowns against the Bulldogs. With that in mind, the Rainbow Warriors are ready to take on the Spartans in Saturday’s game. “Having all this confidence tells us that we can really play up to that level and we just have to wake up,” Lakalaka said.


PAGE 4 | KA LEO | FRIDAY, OCT. 4 2013

PAGE 9 | KA LEO | FRIDAY, OCT. 4 2013

SPORTS@KALEO.ORG | TWITTER: @KALEOSPORTS | JOEY RAMIREZ EDITOR | JEREMY NITTA ASSOCIATE

GRIDIRON

More than just music

Jeremy Nitta Associate Sports Editor

ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

The University of Hawai‘i marching band, the only collegiate marching band in the state, consists of 250 students.

At a University of Hawai‘i football game, it’s hard not to notice the UH marching band. Sitting near the nor th end zone of Aloha Stadium, the marching band seems to be a perpetual source of energy, as it fires up both the team and the crowd with its music and dances. But who is the UH marching band? Is it a group of enthusiastic musicians, or something else? As it turns out, the values of the band extend far beyond its musical prowess. “(When I joined), I expected it to be this huge marching band thing, like a musical where I’d be playing better music and marching harder routines,” said Jordan Cesneros, the saxophone section leader. “But what it really is, is camaraderie, from just meeting all these guys. You spend so much time in this activity that it’s impossible to not form relationships, not only within our sections but outside them too. We’re working together on the field for one common goal.” This feeling of camaraderie is the foundation on which the marching band program is built. The band, which spends large amounts of time together in practice and games, has formed internal bonds stronger than any that musical talent could produce. “My entire philosophy for the marching band here is about the camaraderie that they form by working hard and spending time with each other,” said marching band director David Blon. “The relationships that they form here will wind up being far more important than the shows they put on and all that other stuff.” “I think we all would agree that we found some of our greatest friends here,” said Alyssa Miyamoto, the French horn section leader. “When you’re young, there are going to be people you look up to, and now it’s come to the point where people are looking up to us. We pass down our traditions and hope that they last.” It’s not to say that these students don’t love playing music.

Most of them joined because of their love for it. “I’ve been in band since high school and middle school, so when I found out there was an opportunity to be part of a collegiate band, it seemed like a pretty big thing,” Cesneros said. “Through highschool marching, this was something I always looked up to. And now, I finally have the opportunity to be a part of it, so I took it.” “I joined it because I missed it,” said Keenan Elderts, the drum line section leader. “I took a couple years off after high school, then decided to come back and play for the drum line, which has been a great opportunity.” But at the end of the day, what matters most to the band members are the memories and experiences that they’ve had together. “There are other groups and clubs on campus that also give you the chance to meet new people,” Miyamoto said. “But there’s nothing quite like joining the band. We’re quite a unique bunch, I feel. We’ll accept anyone, and everyone has a great time. You’ll meet lifelong friends. People who are like 50 years removed from college come back to play in the band just because they had so much fun.” “A lot of the best memories are formed through the friendships we form,” Elderts said. “It’s not even just from the rehearsals and game days, but things we do outside band. Our section, for example, does annual beach trips or barbeques down at Magic Island or something. It really helps us to all get bonded.” “Marching band is a lot of work,” Cesneros said. “It takes up a lot of time. But if you ask me, it’s totally worth it. It’s hard because you have to set up your schedule a certain way, and there will be late nights where you go home frustrated from the way you’re playing. But it’s worth it. The people you are with, and the people in this group that you work with everyday, I feel pays everything off.”


PAGE 4 | KA LEO | FRIDAY, OCT. 4 2013

PAGE 9 | KA LEO | FRIDAY, OCT. 4 2013

SPORTS@KALEO.ORG | TWITTER: @KALEOSPORTS | JOEY RAMIREZ EDITOR | JEREMY NITTA ASSOCIATE

GRIDIRON

More than just music

Jeremy Nitta Associate Sports Editor

ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

The University of Hawai‘i marching band, the only collegiate marching band in the state, consists of 250 students.

