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A K LEO T H E

FRIDAY, NOV. 30 to SUNDAY, DEC. 2, 2012 VOLUME 108 ISSUE 37

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Sophomore running back Joey Iosefa leads the Warriors with 73.4 yards of total offense per game.

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Page 2 | Ka Leo | Friday, Nov. 30 2012

News@kaleo.org | Kim Clark Editor | Caitlin Kelly Associate

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Editor in Chief Davin Aoyagi Managing Editor Ariel Ramos Chief Copy Editor Paige Takeya Assc Chief Copy Editor Brandon Hoo Design Editor Beth Dorsey Assc Design Editor Bianca Bystrom Pino News Editor Kim Clark Assc News Editor Caitlin Kelly Features Editor Caitlin Kuroda Opinions Editor Sarah Nishioka Sports Editor Marc Arakaki Assc Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Nik Seu Assc Photo Editor Chasen Davis Web Specialist Blake Tolentino Web Editor Quincy Greenheck

ADVERTISING E-mail advertising@kaleo.org Ad Manager Regina Zabanal Marketing Director Reece Farinas PR Coordinator Samantha Court Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Susan Lin, chair; Kara McManus, vice chair; or Esther Fung, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

Additional Angel Tree locations nearby include Kahala Mall and any Central Pacific Bank branch. CHASEN DAVIS KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

NAOMI L UGO Staff Writer The Associated Students of the University of Hawai‘i is working to promote giving this holiday season by setting up its third annual Angel Tree. “I am very happy with the success [that] we have had over the past few years,” ASUH President Richard Mizusawa said in a press release. “I can’t wait to see the amount of gifts we will be giving to the less fortunate as the UH M ā noa community.” The tree, which is a part of the Salvation Army’s Angel Tree Program, was brought to campus by Mizusawa, who had volunteered previously with the

program while in high school. Students, faculty, staff and community members can make a donation at ASUH’s table in Campus Center and give a present to an “angel.” To celebrate its centennial, ASUH has a goal of 100 donations for 100 angels this December. This would equal the number of donations the group collected in its first two years combined. Mizusawa encourages students to stop by and make a donation or get informed about the program at the table. Donations can be made from now until the tree is taken down on Dec. 5. ASUH members will be present to take donations weekdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.


Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Friday, Nov. 30 2012

Features

‘Be a Scientist Night’

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Only 51 percent of “disadvantaged students” in Hawai‘i meet proficiency in math, according to the Hawai’i State Department of Education’s 2012 Adequate Yearly Progress Report.

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NICOLYN C HARLOT Staff Writer Hawai‘i’s youth have historically had the most trouble with math and science. To combat this issue, the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s math department has collaborated with the Institute for Human Services to educate homeless children in math and science. Student volunteers from the university will team up with the math department, IHS and Graduate Women in Science to put on “Be a Scientist Night” to celebrate all the work the children have put in during the year. “I think part of the reason why we’re doing this is to inspire the kids who … have bigger things to worry about than their grades. … This night, we can show them and their families how much potential this kid has,” said Robert Young, a School and University Partnership for Educational Renewel in Mathematics special events coordinator. This collaboration between UH Mānoa and IHS has been ongoing for the past three years. Every Friday afternoon, students go to the shelter to teach the children for an hour. “Be a Scientist Night” is held once a year, and the children’s families and the entire community are invited.

