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A K LEO T H E

FRIDAY, FEB. 15 to MONDAY, FEB. 18, 2013 VOLUME 108 ISSUE 55

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Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

AFTER

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Page 2 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 15 2013

News@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kelly Editor | Alex Bitter Associate

News K A LEO T H E

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Interim Editor in Chief Marc Arakaki Managing Editor Paige Takeya Co-Assc Chief Copy Editor Joseph Han Co-Assc Chief Copy Editor Kim Clark Design Editor Bianca Bystrom Pino Assc Design Editor Emily Boyd News Editor Caitlin Kelly Assc News Editor Alex Bitter Features Editor Caitlin Kuroda Assc Features Editor Nicolyn Charlot Opinions Editor Sarah Nishioka Assc Opinions Editor Tim Metra Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Assc Sports Editor Jeremy Nitta Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Nik Seu Assc Photo Editor Chasen Davis Special Issues Editor Ariel Ramos Web Specialist Blake Tolentino Web Editor Quincy Greenheck

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications.

ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Susan Lin, chair; Rebekah Carroll, vice chair; or Esther Fung, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

SACHI KASAHARA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

M AT THEW SYLVA Senior Staff Writer

F E B . 9: E - HARASSMENT At 6:34 p.m., a female University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa student reported receiving harassing emails from a male UH associate. At the time of the report, the student had received 25 emails within an hour. The student stated that she had never met the harasser in person, but that they are both part of the same theatre production. The student brought the incident to the attention of her director, who said they would look into the matter further. This case is pending further investigation by Campus Security.

D I S C H A RG E D I S C OV E R E D While on routine patrol of the Hale Noelani area, CS officers responded to a fire alarm activation at Hale Aloha Mokihana at 12:22 a.m. According to housing staff, a resident advisor from a different building saw a large cloud of smoke billowing out of the

upper four floors of the tower. The RA called one of the Mokihana RAs who pulled the lobby activation switch and called the Hawai‘i Fire Department. HFD responded and conducted a check of the building with CS. It was discovered that the fire extinguishers from the eighth and tenth floors were missing, and there was a fire extinguisher discharge in the makai stairwell between the eighth and tenth floors and in one of the elevators. The extinguishers were not found. The building was cleared, and the Fire Safety Office was notified. This case has been referred to Student Housing Services.

F E B . 5 -13: C R I M E U P DAT E

In the last week, CS has responded to a moped theft, two bicycle thefts, a personal item theft (keys), a burglary at Hale Noelani and three graffiti incidents. The burglary at Hale Noelani involved a broken living room sliding window and the screen slit open, similar to break-ins in the area last semester.


News@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kelly Editor | Alex Bitter Associate

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 15 2013

News

Sick supplies: flu vaccine in flux NOELLE F UJII Staff Writer University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa students will now have to venture off-campus to receive an influenza vaccine. According to University Health Services Director Andrew Nichols, UHS has exhausted its supply of influenza vaccines for the general campus community, as of Jan. 18. More than 2,000 doses were ordered for the 2012-13 school year. “I suspect that our efforts to provide affordable flu shots for students and media coverage of an ‘early flu season’ involving much of the continental United States were the causes for the resultant shortage,” Nichols said.

E A R LY WA R N I N G The clinic received its supply of influenza vaccination doses in August 2012. It began to encourage students and the campus community to receive vaccines in early September 2012. University Health Services has likely achieved the highest influenza immunization rate on the Mānoa campus because more vaccines were ordered than ever before and ran out for the fi rst time, Nichols said. However, he also noted how there was no way to know an absolute vaccination rate.

UHS, along with manufacturers and local suppliers, are out of stock for the rest of the influenza season. Prior to the season, vaccines are manufactured in batches with no additional production later in the season. “It is preferable that persons receive the seasonal flu shot annually in September to October to provide optimal protection during an upcoming flu season,” Nichols said. “Vaccination later in the flu season is still encouraged for those who have not yet received the flu vaccine, but individuals may risk either contracting the flu before being immunized or the unavailability of the vaccine.”