At a University of Hawai‘i football game, it’s hard not to notice the UH marching band. Sitting near the nor th end zone of Aloha Stadium, the marching band seems to be a perpetual source of energy, as it fires up both the team and the crowd with its music and dances. But who is the UH marching band? Is it a group of enthusiastic musicians, or something else? As it turns out, the values of the band extend far beyond its musical prowess. “(When I joined), I expected it to be this huge marching band thing, like a musical where I’d be playing better music and marching harder routines,” said Jordan Cesneros, the saxophone section leader. “But what it really is, is camaraderie, from just meeting all these guys. You spend so much time in this activity that it’s impossible to not form relationships, not only within our sections but outside them too. We’re working together on the field for one common goal.” This feeling of camaraderie is the foundation on which the marching band program is built. The band, which spends large amounts of time together in practice and games, has formed internal bonds stronger than any that musical talent could produce. “My entire philosophy for the marching band here is about the camaraderie that they form by working hard and spending time with each other,” said marching band director David Blon. “The relationships that they form here will wind up being far more important than the shows they put on and all that other stuff.” “I think we all would agree that we found some of our greatest friends here,” said Alyssa Miyamoto, the French horn section leader. “When you’re young, there are going to be people you look up to, and now it’s come to the point where people are looking up to us. We pass down our traditions and hope that they last.” It’s not to say that these students don’t love playing music.

Most of them joined because of their love for it. “I’ve been in band since high school and middle school, so when I found out there was an opportunity to be part of a collegiate band, it seemed like a pretty big thing,” Cesneros said. “Through highschool marching, this was something I always looked up to. And now, I finally have the opportunity to be a part of it, so I took it.” “I joined it because I missed it,” said Keenan Elderts, the drum line section leader. “I took a couple years off after high school, then decided to come back and play for the drum line, which has been a great opportunity.” But at the end of the day, what matters most to the band members are the memories and experiences that they’ve had together. “There are other groups and clubs on campus that also give you the chance to meet new people,” Miyamoto said. “But there’s nothing quite like joining the band. We’re quite a unique bunch, I feel. We’ll accept anyone, and everyone has a great time. You’ll meet lifelong friends. People who are like 50 years removed from college come back to play in the band just because they had so much fun.” “A lot of the best memories are formed through the friendships we form,” Elderts said. “It’s not even just from the rehearsals and game days, but things we do outside band. Our section, for example, does annual beach trips or barbeques down at Magic Island or something. It really helps us to all get bonded.” “Marching band is a lot of work,” Cesneros said. “It takes up a lot of time. But if you ask me, it’s totally worth it. It’s hard because you have to set up your schedule a certain way, and there will be late nights where you go home frustrated from the way you’re playing. But it’s worth it. The people you are with, and the people in this group that you work with everyday, I feel pays everything off.”


PAGE 10 | KA LEO | FRIDAY, OCT. 4 2013

SPORTS@KALEO.ORG | TWITTER: @KALEOSPORTS | JOEY RAMIREZ EDITOR | JEREMY NITTA ASSOCIATE

GRIDIRON

The renaissance of Sean Schroeder

ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Senior quarterback Sean Schroeder has improved his passer rating from 100.6 in 2012 to 146.6 this season. JOEY R AMIREZ Sports Editor Whether it is due to mental or physical circumstances, almost every football player has a breaking point where he decides the game just isn’t worth playing anymore. For most, it’s a gruesome injury, fatigue from playing too long or one of hundreds of other reasons to hang up the helmet and cleats for good. For Rainbow Warrior quarterback Sean Schroeder, his breaking point still hasn’t been reached despite three years of standing on the sidelines followed by a season haunted by ceaseless criticism and then a surgical procedure on his back. DUKING IT OUT In 2009, Schroeder graduated from Dana Hills High School in California, where he broke every major passing record. A three-time all-South Coast League selection and 29thranked quarterback prospect in the nation (ESPN.com), Schroeder wanted to play for the hometown USC Trojans. However, he was offered only two scholarships, and neither was from the cardinal and gold in Los Angeles. Instead, he crossed the country to play at Duke. But playing was something that would never happen in Durham, N.C., as Schroeder did not take a single snap in three years with the Blue Devils.

