Issuu on Google+

A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 4 to THURSDAY, DEC. 5, 2013 VOLUME 109 ISSUE 36

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

www.kaleo.org

NIGHTS

KENNEDY THEATRE 50TH ANNIVERSARY preview / timeline / man on the street

PAGES 4-5

FLI

PT OC

EN

photos courtesy of kennedy theatre

TE

R


Page 2 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Dec. 4 2013

News

K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i

University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa 2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 Honolulu, HI 96822

Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-7043 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org

EDITORIAL STAFF Editor in Chief Bianca Bystrom Pino Managing Editor Joseph Han Chief Copy Editor Kim Clark Assoc Chief Copy Editor Kirstie Campbell News Editor Noelle Fujii Assoc News Editor Fadi Youkhana Features Editor Jackie Perreira Assoc Features Editor Karissa Montania Opinions Editor Doorae Shin Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Assoc Sports Editor Jeremy Nitta Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Co-Photo Editor Chasen Davis Co-Photo Editor Ismael Ma Online Photo Editor Jessica Homrich Web Specialist Blake Tolentino

ADVERTISING E-mail advertising@kaleo.org Ad Manager Gabrielle Pangilinan PR Coordinator Tianna Barbier Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications.

ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Rebekah Carroll, chair; Nicholas Pope, vice chair; or Mechelins Kora Iechad, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

Twitter @kaleoohawaii | news@kaleo.org | Noelle Fujii Editor | Fadi Youkhana Associate

Out of this world UH team analyzes Earth-sized exoplanet FADI YOUKHANA Associate News Editor A team of astronomers, including UH M ā noa astronomers led by Andrew Howard, Ph.D., of the campus’ Institute of Astronomy, analyzed an Earth-sized planet outside the solar system. “This is the fi rst Earth-size planet outside of our solar system where we know that it is made of rock, like our Earth,” Howard said. The planet, known as Kepler78b, is uninhabitable because it orbits its star every 8.5 hours with temperatures exceeding 3,700 degrees Fahrenheit and likely has a lava surface, thus making its climate too hot to support life, according to the team’s report. The planet was named Kepler-78b because it was the first confirmed planet in the 78th planetary system discovered by the Kepler space telescope. “Each time a new planetary system is discovered, the host star is assigned the successive Kepler name, starting with Kepler-1,” said Evan Sinukoff, a team member and UH M ā noa graduate student. “The fi rst planet detected around that star is labeled with a ‘b.’ The second such planet is labeled with a ‘c’ and so on.” The discovery is a result of a collaboration of UH M ā noa astronomers with teams from Harvard, MIT, UC Berkeley, Yale and UC Santa Cruz. “It is a particularly exciting time to be a young astronomer,” Sinukoff said. “During the past few years, we have learned that most stars have planets, the majority of which are near Earth-size like Kepler-78b.” This discovery is particularly significant because Kepler-78b is the smallest exoplanet (any planet that orbits a star other than the sun) on which the radius and mass have been measured, according to Benjamin Fulton, team member and UH Mā noa graduate student.

“This is the first time that we have been able to measure the mass of an Earth-sized exoplanet, and we have determined that its bulk properties are very similar to the Earth,” Fulton said. “It is similar in size, mass and therefore density to the Earth. This indicates that it almost certainly has a rocky surface.” Even though Kepler-78b’s climate does not support life, it can play a major role in learning the composition of similar planets. “Our observations have also revealed a rich diversity of planet compositions and evolutionary histories. Considering the hundreds of billions of stars in our galaxy, it is mind-boggling to think of the number and variety of worlds out there waiting to be discovered by future generations ... perhaps even those with life,” Sinukoff said. “It’s amazing that graduate and undergraduate students will have the opportunity to take part in this pursuit.” According to Howard, the team used the Doppler technique to measure the mass of the planet. “As any planet orbits a star it tugs slightly on that star due to the force of gravity,” Fulton said. “ This causes the star to ‘wobble’ back and forth. Larger planets pull harder on the star and produce a larger signal, but small planets like Kepler-78b are barely detectable. With a large amount of ver y high-quality data from the Keck I tele scope on Mauna Kea we are able to measure the amplitude of this ‘wobble’ and therefore the mass of Kepler-78b.” The team combined the planet size measurement using the Kepler data with the planet’s mass to find its density. The density proved to be similar to that of

