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A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 7 to THURSDAY NOV. 8, 2012 VOLUME 108 ISSUE 31

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

www.kaleo.org

‘Finding Kukan’

B reaks Barriers

Robin Lung inspects the original copy of “Kukan” that was founded in a restoration lab in Maryland. MIA FERNANDEZ

CAITLIN KURODA Features Editor Few people know of “Kukan,” a 1941 documentary that highlights China’s resistance to Japan during the early years of World War II – and even fewer know of Ling-Ai Li, the Hawai‘i-born Chinese woman who braved war alongside cameraman Rey Scott and overcame her own fi lmmaking inexperience to produce this Academy Award honoree. Hawai‘i fi lmmaker Robin Lung discovered Li while trying to fi nd a Chinese heroine to look up to. “Finding Kukan” is Lung’s in-process documentary that chronicles her search for the thought-to-be-lost fi lm and the life of the forgotten woman behind it.

THE NEED TO BE BLONDE “I hated my hair, I hated my f lat nose – I wanted to look like a haole,” said Lung,

Kitchen

who, despite growing up in the multicultural environment of Hawai‘i, always “fantasized about having blonde, curly hair” like the heroines of the movies and mystery novels she loved as a child. “I had a lot of role models around me, like my teachers were Asian. But they didn’t have that kind of glamour that you assign to people who are in fictional novels or movies” she explained.

A H E RO I N E AT L A S T It wasn’t until her college years that Lung became interested in learning about her Chinese heritage. Later, Lung made a mid-life career switch to making video biographies, and always wanted to make a documentary on a Chinese woman from Hawai‘i, but didn’t have anyone in mind until she received vintage myster y novels from a friend.

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Within the books, set in Hawai‘i, Lung discovered a character that fit her every defi nition of a role model: a Chinese-American woman holding the position of head sleuth. “And it depicts her like this amazing, modern, smart, sexy, worldly woman,” Lung said. Lung became obsessed with fi nding the fi gure that this character was based on and she came across Li – a teacher, writer, dancer, actress and producer. She was never rich and famous but lived life as though she was, holding her head high and drawing attention to herself wherever she went, all while embracing and promoting her heritage. “I don’t know for sure whether she inspired this fictional character, but she’s very similar … so the more I learned about Ling-Ai, the more I felt she was so close to the fictional character that … I started to fall in love with,” said Lung.

Go to kaleo.org for a full list of results and reactions from the winners and losers of Election Day 2012.

See Restoring, page 5

Report

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Page 2 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 7 2012

News@kaleo.org | Kim Clark Editor | Caitlin Kelly Associate

News K A LEO T H E

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IN SELECT THEATRES NOVEMBER 9TH

Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. ©2012 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Susan Lin, chair; Kara McManus, vice chair; or Esther Fung, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

O C T. 29 FIGHTING A TICKET At 12:42 p.m., Campus Security responded to an assault near Kennedy Theatre. A female student allegedly took a swing at a female parking citation offi cer when the student saw the offi cer generating a ticket. The student claimed that the offi cer hit the driver-side window of her vehicle. Referred to Judicial Services.

physics Building. The man threw the cat food to the side, the female threw some on his truck and an argument broke out. Case closed.

O C T. 26 BA - L E B R AW L At 9:25 p.m., CS responded to a call about two male non-University of Hawai‘i students arguing in the Ba-le Courtyard. One of the men reportedly hit the other because of comments made about his girlfriend. Both men had been drinking before the argument broke out. Case closed.

O C T. 28 C AT F O O D C L A S H

U P DAT E

CS received a call at 2:22 p.m. about a female student throwing cat food on a male meteorologist’s truck. The suspect claimed that the man yelled at her for feeding the cats by placing wet and dry cat food under several vehicles near the Hawai‘i Institute of Geo-

The sex assault reported on Oct. 22 that took place at the Art Building was reclassifi ed as a harassment case. Because of this, a UH alert was not generated. Fear was not a factor in this case and is one of the criteria required for sex assault classifi cation.