Having already graduated with a degree in political science, Schroeder decided to take his final two years of eligibility with him from the East Coast to the middle of the Pacific. SALT AND WOUNDS After less than a week, Schroeder’s time at Hawai‘i had already been miles better than with Duke. Four days into 2012 summer football camp, he was named the starter by thennew head coach Norm Chow, who had been the offensive coordinator for the Trojans. However, that 96-hour ascension proved to be merely an illusion of what was to come as Hawai‘i finished just 3-9 with a 1-7 mark in Mountain West Conference play. Schroeder was blamed for the majority of the Warriors’ failures by UH fans and media alike. The first-year starter ended the season in the nation’s bottom five in completion percentage (5th, 51.0 percent), yards per attempt (3rd, 5.5) and passer rating (3rd, 100.6). “Obviously the quarterback takes the hit the majority of the time because he’s the one that’s in the limelight, and he’s the one that might get picked or sacked,” junior wide receiver Scott Harding said. “But that’s the case, and that’s what comes with being a quarterback. He dealt with it really well last year with as much criticism that he took.” But Schroeder’s most unnerving statistic wasn’t his 11 touchdowns or 1,889 yards, which were Mountain West-worsts for those with 200 throws or more.

Instead, it was the 35 times that he was sacked, more than all but 11 other players in the country. In fact, Schroeder was hit more than 120 times that season and diagnosed with two concussions. However, it was his lower-back, not his head, that forced him to sit out all of this year’s spring practices due to surgery on April 1. Still, he persisted with his rehabilitation routine until he was ready for summer ball and the 2013 season. “That probably gave him a little fire,” said senior wide receiver Billy Ray Stutzmann. “But for the most part, he really stepped up. And the team (has) his back.” Schroeder could not comment for the story due to media restrictions placed on quarterbacks by Chow. REDEMPTION This year, Schroeder saw limited playing time against Oregon State and Nevada and still looked like the same quarterback from the season before as he went 16-for-28 with 149 yards, a touchdown and three interceptions. However, all perceptions of Schroeder were shattered this past Saturday when he checked into the game against No. 25 Fresno State. After freshman Ikaika Woolsey had gone 7-for-19 with 56 yards and an interception, not much was expected of Schroeder and the Rainbow Warriors, who trailed 42-3 with just 21 minutes left.

While few may have anticipated the ‘Bows to have some success, nobody could have predicted one of UH football’s greatest passing performances and nearly the biggest comeback in NCAA history. But this is what Schroeder provided for Hawai‘i as he shredded the Bulldog defense with 17 completions on 27 throws for 321 yards, three touchdowns and an interception on a final Hail Mary in UH’s 42-37 loss. “I know he’s happy, but he’s not content because we didn’t win,” Harding said. “He obviously takes that personally, but I’m proud as hell of him because he went through hell last year. He was down on the ground more than he was probably throwing the ball. So it was good to see him have a really good game and throw the ball really well.” Now, after a year of being criticized at every turn, fans are calling for Chow to make the once-condemned Schroeder the starter against San Jose State tomorrow. “Sean Schroeder deserves a ton of credit, and sometimes it peeves me that he doesn’t get it,” Chow said. “He came in at a tough time last year. … He took a beating. He had a back operation. And still you hear the critics, and it just irritates the heck out of you. But it’s nice to see him have success.” Chow will likely choose between Schroeder or junior Taylor Graham, who started UH’s first three games and sat out last week due to an shoulder injury.