CHOOSING OR LOSING THE OPPORTUNIT Y UHS has a limited remaining supply of pediatric influenza vaccines provided by the Hawai‘i Department of Health. These are only given to persons 18 years or younger or to those who do not have health insurance. According to Nichols and head nurse Wendy Saelua, less than 10 people have requested influenza vaccines and were referred to local pharmacies such as CVS/Longs. Inquiries have decreased significantly during the past couple of weeks. Some students have chosen to opt out of receiving a vaccine

this year. Sophomore Matthew Oba has chosen not to get vaccinated, as he believes he will get sick regardless. Junior Rey Acosta didn’t get the vaccine this year, although he normally would. He didn’t think there would be a shortage of vaccines. “It’s kind of a big deal considering that we’re on an island. ... You can’t walk without bumping into someone, so it spreads faster,” Acosta said. “It’s a big issue.” Freshman Tyler Martinez didn’t receive the vaccine but believes Hawai‘i will be fi ne despite the shortage of vaccines. “I think we should be okay. ... I don’t think it’ll be too bad,” he said. Sophomore Chad Hiyakumoto received the vaccine from his doctor at Kapi‘olani Medical Center. He said the vaccine was hard to get because his doctor was running low on doses. “I think we should always have an accurate supply,” Hiyakumoto said. “It’s kind of sad we don’t have enough for everybody.” The Hawai‘i State Departments of Health and Education, Hawai‘i Association of Independent Schools and Hawai‘i Catholic Schools have been offering free influenza vaccines to students, faculty and staff who attend participating elementary and middle schools through the Stop Flu at School program. CHASEN DAVIS/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Tips to fight the flu from CDC If you are sick with a flu-like illness, stay home for at least 24 hours nes after your fever is gone, except to get afte medical care or for other necessities. med Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. sne Wash your hands often with

soap and water. If they’re not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs.

With UH ID: ID: Get a Free 21oz. Drink with regular purchas e Hours: Mon-Sat 10am-10pm, Sun 10am-6pm

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Page 4 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 15 2013

Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Nicolyn Charlot Associate

Features

How to dress for weather k a S N OW

K ARISSA MONTANIA Staff Writer

It’s always important to dress appropriately for different types of weather, especially at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, where the weather can change from downpour to sunshine in an instant. Follow these tips for practical and fashionable wear for any weather.

SUN

Keep your outfi fit cool and d casual. Wear simple shorts or skirts because they aree easy to move around in and will help you feel m cool throughout ut a hot day. daay. A tank top or racerback tee is also a good option ption because because it will let your shoulders and arms soak up a little ssun. Wearing slippers or fl ats is best for walking lking around arou und and staying comfortable.. Accessorize and hats, ize with sunglasses s s, and always ays use sunscreen. sun nscreen.

When traveling, stay protected from the snow by layering. Dressing for snow requires more accessories than usual. For your head, fuzzy hats aand earmuffs are always fun to wear. Cable-knit sweaters and turtlenecks will w work for tops along with a parka, k windbreaker or heavy jacket layered over your sweater as well l as a mittens or arm-warmers. Wear W legwarmers or kneehigh socks under your jeans h or o sweatpants. Wrap a scarf around your neck so that every n part of your body p is i covered.

g

RAIN

It’s best to wear pants and long-sleeved tops that are warm and provide protection. Start with a tank top under a knitted sweater – when the rain stops and it begins to warm up, you’ll have a breezy top underneath. Basic denim jeans or tights would be best, but make sure that they aren’t so long that the bottoms will get wet. Rain boots, sneakers or flats are always appropriate to wear, and be sure to carry an umbrella.

WIND

v

You don’t want to wear something that will fl y away from you. Three-quarter T-shirts allow you to feel the coolness of the wind without being too cold. Layer a jacket over the shirt for extra protection when the wind is strong. Jeans or leggings have enough material to keep you warm. Shoes like Converse or Keds will give you grip when you walk, so you won’t be blown away. Finish off your windy day look with sunglasses to keep your eyes protected. PHOTOS BY LEVI VILORIA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I


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Candidates for Spring 2013 Special Elections: EXECUTIVE SEATS

COLLEGE SENATOR SEATS

Vice-President (1 seat): • Francesca Koethe

Senator of the Colleges of Arts and Sciences (2 seats): • Jack Koehn • Noriaki Kevin Omokawa

Secretary (1 seat): • Emily Murai Senator-at-Large (1 seat): • Cassandra Belisario • Isaac Lipscomb

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Senator of the College of Health Sciences and Social Welfare (1 seat): • Chloe Fonacier

Voting is from February 11, 2013 at 6:00am until February 19, 2013 at 4:00pm in your MyUH account

Department of Special Educaon: College of Educaon • UH Manoa

POST BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN SPECIAL EDUCATION: A Statewide Program Learn Strategies. Build Confidence. Discover Your Passion.

BECOME A HIGHLY QUALIFIED SPECIAL EDUCATOR IN 18 MONTHS!

