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A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 9 to THURSDAY JAN. 10, 2013 VOLUME 108 ISSUE 42

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

www.kaleo.org

‘We’re there to serve the community’ CAITLIN K ELLY News Editor

3

JABSOM health fair educates public For health and wellness tips, see page 2

Students at the John A . Burns School of Medicine encouraged community members to “Strive for the Summit ” at their eighth annual community health fair on Jan. 4. The event, themed “Kulia I Ka Nu‘u,” which translates to “Strive for the Summit,” was designed to incorporate a forward-moving attitude in attendees toward personal health and wellness. The MD inter-class council and first- and secondyear medical students plan each health fair.

READY TO REBUILD

Team from UH participates in restoring hurricane aftermath

FEATURES

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STEAMY DUM DUMPLINGS MPLI PLLINGS INGS IN GS

Don’t fry it for your diet

WELL INTO THE FUTURE “ We want people to reach their full potential, and we want ever yone to strive for the summit. That ’s what the med school pushes us to do, so we want ever yone who comes through the door to reach their full potential,” said Publicity Committee Chairperson Chadwick Council, a first-year medical student. The health fair was initiated to introduce Hawai‘i’s future doctors to the patients they will one day be treating. The public had the opportunity to receive free retina and eye exams, blood pressure and glucose checks, tobacco cessation information and flu shots. Guests from the Hawai‘i State Legislature were available to offer health information and interact with the community. The public also had the opportunity to participate in full-body well-

NEWS

OPINIONS

8

NIK SEU / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

According to Dean Jerris Hedges, 90 percent of JABSOM students are Hawai‘i residents and end up training half of the physicians who practice in the islands today. ness activities through Zumba and meditation sessions.

M E D I C A L AT T E N T I O N “JABSOM’s entire idea was that they make doctors to help people in the community, and one of the things they want us to do is start integrating ourselves in the community very early.” Council explained. “So the focus of the health fair is to get us exposed to our future patients and help the community understand a little bit more about what JABSOM’s about.”

Council was inspired to get involved with the fair because of his family’s background in medicine. His mother was a nurse for more than 30 years and would make extra visits to patients in her free time. “I would always ask her, ‘Mom, why are you seeing this patient?’ And one of the things she always told me was, ‘It’s about dealing with people. Just because I’m not working doesn’t mean I don’t have a relationship with that patient.’ So seeing that

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was really inspirational,” he said. Though JA BSOM students may have found their way to medicine in different ways, one message remains the same. “Your health is very important,” Council said. “It’s not something that you should ignore. The medical community as a whole is there for you, so don’t be afraid to seek help from the medical community. Because without the public community, there is no health community: They’re one and the same.”

Report

WEDNESDAY N: W: S: E:

3-7 f t. 2-5 ft. 0-1.5 ft. 3-5 ft.

PUSHING PUSH PU SHIING G PERFORMANCE PERF PE RFOR ORMA MANC NCE E

Reconsidering views on performance-enhancing drugs

SPORTS

ROAD REDEMPTION O TO O REDEMPTIO ON

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‘Bows hope to stay composed

THURSDAY N: W: S: E:

2-5 f t. 0-3 ft. 0-1.5 ft. 2-5 ft.


Page 2 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 9 2013

News@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kelly Editor | Alex Bitter Associate

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EDITORIAL STAFF Editor in Chief Marc Arakaki Managing Editor Paige Takeya Co-Assc Chief Copy Editor Joseph Han Co-Assc Chief Copy Editor Kim Clark Design Editor Beth Dorsey Assc Design Editor Bianca Bystrom Pino News Editor Caitlin Kelly Assc News Editor Alex Bitter Features Editor Caitlin Kuroda Assc Features Editor Nicolyn Charlot Opinions Editor Sarah Nishioka Assc Opinions Editor Tim Metra Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Nik Seu Assc Photo Editor Chasen Davis Special Issues Editor Ariel Ramos Assc Special Issues Design Editor Emily Boyd Web Specialist Blake Tolentino Web Editor Quincy Greenheck

ADVERTISING E-mail advertising@kaleo.org Ad Manager Regina Zabanal Marketing Director Reece Farinas PR Coordinator Samantha Court Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications.

