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A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6 to THURSDAY MARCH 7, 2013 VOLUME 108 ISSUE 62

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

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Page 2 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 6 2013

News@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kelly Editor | Alex Bitter Associate

News

Wi Fi

BEN SAUNDERS Contributing Writer When it comes to the wireless Internet at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, the issue is not how many people are using UH’s network but how many devices are connected at a time. “We have … about 7,000 clients,” said Janice Kawachi, manager of the Telecommunications and Networking Operations division of UH’s Information Technology Center. “If you have a lot of people accessing [the network], you are going to get a slow response.” Many people have multiple wireless devices that are all connected at once, thereby creating more traffic than would be found in the network if each person only used one wireless device at a time. There are multiple access points around campus to distribute the strain of traffic more easily. Additionally, more access points are being added to further mitigate any problems caused by large bandwidth usage, with the Art Building being the latest recipient of these upgrades. “All campuses [in the UH system] are working to expand their wireless and improve it,” IT

communications officer Larry Wiss said. “Although they haven’t received any major complaints about serious network issues or disruptions, Information Technology workers at UH are dedicated to making wireless browsing easier and faster.”

WHAT YOU C AN DO TO H E LP Kawachi said it is important for students to report any connection issues to the IT Center, and when voicing issues about Wi-Fi, specificity is key in helping to find a solution. “What’s helpful for us is time, location … what are the symptoms,” Kawachi said. Concerns about the Wi-Fi can be sent to help@hawaii.edu, and basic troubleshooting options can be found at hawaii.edu/wireless. In addition to the web, UH Mānoa’s IT Help Desk, and those of other O‘ahu campuses, can be reached at 808 -956 -8883.

In addition to the web, UH Manoa’s IT Help Desk, and those of other O‘ahu campuses, can be reached at 808-956-8883.

PHOTOS BY BIANCA BYSTROM PINO / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I


News@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kelly Editor | Alex Bitter Associate

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 6 2013

News K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

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EDITORIAL STAFF Interim Editor in Chief Marc Arakaki Managing Editor Paige Takeya Co-Assc Chief Copy Editor Joseph Han Co-Assc Chief Copy Editor Kim Clark Design Editor Bianca Bystrom Pino Assc Design Editor Emily Boyd News Editor Caitlin Kelly Assc News Editor Alex Bitter Features Editor Caitlin Kuroda Assc Features Editor Nicolyn Charlot Opinions Editor Sarah Nishioka Assc Opinions Editor Tim Metra Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Assc Sports Editor Jeremy Nitta Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Nik Seu Assc Photo Editor Chasen Davis Special Issues Editor Ariel Ramos Web Specialist Blake Tolentino Web Editor Quincy Greenheck

ADVERTISING E-mail advertising@kaleo.org Ad Manager Regina Zabanal Marketing Director Reece Farinas PR Coordinator Tianna Barbier Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications.

ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Susan Lin, chair; Rebekah Carroll, vice chair; or Esther Fung, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

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Page 4 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 6 2013

News@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kelly Editor | Alex Bitter Associate

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News@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kelly Editor | Alex Bitter Associate

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 6 2013

News

CPR training: What you need to know CAITLIN K ELLY News Editor

A person has four to six minutes before brain death after suffering cardiac arrest. Because emergency officials typically take four to fi ve minutes to respond, this situation can quickly become life threatening. However, CPR has the potential to increase a person’s window for survival. To educate the University of Hawai‘i community about this technique, first aid/ CPR training classes are being offered today by Campus Security and the Emergency Management Department. The classes are through the American Heart Association and all faculty, staff and students are eligible to sign up. Classes are limited to the first 16 participants. “[CPR] can buy time,” said A H A Training Manager Dor y Clisham. “ W hile they’re doing the CPR, they’re actually getting oxygen in the blood to the brain, so it ’s keeping the brain alive until firefighters or the ambulance shows up.” One method of CPR that is gaining popularity is Hands-Only CPR. The A HA website states that if you see a teen or adult suddenly collapse, call 911 and push hard and fast in the center of the chest to the rhythm of the disco song “Stayin’ Alive.” It has more than 100 beats per minute, which

is the rate one should push on the chest for CPR. “ We want to encourage people to learn CPR,” Clisham said. “It only takes just a few minutes. Hands-only CPR can be learned in about five to ten minutes and it can save a life.” However, there are limita-

tions to this technique. “The only time it wouldn’t work out so much is where it was a near drowning, or pediatric patients and it was a respiratory arrest,” Clisham explained. According to the AHA, HandsOnly CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR for

sudden cardiac arrests at home, at work or in public. “When somebody collapses and they go into cardiac arrest, there’s existing oxygen in the body,” Clisham said. “[For Hands-Only CPR] we’re compressing the heart and we’re allowing the heart to fill up with

