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A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, MARCH. 13 to THURSDAY MARCH. 14, 2013 VOLUME 108 ISSUE 65

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

www.kaleo.org

Big West Tournament

VICTORIA DUBROWSKIJ / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Freshman forward Issac Fotu was selected as the Big West Co-Freshman of the Year. Fotu and the No. 5 seed Rainbow Warriors will take on No. 4 UC Irvine on Thursday at approximately 5:30 p.m. HT in the Big West Tournament.

ISMAEL MA/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Junior forward Shawna-Lei Kuehu was selected as the Big West Sixth Woman of the Year. Kuehu and the Rainbow Wahine open the Big West Tournament on Wednesday at 3 p.m. HT against the lowest remaining seed.

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Sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor | Jeremy Nitta Associate

Page 2 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 13 2013

Sports K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa 2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 Honolulu, HI 96822

Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-7043 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 E-mail kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org

EDITORIAL STAFF Interim Editor in Chief Marc Arakaki Managing Editor Paige Takeya Co-Assc Chief Copy Editor Joseph Han Co-Assc Chief Copy Editor Kim Clark Design Editor Bianca Bystrom Pino Assc Design Editor Emily Boyd News Editor Caitlin Kelly Assc News Editor Alex Bitter Features Editor Caitlin Kuroda Assc Features Editor Nicolyn Charlot Opinions Editor Sarah Nishioka Assc Opinions Editor Tim Metra Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Assc Sports Editor Jeremy Nitta Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Nik Seu Assc Photo Editor Chasen Davis Special Issues Editor Ariel Ramos Web Specialist Blake Tolentino Web Editor Quincy Greenheck

Hawai’i yearns ticket to the Big Dance JOEY R AMIREZ Sports Editor The good news: The Rainbow Warrior basketball team is just three victories away from making the 2013 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament. The bad news: So are seven other Big West teams. And there is only room for one of them at the Big Dance. Hawai‘i (17-13, 10-8 Big West) is looking to capture the Big West Basketball Tournament title, but has a tough road ahead as the No. 5 seed. “You look at every matchup, and there’s not one team – not even the 1-8 matchup – where you would say, ‘Oh, they’re gonna blow them out,’” head coach Gib Arnold said. “ This is truly a conference where everybody’s pretty much bunched up right there. The hottest team and the team with a little bit of luck is gonna come out ahead.”

THE OPPONENT

UH is anchored by a trio of Big West award-winning Rainbow Warriors. Junior forward Christian Standhardinger was chosen to the all-conference fi rst team, while senior center Vander Joaquim was selected as an honorable mention. Freshman forward Isaac Fotu was named Co-Freshman of the Year. “I’m very, very happy that I got [the honor],” Standhardinger said. “But now I just got to put that aside and focus on the tournament and get ready for the tournament. I wanna sit down after the season and be happy about all that stuff, but now I wanna focus since the season is going on.” The big men are also the three highest-scoring players for Hawai‘i, as they average 40 of UH’s 74 points per game. UH will need every basket that the three can provide against its fi rst round matchup – UC Irvine.

The Anteaters (18-14, 11-7 BWC) earned the fourth seed by winning six of their final seven games. They also defeated UH 68-64 in Irvine on Jan. 9 but fell on O‘ahu 78-72 on Feb. 10. “I’m not fearing anything about Irvine, but I’m fearing to lose,” Standhardinger said. “And that’s good because that will make me go very, very hard. I already have the little butterflies in my stomach already, and that’s good cause I’m ready already.” UCI had four players win five Big West Awards this year: senior guard Daman Starring (second team all-conference), senior center Adam Folker (honorable mention and Hustle Player), freshman guard Alex Young (Co-Freshman of the Year) and sophomore center Will Davis II (Defensive Player of the Year). Continued on page 12

VICTORIA DUBROWSKIJ / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Junior forward Christian Standhardinger was the lone Rainbow Warrior on the Big West First Team.

‘Bows gear up for Big West Tournament JEREMY NIT TA Associate Sports Editor The regular season is over, but for the Rainbow Wahine basketball team, the challenge is just beginning. The ‘Bows finished the year with a 17-12 mark while going 12-7 in the Big West, which is good for third place. “Our goal at the start was to make the tournament, and our goal is to win the tournament,” senior guard Monica DeAngelis said. “We still have work to do, and we’re not finished yet. This is what we’ve been preparing for during the preseason and regular season conference. This is what it’s led us to.”