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ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Susan Lin, chair; Kara McManus, vice chair; or Esther Fung, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

NIK SEU / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

For JABSOM students, current health topics can become areas to explore through research opportunities. COMPILED BY K IM CLARK Associate Chief Copy Editor

1. S TAY H Y D R AT E D Dehydration can cause headaches. Taking a bottle of water to class can help keep headaches at bay and improve your concentration.

6. S L E E P

Studies show that most people need about eight hours of sleep a night. Although it might not be possible to sleep that much every night, balance your schedule so that you don’t go too many days without enough sleep.

7. K E E P BAC K PAC K S L I G H T 2 . WA S H YO U R H A N D S Germs can be spread through commonly touched surfaces, such as doorknobs. Reduce germs by washing your hands with soap throughout the day.

Carrying too much weight in your bag or backpack can lead to back problems. Leave some of your books at home, or hold them when walking to class.

8. WEAR SUNSCREEN 3. E AT It’s important to start your day with a healthy meal, so don’t skip breakfast. Eating throughout the day also helps to keep your energy level high.

If you hit the beach on the weekend or spend a lot of time outside, remember to apply sunscreen to prevent burns and skin cancer.

9. P R E V E N T S I C K N E S S 4 . E X E RC I S E Finding t ime to go to the g y m can be hard, but even walk ing to class rather than t ak ing the bus can make a di fference. Tr y mak ing a schedule for when you can work out in your spare t ime.

5. TA K E A WA L K When you’re feeling tired during the day, don’t reach for coffee or an energy drink. Walking can fight fatigue more effectively than caffeine.

If you don’t want to take vitamins every morning, incorporate garlic and onions into your diet. Both are said to have antiviral and antibacterial properties that can boost your immune system.

10. TA K E C A R E O F T E E T H

Brushing your teeth is important for good dental hygiene, but don’t forget to fl oss as well. Eating shiitake mushrooms and wasabi can also help prevent cavities because they contain compounds that fi ght bacteria.


News@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kelly Editor | Alex Bitter Associate

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 9 2013

News

UH team aids Sandy recovery efforts

Why Should I Hire you? Ka Leo is looking for highly motivated students interested in gaining real world work experience. Gain skills that will set you apart from other students graduating with your same degree.

Do you like business, marketing and promotions? Then check out the options at Ka Leo! We are recruiting Public Publ Pu blic ic Relations Rel elat atio ions ns R Representatives eppre rese sent ntat atives fo ffor orr our o growing program.

PHOTO COURTESY OF KARL KIM

UH Mānoa urban planning professor Karl Kim (third from left) observed the Sims Metal Management construction site as part of his Hurricane Sandy damage inspection. A LEX BIT TER Associate News Editor

A team from the University of Hawai‘i is participating in reconstruction efforts in areas of the northeastern United States ravaged by Hurricane Sandy last October. The collaboration, which includes researchers from the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center, UH’s division of the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration’s Sea Grant Program and the Urban Resilience Lab, plans to work with architects and builders in the areas of New York and New Jersey most directly affected by the storm by planning and designing urban areas that can better withstand large storms like Sandy.

DA M AG E A S S E S S M E N T In late November, the team, with leaders including urban planning professor and NDP TC Executive Director Karl Kim, toured and documented damage in the hardest-hit areas in northern New Jersey, Lower Manhattan, Staten Island and Long Island’s Rockaway peninsula. In

addition, Kim and his colleagues met with emergency personnel, local leaders and others involved in the continuing relief and reconstruction efforts. Part of the team’s task in these areas was evaluating the buildings, transportation systems and other infrastructure to determine if alternative designs could prevent similar damage in a storm like Sandy. “Preventing the damage will be costly because the infrastructure systems … were not designed for this type of event,” Kim said. “These are hundredyear-old systems, so we need to rethink building design, location and technologies.” Kim also noted that new building designs – especially those that centralize critical systems, including electricity and wastewater lines, above the ground floor – are being considered and put into practice by businesses looking to reconstruct.

FUNDING: A PRIORITY Another option that the team is emphasizing is the incorporation of “green solutions” into the rebuilt

landscape. Such solutions include wetlands, fl ood-retention basins and other green areas that are useful in absorbing fl ood surges. While Kim emphasized that landscaping, architecture and urban planning are essential to reducing the risk of damage in future disasters, he said the funding appropriated by the federal government remains crucial for repairing the damage that remains. “To me, the priority should go towards those most in need with the least resources – low- and moderate-income families and working people who have lost everything,” Kim said. “The money should go towards the planning, rebuilding and relocation of those communities which have experienced the most damage.” Recovery and reconstruction efforts in the areas most devastated by Hurricane Sandy are expected to take several years. Kim’s organization plans to train a range of individuals, from construction professionals to community leaders, using the same programs that NDPTC has administered to residents of high-risk disaster areas around the world.