The Post Baccalaureate Certificate in Special Education (PB-SPED) program at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, College of Education, leads to teacher licensure at the pre-k -3, k-6, or 7-12 level. Applicants may choose between a mild/moderate disabilities or severe disabilities/autism emphasis. The PB-SPED will be offered statewide to those with a Bachelor degree in any field. Statewide Program Features: • Classes taught online, via interactive web-based course delivery, Blackboard, & Laulima, or during non-working hours. • Candidates given priority for fulltime special education teaching positions in the HIDOE while in the program • Stipends, partially covering air travel and overnight accommodations (double occupancy), will be provided for required (1-3) face-to-face meetings each semester.

DEADLINE TO APPLY: MARCH 1, 2013

TUTION STIPENDS MAY BE AVAILABLE

For more information, contact: Marly Wilson, Program Manager Department of Special Education: (808) 956-8450 or (808) 956-7956 marlyw@hawaii.edu; or https://coe.hawaii.edu/academics/special-education

The University of Hawai‘i is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution

FALL 2013


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 15 2013

Opinions@kaleo.org | Sarah Nishioka Editor | Tim Metra Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 15 2013

Opinions

Opinions COMPILED BY SAR AH NISHIOK A AND JOSEPH H AN Opinions Editor and Associate Chief Copy Editor

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I CONFESSIONS

No better than what we deserve PAIGE TAKEYA Managing Editor Public masturbation, vandalism and rampant drug use are everyday occurrences on campus – if you believe University of Hawai‘i Confessions, a Facebook page that publishes anonymous “confessions” that may (or may not) reveal the sordid side of paradise. But what the site really reveals is something far more disturbing than any so-called confession: UH students prefer to stew in apathy and laugh at misfortune in lieu of taking action to change the university for the better.

E N T E R TA I N I N G B U S I N E S S The page is set up to operate with full anonymity and openness. The confessions themselves are collected through SurveyMonkey, and an administrator posts new “confessions” every few hours. A disclaimer buried on the “About” page encourages readers to remember that the posts are not guaranteed to be accurate or even from UH students. The stories may be from anywhere and anyone, but UH students are the ones flocking to the site. UH Confessions was established on Jan. 23, and by Feb. 14, the page had accumulated more than 10,000 likes. The most popular posts boast more than 700 likes, though most posts tend to average about 60-100 depending on the topic. Topics themselves vary wildly from love confessions to complaints about UH Mānoa to, more frequently, claims of wild debauchery and dissolution. If the site is to be believed, every flat surface on campus is coated with layers of bodily fluid, and passersby should avoid sitting or even standing near trees by Hamilton Library. And if the comments are any indicator, UH Mānoa students love the site and are enthralled by its flow of stories. Almost every post has comments of both support and dissent attached. Even via word of mouth, it is safe to conclude that students are interested and excited to read new confessions every day.

What do you think about the UH Confessions Facebook page? “It’s interesting to read, but for the most part they’re kind of disgusting.”

R I G H T WO R D S, W RO N G P L AC E There is no need to pass judgment on those who claim to grow extensive marijuana gardens in their dorm rooms or those who claim to have gotten to know all the football players intimately. What an individual does with his or her private life is of no concern to anyone else, and it may be that many of the stories are made up anyway. More alarming than the posts themselves are student reactions to the confessions. When more than 200 people like a status that calls all white girls on campus “sluts,” what does that say about the campus’ attitude toward women and sexuality? Perhaps that explains why reports of sexual assault have increased by more than 1,000 percent since 2009, according to the 2012 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for the campus – and those are just the ones that are reported. Why are students willing to voice their dissatisfaction with university policy and administration to an anonymous Facebook page instead of to the school’s administrators? If we have concerns, and we have enough to say about them so as to have a reasoned and thoughtful discussion in the comments, then why are Chancellor Tom Apple’s campus-wide conversations attended by so few students? More than 10,000 people can like a page and spend hours poring through it every night, but our athletes often play to empty stands, and our school newspapers lie on newsstands unread. We can and should be better than this. We have the time – so we should use it. We need to be just as engaged in our real lives, our real campus, as much as we are with a page full of lies. The students of UH Mānoa are better than those represented by UH Confessions – but unless we turn off our computers and reengage with reality, our campus will never reflect that.

POLL

“It’s funny sometimes, and some of it’s true.”