Scan this QR code for more information.

the Earth’s, suggesting a composition of iron and rock. “We couldn’t see the planet directly; it’s much too faint, so we watch the motion of the planet’s host star,” Howard said. “The planet pulls on the star gravitationally, and we can observe that motion using the Keck telescope.” Another team led by Francesco Pepe at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, analyzed Kepler-78b and measured the mass. Their results were similar to Howard’s team.

“My team and Francesco’s team worked completely independently, using measurements from different telescopes, and we analyzed our data separately,” Howard said. The teams submitted their papers to the journal Nature at the same time, and the papers were published back-to-back. “The measurements of the planet’s mass from our two teams agree to within our error estimates,” Howard said. “This adds a lot of confidence to the result.”

Andrew Howard, Ph.D., of the Institute of Astronomy, led the team that measured Kepler-78b. ISMAEL MA KA LEO O HAWAI‘I


Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

WORDSMITH

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Dec. 4 2013

UH ID Discount Welcome Newman Center to the

“Your home away from home”

Typing Assistance

Word Processor Writing Consultant INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS WELCOME!

10% OFF (Until 3/25/14)

808.955.0858 808 .955.0858

Go to our directory for more discounts!

kaleo.org/id

Come, join our ‘Ohana!

We’re a vibrant Catholic PRAY Student Center and Parish STUDY Community right here on UH Manoa Campus. GROW BELONG CONNECT Newman Center-Holy Spirit Parish 1941 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (Located past the Center for Korean Studies Building) 808-988-6222 CampusMinistry@newmanhawaii.org Campus Minister: Andrew Soh

Mass Schedule: Mon: 12:10PM (Eucharistic Service) Tues-Fri: 12:10PM Student Wednesday Night Mass: 9:00PM Sat: 5:00PM / Sun: 9:00AM, 11:00AM, 5:00PM Student Mass & Dinner: Sun, 5:00PM

Special Holiday Shopping Thrift Shop

Thursday, December 12, 12pm - 3pm

Holiday Themed Items Valid Thru: December 31, 2013

Holiday Refreshments Regular Hours Tues: 10AM-1PM Thurs: 12-3PM Last Sat of Month: 9AM-12PM (Half Off!)

Freebies

Gift Wrapping

WCC THRIFT SHOP

Ro Athl Locker Room / Pope Lab Stone Fit. Cen. Food Sci Sherman + Tech Lab Agri Eng Institute St John Plant Sci Lab

Maile Way

EW est

Find us behind Biomedical Science! www.hawaii.edu/wcc 808-956-7418 PO Box 62104 Honolulu, HI 96839

ad

Biomedical Sciences


Page 4 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Dec. 4 2013

Twitter @kaleofeatures | features@kaleo.org |Jackie Perreira Editor |Karissa Montania Associate

Features What’s your most memorable moment? K ARISSA MONTANIA Associate Features Editor “My first year here, I was in a Kabuki play. I played the angry, old grumpy maid. Going through that experience of learning a script first in Japanese and then in English, and learning the stylization and conventions of that particular theater form was really fascinating. It taught me a lot about how my body works and how it feels to be in a play.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF KENNEDY THEATRE

Kennedy Theatre: h t a purposeful variety Every season, Kennedy Theatre devotes a show to each of its focus areas: the Department of Dance, Asian theater and the Theatre for Young Audiences program. Each show is chosen with a purpose: to showcase the talent of the individual focus areas. The upcoming 2013-14 season includes “Lady Mu and the Yang Family Generals,” a Chinese form of Jingju, and “The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip,” a performance directed for a youthful audience that includes puppetry. Here is a breakdown of the upcoming mainstage shows.