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Page 4 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 9 2013

Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Nicolyn Charlot Associate

Features What is your New Year’s resolution and how likely is it that you’ll keep it? COMPILED

“Not to get a boyfriend. Why? I don’t want no more drama, and I want to concentrate on school. one hundred percent.” Krystle Takara Freshman, Pre-nursing

“Well, I created my own Excel sheets for my financial goals for this year, so I think that I’m sticking to them pretty well thus far. … Health-wise, I need to stop smoking. I’ve stopped smoking now for about a year. Those were cigarettes, but I’ve been addicted to hookah. So I have my own hookah at home, and now that’s really hard to stop, so I’m trying to cut that down at least, to a couple times a week. [It’s likely that I’ll keep it because] it’s me and my wife, we’re like a duo, so we help each other out.” Bryson Clemente Junior, Mechanical engineering

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“My New Year’s resolution is to stop procrastinating or at least cut back on it. Because I know I did that a lot last semester and I got screwed over quite a bit. I think it’ll work out. I’ve gotten a little better at time management, but I’m pretty sure there’ll still be times where I’ll be stuck on Hulu instead of doing homework.” Gabriela Andrade Sophomore, Architecture

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“Well, hopefully I can speak Korean fluently by the end of this semester, and the reason is because Korean is my major. And yeah, I guess I have to. I have to.” Amiel Ko Freshman, Korean


Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Nicolyn Charlot Associate

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 9 2013

Features

Keeping your New Year’s resolution CAITLIN KURODA Features Editor It’s easy to make a resolution for the New Year, but actually taking steps to achieve it is a completely different story. If you’ve found it difficult to keep your resolution in the past but hope to change that for the coming year, refer to these tips.

BE REASONABLE It ’s good to be motivated – after all, the point of making a resolution is to challenge yourself – but be realistic at the same time. Making a resolution that is unrealistic sets you up for failure before you’ve even begun. If you know that losing 50 pounds by the end of the semester is going to be more than just difficult for you to achieve, you may want to set a smaller goal.

MEASURE IT If you make a vague reso resolution like “I will eat healthi healthier”

or “I will work out more often,” it may be difficult to keep. You need to set quantifiable goals that you can keep track of. Instead of “I will eat healthier,” plan on consuming a certain amount of calories or servings of fruit each day. Instead of “I will work out more often,” resolve to work out for an hour three times a week. Having a measurable goal ensures that you are aware of whether you’re meeting them.

B R E A K I T D OW N You can’t lose 20 pounds overnight, and you can’t become a master chef after attempting one meal – you need a plan for how to get there. To make your resolution more achievable and less daunting, break it down into smaller goals or steps first. If you plan to lose weight, write down the food and exercise re quirements you need to meet. If you want to learn to cook, start with simple recipes and work

your way up. Ultimate goals are reached with moderation and consistent effort.

MAKE A FRIEND It ’s always easier to keep yourself in line with your resolution if you have someone there with you. Find a friend who has made a similar resolution – don’t just force a friend to join you – and make your resolution fun. Plan out your goals together and keep each other in check if one of you starts to falter.

WO R K H A R D, P L AY H A R D Nothing motivates more than incentives. To keep yourself from burning out, make sure you have a reward waiting for you at the end. Too many re wards or ones that are too large may be adverse to your progress, but small ones along the way will give you something to k forward to and make the look k and commitment worth it. work

TIME MAGA ZINE’S TOP TEN MOS T COMMONLY BROKEN NEW YE AR’S RESOLUTIONS 2012 YEAR’S 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Lose weight and get fit Quit smoking Learn something new Eat healthier and diet Get out of debt and save money Spend more time with family Travel to new places Be less stressed Volunteer Drink less

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IT PAYS TO FINISH COLLEGE ON TIME. Students who earn 15 credits per semester are more likely to earn better grades, have higher completion rates, and finish their degrees on time. On average, residents in Hawai‘i with a bachelor’s degree earned nearly $20,000 more per year than residents who did not earn a college degree. It pays to earn your degree; and earning it faster means you’ll make more money over the span of your career!