Ashlyn Spencer Sophomore Pre-nursing

Joe Michael Agpaoa Junior Travel industry management

45.2 percent

“It’s cool. It’s kind of funny and entertaining, but at the same time it gets kind of repetitive and it’s kind of annoying to see on your Facebook page after a while.” “It’s entertaining, but it kind of puts everybody’s business on blast. As long as it doesn’t put anybody’s names out there, it’s not really a big deal.”

Matt Abell Sophomore Biology

Justine Abair Sophomore Pre-business

“It’s pretty interesting to read what everyone else has to say. It’s whatever everybody has to say. I don’t think it’s a good thing because people get to say whatever they want and hurt people’s feelings.” Tracy Halouska Freshman Marine biology

What do you think about Valentine’s Day?

“The confessions page is kinda disturbing. Some of the things that they say on there, they’re a little too open.”

I’m single, and Valentine’s Day has nothing to offer me.

23.8 percent It’s a lovely way to celebrate people I care about. 31 percent It’s too commercialized; it’s not special anymore.

NEW POLL Do you support the UH men’s athletics teams changing their names from “Rainbow Warriors” and “Rainbows” to just “Warriors”? Yes No

Tiffany McCue Sophomore Biology

Like Comment Share your thoughts at facebook.com/KaLeoOHawaii

ARE YOU A

maniac? We ARE LOOKING FOR YOU

The Manoa Maniacs are commied to inslling, PRIDE, UNITY, and SPIRIT into the student body at the University of Hawaii Manoa. Our goal is to create an atmosphere at athlec events and on campus that is excing, posive and energized. We hope to be the bridge that unites the student body with the University of Hawii athlec teams and players. Together we will prove to be unstoppable.

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK TO BE ENTERED INTO A RAFFLE TO WIN A FREE IPAD: FACEBOOK.COM/ MANOAMANIACS

I don’t think it matters. To respond to this poll question, visit kaleo.org. Have more to say? Write a letter to the editor, and send it to opinions@kaleo.org.

WANT TO GET INVOLVED? Email us at uhmaniac@hawaii.edu Don’t want to get involved? Email us anyway, we’ll have some fun


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 15 2013

Opinions@kaleo.org | Sarah Nishioka Editor | Tim Metra Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 15 2013

Opinions

Opinions COMPILED BY SAR AH NISHIOK A AND JOSEPH H AN Opinions Editor and Associate Chief Copy Editor

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I CONFESSIONS

No better than what we deserve PAIGE TAKEYA Managing Editor Public masturbation, vandalism and rampant drug use are everyday occurrences on campus – if you believe University of Hawai‘i Confessions, a Facebook page that publishes anonymous “confessions” that may (or may not) reveal the sordid side of paradise. But what the site really reveals is something far more disturbing than any so-called confession: UH students prefer to stew in apathy and laugh at misfortune in lieu of taking action to change the university for the better.

E N T E R TA I N I N G B U S I N E S S The page is set up to operate with full anonymity and openness. The confessions themselves are collected through SurveyMonkey, and an administrator posts new “confessions” every few hours. A disclaimer buried on the “About” page encourages readers to remember that the posts are not guaranteed to be accurate or even from UH students. The stories may be from anywhere and anyone, but UH students are the ones flocking to the site. UH Confessions was established on Jan. 23, and by Feb. 14, the page had accumulated more than 10,000 likes. The most popular posts boast more than 700 likes, though most posts tend to average about 60-100 depending on the topic. Topics themselves vary wildly from love confessions to complaints about UH Mānoa to, more frequently, claims of wild debauchery and dissolution. If the site is to be believed, every flat surface on campus is coated with layers of bodily fluid, and passersby should avoid sitting or even standing near trees by Hamilton Library. And if the comments are any indicator, UH Mānoa students love the site and are enthralled by its flow of stories. Almost every post has comments of both support and dissent attached. Even via word of mouth, it is safe to conclude that students are interested and excited to read new confessions every day.

What do you think about the UH Confessions Facebook page? “It’s interesting to read, but for the most part they’re kind of disgusting.”