I N VO LV I N G T H E W H O L E COMMU N I T Y Monique Chyba, a professor of mathematics at UH Mānoa who served as the organizer of this year’s event, stressed the importance of the presence of parents. “What is really important is to engage the entire family – the parents,” she said. “Because if the parents think that this is good for the kids – that’s going to make a great difference in their life.” Young said that it is important for the general community to come because it breaks down stereotypes about homelessness. “It’s to bring them together, to get them to understand more,” he noted, wanting people to realize that social barriers are a problem in ending homelessness. “One of the biggest responsibilities of a university, in general, is to give back to the community,” said Mike Andonian, project manager for the event. Rochelle Funakura, a women’s studies senior serving as a student volunteer at the event, expressed hopes for her role in tonight’s activities. “I hope to contribute to a learning and enjoyable experience for disadvantaged youth,” she said in an e-mail interview. All of the activities will relate to math and science in some way – there will be stations that

feature drawing, Sudoku, insects, robotics, LEGO and more. Students can also make and launch their own paper rockets or try to match their voice pitches to those of whales and dolphins. A live jazz band will be playing, and food and drinks will be served. There will also be opportunities to speak with undergraduate and graduate students and professors about their knowledge in these areas, as well as Mānoa and its programs.

“Be a Scientist Night” When: Friday, Nov. 30; 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Where: 546 Ka‘aahi St. Cost: Free, but donations, particularly wet/disinfectant wipes, clothing, puzzles and diapers, are welcome. Contact: Robert Young, 808956-4669 or superm.hawaii. sec@gmail.com

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Page 4 | Ka Leo | Friday, Nov. 30 2012

Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor

Features

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OZOM AT L I I N C O N C E R T Hailing from the streets of Los Angeles, Calif., Ozomatli will take the stage this Saturday night. The Grammy Award-winning band is known for its diverse musical styles that range from Latin and hip-hop to Jamaican reggae, and the members bring it back to their L.A. roots. The band will be rocking The Republik with songs such as “Saturday Night,” “City of Angels” and “After Party.” W hen: Saturday, Dec. 1; 8 p.m. W here: The Republik, 1349 Kapi‘olani Blvd Cost: $27.50, $37.50 Contact: bampproject.com

NEIL CONWAY / FLICKR

Ozomatli was formed in 1994. ʻ W I C K E D : A N E W MU S I C A Lʼ From New York City to Honolulu, this Broadway hit will be performed for audiences through January. Based on the bestselling book of the same name by author Gregory Maguire, this fantastical musical unveils the “untold” tale of the Wicked Witch of the West that takes place before and during Dorothy’s arrival in the Land of Oz. When: Friday, Nov. 30; 8 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 1; 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 2; 6:30 p.m. Where: Neal S. Blaisdell Concert Hall, 777 Ward Ave. Cost: $40, $65, $95, $150 Contact: magicspace.net

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Melveen Leed, Frank Delima and Anuhea are scheduled to perform at the opening night of Honolulu City Lights. HONOLULU CITY LIGHTS PARADE 13TH ANNUAL GINGERBREAD The Christmas lights will be up FAMILY FE STIVAL in Honolulu Hale, and to commemorate the start of the holiday season, the Honolulu City Lights Parade will travel through downtown this Saturday night. Head down early for food and rides, as well as the annual tree-lighting ceremony, where Mayor Peter Carlisle will light the 50-foot Christmas tree and kick off a series of lights and decorations that run from the Civic Center through Downtown to Chinatown. When: Saturday, Dec. 1; 4 p.m. food booths and keiki rides open, 6 p.m. tree lighting, 7:30 p.m. parade and musical entertainment Where: Honolulu Hale, 530 S. King St. Cost: Free Contact: honolulucitylights.org

The 13th Annual Gingerbread Family Festival is back. Head over to the Neal S. Blaisdell Center for holiday entertainment. The festival will feature gingerbread house construction, gingerbread kits to-go, community and chef competitions, photos with Santa and Santa’s Assisted Technology Workshop. W hen: Sunday, Dec. 2; 9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m. W here: Neal S. Blaisdell Exhibition Hall, 777 Ward Ave. Cost: Free, but house construction kits cost $39 Phone: 808 -536 -1015

CARRY STEPHENS / FLICKR

The Gingerbread Family Festival is held annually by Easter Seals Hawai’i.