News@kaleo.org | Kim Clark Editor | Caitlin Kelly Associate

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 7 2012

News

Martin receives ‘electrifying’ award A LEX BIT TER Staff Writer A University of Hawai‘i graduate student is being honored for his work in electrical engineering with a national award recognizing him as the most outstanding student in his fi eld. Larry Martin, a Master’s student in UH Mānoa’s College of Engineering, was granted the Alton B. Zerby and Carl T. Koerner Oustanding Electrical and Computer Engineering Award, a distinction bestowed annually by Eta Kappa Nu, the national electrical engineering society, on one exceptional college-level electrical or computer engineering student.

ONE STUDENT, MANY AWARDS Though the prize was awarded to Martin as a graduate student, his work as an undergraduate helped to cinch his selection.

By the time he received his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering in 2011, Martin had been awarded several scholarships and honorary titles, including two monetary awards from the National Consortium for Measurement and Signature Intelligence, as well as the 2012 Hawai‘i Council of Engineering Societies Student Engineer of the Year distinction. He also worked as the Program and Technical Manager of the College of Engineering’s Small Satellite Program, where he authored two successful proposals that will allow the program to launch two radar-calibrating nanosatellites with NASA in 2013-2014. As the sole recipient of this latest award, Martin will be recognized in March 2013 at the joint Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Eta Kappa Nu awards banquet in Orlando, Fla.

“It’s great to see that Larry’s tremendous accomplishments are being recognized on the national level,” said Wayne Shiroma, an electrical engineering professor who has worked with Martin on the Small Satellite Program. In a press release, Shiroma also said he is proud to add Martin’s name to the three other UH engineering students who have received the Zerby-Koerner award over the last eleven years. According to information provided by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the award’s recipient is selected each year from a pool of college student nominees from around the country. This pool is then reduced to ten finalists, who are presented to a panel of distinguished electrical and computer engineers responsible for selecting the overall winner as well as one or more honorable mentions.

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Page 4 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 7 2012

Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Maile Thomas Associate

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O‘ahu Fringe Festival surprises CAITLIN KURODA Features Editor “Uncensored,” “original” and “rapid-fi re”: The Second Annual O‘ahu Fringe Performing Arts Festival aims to be this and more, bringing together artists and performers for an eclectic weekend fi lled with spoken word, puppetry and pole-dancing. The festival starts tomorrow and runs through Saturday, with nightly performances at venues like The ARTS at Marks Garage and Ong King Arts Center. Check out this selection of acts and visit oahufringe.com for a full listing and schedule.

PLANET EGG PuppetCinema will be crashlanding its fresh vegetable and stereo part puppets on the stage for three science fiction-inspired shows. This critically-acclaimed performance company will film its puppets in real time and project them onto the big screen, blending puppetry and film with accompanying live Foley (reproduction of everyday sound effects). The show is appropriate for children age five and above,

but touches upon themes of murder, romance, revenge and cultural misunderstandings. PuppetCinema will also be offering a workshop for attendees to make their own puppets and learn how to create and use Foley objects. Performance: When: Thursday, Nov. 8; 6 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 10; 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Where: The ARTS at Marks Garage, 1159 Nu‘uanu Ave. Cost: $10 Puppet Workshop: When: Saturday, Nov. 10; 10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Cost: $15 Contact: 808-721-6942 to RSVP

H I S T O RY O F T H E P O L E Learn more about the beginnings of pole dancing in circus and as a form of adult entertainment, as well as its recent popularity in fitness and competitive sports. This narrated performance, presented by Pamela Poles, will take the audience (ages 13 and up) on a visual journey through the pole’s history. The original choreography fea-

tured in this piece ranges from circus-type acrobatics to more risqué performances. When: Thursday, Nov. 8; 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 10; 9 p.m. Where: The ARTS at Marks Garage, 1159 Nu‘uanu Ave. (Thursday), Ong King Arts Centre, 184 King St. (Saturday) Cost: $10

K AC H UZ Z I P R E S E N TA R E !