ADVERTISING E-mail advertising@kaleo.org Ad Manager Regina Zabanal Marketing Director Reece Farinas PR Coordinator Tianna Barbier Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications.

ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Susan Lin, chair; Rebekah Carroll, vice chair; or Esther Fung, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

H E A D E D BY T H E T R I O

ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Freshman guard Ashleigh Karaitiana was selected to the Big West AllFreshman team and on the Honorable Mention team.

P R E PA R E D M I N D S E T The Rainbow Wahine’s third-place finish guarantees them a first-round bye in the tournament, having them play

the lowest remaining seed from the first round. But high seeding isn’t affecting the way the team progresses. “We’re very confident, but we’re just going to take things one game at a time,” freshman forward Ashleigh Karaitiana said. “We can’t overlook any team, so we have to just work hard and get the job done.” “We know that this is what we’ve been working for the whole season,” DeAngelis said. “We’ve played all these teams twice, so there’s not really going to be anything new that we haven’t seen before. So we’re just going to go out there and play as hard as we can.”

THREE CONFERENCE WINS Statistically, the Rainbow Wahine has gotten the job done on defense. They rank second in the conference in overall defense while also limiting their opponents’ shooting percentages, es-

pecially from long distance. “We’ve come to the conclusion that we are not going to win pretty games,” head coach Laura Beeman said. “They’re going to be ugly, but if it’s an ugly win then we don’t care. We know it’s a little ugly at times, especially at the offensive end, but our defense is our staple. So we’ll live on our defense, get better on offense and hopefully string three wins together at the conference tournament, which is our goal. “ There have been so many changes and transitions, and good moments and bad mo ments,” Beeman said. “But the good far out weigh the bad. W hat ’s kept me focused and op timistic on days that it ’s gotten really bad has been these young ladies. They’ve had my back, just as much as I’ve had their back.” The team’s 17-12 record is its best since the 2005 - 06 team Continued on page 12


Page 3 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 13 2013

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Page 4 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 13 2013

News@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kelly Editor | Alex Bitter Associate

News Information Technology Center $7.4 million

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STATUS REPORT: REMEMBERING RENOVATIONS CAITLIN K ELLY News Editor

No matter what academic programs students come from, everyone is affected by ongoing construction on campus. Here’s an update on a few of these projects.

CAMPUS CENTER The fi rst major renovations to the Campus Center began in summer 2008, and the second of three phases continued this semester. Phase two includes the establishment of a full-service Starbucks, which opened on July 23, 2012, and a recreation center, which is slated to open in fall 2013. Work completed on the proj ect this semester so far in cludes the water proof ing of the concrete roof, the place ment of equipment in the recre -

at ion center mechanical room, as well as the inst allat ion of plumbing, chilled water lines, f ire spr inkler lines and a ir condit ioning ducts. The recreation center was previously scheduled to open in spring 2013, but unforeseen underground conditions and revisions to the water service design caused delays. Old utility lines required investigation before being removed or relocated. Phase three will include additional renovations to the Campus Center, including more areas for student organizations to collaborate. This portion is projected to be completed in spring 2015.

E DMO N D S O N H A L L A groundbreaking ceremony for the $15 million renovation of Edmondson Hall was held on

Feb. 28, 2012. The project will come full circle in the next few months. Scheduled renovations, which currently include installing ceilings, f looring, laborator y casework and telecom and painting interior walls, are projected to be completed by July 26, 2013. The project is now 85 percent complete. Upon completion, Edmondson Hall will become the new home for the department of biology. It will also become the center for life sciences research and teaching along with Snyder Hall, current home of the department of microbiology. The building is named after Charles Howard Edmondson, a former zoology professor who was the first director of the Waikīkī Aquarium and Marine Biology Research Laborator y.