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blood again. So by doing so, we are actually circulating oxygen throughout the body.” College students are still susceptible to cardiac arrest, and 89 percent of people who suf fer an out- of-hospital cardiac arrest die because they don’t receive immediate CPR from someone on the scene. “In the past, people used to talk about cardiac arrest and they would say ‘ That’s for the old people; old people’s hearts give out and that’s why they go into cardiac arrest,’” Clisham explained. “Now we’re seeing so many more young people in athletics because they’re pushing their bodies and a lot of them are drinking these energy drinks and getting their heart rates up, so it’s pushing their heart.” A fter being involved with A H A , Clisham has come to ap preciate the impact that CPR can have on lives. “Life is f leeting, especially a young life,” she said. “ W hen you see a young life taken, it ’s really sad. It ’s a ver y sad thing. You just feel like this person has not quite reached their po tential, so if you’ve done some thing and could make a dif ference and could actually save a life, I think it ’s huge.”


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 6 2013

Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Nicolyn Charlot Associate

Features

Midterm brain food

K ELLY SLOAN Staff Writer With the stress of studying for midterms, students can become so focused on schoolwork that they slip into unhealthy eating habits. But before you grab that candy bar to keep your appetite at bay as you study, consider this: Your brain runs on blood sugar, and the regulation of these sugar levels greatly affects brain function. Some foods are broken down into blood sugar more quickly, such as candy or soda, while other foods, such as eggs and whole grains, take longer. An imbalance in blood sugar levels can leave you feeling irritable, inattentive and sleepy, which can affect the proper brain function required for schoolwork. It is important to eat foods that take longer to break down, leaving a steady source of energy for the body to use. Examples of these foods include whole grains, fruits, vegetables and legumes. A nutritious diet keeps your brain working at its best and is great for your overall health. Eating smart is just as important as memorizing fl ash cards, so incorporate these nutritious foods into your diet for increased brain power before your next big test.

AVO C A D O S Avocados contain monounsaturated fat (considered to be healthy fat), vitamin K, potassium and folate. Folate is essential for brain health and the maintenance of cognitive functions including memory.

BA N A N A S

Bananas are a source of potassium, fiber and vitamin B6. The high level of potassium supplied to the brain keeps oxygen levels normal. Bananas also facilitate brain function by releasing energy slowly, and this helps keep the brain alert.

SA L MO N A N D N U T S

Fish and walnuts are a great source of omega 3 fatty acids. Your body cannot make omega 3’s, so you must get them from the foods you eat. Fish is filled with nutrients that help improve and maintain overall health and also assists in clear thinking. A handful of walnuts can provide essential alpha linolenic acid for lower stress levels and anxiety.

PEANUT BUTTER

Peanut butter is high in protein and also contains vitamin B3 and folate. Protein is important for brain function because it contains amino acids that are essential for neurotransmitters, the chemicals that pass information around among brain cells.

OATM E A L A N D UNSWEETENED CEREAL

Oatmeal and cereal contain complex carbs, which provide for the regulation of blood sugar levels and brain function. They also have energy-boosting protein and fiber. Milk with oatmeal or cereal enhances the nutritional value of your breakfast by making it a source of calcium and vitamin D, which may help with memory and attention span throughout the day.

TIPS FOR IMPROVING BRAIN FUNCTION FOR MIDTERMS

AUSTIN KAMIMURA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

1. Get a good night’s sleep – in both quality and quantity. 2. Eat a well-balanced breakfast with sources of protein, carbohydrates and good fats – for example, yogurt with granola and walnuts. 3. Eat nutrient-dense foods and beverages for lunch, dinner and snack time. Snack suggestions include beef jerky, banana and peanut butter sandwich on whole wheat bread or a blueberry smoothie.