s A sp m a ecial e t l a i friendship n the spec o TYLER ISONO Staff Writer

As members of the special teams unit, senior punter Alex Dunnachie and senior long snapper Luke Ingram have a very close relationship. And with the end of the 2012 Warrior football season looming, Dunnachie and Ingram both look forward to going pro. “I definitely got NFL aspirations,” said Dunnachie. “I am hoping after this [Saturday’s] game, I can start talking to a few of the teams and figure out what I am immediately going to do and the whole agent thing. Definitely looking at the next level, hopefully get invited to the combine, and then we will see how the draft goes. If not, I’m going to keep clocking away – go back to

Senior long snapper Luke Ingram

Australia, work on technique and get myself ready for it.” Ingram has similar aspirations. “After this season, I am not sure. [I’m] going to do some evaluations, evaluate myself and figure what I really want to do,” Ingram said. “[I’ll] try to get ready to go to the next level; it’s a long process to go through. It’s physically and mentally stressful, but it’s something that is coming up quick. Take a little time off, maybe a week or two, then take off after it and hopefully reach the NFL.”

ʻB E S T O F B U D Sʼ Although Dunnachie and Ingram come from very different backgrounds, they have become more than teammates. “As far as my relationship with him, we are best of buds and have been close since day one,” said Ingram. “I am excited to watch him play as his career goes on.” “Ever since we came here we have been on the same journey,” said Dunnachie. “He [Ingram] is one of my real good mates, and it’s going to be sad not to see him anymore.” As individuals, Ingram and Dunnachie both have had unique journeys to becoming Warriors. Ingram is best described as a native son of the islands. “I am from Kahalu‘u, moved to Mililani a little before middle school. [I] grew up in Mililani [and] got into football because of my older brothers,” said Ingram. “I have two older brothers. I wanted

to be just like them: When they played baseball, I wanted to play baseball, and when they wanted to play football, I wanted to play football. [I] got to Mililani High School, followed in my brother Jake’s footsteps. [I] tried to be a defensive end for Mililani and graduated in 2008.” Luke continued to follow his brother’s footsteps when he came to University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa to take over Jake’s former position. Jake Ingram was the starting long snapper for the Warriors back in 2004 until he eventually got drafted into the NFL. As a native from Australia, Dunnachie took a different path to UH Mānoa. “I wasn’t really into football. Coming from Australia, I played Australian-rules football [so] it was really strange,” said Dunnachie. “I went to a biggest kick competition with my local football team and ended up winning the competition. The coach basically said, ‘You have a bit of potential at this, you should keep going.’ I trained with him for about four or five months, put a video on YouTube, sent the YouTube video to a bunch of colleges and that’s how I ended up here on a full ride. As crazy as it sounds, that’s exactly how it happened.”

W H E N T O WO R K These players ended up playing together and forming a powerful core for the Warriors’ special

Follo us on Twitter Follow @ka @kaleosports for upto-th to-the minute updates live from f Halawa.

teams in the past four ye a r s . During this time, they formed a relationship that can be seen both on and off the field.

“The thing about Alex is when he is off the field, he is this fun, happy-go-lucky guy; when he is on the field he has the same attitude,” said Ingram. “When I’m off the field, I’m real happy and fun and like to joke around too, but when I’m on the field, I’m real serious. I don’t like to joke or mess around. So sometimes I get after him a little too much on the field when I need snaps and stuff during the game.” Dunnachie, however, doesn’t seem to mind. “We get along really well with each other on and off the field,” said Ingram. “We are good mates off the field and we hang out with each other and look out for each other. On the field, I think it sort of reflects that relationship. I know exactly what he needs me to do and he knows what I need to do, and we both help each other get ready or leave each other alone when we need to as well.”