Gar t Hal ley $1 l mill 2.5 ion

GA R T L E Y H A L L The original Gartley Hall building was almost 100 years old when it was closed in September 2009. Below-grade soil instability caused the building to settle unevenly and become structurally unsound – $12.5 million was allocated for its renovation. The building was gutted but retained the entire exterior facade due to its historic significance. The perimeter footings with micropiles also needed to be stabilized in order to rebuild the structure. Micro-pile work on the perimeter footings has been completed, and the contractor is presently excavating the grade beam trenches and the elevator pit that will go under the basement slab. The project is currently 12 percent complete, with a projected contract completion date of December 2013.

PHOTOS BY NIK SEU / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

I N F O R M AT I O N T E C H N O L O GY C E N T E R

This six-story building will be home to information and communications technology and services that support modern teaching, administration and research for all 10 UH campuses. Construction costs about $7.4 million and was funded through a combination of State General Obligation Bonds and UH Revenue Bonds. The center is scheduled to open in fall 2013. Construction work completed on the ITS Center this semester includes the installation of gypsum board sheathing, vapor barrier, metal wall panels and glass on the building exterior as well as the installation of fi re sprinkler piping and building roofi ng. Mechanical and electrical rough-in work is continuing on all fl oors.


Page 5 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 13 2013

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Page 6 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 13 2013

News@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kelly Editor | Alex Bitter Associate

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Nishiyama stressed that everyone must learn to take action to protect future generations. “Even when we stand alone, we must speak up,” she said. “We need to protect ourselves. It can happen to all of you. This is not only for Fukushima. This is not just about the nuclear disaster. For our children, we have to create a sustainable society as soon as possible. Please think and act for the sustainable society.” e

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TA K I N G AC T I O N

To aid these evacuees living in Kyoto, Nishiyama founded the support group Minna no Te, which translates to “Everyone’s Hands.” Since its inception, Minna no Te has assisted refugees by distributing monthly newsletters that provide information about upcoming events, delivering relief supplies, inviting Fukushima children to visit Kyoto to play outdoors without fear of radiation and connecting evacuees with family and friends still residing in Fukushima through a biannual bus service. “It will take many years to restore these areas [affected by the disasters], for victims to go back to their ordinary lives. Minna no Te will support them continuously and motivate the public to show concern for the evacuees and disaster areas,” Nishiyama said.

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PRESENTED BY:

Monday marked the second anniversary of the triple disaster that devastated Japan. On March 11, 2011, an earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis cast a dark shadow over the Land of the Rising Sun, leaving almost 19,000 people dead or missing. “In a moment, we lost what belonged to us and our ancestors – home, beautiful land, mountains, river and the sea,” said survivor Yuko Nishiyama from Fukushima, a prefecture that was contaminated by the radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Nishiyama, who is also a famed ed activist, visited Hawai‘i this past ast weekend to share her experience ce of the tragedy at the University of Hawai‘i’s public symposium “Japan an After 3.11: Change and Hope from m the Center of Triple Disaster.” Persuaded by a friend to leave ve the radiation-infected zone, Nishiyayaay ma and her daughter relocated firs rst st to Tokyo and then to Kyoto, where re free public housing was being offered ed to Fukushima evacuees. Many of her er friends and family opposed her decicision – they decided to stay in Fukuushima, waiting for an official evacuauation order that would never come. However, Nishiyama and her er daughter weren’t the only evacuuees from Fukushima Prefecture. e. More than 150,000 Fukushima ma Prefecture residents escaped to other regions in Japan. “In Kyoto, there are several al hundred refugees from Fukushima ma and more than 300 from other parts ts of Tohoku and Kanto regions,” s,” Nishiyama explained. “Most of them are children and mothers rs who have been separated from m their fathers and grandparents. s. Since Kyoto is several hundred d kilometers from Fukushima, theirr fathers visit either once a month orr every two or three months. A few w fathers quit their jobs to move to o Kyoto to live with their families,, but most of them live apart.”

MINNA NO TE

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One in three Americans will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. The American Cancer Society Relay For Life gives everyone the opportunity to fight back and to make a difference in the battle against cancer.