News@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kelly Editor | Alex Bitter Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 6 2013

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Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Nicolyn Charlot Associate

UH students head to Cook Islands for Film Raro challenge

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Lau and her crew are currently fundraising for equipment and backup supplies. For more information on the film-inprogress and how to donate, go to indiegogo.com/projects/342634. CAITLIN KURODA Features Editor Making films requires a lot of skill and an equal amount of luck – University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa student Erin Lau, a junior in the Academy for Creative Media, seems to have both. Lau’s script for “Little Girl’s War Cry” has been selected from entries worldwide as one of eight to be produced and screened in the Cook Islands as part of the Film Raro Film Makers Paradise Challenge this May. This “film challenge like no other” will bring eight film crews to Rarotonga, the most populated of the Cook Islands. There they will have seven days to film, edit and screen their 10 -minute scripts. Lau will bring along two UH Mānoa ACM graduates, Kristin Kouke (director of photography and editor) and Jamie Poliahu (gaffer), as well as fellow junior in ACM Bryan Ruiz (sound technician). “It’s a huge honor to be selected with people who are already industry professionals and have already accomplished so much,” Lau said in an email interview. “But it’s a little intimidating because you’re fi lming with people who are already so polished and potentially have resources that we don’t yet because we’re still so young.”

AG E I S J U S T A N U M B E R Among professionals and other longtime filmmakers, Lau’s crew is the youngest and the only one made up of people who are still students. “We’re all still sort of getting used to how the film business works,” Ruiz said in an email interview. “Most of us have only worked on student films, but for this competition, I don’t think any of us really know what to expect.” Despite their inexperience, Lau sees her crew’s young composition as an advantage rather than a hindrance, citing that their age and experience levels will bring a “fresh and new perspective” to the competition. Additionally, Lau emphasized other characteristics and accomplishments of her crew that she believes will give them an edge over their competitors, including filming abroad in locations such as China and France. “[Filming abroad] has allowed us to develop a more global perspective, as well as the patience and experience to focus under pressure when shooting in new and foreign environments with tight slots of time,” Lau explained. “And since we’re coming from a culture and background similar to the Cook Islands, we come from a place that also has many indigenous stories and common challenges we can re-

late to and have the experience and understanding of proper protocols when filming in those environments and types of topics.”

ʻTHEIR STORIESʼ Lau’s script, “Little Girl’s War Cry,” follows Tiare, a 10 -yearold Maori girl who is raised by a single mother who faces abuse from her boyfriend. Tiare often escapes into her imagination, but she is soon forced to face the harsh realities and violence that has always been a part of her family and childhood. Lau chose to center her film on the issue of domestic violence because of its prominence in the Cook Islands as well as the rest of the Pacific region. “Although steps have been taken to tackle the problem in the Cook Islands, it still exists in silence,” Lau said. “I hope to capture through this fi lm, if even the slightest piece, the feelings and experiences children and women must endure in these cases, in hopes that it will move people to understand the seriousness of the issue and that in taking action, they can make a difference.” Scan this QR code to read about Lau and her previous achievements at the Shanghai International Film Festival.


Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Nicolyn Charlot Associate

Page 9 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 6 2013

Features

March game releases to anticipate

AYUMI E STHER CONMY Staff Writer

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ʻS TA RC R A F T I I : H E A R T O F T H E S WA R Mʼ The StarCraft series is releasing an expansion for “StarCraft: Wings of Liberty.” “StarCraft II: Heart of the Swarm” is also part two of the “StarCraft II” trilogy. The expansion pack will include additional units, changes to the multiplayer mode and a campaign that continues the main story that focuses on the Zerg race. Taking place two years after the events of “Wings of Liberty,” the main focus of this game will be on the Zerg race and Sarah Kerrigan, the protagonist and anti-hero. Having regained her human form, Sarah is on a crusade to regain leadership of her swarm that has been divided into many factions, while exacting vengeance on Arcturus Mengsk, Emperor of the Terran Dominion. This Blizzard-developed realtime strategy game developed by Blizzard is set to be released on March 12 on PC and OS X. The regular edition will be priced as an expansion pack and will cost $39.99.