SPORTS@KALEO.ORG | TWITTER: @KALEOSPORTS | JOEY RAMIREZ EDITOR | JEREMY NITTA ASSOCIATE

PAGE 11 | KA LEO | FRIDAY, OCT. 4 2013

GRIDIRON

San Jose State seeks to spark a ‘Fale’ing offense

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Hawai‘i’s defense will look to build off their second half performance against Fresno State. FILE PHOTO KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

BLAKE TOLENTINO Web Specialist In 2006, Daniel Craig successfully rebooted the James Bond franchise with the critically acclaimed “Casino Royale.” In similar fashion, the 2012 San Jose State Spartans successfully rebooted their ailing football program behind the strength of leading man, quarterback David Fales. If 2012 heralded the Spartans’ triumphant return to glory, then 2013 is their “Quantum of Solace,” the frustrating and confusing sequel that disappointed fans despite the return of the main star. Like Hawai‘i, the Spartans’ offense has turned in a series of disappointing performances despite the potential for greater production. While the Rainbows Warriors added what appeared to be key pieces for the execution of second year head coach Norm Chow’s new offense, the Spartans returned a bevy of starters, including Fales and leading wide receiver Noel Grigsby, who had 1,307 yards and nine touchdowns last year. Both teams looked to improve on last season’s shortcomings. Instead, UH is currently ranked 113th in the nation in total offense. The Spartans have also struggled

to score in their first four games, going 0-3 against FBS competition after finishing their last campaign ranked No. 21 in the country. On Saturday night, both teams will be looking to extend the other’s misery for another week as they try to salvage their seasons. While the Warriors’ early offensive struggles weren’t surprising given the many new faces, the Spartans’ struggles are puzzling. On the surface, the return of Fales, standing behind a veteran line and with his favorite target in Grigsby, seemed to signal stability in the offense. However, a new coaching staff and the loss of impact players such as first team All-Western Athletic Conference tight end Ryan Otten and second team All-WAC running back De’Leon Eskridge have greatly lessened the efficiency of the unit. To add injury to insult, Grigsby has also been sidelined indefinitely with a knee injury, while leading returning rusher Tyler Ervin is dealing with injuries of his own. All of these struggles might trick one into thinking this upcoming contest might be the pillow fight of the week. But both teams’ early failures might be deceiving. “You need to take the time to look at who they played,” Chow said. “They played Minnesota, and they

played Stanford. … So those things (records) are deceiving.” In spite of having just six touchdowns to five interceptions this season, Fales has proven in the past that he is capable of much more. Perhaps playing a team like Hawai‘i instead of leaders in the Big Ten and Pac-12 may be just what he and the Spartans need to right the sinking ship. Fales will be looking to prove that last season’s 4,193 yards and 33 touchdowns were not a fluke. Hawai‘i defensive coordinator Thom Kaumeyer certainly isn’t taking him lightly. “I think he’s very similar to what we faced with (Fresno State quarterback David) Carr,” Kaumeyer said. “He’s very accurate. He can move around and does a nice job reading zones and coverages, so we’re going to have to do pretty much what we did last week and try and disrupt some of the timing and the routes. We’re going to have to try and make sure we get some internal pressure on him so he’s not comfortable.” Last week, the Rainbow Warriors faced the challenge of defeating a team riding a wave of momentum as Fresno State entered Aloha Stadium undefeated and ranked. This week, they face a new challenge: Can they defeat a team that’s as desperate for a win as they are?

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PAGE 12 | KA LEO | FRIDAY, OCT. 4 2013

SPORTS@KALEO.ORG | TWITTER: @KALEOSPORTS | JOEY RAMIREZ EDITOR | JEREMY NITTA ASSOCIATE

GRIDIRON

UH has all

hands on deck JOEY R AMIREZ Sports Editor When the chips were down and the Rainbow Warrior football team needed some offense against Fresno State last weekend, it opened up its passing attack. The result was 34 points straight in 21 minutes. Meet the full house of Hawai‘i wide receivers that is looking to see last week’s 318 second half yards and raise them.

ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

(Left to right) Billy Ray Stutzmann, Chris Gant, Scott Harding and Keith Kirkwood have combined for 37 catches for 553 yards and four touchdowns.