Senior punter Alex Dunnachie (pictured above) is second in the Mountain West with 46.0 yards per punt. PHOTOS BY NIK SEU KA LEO O HAWAI‘I


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Friday, Nov. 30 2012

Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor | Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Friday, Nov. 30 2012

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Hawaii vs. South Alabama 12-1-12 at 6:00 PM Alex Gourley

Sean Hamada

Catherine Chau

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HALFTIME FIELD GOAL KICK K CONTESTANTS! At the South Alabama vs. Hawaii game this Saturday contestants will have the chance to win a brand new Moped and a $500 Gift Card from Chevron.

Warriors plan to send seniors out with victory JOEY R AMIREZ Associate Sports Editor If it were up to the Warrior football team to decide, the 2012 season would have gone much differently. More specifically, there would have been no eight-game losing streak where Hawai‘i (2-9, 1-7 Mountain untain West) was outscored 360 -95. However, thanks to a 48-10 shellacking of UNLV last week, the Warriors have an opportunity to end the year on a high note as they face the University rsity of South Alabama (2-10, 1-7 Sun Belt)) this Saturday at 6 p.m. in the last game of the season. “ We’re gonna approach roach it like it ’s any other game,” said id senior defensive end Paipai Falemalu. malu. “But I think us seniors especially [are] gonna try tr y to play to the best off our ability, and maybe even better because cause it ’s our last game [at Hawai‘i]. It might even be our last football game ever, r, so we just gotta make the most of it.” Fifteen players willl be making their final appearances in Warrior uniforms this weekend, but only ly three of them will be starting. “I don’t really know w what to think,” Falemalu said. “It ’s coming so quick, and I never thought that hat it would end. I can’t believe it ’s almost most over. My five years here went pretty quick.” While UH has undoubtedly ubtedly had issues this year, it can be argued ued that its opponent’s situation has been n even worse. South Alabama is currently urrently suffering through a five-game losing ing streak and has not won on the road since ce October 2011. Much of this lack of success can be attributed to the fact that hat this is the Jaguars’ first year of FBS S football. However, even their victoriess have been lackluster, as they scored just nine points against FCS Nicholls State and needed two overtimes to defeatt Florida Atlantic. Still, after a season n of weekly blowouts, Hawai‘i does not plan on letting a seemingly easy victor y slip by. “ They [are] a heck of a team,” junior cornerback Mike Edwards wards said. “ They have a lot of talent and nd a lot of speed. W henever you got speed peed in between

those lines, that ’s gonna make any competition difficult. We just gotta come out there and finish strong. We gotta finish on our ‘A’ game.”

OV E R N I G H T I M P ROV E M E N T A fter being held to an average of 18.3 points in its first 10 games, the Warrior offense looks to keep closer to the 48 it hung on the Rebels last Saturday. A pair of returning players sparked this outburst and will attempt to have similar performances this week. Freshman running back will Gregory averaged 6.6 yards per carry and also scored a touchdown in his first game back from suspension for punching a Boise State player. Junior quarterback Sean Schroeder threw for 201 yards, one score and no interceptions after being benched the previous week against Air Force. “The offense played really great this past weekend,” said Falemalu. “The defense, we were on the sideline a bunch. And we were like, ‘Man, we’re still sitting on the bench.’ It was a good feeling to be on the bench and allow our offense to run up the score.” UH’s defense also made a statement last week as it allowed the lowest amount of points for an FBS school since November 2010. “It meant a lot personally, and it meant a lot for

this team,” said Edwards. “[We] finally get to see where our hard work and our dedication is going to. We just came out there and we executed this weekend.” However, much of the Warriors’ de fensive issues this year have been due to the offense’s inability to keep drives alive as UH ranks ninth-worst in the country in first downs (16.91 per game) and turnovers (2.64). Now, after holding UNLV scoreless for three quarters and allowing just one first down conversion on 15 attempts, the Hawai‘i defensive unit hopes to have similar results against the Jaguars. USA averages just 19.4 points per game and will have

to deal with a package of Warrior secondary that seem to be hitting its peak. Edwards leads the Mountain West with 16 passes defended this year. Freshman safety Marrell Jackson is averaging the most tackles per game (4.9) on the team. And junior defensive back John Hardy-Tuliau was named Mountain West Defensive Player of the Week after a twointerception performance against UNLV.