R I G H T WO R D S, W RO N G P L AC E There is no need to pass judgment on those who claim to grow extensive marijuana gardens in their dorm rooms or those who claim to have gotten to know all the football players intimately. What an individual does with his or her private life is of no concern to anyone else, and it may be that many of the stories are made up anyway. More alarming than the posts themselves are student reactions to the confessions. When more than 200 people like a status that calls all white girls on campus “sluts,” what does that say about the campus’ attitude toward women and sexuality? Perhaps that explains why reports of sexual assault have increased by more than 1,000 percent since 2009, according to the 2012 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for the campus – and those are just the ones that are reported. Why are students willing to voice their dissatisfaction with university policy and administration to an anonymous Facebook page instead of to the school’s administrators? If we have concerns, and we have enough to say about them so as to have a reasoned and thoughtful discussion in the comments, then why are Chancellor Tom Apple’s campus-wide conversations attended by so few students? More than 10,000 people can like a page and spend hours poring through it every night, but our athletes often play to empty stands, and our school newspapers lie on newsstands unread. We can and should be better than this. We have the time – so we should use it. We need to be just as engaged in our real lives, our real campus, as much as we are with a page full of lies. The students of UH Mānoa are better than those represented by UH Confessions – but unless we turn off our computers and reengage with reality, our campus will never reflect that.

POLL

“It’s funny sometimes, and some of it’s true.”

Ashlyn Spencer Sophomore Pre-nursing

Joe Michael Agpaoa Junior Travel industry management

45.2 percent

“It’s cool. It’s kind of funny and entertaining, but at the same time it gets kind of repetitive and it’s kind of annoying to see on your Facebook page after a while.” “It’s entertaining, but it kind of puts everybody’s business on blast. As long as it doesn’t put anybody’s names out there, it’s not really a big deal.”

Matt Abell Sophomore Biology

Justine Abair Sophomore Pre-business

“It’s pretty interesting to read what everyone else has to say. It’s whatever everybody has to say. I don’t think it’s a good thing because people get to say whatever they want and hurt people’s feelings.” Tracy Halouska Freshman Marine biology

What do you think about Valentine’s Day?

“The confessions page is kinda disturbing. Some of the things that they say on there, they’re a little too open.”

I’m single, and Valentine’s Day has nothing to offer me.

23.8 percent It’s a lovely way to celebrate people I care about. 31 percent It’s too commercialized; it’s not special anymore.

NEW POLL Do you support the UH men’s athletics teams changing their names from “Rainbow Warriors” and “Rainbows” to just “Warriors”? Yes No

Tiffany McCue Sophomore Biology

Like Comment Share your thoughts at facebook.com/KaLeoOHawaii

ARE YOU A

maniac? We ARE LOOKING FOR YOU

The Manoa Maniacs are commied to inslling, PRIDE, UNITY, and SPIRIT into the student body at the University of Hawaii Manoa. Our goal is to create an atmosphere at athlec events and on campus that is excing, posive and energized. We hope to be the bridge that unites the student body with the University of Hawii athlec teams and players. Together we will prove to be unstoppable.

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK TO BE ENTERED INTO A RAFFLE TO WIN A FREE IPAD: FACEBOOK.COM/ MANOAMANIACS

I don’t think it matters. To respond to this poll question, visit kaleo.org. Have more to say? Write a letter to the editor, and send it to opinions@kaleo.org.

WANT TO GET INVOLVED? Email us at uhmaniac@hawaii.edu Don’t want to get involved? Email us anyway, we’ll have some fun


Page 8 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 15 2013

Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Nicolyn Charlot Associate

Features

Campus events COMPILED BY CAITLIN KURODA Features Editor

MYSTICAL POETRY NIGHT When: Friday, Feb. 15; 5 p.m.-8 p.m. Join the Islamic Society at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Where: Hale Halawai for a night of performance and cultural food. A free dinner including Cost: Free Cajun chicken, hummus and stuffed grape leaves will be served until Contact: 808-358-5275 5:30 p.m. Poetry recitals, a performance by a local Sufi group and an nazeehah@hawaii.edu open mic session will follow.

JOHN HUGHES MOVIE MASH-UP NIGHT When: Friday, Feb. 15; 6:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Where: Campus Center Cost: Free Contact: 808-956-4491, ccbac@hawaii.edu

The Campus Center Board Activities Council presents a movie night featuring two of John Hughes’ greatest hits: “The Breakfast Club” and “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”. Show up in your best ‘80s look for a chance to win prizes. As always, snacks and drinks will be available for 25 cents.

Art can be a job COURTESY OF JAMES CHARISMA

UH/HPU PAN PACIFIC CHAMPIONSHIP DEBATE TOURNAMENT UH, in collaboration with Hawai‘i Pacific University, will host the Pan Pacific championship for the first time. Watch the two schools debate against teams from mainland universities on topics including public policy, social issues and international affairs.