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“God of War: Ascension,” set to be released March 12, is the seventh installment and prequel in the Greek mythology-based action-adventure series. The game takes place about 10 years before the original series and is centered around the theme of vengeance. Gamers will play as Kratos, who is much more human than divine in this game. After being tricked by Ares into killing his wife and son, he goes on a quest for redemption, which leads to his attempt to break away from Ares’ control. Along the way, he will face off against the three Furies. This third person action-adventure game was developed by Sony’s in-house Santa Monica Studios and will be released exclusively for the PS3. It will also be the fi rst game in the series to have multiplayer components for as many as eight players as well as extra downloadable content. The regular edition will retail for $59.99.

“BioShock Infinite,” which hits the streets on March 26, is set in 1912 and follows a different storyline than the rest of the series. The setting is in the steampunkinspired air-city of Columbia, where players take on the role of Booker DeWitt, a former Pinkerton agent who has been sent to rescue the long-time captive Elizabeth. Although Booker is successful in saving the 12-year detainee, they must team up to fight off the Founders and the Vox Populi, two rival factions that are engaged in bloody civil war. Gamers will use the same combinations of weapons, gear and psychokinetic powers seen in previous games. Gamers can look forward to an expansion of available combat challenges due to the open-air nature of the setting. This Irrational Games-de veloped first-person shooter will be available on the Xbox 360, PS3 and PC. The regular edition retails for $59.99.

Crystal Dynamic’s “Tomb Raider,” out now, has revamped and rebooted the series. The game overhauls the beginnings of Lara Croft and explains how her transformation from unsure young woman to athletic adventurer came about. An inexperienced Lara Croft is shipwrecked on a tropical island near Japan. Her fight for survival becomes more dangerous than expected when she is separated from the other survivors and forced to fight off the dangerous mercenaries that lurk on the island. It is also the first “Tomb Raider” game to be rated Mature for violent content. Early reviews have praised the intense emotional punch of the game, though critics have commented on the disparity between Lara’s hesitance to use violence in the story as she slaughters hundreds of enemies in the game. This action-adventure platform game will be available for the Xbox 360, PS3 and PC for $59.99.

ʻG G E A R S O F WA R : J U D GM E N T ʼ

“Gears of War: Judgment,” developed by Epic Games and People Can Fly, will release March 19. Though it may be the fourth entry in the series, the title actually is a prequel to the other three. Series protagonist Marcus Fenix is sitting this one out, as his squadmates Damon Baird and Augustus Cole headline the show instead. Players follow the saga of the Kilo Squad as they battle their way to try and save the city of Halvo Bay in the subsequent aftermath of Emergence Day. Two new multiplayer modes are set to make an appearance in “Gears of War: Judgment”: OverRun and Free-for-All. Made exclusively for the Xbox 360, this third-person shooter is priced at $59.99 for the regular edition. Anyone who pre-orders the game from any retailer will receive a free copy of the original “Gears of War.”


Page 10 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 6 2013

Opinions@kaleo.org | Sarah Nishioka Editor | Tim Metra Associate

Opinions LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Learning from another land