In Hawai‘i the majority of the population is of Asian descent, so “it seems only fi tting that Asian theater should therefore be regularly featured in the UHM theater season and in the curriculum of the department,” Wichmann-Walczak said. This year, the rotation of Asian theater lands on Chinese theater. “Lady Mu and Yang Family Generals,” was chosen by Madam Shen Xiaomei, who is Wichmann-Walczak’s Jingju performance teacher. “It is the crowning achievement of her (Madam Shen Xiaomei’s) teacher, the legendary male performer of female roles, Master Mei Lanfang,” Wichmann-Walczak said.

‘LADY MU AND THE YANG FAMILY GENERALS’ Common forms of Asian theater that are covered by the theater department are Kabuki and Noh from Japan, Randai from Indonesia and Jingju from China. “Each Asian show is the result of a long-term, intensive training program taught by guest artists from a particular Asian country. ... In general, there is a four-year rotation among China, Indonesia, Japan and a guest culture,” said Elizabeth Wichmann-Walczak, professor of Asian theater.

‘THE VERY PERSISTENT GAPPERS OF FRIP‘ The Theatre for Young Audiences program considers children’s theater to be of equal importance and seriousness as the other programs offered. In past years, performances by the Theatre for Young Audiences have brought in a crowd of varying ages and attitudes, all of whom walk away delighted. “The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip” is based on a book by George Saunders. It will feature screaming orange puppets and a dramatic, ever-changing cast of characters.

ELIZABETH ANDERSON Staff Writer

-Amy Lynn Schiffner Associate professor of dance and theater “Witnessing the hundreds of school children that enter the doors of Kennedy Theatre when we’re having a Theater for Young Audiences production. For many of them it’s the first time they are ever coming into a theater. You just see their eyes light up with excitement and wonder what’s going to happen. I always think maybe that experience will be what propels them into actually becoming an audience goer or potentially studying it themselves in the future.” -Marty Myers, Theater manager “I just had my first big production of ‘Big Love’ at Kennedy Theatre. It was the first time I got to work outside of class with my fellow students. Before I came to Kennedy, I was a pilot. Through taking classes I came out of my shell and am now more comfortable talking in front of crowds and invoking emotion from people. I found out that the thing I love more than flying is making people laugh.”

ALL PHOTOS BY KENNETH RODRIGEZ-CILMAN / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

-Zachary Loscalzo Junior Theater student


Twitter @kaleofeatures | features@kaleo.org |Jackie Perreira Editor |Karissa Montania Associate

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Dec. 4 2013

Features Kennedy Theatre’s 50th anniversary: the defining moments

COMPILED BY BEN SAUNDERS, Staff Writer

11/20-21/1925: The UH dramatic club presents “The House of Rimmon” at Farrington. Fall 1963: The East-West Theatre opens as part of the East-West Center at UH Mānoa.

11/22/1963: President Kennedy is assassinated

in Dallas, Texas.

ANY

TIME,

ANY

PLACE. HEALTH SERVICES CHECK-IN...

11/24/1963: The East-West Theatre is renamed the John F.

Kennedy Theatre in honor of the President. “Benten the Thief,” “Hamlet” and “The Man Who Came to Dinner” are performed (“Of Thee I Sing,” the political satire that was inititally scheduled to run, is postponed for a year).

I’M HERE FOR BIRTH CONTROL.

1970: Timothy Dalton appears in “Macbeth.” June 1972: Program founder Earle Ernst retires.

H HA PP Y H AP PY OL HO DA LII D YS AY S!!

1985: Elizabeth Wichmann directs Jingju production “The Phoenix Returns to Its Nest.” The successful show is revived a year later and goes on tour in China.

I‘M SO HAPPY THE CLINIC IS OPEN DURING WINTER BREAK.

1994: Earle Ernst passes away. Lab Theatre is renamed the Earle Ernst Lab Theatre in his honor. 2001: First-ever English Randai production, “Umbuik Mudo and the Magic Flute,” is directed by new faculty member Kirstin Pauka.

2005: Terence Knapp retires, and Paul Mitri becomes department chair.