Jack-of-all-trades UH fans are still getting to know freshman Keith Kirkwood, who has six catches for 129 yards and a pair of touchdowns in his first four games with the Rainbow Warriors. Although he played just one year of organized football at Neptune High (N.J.), Kirkwood was also a nominee for the 2013 McDonald’s All-America Boys High School Basketball Team. “He brings that raw talent and that deep threat,” said senior wide receiver Billy Ray Stutzmann. “His height and his speed (are) solid. And he’s really young, so he’s gonna bring a lot in the next couple years.” Queensland’s finest Junior Scott Harding currently leads the ‘Bows with 16 catches for 150 yards. But the Brisbane, Australia, native contributes in many more ways than receptions. So far, Harding has returned six punts for 48 yards and has booted 16 punts of his own with a 41-yard average. Last season, Harding was named to Phil Steele’s allMountain West Conference sec-

ond team as a punt returner. In 2011, he was selected as a first team Freshman All-American by the Football Writers Association of America, also as a return man.

King of catch After sitting out of Hawai‘i’s first three games due to a concussion from a July car accident, senior Billy Ray Stutzmann made a memorable season debut by grabbing three catches for 46 yards, including a 35-yard score in UH’s 42-37 loss to Fresno State. One of the most experienced Rainbow Warriors, he leads the team with 129 career receptions for 1,533 yards and six touchdowns. “He knows the system and knows the playbook from last year and has a great feel for the game,” Harding said. “He’s been around for a long time, so he’s a great receiver. And it’s always good to have another vet back on the team.”

Ace returner If the ‘Bows need a big play, chances are they’re going to senior Chris Gant. Already with 12 catches for 228 yards and a touchdown, the Long Beach native currently leads the Mountain West with 19 yards per reception. In addition, Gant has returned 15 kickoffs for 322 yards, which is third-best in the conference. “He brings a lot of passion, a lot of energy and leadership,” Stutzmann said. “He’s been here a while, and he’s been making plays. We need those sparks. We talk about it all the time: Our receivers are the ones that need to make plays for the offense to move the ball.”


A K LEO T H E

FRIDAY, OCT. 4 to TUESDAY, OCT. 6, 2013 VOLUME 109 ISSUE 16

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

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S.L.A.M. aims to enrich students’ college experiences

IEVA BYTAUTAITE / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

(Back) Karim Troost, Robert Moran, Rio Kwon, (Front) Kai Noa Lilly, Caralina Torres and Doorae Shin. I EVA B YTAUTAITE Staff Writer

Five student ambassadors from the College of Social Sciences have registered their club, Social Leaders at Mānoa, as a Registered Independent Organization with aims to raise accessibility and awareness of opportunities for internships, scholarships and leadership positions available to students as well as to develop student leaders. “The student ambassadors had an idea to start the club to get more students to spread the word about opportunities available to all students on campus,” said Kai Noa Lilly, Engaged Student Learning coordinator and S.L.A.M. adviser. “Being aware of the opportunities available enhances students’ degrees. A lot of students are not aware, and we want to make them aware.” According to the club’s mission statement, S.L.A.M. will focus on facilitating accessibility and awareness of opportunities to students in the College of Social Sciences and provide them with the tools to become

more active, empowered members of the campus, local and global communities. The ambassadors hope that the club will help enrich students’ college experiences, making them not only memorable but also useful in the future. “We hope we can show people that participating in school events provides the best experience,” said Karim Troost, a student ambassador and a senior U.S. history and political science major. “Students can carry on this experience after they graduate and become leaders in their community and beyond.” One of the main objectives of the club is a focus on leadership. Because there are no hierarchal positions in the club, the members each take on leadership roles and rotate organizing events, fundraisers and community service, according to Lilly. “One of the main purposes of the club was to create a space for students to learn about leadership and become leaders,” said Robert Moran, a student ambassador and senior economics major.

Rio Kwon, ambassador and a junior political science and English major, said he hopes the club will be able to inspire students to become great leaders. The ambassadors also agreed on the importance of working together with faculty and alumni, and the club will facilitate students to make those connections. “Meeting alumni enables students to see someone with their degree doing something they dream of doing,” Lilly said. “It is important to make those links.” In November, S.L.A.M. will hold a club mixer, an event which will provide an opportunity for clubs on campus to get together, share ideas, talk about challenges and meet club presidents and representatives. “An event like this allows for partnership, collaboration and gives clubs a chance to learn from each other,” Lilly said. Students interested in representing the College of Social Sciences by becoming an ambassador for the college or are interested in joining S.L.A.M. can email lilly@hawaii. edu for more information.