When: Saturday, Feb. 16; 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Where: Shidler College of Business Cost: Free Contact: Dr. Robert Boller, 808-956-3324 boller@hawaii.edu

HAMSLAM When: Thursday, Feb. 21 7:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Support local slam poets as they participate in an open mic Where: Hamilton Library Alcove session at the second HamSlam of the year. Head to the alcove in Cost: Free the first floor of Hamilton Library for pupus, slam poetry, music and an Contact: Teri Skillman appearance by “National Slam Legend” Kealoha. 808-956-8688 skillman@hawaii.edu IAN O’SULLIVAN GUITAR Join Ian O’Sullivan, guitar lecturer at UH, for an evening recital comprised of his own works as well as those by Bach, local composers and musicians Byron Yasui and Jeff Peterson. When: Saturday, Feb. 16 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Where: Orvis Auditorium Cost: $12 general admission; $8 students, faculty, staff and seniors 65+; $5 UH music majors Contact: 808-956-8742 uhmmusic@hawaii.edu

O’Sullivan became the first from Hawai‘i to graduate with a master’s degree in guitar from Yale University. COURTESY OF IAN O’SULLIVAN

BOBBY BERGONIO Staff Writer Designers and artists entering the job market face a daunting task, but the Iwilei Creative Program strives to be the big break that these students need. This free threemonth program is a creative incubator for designers to meet and build relations with professionals in the business. Graphic designers Matt Heim, Scott Kawamura and University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa alumnus James Charisma have collaborated on this project to help artists gain experience and knowledge of the industry. Sumner LLC, in association with HonBlue and Electric Pencil, will allot a portion of their Nimitz facility to house the incubator and allow students a conference room, individual workspaces and a creative bullpen. “We wanted design students to hone their own skills and meet local industry contacts, which can be potential clients and potential employers,” Charisma said.

P ROMO T I N G A R T, I N S T I L L I N G P RO F E S S I O N A L I S M The Iwilei Creative Program will accept four to eight students to participate in weekly workshops and collaborate with designers, writers and photographers in order to develop their talents in marketable ways. Not only will they utilize their artistic skills, but the students will also learn many business concepts – from budgets to cost projections – to be mindful of the costs and profits of the creative industry. “A lot of time, people have experience in Adobe Photoshop or Adobe Suite, but they

don’t necessarily have experience working with a budget or working on a timeline and turning the creative process into a marketable business,” Charisma explained. Graduates of the program will not only gain valuable work experience and certifi cation, but also a network of professional contacts – experts who may be able to provide direction and employment.

F ROM PA P E R T O P RO D U C T Designers will also help launch “Abstract,” a local arts and culture magazine aimed toward 18-35-year-old college students and post-graduates. According to Charisma, “Abstract” will mainly focus on the “ever-changing contemporary urban landscape of Hawai‘i.” Students of the program will be in charge of its production from start to fi nish, creating content, developing layouts, choosing fonts and adjusting colors. They will experience the trials and triumphs that designers, writers or photographers face as they bring the magazine to publication. A launch party for “Abstract” will be held in March and give students a chance to network with potential clients, associates and future employers while gaining sponsorship for the publication to self-sustain in the future. “The magazine really is just a pride that comes out of it,” Charisma said. “The main thing is to create an incubator to help educate the next new generations of design students.” For more information on the program, contact James Charisma at jamescharisma@yahoo.com.


Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 9 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 15 2013

Comics


Page 10 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 15 2013

Games

Advertising@kaleo.org | Regina Zabanal Student Ad Manager |Reece Farinas Marketing Director

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Ka Leo is looking for comic artists interested in gaining real world working experience. Gain skills that will set you apart from the other students graduating with your same degree.

ACROSS 1 Employment agency listings 5 Fried Cajun veggie 9 WWII conference site 14 Billion extension 15 Steady guy 16 He hunted with a club in the “Odyssey” 17 Club used as a weapon, say 20 Nonagenarian actress White 21 Yeats or Keats 22 Color, as Easter eggs 23 Summer quencher 24 Dorm VIPs 27 Where Lux. is 29 Kid-friendly comfort food 36 Soothing additive 38 River through Sudan 39 Country rocker Steve 40 Sable maker, briefly 41 Turn __ ear 43 Pub projectile 44 Former Portuguese territory in China 46 Prefix with -pus 47 Abates 48 Tests during which checking notes is allowed 51 Gymnast’s goal 52 Deli bread 53 Art on skin, slangily 56 Draw upon 59 Not as much 62 Calf-roping gear 64 Candid sort 68 Street toughs 69 Diamond Head’s island 70 Aromatic drinks 71 Go on tiptoe 72 Small songbird 73 Wine area near Turin DOWN 1 “Star Wars” gangster 2 No longer squeaky 3 Xbox battle game