“ We haven’t been able to showcase it as much this season, but this is one of the best secondaries I’ve ever been a part of,” said Edwards. “John and Marrell [are] both able to play strong safety and free safet y, and most of the boys [are] able to do their one -eleven. It ’s a great feeling to have that much talent back there.”

Junior quarterback Sean Schroeder is expected to start against South Alabama despite a back injury that caused him to miss most of this week’s practice. NIK SEU KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

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Page 6 | Ka Leo | Friday, Nov. 30 2012

Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor | Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Friday, Nov. 30 2012

Gr G r id idi diro on n

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Why Should I Hire you? Do you you llike i e th ik the he in inte internet, te ern rnet et,, et making creating k websites, ki b i i apps, working on Facebook? Then check out the options at Ka Leo. We are recruiting Web Developers for our growing program. 808-956-7043 www.kaleo.org/jobs

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Brought to you by:

Hawaii vs. South Alabama 12-1-12 at 6:00 PM Alex Gourley

Sean Hamada

Catherine Chau

Vincent Karver

HALFTIME FIELD GOAL KICK K CONTESTANTS! At the South Alabama vs. Hawaii game this Saturday contestants will have the chance to win a brand new Moped and a $500 Gift Card from Chevron.

Warriors plan to send seniors out with victory JOEY R AMIREZ Associate Sports Editor If it were up to the Warrior football team to decide, the 2012 season would have gone much differently. More specifically, there would have been no eight-game losing streak where Hawai‘i (2-9, 1-7 Mountain untain West) was outscored 360 -95. However, thanks to a 48-10 shellacking of UNLV last week, the Warriors have an opportunity to end the year on a high note as they face the University rsity of South Alabama (2-10, 1-7 Sun Belt)) this Saturday at 6 p.m. in the last game of the season. “ We’re gonna approach roach it like it ’s any other game,” said id senior defensive end Paipai Falemalu. malu. “But I think us seniors especially [are] gonna try tr y to play to the best off our ability, and maybe even better because cause it ’s our last game [at Hawai‘i]. It might even be our last football game ever, r, so we just gotta make the most of it.” Fifteen players willl be making their final appearances in Warrior uniforms this weekend, but only ly three of them will be starting. “I don’t really know w what to think,” Falemalu said. “It ’s coming so quick, and I never thought that hat it would end. I can’t believe it ’s almost most over. My five years here went pretty quick.” While UH has undoubtedly ubtedly had issues this year, it can be argued ued that its opponent’s situation has been n even worse. South Alabama is currently urrently suffering through a five-game losing ing streak and has not won on the road since ce October 2011. Much of this lack of success can be attributed to the fact that hat this is the Jaguars’ first year of FBS S football. However, even their victoriess have been lackluster, as they scored just nine points against FCS Nicholls State and needed two overtimes to defeatt Florida Atlantic. Still, after a season n of weekly blowouts, Hawai‘i does not plan on letting a seemingly easy victor y slip by. “ They [are] a heck of a team,” junior cornerback Mike Edwards wards said. “ They have a lot of talent and nd a lot of speed. W henever you got speed peed in between

those lines, that ’s gonna make any competition difficult. We just gotta come out there and finish strong. We gotta finish on our ‘A’ game.”