Meeting every student’s needs

The college ambassadors The ambassador program of the College of Social Sciences represents the college and the Dean’s office as part of the college’s initiative to broaden the approach of how to answer the needs of the students in the college. The program was started in fall 2013. To become a student ambassador for the College of Social Sciences, students need to have a junior or senior standing and be part of the college. Students will also need to complete an application process. Social Leaders at Mānoa is open to students of all major and standing. The club was the ambassadors’ initiative to get students of all majors involved and learn more about the College of Social Sciences and leadership skills.


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Friday, Oct. 4 2013

Twitter @kaleofeatures | features@kaleo.org |Jackie Perreira Editor |Karissa Montania Associate

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‘Gravity’: an atmos-fear-ic thrill

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JOSEPH H AN Managing Editor Alfonso Cuaron’s “Gravity” is a brilliant and moving spectacle – cinema at its most visceral. Although this is a tale of survival and lends itself to a simple plot, the technical staging and visual orchestration inspires wonder in panoramic beauty and instills deep fear in the infinite uncertainty of space. While there may be no sound in space, “Gravity” speaks in the poetic; a metaphor for human struggle and the potential for life. The film focuses on Dr. Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock), a medical engineer on her first mission, and veteran Matt Kowalsky (George Clooney) on his final mission. Ryan is a calculated and meek character, whereas Matt is a talker, often telling stories to Mission Control in Houston, but shows expertise that comes from experience. When both are cast into danger’s way after

satellite debris begins a chain reaction of destruction and hits their space shuttle, the atmosphere around them perpetually undermines their control. Ryan’s cord becomes untethered, forcing her to spin and drift further into the universe until she rejoins with Matt and they both attempt to make it to the International Space Station. The film uses elegant manipulation and CGI to make it feel as if this was shot on location. Close-ups of Ryan, subjective camera perspectives and the use of 3-D in “Gravity” make the movie-going experience disorienting, thrilling and breathtaking. The audience shares the view from inside Ryan’s helmet and occupies the same suit. The evolving threats and predicaments that occur subject you to the same feelings of vulnerability, fear and unease that Ryan must contest and struggle with, making it literally difficult to breathe in high points of anxiety. Bullock commands the screen with fi -

nesse; subtle expressions that evoke the range of emotions that course through Ryan, whose backstory becomes the poetic center of the fi lm. In “Gravity,” space doesn’t become a frontier but a vacant arena that amplifies the personal and intimate tragedy of Ryan’s life. Rather than becoming entangled in the chaos around her, Ryan must fi nd reason in her will to live because even the eternal silence of space cannot drown out the echoes of her past. Ultimately, “Gravity” is gripping and endearing as it unearths the worth of letting go and the blooming or yearning that is required in overcoming pain. By the fi lm’s end, it’ll be difficult to fi nd your balance.

R AT I N G :

‘The Cabin in the Woods’ (2012) Five college students (including Chris Hemsworth) travel to a secluded cabin for a quick getaway. From then on, the film plays with the quote present in the trailer, “You think you know the story. Think again.” “The Cabin in the Woods” is half a satirical horror comedy with cliché characters and half a full-fledged terror masterpiece. Any fan of horror will instantly fall in love with its clever writing by Joss Whedon and diverging plot. By

looking almost identical and containing a cellar door, the cabin itself is a homage to the “Evil Dead” franchise.

FEAR VERDICT Aside from the gags and sat-

COVER YOUR EYES

ire, “The Cabin in the Woods” has its fair share of frightening scenes. Without going too much into detail and spoiling the movie, the terror continually emerges offering a specific scare for every viewer.

Gore, frightening images and jump scares.