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Page 6 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 9 2013

Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Nicolyn Charlot Associate

Features

Getting a healthy start

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VEGE TABLE GYOZ OZ A

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The holidays are over, and it’s that time of year again to face the scale. This recipe for gyoza ( Japanese dumplings) is packed with vegetables and calls for steaming – instead of the usual frying – which will help you return to that healthy lifestyle that you may have neglected during the holiday season. You can improvise with any vegetables that you already have, making this recipe ideal for any college student short on time or money.

INGREDIENTS ( Y I E L D S 12 GYOZ A) : 1 package pre-made gyoza skins 1½ cup shredded cabbage ½ cup finely diced onion ½ cup finely diced bell pepper ½ cup finely diced celery ½ cup frozen peas 2 Tbsp green onions 1 Tbsp chopped garlic

1 Tbsp grated ginger 2 tsp sesame oil ¼ cup soy sauce 1 tsp mirin ¼ cup rice vinegar ½ tsp olive oil

DIRECTIONS: 1. Mix soy sauce, rice vinegar and one teaspoon of sesame oil to create the gyoza sauce. Set aside.

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2. In a medium frying pan over medium heat, add olive oil, onion, bell pepper, celery, garlic and ginger. Cook until onions become translucent. Then add cabbage, peas, the remaining teaspoon of sesame oil and mirin. 3. Cook mixture thoroughly until all ingredients have become soft, then stir in green onions. Cook for an additional minute, turn off heat and set mixture aside to cool. 4. After mixture has cooled, drain any remaining liquid. Place a heaping teaspoon of the cooled mixture in the center of a gyoza skin. Lightly dab water along the edge of the skin. Carefully fold one edge of the skin to the other side. Use firm fingertips to gently pinch the edges together to create a seam. Repeat process for each gyoza skin. 5. Put a half cup of water in a medium frying pan over low heat. When it begins to simmer, carefully place each gyoza in the water half an inch apart. Cover and let cook for five minutes. 6. Serve hot with sauce on the side.


Opinions@kaleo.org | Sarah Nishioka Editor | Tim Metra Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 9 2013

Opinions LETTER TO THE EDITOR How reliable are our sources on the safety of GMO foods? In Elenka Jacobs’ letter from Dec. 5 entitled, “GMO foods: Are we guinea pigs?”, great credence is given to claims made by Jeffery Smith, who, it is said, “has done extensive research on Bt corn and what it can do to our bodies.” Smith has read and selectively presents sections of articles in his books and website that generate emotion and fear about genetic engineered (GE) foods. But who is Jeffery Smith with his pronouncements on what is theoretically possible in biology? The question has always puzzled me, and I am bewildered by the fact that he is so frequently quoted as the source of information on the claimed evils of GE foods. Jeffery Smith’s book, “Seeds of Deception,” tells us on the back cover that he is “a master storyteller” who lives in Fairfield, Iowa. The inside back cover says he has an MBA, most likely from the Maharishi University of Management in 1985 or 1986. A Google search has Smith’s book publisher, Yes! Books, at the same PO Box number as the Institute of Responsible Technology, also located in Fairfield, Iowa. The Institute describes itself as a “world leader in educating policy makers and the public about genetically modified (GM) foods and crops,” and it is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, tax-exempt charitable organization. The Institute provides a biography of Mr. Smith that is vague, with little details of his history, training, professional skills and business involvement. However, other than Mr. Smith, this Institute does not give any indication of the existence of its Board of Directors. His books can be purchased at another website with the Institute’s PO Box number. He is, or was, a vicepresident for marketing for Genetic ID located in Fairfield, Iowa. Genetic ID is a for-profit GE testing service whose chief scientific officer is Dr. John Fagan, a former professor and dean at the Maharishi University of Management. The Institute of Responsible Technology boasts that it was founded in 2003 by international best-selling author and GMO expert Mr. Jeffery Smith. One could say that Mr. Smith has used his MBA well by both authoring and self-publishing books, creating an Institute to collect tax-deductible donations and an interconnected site in order to advertise and sell his books directly. Smith has created a nice little empire based upon the generation of man’s greatest motivator – fear. Professional training is not necessary to understand biotechnology, but if you market yourself as a world leader and expert in a complex scientific area, I would expect some basic education in the subject. Maybe if Mr. Smith had some training in biology, genetics, nutrition, biochemistry and microbiology, then I would give more credence to his pronouncements. There are websites that point out Mr. Smith’s abuse and misuse of science, failure to compare risks and benefits of all plant breeding methods, and the difficulty of analyzing and drawing conclusion from published research. For one example, go to academicsreview. org/reviewed-individuals/jeffrey-smith/. Mr. Smith is very prone to repeating claims that have been proven wrong and, in selectively presenting information, lying by omission. He also likes to cite newspaper and magazine articles that quote him. You are the judge as to what you believe. A flashy website does not mean that it is truthful, has reliable information or that it is not politically and economically motivated disinformation.