OV E R N I G H T I M P ROV E M E N T A fter being held to an average of 18.3 points in its first 10 games, the Warrior offense looks to keep closer to the 48 it hung on the Rebels last Saturday. A pair of returning players sparked this outburst and will attempt to have similar performances this week. Freshman running back will Gregory averaged 6.6 yards per carry and also scored a touchdown in his first game back from suspension for punching a Boise State player. Junior quarterback Sean Schroeder threw for 201 yards, one score and no interceptions after being benched the previous week against Air Force. “The offense played really great this past weekend,” said Falemalu. “The defense, we were on the sideline a bunch. And we were like, ‘Man, we’re still sitting on the bench.’ It was a good feeling to be on the bench and allow our offense to run up the score.” UH’s defense also made a statement last week as it allowed the lowest amount of points for an FBS school since November 2010. “It meant a lot personally, and it meant a lot for

this team,” said Edwards. “[We] finally get to see where our hard work and our dedication is going to. We just came out there and we executed this weekend.” However, much of the Warriors’ de fensive issues this year have been due to the offense’s inability to keep drives alive as UH ranks ninth-worst in the country in first downs (16.91 per game) and turnovers (2.64). Now, after holding UNLV scoreless for three quarters and allowing just one first down conversion on 15 attempts, the Hawai‘i defensive unit hopes to have similar results against the Jaguars. USA averages just 19.4 points per game and will have

to deal with a package of Warrior secondary that seem to be hitting its peak. Edwards leads the Mountain West with 16 passes defended this year. Freshman safety Marrell Jackson is averaging the most tackles per game (4.9) on the team. And junior defensive back John Hardy-Tuliau was named Mountain West Defensive Player of the Week after a twointerception performance against UNLV.

“ We haven’t been able to showcase it as much this season, but this is one of the best secondaries I’ve ever been a part of,” said Edwards. “John and Marrell [are] both able to play strong safety and free safet y, and most of the boys [are] able to do their one -eleven. It ’s a great feeling to have that much talent back there.”

Junior quarterback Sean Schroeder is expected to start against South Alabama despite a back injury that caused him to miss most of this week’s practice. NIK SEU KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

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Page 8 | Ka Leo | Friday, Nov. 30 2012

Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor | Joey Ramirez Associate

Gr G riiid r d iir ro on n Why Should I Hire you? Do you like design, being creative and developing promotions? Then check out the options at Ka Leo. We are recruiting Graphic Designers for our growing program.

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announces the return of

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$500 FOR WINNING POETRY SUBMISSION $500 FOR WINNING PROSE SUBMISSION 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners will be published in Hawaii Review Issue 78 (May 2013)

Deadline for submissions is December 14th 2012 For more information visit http://www.kaleo.org/ hawaii_review/site/contest.html

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CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE

University of Hawaii Service Learning Program

The service learning program provides students with the opportunity to volunteer in their community in meaningful ways while furthering their education. If you would like to volunteer for the various community projects available through the Service Learning Program, please contact us at slp@hawaii.edu or 808-956-4641. facebook.com/UHServiceLearningProgram A Service Learning Program public service announcement. For other volunteer opportunities contact Service Learning Program at (808)956-4641

We’re in this together M ARC A R AK AKI Sports Editor I understand where you are coming from. A 2-9 football team is not easy to support. But remember who these guys are: They are your classmates, your friends and your brothers. “We’re just like them,” senior defensive end and co-team captain Paipai Falemalu said. “We go to school here. We’re proud to be a part of the [University of Hawai‘i] system. “We want to let them know that we play for them. It’s not just us. They see us around campus; they see us off-campus – so we want to ask that they come out and support.” And Falemalu and 14 of our other peers will be playing in the last football game of their collegiate career. “It will be great seeing the students out there supporting us,” Falemalu said. “We haven’t been having so good of a season, so that probably has a lot to do with it. “We just hope they come out and support [us]. The fans that are there – we thank them. It plays a big role – the 12th man and it helps us to play better. We feed off of their energy.” Our friends play in front of the national spotlight week in and week out. They deserve your support. If a winning team is what you are looking for, well, they beat UNLV by 38 points last week. This is a changing team. “We play for them, and they’re there for us,” senior wide receiver and co-team captain Miah Ostrowski said. “It goes hand-in-hand. We’re trying to make things exciting for

? (

)