TB TEST

2013: Longtime faculty member Glenn Cannon passes away. Kennedy Theatre begins its 50th anniversary celebration. PHOTOS COURTESY OF KENNEDY THEATRE ENGINEROOMBLOG/FLICKR MANHHAI/FLICKR

SICK

ANKLE SPRAIN

YOU NEED HEALTH INSURANCE! for more information, go to:

WWW.HAWAII.EDU/SHS

6/*7&34*5:)&"-5)4&37*$&48*4)&4:06 (00%-6$,0/:063'*/"-4)"11:)0-*%":4


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Dec. 4 2013

webphotos@kaleo.org | Jessica Homrich Web Photo Editor

Photos Kinsey Justa

Selfie Follow

@kaleophotos

Gavin Shigesato

on Instagram and twitter Special p Holiday Shopping Thrift Th if Sh Shop

Thursday, December 12 12pm - 3pm

Bollywood Movie Night Featuring:

Holiday Items

Gift Wrapping Regular Hours Tues: 10AM-1PM Thurs: 12-3PM Last Sat: 9AM-12PM Behind Biomedical Sciences! For more info visit:

Candies & Treats!

FREE EVENT!

www.hawaii.edu/wcc

Friday, December 6 6pm - 9pm

LE‘AHI STIMULUS GARDEN NEEDS VOLUNTEERS!

At Da Spot 2469 S King St Honolulu, HI 96826

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2013 8:00AM – 12:00PM

become an

account executive 2445 Campus Rd. Hemenway Hall 107 808-956-7043 www.kaleo.org/jobs

Learn about the powerful effects of plants on people by helping maintain a sensory garden for the residents of Le‘ahi Hospital.  Participate in activities with the residents and contribute to their well-being! For more information call Christopher at 808-734-9353 A Service Learning Program public announcement. For more volunteer opportunities give us a call at SERVICE LEARNING 808-956-4641 PROGRAM

FREE FOOD We are open to any student wanting to learn about the cultures of India, Pakistan, Nepal, and other South Asian countries through fun cultural activities, such as Bollywood Dance Night and movie nights. For more info email: lsac@hawaii.edu @uhlsac lsac_hawaii A ‘Lovers of South Asian Culture’ Event

/lsac.uhm

Sponsored By:


Instagram @kaleophotos | webphotos@kaleo.org | Jessica Homrich Editor

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Dec. 4 2013

Photos

Shane Grace

Lelani Portillo

Essentials

Austin Kamimura

Interested in getting involved in a fun, on campus position?

Get involved with: Activities Council

Campus Center Board

Recreation Sports Council

Now Hiring

Student members

Activities Council (Plan events) Campus Center Board (Make decisions and policies) Recreation Sports Council (Plan sports events)

The Office of Student Life and Development is committed to providing opportunities for students through innovative programs and quality services, which promote leadership, life skills, and personal development.


Page 8 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Dec. 4 2013

Twitter @kaleoopinions | opinions@kaleo.org | Doorae Shin Editor

Opinions Time for Chow to say, ‘Ciao’

LYLE ANAMINE / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Hawai‘i won six games in the year prior to Chow’s hiring. It has won four since. FADI YOUKHANA Associate News Editor Rainbow Warrior head coach Norm Chow concluded his second season in charge of the ‘Bows. His two-year tenure has produced little to no positives on and off the field. To avoid further long-term damage to the program, it is time for the Punahou alumnus to step down.

RECORD Chow has produced only four wins in two years. His record during the 2012 season (3-9) can be partially excused due to the new system and the time it takes for a new regime to establish its philosophy in college football. One season is not a proper sample size to judge a new coach with. If the second season showed evidence of improvement, his first season’s results would not be a valid reflection of Chow’s coaching ability. But this season, the

‘Bows managed only one win in their last contest of the year against Army. While injuries and a strong schedule play a part in the 11 losses this year, the heart of the blame still falls on the man in charge.

back had thrown for career-highs in yards (499) and touchdowns (6) and Chris Gant torched the Wyoming defensive backs for 174 yards and four touchdowns.