ROBERT PAULL Chair/Researcher Tropical Plant & Soil Sciences


Page 8 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 9 2013

Opinions@kaleo.org | Sarah Nishioka Editor | Tim Metra Associate

Opinions

Performance-enhancing drugs for the long run ROMAN K ALINOWSKI Staff Writer

On Oct. 22, 2012, Lance Armstrong was disqualified from all professional cycling results dating back to August 1998, including his seven consecutive Tour de France titles. This is the latest in a string of highprofile cases of performance-enhancing drugs in athletics, from cycling and swimming to baseball and football. Rather than punish those at the peak of their sport for differences in training regimens, society should reexamine sports and its attitude toward performance-enhancing drugs.

NOT AS NEW AS IT LOOKS The use of exotic strategies to enhance one’s ability in sports dates back to the first Olympic games in ancient Greece, where athletes would eat diets heavy in meat (unusual for

the time), as well as various medicinal herbs. Experimentation in training supplements continued uninhibited by government until the 1920s, when drugs like cocaine were banned from modern competitions. Since then, science has progressed much further and new drugs are able to target specific areas by mimicking existing hormones. The most prevalent drugs are anabolic steroids and Human Growth Hormone, which stimulate quick muscle growth and recovery, as well as erythropoietin, which is a cloned hormone that boosts the oxygen carrying power of blood. There are many other drugs, and new variants come out each year, which makes it extremely difficult for anti-doping agencies to catch offenders with drug tests. The majority of the highest-paid and top-tier athletes either use various substances to in-

crease their performance or have at least been accused of it. Lance Armstrong has never admitted to doping, but he is far from alone: Mark McGuire, Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and many other cyclists and Olympic athletes have all either tested positive or admitted to using banned substances to increase their performance. Football and basketball have lower testing standards in America – not having as many positive tests – but the visual effect of PED’s are present.

KEEP AN OPEN MIND A key principle in libertarianism is that people must be free to put whatever they want into their bodies because the government has no right to regulate them. With that mentality, it is fair to do research and development in the field of PED’s, just as we do with new training equipment,

training schedules and massage techniques – because every action carries with it risks and rewards. Instead of disqualifying athletes for using new technology in the form of PED’s, a separate competition circuit should be established for each sport where any and all PED’s are allowed. That way, the free market can decide which are more entertaining – sports with PED’s or those without. I think football is much more tolerable with faster plays, harder tackles and longer passes. Any sport with faster and stronger competitors would be more entertaining than our current set-up in athletics. There is a fine legal line between dietary supplements and banned substances that is completely unnecessary. The fact remains that all athletes who are shamed by the media as “dopers” are still great athletes, and people like Lance Armstrong de-

MONTIGNY PHILIPPE/ABACA PRESS/MCT

In a 2006 deposition, Armstrong testified under oath that he had never used PED’s.

serve to keep their awards. The athletes reached the peak of their sport with dedication and a bit of help. No one achieves anything alone, and if PED’s and associated research were legal, the playing field would once more be level.

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Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 9 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 9 2013

Comics


Advertising@kaleo.org | Regina Zabanal Student Ad Manager |Reece Farinas Marketing Director

Page 10 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 9 2013

Games

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

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CROSS

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WORD PUZZLE

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

ACROSS 1 Allow in 6 Behind the times 11 Keg insert 14 Nasty 15 Idol whose fans are called Claymates 16 Acapulco article 17 Traditional Christmas dessert 19 ER personnel 20 Swings about 21 Crunchy snack 23 LeBron James, e.g. 26 Ruler in old St. Petersburg 27 __ Diamond 30 Sweet spread 32 More than vexation 33 Red Army leader Trotsky 34 Run-of-the-mill 35 Liquid-Plumr rival 37 Jamaican music genre 39 Something to skip at the beach 42 Bollywood dress 44 Face cream ingredient 46 Kenny G plays one 47 Fiber-rich cereal 50 Hung on to 51 “Show Boat” novelist Ferber 52 Roger with 17 Grand Slam wins 54 Shrinking Asian lake 56 Scary bacteria 59 Downturn 60 Coffee break treat 64 “Little Red Book” chairman 65 Chipped in a chip 66 Comics friend of Nancy 67 Windup 68 Dallied (with) 69 Helped with dinner cleanup—or, a hint to the relationship between the