NIK SEU / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

1,000 pom poms will be distributed in the student section at this Saturday’s game. them and in the meantime, they’re helping us [by] giving us a lot of momentum. We need them there.” The question I ask you is, why not go? Is Aloha Stadium too far? Take the free bus shuttle from the corner of Dole and East West. The bus leaves at 4 p.m. You want to bring someone from another school with you? You are allowed to reserve your ticket outside the student section and purchase a ticket for your friend and sit next to them. Go today to the Stan Sheriff Center

Box Office from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and get your tickets. Do you want to see “Twilight” or “Skyfall” at the theaters? See them on Sunday with ten and six show times respectively. The football team has one showing at 6 p.m. on Saturday for the last time until Aug. 31, 2013. Sure, they only won two games this season, thus far, but only together are we the University of Hawai‘i. These guys play for us, so let’s show them our support one last time for 2012. I challenge you to fill the student section on Saturday evening.


Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 9 | Ka Leo | Friday, Nov. 30 2012

Comics


Advertising@kaleo.org | Regina Zabanal Student Ad Manager |Reece Farinas Marketing Director

Page 10 | Ka Leo | Friday, Nov. 30 2012

Games

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

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CROSS

WORD

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ACROSS 1 John and Paul 6 Capital on its own gulf 10 Bar or bel intro 14 Imminent, old-style 15 Shots served neatly? 16 Country on its own gulf 17 Mimic mackerel? 19 Tolled 20 Seed cover 21 Tony winner Roger 22 Many an Everly Brothers hit 23 “__-hoo!” 24 Mimic masquerades? 26 Early Pilgrim family 28 Ready 29 County bordering Mayo 30 Fairy tale threat 33 Mimic magazine managers? 38 The gamut 39 Obtain despite resistance 42 Key of Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 24 47 European tourists’ rentals 48 Mimic masquerades? 52 “__ we having fun yet?” 53 Like much mouthwash 54 Pearl Buck heroine 55 “Dang!” 56 __ uncertain terms 57 Mimic miseries? 59 Bread brushed with ghee 60 Stationary surgical patient 61 Rival of Helena 62 In addition 63 “The War of the Worlds” foe 64 Slurpee cousins DOWN 1 Tropical fruits 2 Hot 3 Regular

4 Rank below marquis 5 Capacity-exceeding letters 6 Gold-medalist decathlete Johnson 7 Less receptive 8 Painter’s undercoat 9 __ Wednesday 10 Back fin 11 Sends, in a way 12 Taper, e.g. 13 Gulp down 18 Speaker of Cooperstown 22 Crude meas. 24 Letter run 25 Finn floater 27 I problem? 30 Wrong, with “all” 31 Meter opening 32 Dick Cheney’s eldest 34 Blabs 35 Has a mortgage, say 36 Tourist’s options: Abbr. 37 Break up 40 End of the slogan that starts “Everybody doesn’t like something” 41 African dangers 42 Big food problem 43 __ column 44 Salon dyes 45 It starts with thunder and lightning in “Macbeth” 46 Mr. Rogers 47 Blow off steam 49 Irish lullaby start 50 Eating may relieve its symptoms 51 Compels 55 Frisbee, for one 57 “Lou Grant” production co. 58 Portugal’s Manuel II, e.g.

ANSWERS AT KALEO.ORG

Fall Finals Survival Guide 12-10-12

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzle’s solution.

GET ITb.ile mo

Download the app search: Ka Leo O Hawai’i

.org


Opinions@kaleo.org | Sarah Nishioka Editor

Page 11 | Ka Leo | Friday, Nov. 30 2012

Opinions SAR AH NISHIOK A Opinions Editor The Hawai‘i State Office of Elections has been under fire for providing an insufficient number of ballots during the Nov. 6 presidential election. Gov. Neil Abercrombie was quoted as saying, “I think part of the way to deal with this is to move into a mail-in ballot across the board.” He believes a mail-in election system will ensure that no one is turned away and that all votes will be heard on Election Day. He is wrong. What Abercrombie is proposing will disenfranchise the thousands of people in our state who have no home to send their ballot to.