4 Told to go 5 Asian tie 6 Barbie’s guy 7 Grating voice 8 One might get stuck in a jam 9 Video-sharing website 10 Radius’s limb 11 Committed perjury 12 Randall who played Felix Unger 13 Chip in a chip 18 Supermodel Banks 19 Marsh stalk 25 Tolstoy’s Karenina 26 Snowmobile brand 28 “__ and weep!”: poker winner’s cry 30 Take back 31 Smart guy? 32 More like Felix Unger 33 African countries on the Mediterranean, e.g. 34 Mediation agcy. 35 Congeals 36 Target practice supply 37 “... one giant __ for mankind” 42 Cunning 45 Washington Monument, for one 49 Universal blood type, for short 50 Related to flying 54 Had lunch in 55 Foot bones 56 Letter carrier’s org. 57 Leave speechless 58 Marine eagle 60 Vegas event 61 Kindergartner’s reward 63 Tiny bit 65 Wanted-poster letters 66 Sailor’s pronoun 67 Attila, notably

ANSWERS AT KALEO.ORG

GET IT.l ne on

.org

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

GET ITb.ile mo

Download the app search: Ka Leo O Hawai’i

COMIC ARTIST Contact: comics@kaleo.org Or apply online at: www.kaleo.org/jobs

.org


Opinions@kaleo.org | Sarah Nishioka Editor | Tim Metra Associate

Page 11 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 15 2013

Opinions

Preventative measures

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Syria was attacked because it was potentially harboring weaponry that could have fallen into the hands of a violent terrorist organization that may have been planning to kill thousands. Israel could have done nothing and hoped that Hezbollah terrorists would not obtain these weapons, but instead they acted preemptively, as Churchill suggested. They guaranteed the security of their nation and saved hundreds of thousands of potential lives.

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E x c l us

iv

Read an extended

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version of this article W

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Israel is a resilient country, surrounded by totalitarian regimes in a region rife with terrorism. In the eyes of Israel, it was not a question of whether known terrorist organization Hezbollah gained access to these types of weapons – but when. The death toll in Syria has already reached more than 60,000 with only basic combative weapons, so how can the office of the Russian Prime Minister say that this attack was unprovoked? If chemical, biological and missile weaponry were brought into the mix, the war in Syria would escalate beyond civil bloodshed. In the aftermath of WWI, one of the bloodiest wars known to man, countries were doing everything in their power to avoid another war. A few decades, Winston Churchill believed that WWII might have been avoided if they had stopped Hitler before he became a threat – crush the

E x c l us

L E A R N I N G F ROM T H E PA S T

egg before it hatches. This is similar to the situation in Syria, and the Israeli government’s thought process was exactly that: Crush the enemy before it gains the ability to use highly destructive weapons both domestically and internationally. From this viewpoint, it is difficult not to agree with Israel’s decision to attack the research facility.

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Syrian military officials reported an Israeli airstrike against a research facility on Wednesday, Jan. 30. Israeli officials have refused to mention the airstrike, but some countries, like Russia, have commented on the violent attack that killed two and injured five. Even though it was in violation of the UN Charter, Israel made the right choice in destroying the facility. The office of the Russian prime minister has released a statement that said, “If this information is confirmed, then we are dealing with unprovoked strikes at targets on the territory of a sovereign state, which grossly violates the UN Charter and is unacceptable, whatever motives are used to justify it.” The attack was motivated by the fact that Israeli diplomats believed the facility was not only researching weapons of mass destruction but also harboring them. Israel considered this a threat to its national security, given the current instability of the Syrian government. The main question we should ask ourselves is whether Israel

had the right to break the UN Charter agreement. But with Syria’s current volatility and strong Hezbollah infl uence, Israel had little choice in the matter.

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CARTER K OCH Contributing Writer

at kaleo.org

Featuring the Kenny Endo Taiko Ensemble and UHM Dance

FEB 8, 9, 15, 16 at 8pm and feb 17 at 2pm UHM Student Specials (UHM validated Spring 13 ID required)

$5 to any performance Buy-One-Get-One Free Night: Feb 8 Tickets available beginning at 5pm on day of show. Supported by Student Activity Fees.

Tickets on sale NOW at Kennedy Theatre, online at etickethawaii.com, Stan Sheriff Center, Campus Center, and at 944-2697. Visit www.hawaii.edu/kennedy for more info!


Sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor | Jeremy Nitta Associate

Page 12 | Ka Leo | Friday, Feb. 15 2013

Sports

Rainbows take a quack at No. 6 Ducks

Hawai‘i leads the all-time series against Oregon 12-6. KENT NISHIMURA KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

JOEY R AMIREZ Sports Editor

For the third straight year, the University of Hawai‘i and University of Oregon baseball teams will open their respective seasons in Les Murakami Stadium. After splitting the series in 2011, the Ducks fi nally got the best of UH as they won three of their four games last year. Oregon is looking for the same magic this time around, seeing how well the season that followed last year’s series turned out. UO went on to have the greatest campaign in program history as it fi nished 46-19 and reached the NCA A Super Regionals for the fi rst time in the modern era. This success has resulted in the Ducks opening the 2013 season as the No. 6 team in the nation. “They have a great program, but it doesn’t really make a difference to us,” said sophomore second baseman Stephen Ventimilia. “No matter who’s on the other side of the field, we have to come out and play our hardest and try to win every game. You always wanna play the best competition.”

U N C E R TA I N T Y O N T H E MO U N D Hawai‘i was able to rely on solid pitching throughout most of the 2012 campaign, which ended with the ‘Bows finishing 30 -25 overall and 10 -8 in their final

Western Athletic Conference season. However, last year’s ace Matt Sisto has graduated and junior lefty Jarrett Arakawa, who was expected to take up the mantle, has been lost for the year due to a torn labrum in his throwing shoulder that he suffered while playing in the Cape Cod League this summer. “Obviously it’s huge when you lose your top guy, but imua, move forward,” head coach Mike Trapasso said. “There’s nothing we can do, and we focus with our guys all the time about focusing on what you can’t control. Eighteen- to 21-year-old college males focus a lot on things that they can’t control. We don’t have control over Jarrett being there. We have control over reacting to it. We have control over getting better and somebody stepping up.” Now assuming the front man role for UH’s pitching staff is sophomore Scott Squier, who is the only other player to have started more than three games last year (14). During his debut season, the southpaw posted a 3.50 earned run average and held opponents to a .261 batting average – best among starters. He also was second on the team with 55 strikeouts. However, UH’s new ace feels no need to carry the ‘Bows himself. “We’re a pitching staff: We just gotta go out there and get outs together,” Squier said. “Whether I’m out there or who-

ever else is out there, [we] gotta go get outs [and] throw strikes. Every year Coach Trap sets up a tough schedule, but [if] we wanna be the best, we gotta play the best.” Squier is slated to start in the season opener on Friday. Freshman and 2012 HHSA A Pitcher of the Year Quintin TorresCosta is scheduled to make his UH introduction on Saturday. Senior Connor Little will pitch for the first time since 2011 on Sunday. Senior Corey MacDonald will be the starter for the final game on Monday.

SEARCHING FOR SUCCESS AT THE PLATE An issue for last year’s squad was its inability to produce offensively. This lack of production led to Hawai‘i posting a 4-22 record while its opponent scored four or more runs. “We had a lot of young guys last year,” Ventimilia said. “Hopefully the added repetitions will help and just being more comfortable at the college level.” The Rainbows have also lost many of the hitters who enjoyed success last season. UH returns just two of its top five players in terms of batting average, hits and runs batted in. The fi rst two categories are spearheaded by Ventimilia and 2012 All-WAC selection Pi‘ikea Kitamura. The senior shortstop and sophomore catcher Trevor Podratz are UH’s returning leaders in RBI. “[We] brought in new players,” Trapasso said. “A lot of it was balance and that

we didn’t have enough lefty-righty balance. We had two lefties in our lineup, and we struggled against right-handed pitching. … Now we brought in depth. We recruited a lot of left-handed bats.” While many teams schedule only one tough opponent to start off the season, Oregon could merely serve as a warm-up for what’s to come in 2013. “We could struggle to keep treading water in those 25 [nonconference] games,” Trapasso said. “By the time we get to conference play, 20 of those 25 games might be against ranked opponents. There’s just no negative to that. It’s gonna make you better. And if you’re able to survive that, not only are you tougher and you’ve bonded as a team, but you’ve also probably got a heck of an RPI computer ranking that’ll help you when you get to conference play.”

UPCOMING GAMES Hawai‘i vs. Oregon Friday, 6:35 p.m.; Saturday, 6:35 p.m. Sunday, 1:05 p.m.; Monday, 1:05 p.m. All games will be held at Les Murakami Stadium


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