Read an extended version of this article at kaleo.org

Nishiyama delivered her lecture on Sunday, March 10 at the Center for Korean Studies Auditorium. PHOTO COURTESY OF MARY MCDONALD KA LEO O HAWAI‘I


Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Nicolyn Charlot Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 13 2013

Features

Waves of Change Conference: engaging with the Pacific community CAITLIN KURODA Features Editor

COURTESY OF MĀNOA VALLEY THEATRE

“Next “N Nex extt to to Normal” Norrma mal” l debuted l” deb ebut uted ut e off ed off ff-B -B -Broadway Bro road addwa adwa wayy inn 2008. 20008. 8

Hilarity and heartbreak

Stage review: ‘Next to Normal’ at Mānoa Valley Theatre K ARLEANNE M ATTHEWS Senior Staff Writer Think of the aspects that typically make a musical hit: lovable heroes and obvious villains; upbeat, catchy songs that you can sing along with; a contrived, easily-solved crisis; and a tidy ending that sends you out of the theater with a smile on your face and your toes tapping. You won’t find any of those things in Mānoa Valley Theatre’s production of “Next to Normal,” and yet it’s one of the best shows I’ve seen there. “Next to Normal,” written by Brian Yorkey and Tom Kitt, won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2010, only the eighth musical to do so, and that fact speaks to its depth and quality of writing. It’s the story of a family dealing with death, love and mental illness, with each character longing to connect and regain a sense of normalcy that hasn’t truly existed. Alison Aldcroft is impressive as Diana, a mother struggling to keep her depression and hallucinations in check. Her singing and acting are superb, though her singing occasionally takes on a country twang

that seems a little out of place. M. Wesley Watson, as the father, Dan, best encapsulates the tension between choosing genuine pain and loss over false and superficial happiness. At first, I thought Watson was overacting and less believable than the other cast members, but soon it became clear that the veneer was a shield Dan put up for his family, not one Watson put up for the audience. Musical excellence is a common theme among the cast members; the musical’s writers are apparently no fans of easy chords or unison singing, and the MVT’s actors rise to the challenge individually and together. The technical aspects of MVT’s staging are less successful. The stark and minimal set hits the right balance between visual interest and adaptability, but attempts to spice up the impact through projections and a disjointed lighting design that are distracting. In theory, using projections as glimpses into Diana’s mind and dramatic changes in lighting to reflect the show’s abrupt changes in mood should have worked.

But in almost every case, MVT would have been better off relying on the formidable talent of its cast to draw the audience in. The approach of the show is nicely summed up in its final song: “Give me pain if that’s what’s real/ it’s the price we pay to feel.” “Next to Normal” eschews feeling good in favor of feeling human. The success of the musical is almost dependent on a cast’s ability to convey complex and often rapidly changing emotions while tackling difficult music – MVT’s cast does that, and the result is both exhilarating and poignant.

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‘NEXT TO NORMAL’ When: Runs through March 24 with performances Wed-Sun Where: Mānoa Valley Theatre, 2833 E. Mānoa Rd. Cost: $20-$35 Contact: 808-988-6131 or manoavalleytheatre.com Note: Ages 16 and up

While the Hawaiian islands are one of the most isolated places on earth, we are not without our neighbors in the Pacific. Next month from April 4-6, representatives from these Pacific islands will gather at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa for the “Waves of Change” conference to share findings related to climate change and its many implications and discuss how these fi ndings must be addressed by the Pacific island community, Hawai‘i and the rest of the world. According to Tarcisius Kabutaulaka, associate professor for the Center of Pacific Islands Studies and the conference convener, there are three objectives to the conference: fi rst, to converse about the impacts of climate change in the Pacific region; second, to focus on the implications of climate change-related migration within and out of the region; and third, to work with high school students, connect them with leaders and integrate these issues into their curriculum. “The conference will feature the president of [Kiribati],” Kabutaulaka elaborated. “[Kiribati] is one of those countries affected a lot by climate change, and the president … Anote Tong, has been quite vocal internationally.” Tong, the keynote speaker, will be joined by other policymakers, natural scientists, scholars and people from affected areas during the three-day conference.

ʻNOT JUST AN ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUEʼ Kabutaulaka encouraged student attendance at the conference, emphasizing the various facets of climate change that can be looked into, no matter what a student’s major or area of interest. “It’s not just an environmental issue – it’s a social issue, it’s a cultural issue, it’s an economic issue, it’s a political issue [and] it’s a legal issue,” Kabutaulaka said.