CHANGE YOUR PANTS


Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Friday, Oct. 4 2013

Comics


Page 8 | Ka Leo | Friday, Oct. 4 2013

Twitter @kaleoopinions | opinions@kaleo.org | Doorae Shin Editor

Opinions FEDERAL GOVERNMENT COMMITTING FEDERAL CRIME (for 29 years)? by Leland Yoshitsu - Amazon • B&NNook • Sony • eBookPie 1. You are purchasing an eBook (or paperback) that contains a collection of historic and legal documents which PROVES THE FACT that the US Federal Government and a major American Corporation, NBC, have COMMITTED A NUMBER OF CRIMES AGAINST A US CITIZEN, Leland Yoshitsu, to secretly and intentionally DEFRAUD him from receiving and obtaining TRUTH AND JUSTICE.

PRESIDENT OBAMA

After over 4 years have passed since “President Obama’s August 2009 White House letter to Leland” was written and mailed: Has President Obama COMMITTED THE CRIME OF MAIL FRAUD to SECRETLY TORTURE AND TORMENT a US Citizen (and his Family) for “PETITION(ING) THE GOVERNMENT FOR A REDRESS OF GRIEVANCES”?

Minimum wage is no means for survival in Hawai‘i

see: www.lelandyoshitsu.com & facebook.com/leland.yoshitsu see: The New York Times Book Review-Exchange (August 2012 - 800-458-522 Shajuan Oliver)

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K IM L UZ Contributing Writer People often refer to Hawai’i as “paradise” – a tropical getaway fi lled with exotic attractions and perpetual relaxation. A chart compiled by Movoto Real Estate listed the “50 Hardest Working Cities in America,” and no city in Hawai‘i made the cut. It seems this paradise leads others to believe that Hawai‘i residents lounge on the beach and enjoy Mai Tai’s all day while our large tourist economy somehow thrives without the hard work of employees. This July, CNBC named Hawai‘i the state with the highest cost of living. These studies have paradoxical results and suggest that the people of Hawai‘i can make a living in the most expensive state while simultaneously failing to work hard. It is easy to assume that people in Hawai‘i are simply wealthier, choosing the islands as their home because they can afford it. However, the opposite is true. Most Hawai‘i residents work multiple jobs, depending on tips made from waiting tables in the evening and on minimum wage-paying jobs during the day. Regardless of this common life-

style, a bill that proposed to increase minimum wage in Hawai‘i failed to get passed in the last legislative session.

INDECISION KILLS BILL Bill SB 331 SD2 HD1 was the last remaining bill relating to minimum wage toward the end of the 2013 legislative session. It proposed that minimum wage be increased by $0.50 for the next three years and then a $0.25 increase in the year 2017. If it passed, minimum wage in Hawai‘i would be up to $9 by 2017. The bill, however, did not have an amount for the state’s tip credit, currently at $0.25. With 15 minutes left to make all final decisions on what bills would be passed to Governor Neil Abercrombie, both the House and Senate were unable to make a decision on how much the tip credit should be, thus, failing to pass the bill, which leaves minimum wage stuck at $7.25 for at least another year. It is unfortunate that with all the buzz about increasing minimum wage, both by Governor Abercrombie on our state level and by President Barack Obama on the federal level, the most ex-

pensive state in the U.S. was unable to enforce this. Even with the public discourse to increase minimum wage within the next year, much opposition exists. Businesses argue that with the increase, it would force them to cut staff because of their inability to afford paying employees at the increased rate.

F O R O U R Q UA L I T Y O F L I F E

An increase in minimum wage is nothing less than a great idea with signifi cant benefits, especially for residents of Hawai‘i. Higher pay will increase productivity in the workplace as many will be relieved from the need to work multiple jobs; residents can walk into their jobs rested, refreshed and ready to offer their best work ethic. A wage increase would join the 19 other states and the District of Columbia that have higher minimum wages than the federal standard. Numerous bills were introduced in support of an increase in Hawai‘i, and movements are continuously growing. With the highest cost of living in the country, it is imperative to demand a living wage so we may enjoy a higher quality of life in this place we call home.


2013, october 4