starts of 0-/17-Across and 47-/30-Across DOWN 1 Dangerous reptile in the Nile delta 2 Pol. convention attendees 3 Rough up 4 Not susceptible 5 Laid-back sort 6 Push-up bra feature 7 It may be financial 8 Slopes headwear 9 Men of La Mancha 10 Career for a sci. major 11 Sets free 12 Once-a-year bloomer 13 60-Across, for one 18 Grammarian’s concern 22 Explosive experiment 24 Sellout signs, briefly 25 Big mug 27 Holed up 28 NHL legend Bobby 29 Well-matched pair 31 No-way man? 33 “Tank Girl” star Petty 36 Sounding stuffy 38 Winglike parts 40 Short rest 41 Office contact no. 43 Really hot spot 45 No right __: traffic sign 47 Software installation info file 48 Rocky’s love 49 Loveliness 50 Swedish currency 53 Digital greeting 55 Lovers’ clash 57 Taylor of “Mystic Pizza” 58 One of the Antilles 61 Alumna bio word 62 Teacher’s deg. 63 Coal carrier

ANSWERS AT KALEO.ORG

Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

-1 8 2 1 t or i f k o o L

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Sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor

Page11 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 9 2013

Sports

Jawato: The ‘3’ machine M ARC A R AK AKI Editor in Chief For recruits from California, playing in Hawai‘i has its positives, but playing in front of their family and friends is not one of them. Rainbow Warrior redshirt freshman guard Brandon Jawato knows that competing in the Big West will allow them to play in front of their family and friends, and they will get a chance to do just that this week as Hawai‘i travels to play UC Irvine and Long Beach State on Wednesday and Saturday. Jawato’s hometown of El Segundo, Calif., is 45 miles away from Irvine and 22 miles away from Long Beach. “That’s going to be great playing in front of my family and friends – they’re going to come out and support me,” Jawato said. “I miss my family the most and kind of miss the food out there – the Mexican food.” However, playing in front of loved ones can have its challenges – the need to get tickets. “I just know my mom and dad and all my cousins [are going to be there],” Jawato said. “I’m probably going to give my friends some tickets. I’m actually going to be more pumped up – try to play harder in front of my family and friends.”

THE HOT HAND

MARC ARAKAKI / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Jawato is averaging 16.0 points per game and has hit 90 percent of three-point attempts in Big West play.

Heading onto the road, Jawato has just started to get hot. In Saturday’s game against UC Riverside, Jawato Upcoming Ga Games drained 7-for-7 beyond the arc for 21 points in the fi rst half. UH @ UC Irvin Irvine “He’s a guy that’s got a ESP 6 p.m. HT, ESPNU nice stroke, and he can shoot it while he’s moving,” head coach UH @ Long Beach State Gib Arnold said. “Hopefully he’ll 2:05 p.m. stay hot – that really helps us.”

Warriors host Outrigger tournament Sports Desk

NIK SEU/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

The University of Hawai‘i men’s volleyball team is looking to improve from a 2012 campaign that ended with seven winss and a school-record 20 losses. However, this year could pick up right where the last one left off, given the slate of schools that compose the Warriors’ early season schedule. Hawai‘i (0-2, 0-2 Mountain Pacific Sports Federation) opened up on the road with the No. 2 team in the nation, BYU, and was only able to win one set in two matches against the Cougars. UH failed to create any traction offensively, as it recorded a .138 team hitting percentage in both games combined. The Warriors are set to host the Outrigger Hotels Volleyball Invitational this week, and the opposition is just as formidable. UH will take on No. 10 Ohio State on Thursday and No. 8 Penn State on Friday. The Warriors will close out the tournament on Saturday against No. 5 UCLA. All of Hawai‘i’s matches are scheduled to begin at 7 p.m., following games between the other participants at 4 p.m. Admission is free for students with valid UH IDs.

Junior middle blocker Nick West leads tthe Warriors with eight blocks this season.