This adult-only show will explore themes of unattainable societal expectations of women – but it may also make you laugh. Tara Mariquita Makua stars as Kachuzzi the Clown in this social commentary and comedy as she tries to balance beauty, her career and her family. Audience interaction is a key element of the show, so beware: Kachuzzi may target male audience members that she likes and women could very well become either Kachuzzi’s confidantes or arch-nemeses in life and love.

When: Thursday, Nov. 8; 6 p.m., Friday, Nov. 9; 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 10; 10:30 p.m. Where: Loading Zone, 47 Hotel St. (Thursday), Ong King Arts Centre, 184 King St. (Friday and Saturday) Cost: $10

Pole dancing tones the body by using the body itself in core and whole-body workouts. PHOTO COURTESY OF PAMELA POLES


Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Maile Thomas Associate

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 7 2012

Features

Restoring a lost film

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COURTESY OF NAOMI LIN

ʻF I N D I N G K U K A N ʼ

KEEPING ʻKUKANʼ ALIVE

Lung was driven to find out anything she could about Li, and that is when she learned of Li’s involvement in the making of “Kukan” – and that the film was lost. After asking around and following clues, she was finally able to track down a partial copy and eventually a full (although damaged) copy with Scott’s family. But there are still more answers to be found. In her teaser for “Finding Kukan,” Lung questions why the film was lost to the world and why Li and Scott – particularly Li, who is only credited as technical advisor – were so easily forgotten despite producing the first documentary film to receive an Academy Award. These questions will be explored throughout the documentary as Lung pieces together the facts about these two mysterious individuals.

“Finding Kukan” is currently two-thirds complete in terms of fi lming. Editing is planned for next summer and the fi lm is targeted towards a national PBS broadcast. Lung shared, “My goal for this is to have it broadcast nationally on television and reach as wide an audience as possible, and to have Ling-Ai’s story not be forgotten, and to have the story of this film not be forgotten.” By bringing light to Li’s life, she hopes to inspire other AsianAmerican women to aim high while still holding on to their cultural heritage. She also believes that the story of Li and Scott, “renegades who were trying to do something that nobody else had ever done,” will speak to “anybody wanting to be inspired to do something larger than themselves.”

Support “Finding Kukan” “Finding Kukan” has raised $12,000 of its $16,000 goal through its Kickstarter campaign. To support this documentary and keep “Kukan” alive, scan this QR code or go to goo.gl/FeoaA Donations as little as $1 are appreciated, and those who donate at least $10 will receive a “Finding Kukan” postcard as well as a digital download of the final documentary. Donations will be accepted until Saturday, Nov. 17.

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FFeatures@kaleo.org Fe eat atur tur ures es@ @kal @k aleo leo.org orgg | Cait CCaitlin aitlilinn Ku Kuro Kuroda rodda da Ed Edit Editor itor or |M | |Maile aile ai le TThomas homa ho mass Associate Assso As sociciat iate te

Features

Instagram

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What’s really healthy? SHAYNA DIAMOND Senior Staff Writer

facebook cebook

Articles proffering health and weight-loss advice are commonplace. They tell us when, what and how to eat, but while these tips seem legitimate, a little research proves they can be inaccurate.

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Post to the Ka Leo Instagram or Facebook

T I M E T O E AT

PLAYTOWIN

“Don’t eat after 8 p.m.” is probably something you’ve heard before, accompanied by the claim that it makes digestion difficult and slows your metabolism. But late-night hunger cravings are normal. Potential causes include becoming dehydrated throughout the day, hunger from an early or too-small dinner, suffering from low salt or sugar levels, lack of protein and even boredom. Eating as a result of boredom is bad for you both physically and mentally, but avoiding eating altogether could be worse. Get to know your body and recognize the difference between boredom and actual cravings. If you’re concerned about the legitimacy of your cravings, satisfy them in a healthy way. Make every bite count by eating fruits, vegetables and fiber-rich foods.