P L AY- C A L L I N G

S A L A RY

Fans at Aloha Stadium can often be heard correctly predicting the next play the ‘Bows offense is about to run. Chow’s predictability when calling offensive plays has given opponents a significant advantage. The most evident example of questionable play-calling came against Wyoming. The game was in overtime after the 4th quarter ended in a 56-56 tie. Chow chose to run the ball six straight times in overtime and go for it on 4th and 1. This meant Wyoming only needed to kick a short field goal to win, which it did. The decision by the coach to shoot for it on 4th down and go for the win is not the problem. It’s the fact that he called a run play six times in a row while his quarter-

Coaches are typically evaluated at the end of the season. Their financial impact on the university must outweigh the burden of their salary. Coach Chow has earned $550,000 per season for the past two years. This means he has been paid $1,100,000 for four wins, including a victory against FCS opponent Lamar. With Chow being the highest paid state official in Hawai‘i, his salary is excessive and unwarranted for the product UH Mānoa fans are receiving.

T I C K E T SA L E S A N D R E C RU I TM E N T Releasing Chow and paying off his contract will cost the university in the short term, but if the results remain the same, then the university will lose much more in the long term.

Ticket sales and attendance at Aloha Stadium have decreased during the past three years. Fans will not go to the stadium to see the same product with little improvement as the losses pile up. Furthermore, Chow’s record will hurt the recruitment process for years to come. Current high-school players will not want to come to Hawai‘i when they see the Rainbow Warriors struggle weekly. Since 2010, Hawai‘i’s recruiting ranking has gone down from 65th overall to 93rd overall in 2013 according to Yahoo. Chow’s career has been impressive, and he deserves a head coaching job. His local ties to Hawai‘i add to the appeal of his position. However, the production of his team in the past two seasons has not measured up to his contract. College football is a business, and when a program negatively impacts the financial state of the athletics department, then something must be done. The university can’t afford another season of regression off the field. Thus, it is time for head coach Norm Chow to say, “Ciao.”


Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 9 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Dec. 4 2013

Comics


Page 10 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Dec. 4 2013

Games

Advertising@kaleo.org | Gabrielle Pangilinan Student Ad Manager

presents

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

NIGHTS Honolulu’s Deluxe New Club + Lounge DEC

6:00 - 10:00 PM

05

6:30 - 8:30 PM Happy Hour

(Tapas + Premium Cocktails for UH Students)

Special Deals with UH ID! Must be 21 with valid ID Dress to Impress (No tanks, no t-shirts, no shorts, no slippers)

ACROSS 1 Caesar’s love 5 Signal to an on-call doctor 9 Omits 14 Chowhound’s request 15 Sharif who played Zhivago 16 World Court site, with “The” 17 Shepard in space 18 Plate ump’s purview 20 Brand for heartburn 22 Providence-to-Boston dir. 23 Scraps for Rover 24 Unit of work 25 Soda for dieters 28 French season 30 Thin pancake 31 Violinist’s gift 34 Move very slowly 36 Suffers from 37 In recent times 39 Mechanic, at times 41 “That works!” 42 4-Down collector 43 Boy king 44 Made a hue turn? 45 Suffix for records 46 Oater group bent on justice 48 Nile biter 49 Blush wine, for short 51 Short market lines? 54 Piedmont wine region 57 Erie Canal mule 58 __ Pipeline, Oahu surfing attraction 60 “She’s Not There” rock group 63 “Ripostes” poet Pound 64 Overnight refuge 65 Theater part 66 Choir part 67 Blow some dough 68 __ collar 69 Stonewall’s soldiers

DOWN 1 Shock 2 Large grinder 3 Citrus shavings 4 Payment to 42-Across 5 “Thick and Rich” chocolate syrup 6 Rescue pro 7 Ones on the payroll 8 Freddie __ Jr. of “ScoobyDoo” films 9 Ship reference 10 Musical buzzer 11 Composer Stravinsky 12 Fourth-down play 13 Dates 19 Property border warning 21 The Red Sox’ Jon Lester, e.g. 26 1980s Chrysler product 27 Altered mtge. 29 Social cupfuls 31 This crossword, literally for some, phonetically for all 32 “Please don’t yell __” 33 Oboe, e.g. 34 Eye rudely 35 They’re found in lodes 36 Reason for a medal 38 Classic Fords 40 Last year’s frosh 41 1956 Mideast dispute area 43 J. Alfred Prufrock creator 47 Straw-strewn shelter 48 Santa __ winds 49 Shrivel 50 “A Doll’s House” playwright 52 Medicare section 53 Informal byes 54 Dollar dispensers, for short 55 Hit a Target? 56 Head of Paris? 59 Close by 61 Getting on in years 62 Big one on the set, perhaps