Climate change is not just a Pacific island issue, it’s a global issue and an issue for Hawai‘i. He also stressed climate change as a “Hawai‘i issue,” citing that oftentimes, residents tend to think of Hawai‘i only as an extension of the United States while forgetting it is part of the Pacific community as well. “It’s important that we, students in particular, understand Hawai‘i’s relationship with its neighbors,” he said. “Climate change is not just a Pacific issue, it’s a global issue and an issue for Hawai‘i. So students living and studying here, if they are to understand Hawai‘i, they need to understand climate change and its impact ...”

WAV E S O F C H A N G E At the forefront of conversation among the Pacific for over a decade now, Kabutaulaka noted that the severity of climate changes’ effects may seem minimal in Hawai‘i – seen in eroding

coastlines – but in other places, the impact is more noticeable. Rising sea levels have made the low-lying Carteret Islands, for example, increasingly uninhabitable, and many people have been relocated to the larger island of Bouganville. In Tuvalu, drought brought about by climate change forced the island nation to have fresh water shipped from New Zealand. As these areas become unable to support life, their residents are forced to migrate away from them. As these people migrate, where they relocate is also affected. Kabutaulaka touched upon the social, legal, and cultural implications that arise when a migrating community must seek refuge in a host community. “Take for instance,” he said, “if people come to Hawa‘i. It has implications in our ability to provide services, our ability to be able to accommodate the influx of a new population coming in. In some places this can create conflicts and tensions between host communities and migrant communities.” But despite the dauntingtasks at hands, Kabutaulaka believes that people will find solutions and means of adaptation. “... We’re going to be sharing information about how people are proactively and positively working to respond to climate change,” he said.

t “Waves of Change: Climate Change in the Pacific Islands and Implications for Hawai‘i” will be free and open to the public. Pre-registration runs through March 22. To register, visit hawaii.edu/cpis/2013conf/ registration.htm.


News@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kelly Editor | Alex Bitter Associate

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is your source for campus news and events. We publish 10,000 print issues on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays distributed through more than 100 racks around campus. We also provide stories, photos and videos through Ka Leo’s mobile app and website (kaleo.org). Students currently pay a fee of $13 per semester that fund our program. And this is why I am writing to you today. I want you to be involved in a decision we need to make. We are confronting an issue that many college newspapers face. Interest in print-based journalism is dwindling, and many college newspapers are reducing print frequency to save money and move more content online. The question Ka Leo faces is: Should the newspaper change its printing schedule? Visit the link to the left or scan the QR code to complete a survey that will help us make a decision on whether to change our printing away from three times a week. If you complete the survey, you will have a chance to win: First place – $100 Makino Chaya Restaurant gift card; second place – $50 Kiss My Grits Restaurant gift card; and third place – $25 Big City Diner gift card. You must be a fee-paying student to be eligible to win prizes. If you have any questions or comments about changing our printing schedule, please email me at editor@kaleo.org. I look forward to hearing from you. Mahalo, Marc Arakaki Ka Leo Interim Editor in Chief

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Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 9 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 13 2013

Comics


Page 10 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 13 2013

Games

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ACROSS 1 Sound finely tuned 5 Parsley family herb 9 Straight from the garden 14 Role for Ronny 15 Neighborhood 16 Ceiling 17 GREEN 20 Next in line 21 Hobbyist’s buy 22 Tennis racket part 23 First word of “Greensleeves” 25 In a glass by itself 27 GREEN 33 Green prefix 34 Green shade 35 Aimée of “La Dolce Vita” 37 Cozy reading rooms 39 Personal property 42 “At Wit’s End” humorist Bombeck 43 Drilling tool 45 Buster? 47 It might say “Wipe your paws” 48 GREEN 52 __ carotene 53 Draws 54 Parlor piece 57 “The Green Hornet” airer, 1966-’67 59 Puget Sound port 63 GREEN 66 Japan’s commercial center, historically 67 Accessory on the handlebars 68 TV part? 69 __-case scenario 70 Oscillation 71 Body art, briefly DOWN 1 Little, to Leoncavallo 2 Aware of, as the latest