In defense of marriage The article published on Feb. 13, entitled “Finding free love for the future,” was remarkable and dangerous. The author asserts that marriage is a thing of the past and we would be better off engaging in the practice of free love, a social movement often associated with promiscuity and the doctrine of having sex indiscriminately for the purpose of “feeling good.” No doubt this article was good for a few laughs, but it distorts reality and pushes an agenda that is damaging both to society and to the individuals who buy into its philosophy. The author’s argument that marriage is “about the social bondage of women” is justified by a few vague references to history. While marriage has been used in such a manner in certain societies, this argument is inappropriately applied to marriages taking place in America today. The vast majority of marriages in most modern societies are entered and exited willingly. Ironically, the divorce rate cited by the author is evidence against his contention that marriage is bondage. Try asking people you know who are married if they feel that they are in bondage or that the woman is forced to be subservient to her husband. Divorce is certainly a problem, but it is not solved by dissolving the institution of marriage. I would contend that the prevalence of divorce has much of its roots in the doctrines of free love. When society buys into the idea that feeling good and pursuing pleasures are more important than commitment, self-responsibility, sacrifice and dedication, it is a natural consequence that people will run from problems rather than pull together to overcome them. Relationships have issues, and people face difficulties. But if we run from them and distract ourselves with temporary, even if exciting, pleasures, we are avoiding the problem. Marriage is hard work and free love is not. But marriage, done properly, is satisfying and lasting. Free love is temporary, fleeting and hollow. Even more sinister, the doctrine of free love objectifies others. Sex is seen solely as a mechanism for pleasure, and sexual partners are seen merely as a path to physical satisfaction. This is a distorted worldview that dehumanizes women as sexual objects and men as slaves to their hormones. True love, especially when sealed by a commitment of marriage, seeks to build others and strengthen one another in the highest respect. The author did get one thing right: He defined love as “caring about another person in the same way one loves him or herself.” Unfortunately, the philosophy of sex with anyone and everyone, which he seems to espouse, does exactly the opposite: It loves ourselves more than others. Those who buy into the idea of free love will one day wake up to realize that their lives have been dedicated to the pursuit of temporary excitement. Those wise enough to, when the time is right, settle down with someone they truly love and then work with that person to overcome the challenges of relationships and life, building up each other along the way, will find everlasting happiness. They will have sacrificed instant pleasure for lasting satisfaction and love. It will take work, to be sure, but it is absolutely worth it.

S TEVE MOODY Student East Asian Languages and Literatures

The Hawai‘i Tourism Authority reported that 681,854 visitors came to the islands in January. JDNX FLICKR

SURIA CARVALHO Contributing Writer About seven years ago, I fell in love with Hawai‘i – the land, the “spirit of aloha,” the similarities with my home country of Brazil and the idea of its cultural melting pot. I was, on some level, aware of past struggles of Native Hawaiians but had little idea of the degree to which they suffered and still suffer today. I am beginning to see that there is another side to the commercialized image of Hawai‘i – a paradise full of happy natives that can’t wait to share their culture with tourists. It is not a pretty or happy image, at least not for the Hawaiians, and it is a story I have heard before.

I N T E R N AT I O N A L CONNECTIONS I work for the University of Hawai‘i Media Center, and my job is to facilitate the interactive video classes by preparing the room and operating the cameras. While assisting a class about Native Hawaiian health, I learned about the healing systems of the Hawaiian people implemented prior to Captain James Cook’s arrival. Although Cook’s reports described Native Hawaiians as strong and healthy-looking, Hawaiians today have significant incidences of hypertension, dyslipidemia, type II diabetes mellitus, obesity, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. These are not the only conse-

quences of colonialism and contact with the “Western” world: According to Jonathan Okamura’s book, “Ethnicity and Inequality in Hawai‘i,” Hawaiians, Samoans and Filipinos occupy the lower end of the strata, with family income levels that sit below the medium income level. The 2000 Census notes that 6.4 percent of the Native Hawaiian population was unemployed, and only 3.2 percent had a graduate or professional degree. I was born in a country that was also subjugated by colonial powers. Although Brazil gained its freedom from colonial powers early in its history, my country still suffers from the effects of neocolonialism. Our native populations were also stripped of their land, culture and language and were practically decimated by the introduction of diseases, tobacco and alcohol. When the Portuguese began planting sugar cane in Brazil, they tried to use the indigenous population as slaves. However, they were hard to capture and soon began dying in great numbers as the Europeans also brought diseases to which they had no natural immunity. There are a number of documented reports of smallpox being intentionally used as a biological weapon to get rid of native tribes. In 1570, King Sebastian decreed that the indigenes should not be used for slavery and demanded the release of those held in captivity. However, almost 185 years went by before their

slavery was finally abolished. Sadly, between 1900 and 1967, an estimated 98 indigenous tribes were wiped out.