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

Your

step-by-step

guide to

surviving the end of the

Fall semester

12-16-2013 Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.


Instagram @kaleophotos | webphotos@kaleo.org | Jessica Homrich Editor

Page 11 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Dec. 4 2013

Photos

Antoinette Ranit

PUG POWWOW

These photos are from the Pug Meetup Group, which meets at different parks each weekend. Its goal is to promote the love and well-being of pugs, foster socialization and educate the public about proper ownership and care of the breed. The group is open to anyone who loves pugs.


Page 12 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Dec. 4 2013

Twitter @kaleosports | sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor | Jeremy Nitta Associate

Sports

Rainbow Wahine host NCAA tournament L ACY DENIZ Staff Writer

Sophomore outside hitter Tai ManuOlevao and the Rainbow Wahine qualified for the NCAA tournament for the 21st consecutive season. ISMAEL MA KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

SATURDAY

FRIDAY

2013 NCAA WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL CHAMPIONSHIP 1ST & 2ND ROUNDS

There will be a “hana hou” for the Rainbow Wahine team, as they host the two opening rounds of the NCAA tournament for the first time in 10 years. On Sunday, tournament officials announced the ‘Bows will enter the tournament seeded No. 11 in the championship bracket. Out of the 64 teams, 32 gained automatic qualifications, and the remaining half were fi lled with atlarge selections. First and second round matchups were determined by geographical proximity. Only 10 schools have been crowned tournament champions before. This includes the Rainbow Wahine, who have won the tournament three times before in 1982, 1983 and 1987. The ‘Bows will start their quest for the title with an opening round visit from Idaho State (23-11). Idaho State had an impressive season closeout. Along with grabbing the 2013 Big Sky title for the first time since 1990, ISU head coach Chad Teichert also claimed his 100th career win – a first in Idaho State history. Bengals standout Lori Men-

denhall-Lee was also chosen for the All-Conference first-team and the All-Tournament team. As for Hawaiʻi, a total of six players earned Big West honors. For the second year in a row, senior outside hitter Emily Hartong was voted the Big West Conference’s Women’s Volleyball Player of the Year. Senior setter Mita Uiato, senior libero Ali Longo and freshman outside hitter Nikki Taylor were also awarded with fi rst-team honors. Junior middle hitter Kalei Adolpho and sophomore middle blocker Jade Vorster landed honorable mention accolades. According to the NCA A tournament’s offi cial page, currently 76 percent of the fans are predicting UH to hail as victors in the ‘Bows vs. Bengals match. If the Wahine beat ISU in the first round, UH will advance to challenge the winner from the Arizona State (19-13) vs. BYU (22-6) match. The second round game will be on Dec. 6 at 7 p.m. The Wahine may also have the chance of playing against BWC foe Cal State Northridge in the third round, whom they split the season series with.

VISIT HAWAIIATHLETICS.COM FOR SEASON SCHEDULE S

Arizona State vs. BYU @ 5:00PM PM Idaho State vs. Hawai‘i @ 7:30PM

(FIRST 300 UHM STUDENTS RECEIVE COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS. PICKUP AT SSC BOX OFFICE STARTS AT 9:00AM THURSDAY MORNING)

TBD vs. TBD @ 7:00PM

(IF UH WINS FRIDAY NIGHT, FIRST 300 UHM STUDENTS RECEIVE COMPLIMENTARY TICKETS. PICKUP AT SSC BOX OFFICE STARTS AT 9:00AM SATURDAY MORNING)

AND FOLLOW US ON

@HAWAIIATHLETICS


2013, december 4