3 Fruit coat 4 Protect again, as a driveway 5 Pre-Renaissance period 6 Football commentator Cross 7 Drip, say 8 Emilio Estefan, notably 9 Producer Ziegfeld 10 Cellphone customer’s creation, perhaps 11 Mideast ruler 12 “Right away, señor!” 13 Internet address letters 18 Brilliance 19 Gossip tidbit 24 Install in Congress 26 Dr.’s group 27 Sanskrit scripture 28 Frost over 29 Mute sound? 30 Stuck (to) 31 Marilyn, before she was Marilyn 32 Poison __ 36 Latest addition to the British Royal Family 38 Reversals 40 __ food 41 Genetic research insect 44 U.S. 1, for one 46 Lobster Newburg ingredient 49 Emphatic type: Abbr. 50 Big wheels 51 Author Fitzgerald 54 Put in the overhead bin 55 Very 56 Cold feet 58 Seagoing help 60 Military classification 61 Go all weak in the knees 62 Seagoing assents 64 Bit of muesli 65 Schnozz extender

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Opinions@kaleo.org | Sarah Nishioka Editor | Tim Metra Associate

Page 11 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 13 2013

Opinions It’s a man’s world, and women don’t help CINDY HUYNH Contributing Writer It is always a sad day in history when a woman has to hurt other women to establish her position. Three weeks ago, Marissa Mayer decreed that Yahoo employees could no longer work from home. Originally, when the pregnant 37 year-old was named CEO of Yahoo, it was a cause for celebration for women around the world, especially working mothers. This was a woman who had it all: a happy marriage, a successful career and children. It should have been the start of a new era, but it was regression instead. While certainly workers of both sexes telecommute, the reality is that the ability to work from home is a godsend for working mothers, and Mayer’s actions should be considered a betrayal to decades of women’s rights progress. FORTUNE LIVE MEDIA / FLICKR

Marissa Mayer became Google’s first female engineer in 1999.

C H A N G I N G T H E WO R L D Mayer’s decision has already influenced other big-name corpo-

rations to do the same. Last week, Best Buy announced that it is making changes to its flexible work program for the 4,000 employees who do not work in its stores. According to Telework Research Network, about 2.8 million employees – or just more than two percent of the U.S. workforce as of 2010 – telecommute a majority of the time. This figure does not include self-employed workers or unpaid volunteers.

NO NEED TO BE A MAN Yahoo has made several excuses to defend its decision, stating that “it builds company morale” and “creates a culture of innovation and collaboration.” In fact, Yahoo claimed that 95 percent of employees were optimistic about the company’s future and that this was a 32 percent rise from the previous survey. The decision to ban telecommuting is actually an attempt by Mayer to establish her place in a world dominated by males. When coming into power, women are

scrutinized to a higher degree than their male colleagues. In response, women like Mayer make decisions that hurt other women to prove that they are equals with men and do not need special treatment. They do it to be considered “one of the guys,” even if it harms their own goals as women. Mayer needs to reverse her policy for many reasons. As an Internet-based corporation, if there is any company that could work with telecommuting, it should be Yahoo. Even Bill Gates has disagreed with her decision, claiming that it “counters” Yahoo’s intention to innovate its image. The main issue is that Mayer doesn’t understand that telecommuting allows women to have a career while taking care of their families. How many women have lost or will lose their jobs because of this rule, and how many mothers will lose their jobs as more companies follow this reasoning? There is no way of telling how this will play out, but it probably won’t end well for the average worker.

Tension threatens U.S. and China relations CARTER C. K OCH Staff Writer

For the past decade, the gross domestic product of China has increased by an average of eight percent per annum and is expected to carry over to 2014, which is an economic boom. While the United States’ unemployment rate was standing at nearly 10 percent in 2010, China was experiencing a rate of only 4.6 percent and expecting that rate to drop to four percent by the end of 2012. Although the United States considers a five percent unemployment rate to be full employment, taking into consideration frictional and structural unemployment, China is still outplaying the U.S. in regards to economic growth. The fact of the matter is that the U.S. economy is underperforming, and although it is showing improve-

ment, progress is sluggish. U.S. involvement in Taiwan, although aimed at securing financial interests abroad and increasing economic performance, may actually be placing a dangerous strain in its relationship with China.