MOV I N G F O RWA R D

In 1988, the Brazilian Constitution finally recognized the rights of indigenous people to pursue their traditional ways of life and granted them their “traditional lands,” which are demarcated as Indigenous Territories. Sadly, Hawaiians have not been given back any of their lands, nor have they gained recognition or legal rights to pursue their traditional ways of life. The only thing they have gained is a public apology, signed by President Bill Clinton, for the U.S. involvement in the overthrow. Hawai‘i should learn from the experiences of the indigenous people of Brazil. In practice, Brazil’s indigenous people still face many challenges to their survival and cultural legacy, but regaining their land has given them a place to practice their culture and be who they are. It is imperative that Native Hawaiians be granted their rights to pursue their traditional ways of life and get back at least some of their “traditional lands,” as the indigenes in my country have. The more I learn about the ancestors of Native Hawaiians and their way of living, the more I appreciate it. I love the real Hawai‘i, not the commercialized image that ignores the pain and struggles of its native people.


Advertising@kaleo.org | Regina Zabanal Student Ad Manager |Reece Farinas Marketing Director

Page 11 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 6 2013


Sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor| Jeremy Nitta Associate

Page 12 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 6 2013

Sports

UH looks for redemption against USC M A DDIE S A PIGAO Staff Writer

VICTORIA DUBROWSKIJ / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Sophomore outside hitter Brook Sedore ranks third on the team with 2.48 kills per set.

The University of Hawai‘i men’s volleyball team (5-12, 4-10 Mountain Pacific Sports Federation) had a rough weekend, losing to No. 8 Cal State Northridge (9-6, 7-6 MPSF) twice in four sets apiece. This was the fi rst time in 22 years that CSUN won two matches in the same season against UH. Hawai‘i hopes to bounce back from its two losses during the weekend and beat unranked USC (4-9, 4-9 MPSF) at home. The Trojans are coming off a dramatic five-set loss against No. 4 Stanford (12-6, 9-6 MPSF). UH looked out of sync on Friday and Sunday nights. There were times when Hawai‘i was on top and playing well, but its deficits were too great to come back from. “We just have to take the loses

and turn them into a learning experience,” said junior middle blocker Taylor Averill. “[We need to] take what we had some problems on and adjust for next weekend.” The Warriors’ offense is led by sophomore outside hitter JP Marks with 176 kills and 17 aces and freshman outside hitter Sinisa Zarkovic with 184 kills and 12 aces. The Warriors’ defense has also been championed by Marks with 106 digs and senior libero Matthew Cheape with 98. USC will be the first unranked team that UH will play this season. The Trojans have lost the majority of their matches in four sets, only going to five once. UH has gone to five sets in 10 matches, winning five of them. The Trojans are led by junior opposite Tanner Jansen with 194 kills, followed by sophomore middle blocker Robert Feathers with 111 kills. The Tro-

jans defense is led by Kamehameha-Kapalama alumnus and sophomore setter Micah Christensen with 113 digs. “We just beat ourselves this weekend, but we know we can take on USC,” Averill said. “We just need to execute the game plan.” The Warriors take on USC Friday at 7 p.m. in the Stan Sheriff Center and again on Sunday at 5 p.m.

UPCOMING GAMES UH vs. USC Friday at 7 p.m. Sunday at 5 p.m. Both matches will be held in the Stan Sheriff Center. Students get in free with a validated ID.


Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 13 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 6 2013

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Page 14 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 6 2013

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Sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor| Jeremy Nitta Associate

Page 15 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 6 2013

Sports Seniors lead third place ‘Bows into last two Big West games

ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Senior center Stephanie Ricketts was the first ever athlete at UH to play softball and basketball. M ARC A R AK AKI Interim Editor in Chief Seniors Stephanie Ricketts and Monica DeAngelis exude leadership on the UH women’s basketball team. Ricketts, in her first year on the women’s basketball team, spent four seasons on the softball team as a pitcher, where she received All-American honors in 2011 and 2012. “She has taught the team that confi dence and composure goes a long ways,” head coach Laura Beeman said. “She has this knack of getting the job done.” DeAngelis is also in her fi rst year on the Rainbow Wahine basketball team and is the team’s starting point guard. “She [Monica] will try to lead the team whether they will listen to her or not,” Beeman said. “At times – even when she has bad games – the girls still appreciate the confi dence and that level of composure.”

SENIOR NIGHT R icketts and DeA ngelis will play

in their last games at home this week against UC R iverside on Thursday and Cal State Fullerton on Saturday, and both seniors will be honored following Saturday’s game. “Most of all [I’m] just thankful that I got the opportunity to play with these girls and for this coaching staff and to play basketball in general,” Ricketts said. “[I] donʻt wanna pursue a career professionally because my body can’t take it,” DeAngelis said. “[I’ll feel] mostly sadness but also happiness and thankful for this journey that has taken me through 18 years of my life.”