MAIL PRIVILEGE Washington and Oregon have already made the switch to allmail elections, and Abercrombie has said, “I’ve been an advocate [of mail-in elections] for some time. … It makes good sense.” While Abercrombie thinks it “makes good sense,” his 100 percent mail-in ballot plan is flawed. It is inadequate and unconstitutional because it does not and cannot account for people who do not have steady living situations. Hawai‘i allows voters to register absentee or permanent absentee, which means that their ballots will be sent to their homes before the election.

The instructions on the absentee registration form note that “A Post Office Box … Business Address, or Mailing Service Address is not an acceptable residence address.” Voters must use a residential address when they register as absentee – but not when they sign the regular voter affidavit. That affidavit allows them to merely “describe [their] location of residence” if they do not have an address. The 2012 Hawai‘i Homeless Service Utilization Report reveals that 13,980 individuals used state shelter services between July 2011 and June 2012. This number does not include people who sleep on sidewalks and beaches and avoid state services entirely. These numbers also do not include the people who have no home of their own but stay with friends or relatives to avoid living on the streets. All of these people are American citizens who do not have a residence address that can receive ballots. They have not surrendered their voting rights because of their poverty – but they

would still be unable to vote in an absentee-only election.

A H OM E , A C I T I Z E N Absentee voting is a convenient method of voting, but mailin-only elections would become a barrier to the voting rights of the poor and homeless. It is similar in effect to America’s early laws requiring voters to own a certain amount of land, which disenfranchised women, slaves, immigrants and the poor. Requiring modern citizens to have a residential address in order to exercise their right to vote is a step backward, no matter how much “good sense” it may make for everyone else. While a ballot may not put food on the table, it gives the homeless and less fortunate the opportunity to select the government officials that will make policies on their behalf. If Abercrombie and the State Legislature are committed to helping the homeless in Hawai‘i, they should ensure that these citizens are considered in any restructuring of the election process. Even if someone does not have a legally recognized home, they deserve to vote as a matter of civil right and human dignity.

REECE FARINAS / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Abercrombie stated that he has asked Attorney General David Louie to open an investigation into the state Office of Elections concerning the ballot shortage.

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Page 12 | Ka Leo | Friday, Nov. 30 2012

Opinions@kaleo.org | Sarah Nishioka Editor

Opinions

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“I recently saw pictures of my boyfriend on an Internet message board – they were pictures of him naked, and they were recent. I don’t know who the other person was or how they got the pictures, but my boyfriend obviously took them himself and didn’t send them to me. Is he cheating on me? How do I confront him about the pictures?”

QUINCY GREENHECK Web Editor

If you have absolutely no shred of doubt that these nude pictures are recent, then prepare for the worst. Let’s be real: The only reason he’d have a naked picture of himself is to send it to someone else, and the only reason to send it to someone else is to try to get sex. Whether he’s actually cheated on you is unknown, but he has definitely done more than simply toy around with the idea. He solicited someone for a sexual encounter, and it wasn’t you. My advice would be to dump him as quickly as you can. Show him the photos so he knows why you’re leaving, but don’t let him try to talk his way out of it. He will most likely try to deceive you with a very sincerely delivered lie, be prepared.

He said...

A RIEL R AMOS Managing Editor

Ask him. You can make up hundreds of scenarios, but you won’t know his side of the story unless you talk to him. Of course, he could lie about why he sent someone nude photos of himself, but at least give him the chance to explain. But listening to his explanation doesn’t mean you have to believe it. Be concise in your questions and practical in your interpretation of his answers. He needs to show you that you can trust him, so ask for proof such as the correspondence between him and whoever was on the receiving end of his pictures. If he insists that he is faithful, have him prove it.

She said...

E-mail your questions to opinions@kaleo.org


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