BUILDING TENSIONS At a lecture held at the East West Center a few weeks ago, former Ambassador J. Stapleton Roy discussed the strategic challenges in the U.S. arms sale to Taiwan and the noticeable increase in Chinese aggression in Southeast Asia. Roy explained that the reason for growing arms sales to Taiwan involves two key components: The first is that “we have wanted to create maximum disincentive for a nonpeaceful solution, and we do that by continuing to sell arms to Taiwan,” which translates to an armed Tai-

wan government with less Chinese influence on Taiwan’s trade agreements, and the second component is to promote incentives for peaceful solutions. It is not the objective of the U.S. to make Taiwan strong enough to break away from China completely, but to obstruct China from affecting trade relations between Taiwan and the U.S. Unfortunately, this is not how the Chinese view these tactics.

C H I N AʼS P E R S P E C T I V E During the lecture, Roy noted that China sees such tactics by the U.S. as an attempt to contain a growing Chinese economy, while China sees the U.S. as a declining power that is losing more of its global inf luence. With such a view in mind, the ambassador noted that the U.S. should increase military presence in Southeast Asia to show that it is neither a

OLIVIER DOULIERY/ ABACA PRESS / MCTS

At the end of his Southeast Asia trip last year, President Barack Obama met with Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao. declining nor weakening power. It is extremely dangerous to allow China to carry such a perspective because its aggression in Southeast Asia may continue to increase, which will directly affect U.S. allies in the region. The world has experienced too many global wars to allow the misperceptions of leaders to cause

new tensions and the possibility of another war. It is not only a domestic responsibility for China and the U.S. to demonstrate a peaceful resolution, but also an international responsibility: They should show the world that cooperation and peace are above all other matters, including a higher GDP or better economy.


Sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor | Jeremy Nitta Associate

Page 12 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 13 2013

Sports VISIT HAWAIIATHLETICS.COM FOR SEASON SCHEDULES

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(continued from page 2) “They’re [Hawai‘i] a talented team,” UC Irvine head coach Russell Turner said. “They’re a good team, and we respect them. Their size is a factor, clearly. But as Gib said, he felt like they matched up well with us. I feel the same thing. I thinks it’s gonna be a really fine matchup. It’s gonna be a good college basketball game when we play.” However, one place where the teams do not match up is location. The tournament will be held at the Honda Center, which is 15 miles from UCI and more than 2,000 from UH. “The game here was really close, and Hawai‘i’s good,” Turner said. “This is a different kind of road trip too. … I don’t think there’s an advantage either way. I know Hawai‘i’s fans are outstanding and will likely travel. I’ve seen Hawai‘i’s volleyball team play here at Irvine, and it seemed like

they had as many people as we had. I think that they’ll have great support, I think we’ll have good support from the Irvine folks and I expect it to be a good matchup in a neutral place. Either team can win.”

UPCOMING GAMES Big West Tournament Quarterfinals: UH vs. UC Irvine Thursday 30 minutes after Long Beach State vs. Cal State Fullerton (3 p.m.) Semifinals Friday at either 3:30 or 6 p.m. Championship Saturday at 4:30 p.m.

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went 18 -10, but that team lost in the first round of the Western Athletic Conference tournament. This year’s squad is determined not to suffer the same fate in the Big West. “ We’re really pumped for this tournament,” senior center Stephanie Ricketts said. “We’ve been talking about this tournament since before I can even remember. The way I think about it, all during the preseason we had tournaments. And they were fi lled with tough teams, and we weren’t able to win any of them. We want to win a tournament, and we know that we can win this one.” “We’re going to go into that game the way we always do,” junior guard Kanisha Bello said. “We’re going to be prepared, and I know we’re going to come out on top. There’s no way I’m going to end my career on a loss.”

Big West Defensive Ranks Scoring defense: 2nd, 59.4 points per game 3-pt FG percent defense: 3rd, .280 Defensive rebound percent: 1st, .699

UPCOMING GAMES Rainbow Wahine begins tournament play today at UC Irvine’s Bren Events Center at 3 p.m. HT


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