A L L - A RO U N D R I C K E T T S Ricketts last played competitive basketball while at Archbishop Mitty High School in San Jose, Calif. “I’m pretty sure I made a fool out of myself a few times on the court but definitely worth it,” Ricketts said. “ The hardest part was changing the speed of how you think. ... In basketball, you can’t

VICTORIA DUBROWSKIJ / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Senior guard Monica DeAngelis transferred from Loyola Marymount University where she earned a bachelor’s degree in business administraton. think ahead at all because plays get broken – you just have to react.” She played in all but one of Hawai‘i’s 17 home games this season, including one road game, averaging 11.6 minutes per game.

DETERMINED DEANGELIS DeAngelis, also known as “Mo,” is a transfer from Loyola Marymount where she played three years for the Lions. She chose Hawai‘i for a change of atmosphere. “I’ve learned so many things here from Coach Beeman and the coaching staff. ... That’s pretty incredible at this level,” DeAngelis said. DeAngelis is currently in the educational administration program at UH Mānoa and is expected to graduate next year. “I defi nitely want to coach one day – defi nitely at the club level,” DeAngelis said.

TAGA L I C O D A N D B E L L O Juniors Vicky Tagalicod and Kanisha Bello will also be graduating this year and will leave the basketball program following this season.

“They both want to start their careers – they’re both ready to give to the community,” Beeman said.

Scan these QR codes to read past profiles of: Monica DeAngelis written on Jan. 11, 2013

Stephanie Ricketts written on Nov. 7, 2012

UPCOMING GAMES UH vs. UC Riverside 7 p.m. Thursday UH vs. Cal-State Fullerton 7 p.m. Saturday Both games will be held in the Stan Sheriff Center


Sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor| Jeremy Nitta Associate

Page 16 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, March 6 2013

Sports Hawai‘i closes out regular season at Northridge JOEY R AMIREZ Sports Editor Only one regular season game remains for the Rainbow Warrior basketball team (17-12, 10-7 BWC). But that matchup with Cal State Northridge (14-17, 4-13 BWC) is crucial to Hawai‘i’s seeding in the Big West Basketball Tournament. UH is currently ranked fifth in the conference, but the ‘Bows have room to climb to third seed or to fall to sixth. Hawai‘i is looking to recover from a 64-61 loss in its final home game to Cal Poly on Saturday – the only home defeat in conference play for the Rainbow Warriors this year.

A LOOK AT THE COMPETITION KENT NISHIMURA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Freshman forward Isaac Fotu (left) helps the Rainbow Warriors lead the Big West in rebounding margin at +5.7.

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The Matadors are also on a six-game losing streak and ranked ninth in the Big West, but that does not mean that they do not have the pieces to pull off an upset.

CSUN has proven its ability to score, having the conference’s second-best offensive output (74.8 ppg). Northridge (37.1 rpg) is also one of the few teams with the ability to challenge Hawai‘i (38.6) in grabbing rebounds, and the Matadors average the most steals in the Big West (8.5). The key to a Rainbow Warrior victory should be keeping up with CSUN’s pace, seeing how its second-best scoring offense is matched by having the secondworst defense. The Matadors allow 74.8 points per game and are 4-15 when allowing 73 or more. UH is 13-2 when reaching that mark.

is especially needed because UH has played three Rainbow Warriors off the bench in its last two games. Senior forward Hauns Brereton has scored 13 points or more during the same span after having only five such performances in UH’s previous 24 games. Also, senior point guard Jace Tavita leads the Big West with 5.6 assists per game. “They’ve done a lot for University of Hawai‘i basketball,” said head coach Gib Arnold. “We’re a very good team right now, a very good program. We’ve got great support. We play good basketball, and we wouldn’t be doing that without those three guys.”

S E N I O R S L E A D I N G T H E WAY

UPCOMING GAMES

Hawai‘i will call upon its trio of seniors to step it up in this final regular season matchup, including Joaquim, who has averaged a team-best 17.0 points and 10.3 rebounds during the past three games. Their influence

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