F Follow us on Twitter @ @kaleosports for live uupdates.

Department of Special Educaon: College of Educaon • UH Manoa

POST BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE IN SPECIAL EDUCATION: A Statewide Program Learn Strategies. Build Confidence. Discover Your Passion.

BECOME A HIGHLY QUALIFIED SPECIAL EDUCATOR IN 18 MONTHS!

The Post Baccalaureate Certificate in Special Education (PB-SPED) program at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, College of Education, leads to teacher licensure at the pre-k -3, k-6, or 7-12 level. Applicants may choose between a mild/moderate disabilities or severe disabilities/autism emphasis. The PB-SPED will be offered statewide to those with a Bachelor degree in any field. Statewide Program Features: • Classes taught online, via interactive web-based course delivery, Blackboard, & Laulima, or during non-working hours. • Candidates given priority for fulltime special education teaching positions in the HIDOE while in the program • Stipends, partially covering air travel and overnight accommodations (double occupancy), will be provided for required (1-3) face-to-face meetings each semester.

DEADLINE TO APPLY: MARCH 1, 2013

TUTION STIPENDS MAY BE AVAILABLE

For more information, contact: Marly Wilson, Program Manager Department of Special Education: (808) 956-8450 or (808) 956-7956 marlyw@hawaii.edu; or https://coe.hawaii.edu/academics/special-education

The University of Hawai‘i is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution

FALL 2013


Sports@kaleo.org | Joey Ramirez Editor

Page 12 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 9 2013

Sports

Rainbow Wahine ready to make home Big West debut JEREMY NIT TA Senior Staff Writer

MATINA WILSON / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Senior guard Monica De Angelis leads UH with 25 assists this season.

WOMEN’S

After experiencing its first taste of Big West play on the road, the University of Hawai‘i women’s basketball team (5-8, 1-1 BWC) is hungry to keep winning as it makes its home conference debut tonight against UC Irvine (4-10, 0-2) at 7 p.m. Hawai‘i split its fi rst two games on the road, falling to Cal State Fullerton 83-74 and defeating UC Riverside 65-50. It gave us the confidence that we can win on the road,” senior guard Monica DeAngelis said. “We got the first jitters out in conference play.” Head coach Laura Beeman credits her team for pulling it together against UC Riverside. “This road trip showed that the girls could bounce back,”

Beeman said. “You think you’re going to blow through [Big West Conference play] after what our preseason was like, and then have that letdown. To bounce back and win the next night was huge. I’m really impressed with that. “It was the girls basically saying, ‘Enough is enough, and let’s lock in and do what we do – and if we do that, we’ll be successful,’” Beeman said. “I think it had nothing to do with us as coaches. It was them making a mental shift and saying, ‘Let’s play.’”

S TAY I N G B O L D The ‘Bows hope that the road trip will help boost the team’s confidence. “We have to not lower our expectations,” Beeman said. “We need to keep our expectations high. That’s probably the biggest thing I’ve learned from this team. We’re going

to struggle, we’re going to lose some ball games, but we’re not going to lower our expectations.” After playing two games in three days on the road, Beeman is happy that the team will have a little more time to prepare for this week’s competition. “Irvine is athletic, but that’s kind of the story with the Big West,” Beeman said. “It’s a very athletic conference, and we’re going to face guards who are going to want to attack us, and post players who will want to play on the perimeter. They’re going to be scrappy, and they’re going to work hard.”

R E A DY- M A D E Following their matchup with the Anteaters, the Rainbow Wahine will be back in the Stan Sheriff Center to take on Long Beach

MEN’S

BASKETBALL VOLLEYBALL

State (9-5, 2-0) on Sunday at 5 p.m. “One game will prepare us for another game,” Beeman said. “Ir vine will get us ready for L ong Beach, and so did Fullerton. Our composure here is going to be much, much better and it ’s going to be a great week of games for us.”

Upcoming Games UH vs. UC Irvine 7 p.m. UH vs. Long Beach State Sunday 5 p.m.

Scan this QR code to watch a video interview with the Rainbow Wahine basketball team .

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WEDNESDAY VS. UC IRVINE @ 7PM THURSDAY VS. #10 OHIO STATE @ 7PM SUNDAY VS. LONG BEACH STATE @ 5PM FRIDAY VS. #7 PENN STATE @ 7PM SATURDAY VS. #5 UCLA @ 7PM

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