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YOU NEED FAT TO LOSE FAT

Don’t eat vegetables and fruits exclusively: Keep a balanced diet. Moderation is key to a healthy diet. PHOTOS BY CHANEL HEBARU KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

While the producers of diet fads disagree on many things, many agree that “fat is bad.” The truth is that the human body needs fat to function properly. Eating less fat means you have to eat more protein or

carbs to make up for the loss in energy intake. Dietary fats supply slow-burning energy. By replacing fat with fasterburning carbs, you risk burning muscle tissue, feeling less energetic and wreaking havoc on your metabolism. Besides, certain types of fat are necessary for hormone production. Since hormones regulate many things (including the body’s ability to build and maintain muscle tissue), upsetting their balance could upset your metabolism as well. Muscle burns calories 24 hours a day and eating a lowor no-fat diet will make it more diffi cult to burn and replace fat with long-lasting muscle.

S K I P P I N G M E A L S WO N ʼ T K I L L YO U Irregular eating habits are a big concern of the dieting community. We’re told never to pass on meals, particularly breakfast, because it slows our metabolism. But it’s less healthy to obsess over when you eat and how much you eat than to miss the occasional meal or eat at a different time every now and then. It’s best to be conscious of when your body is hungry and when you can satisfy that hunger in the healthiest way. Waiting a half-hour until you can grab an apple is better than eating Pop Tarts as you rush out the door. Take the time to enjoy your meals when you can, and don’t stress about missing a single meal – it doesn’t mean your day is ruined.


Opinions@kaleo.org | Sarah Nishioka Editor | Jackie Perreira Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 7 2012

Opinions

Plan ahead – don’t regret it later You can never be too prepared for a natural disaster. Many people do not properly prepare even though they are forewarned, but it’s important to be ready for whatever happens. Did you fill containers with fresh water? Did you have long-lasting foodstuffs set aside? Did you make contact with your local friends and family? Setting up a disaster kit and having a talk with your family, friends, employees and coworkers about what to do in case of an emergency can be done in a couple hours of free time or a single scheduled meeting. Still, many people and businesses never take the time to make proper preparations – and that carelessness comes with consequences.

D O A S YO UʻR E T O L D According to the U.S. Department of Labor, over 40 percent of small businesses never recover from a serious natural disaster. Fortunately for Hawai‘i, mega-storms like Hurricane Sandy are not a yearly risk – but fl ash floods and the resulting mudslides are. Less

Hurricane season in Hawai‘i lasts from the beginning of June until the end of November. WORLD NEWS / MCT

common, but still possible, are earthquakes and tsunamis. The Oct. 27 tsunami scare was a demonstration of how seriously the local government takes these warnings, as well as how prepared it is. In a matter of hours, Waikīkī and Honolulu were shut down and evacuated, even though there were around 175,000 tourists on the island. Follow the instructions and guidance put down by the local authorities; they know what they’re doing. These situations happen, and our local government is prepared for them. When people decide to ignore these warnings, they’re only worsening an already terrible situation. If you were in a fl ood zone and did not evacuate, you were wrong. People who did not leave the fl ood zones were putting more than their own lives at risk: They were risking the lives of rescue workers who might have had to save them. The last few tsunami warnings may have ended up being nothing serious, but there’s always the possibility that half a dozen feet of ocean can come crashing across the islands, leaving wreckage and ruin in its wake. Putting the lives of emergency and rescue personnel at risk to

surf a storm wave or take a photograph is criminally irresponsible. Under Hawai‘i state law, violating the directives of emergency personnel during these situations has severe consequences, including up to $5,000 in fines and a year in prison.

B E P R E PA R E D The rainy season is coming up, so don’t be caught off guard. As recently as March, the islands saw flooding, mudslides, hail showers and even waterspouts. We may live in paradise, but it’s not shave ice and sunshine every day. The global climate is changing and tropical regions like Hawai‘i are at greater risk of increased rainfall – possibly up to 10 percent heavier rainfall extremes, according to an MIT study recently published in “Nature Geoscience.” Take the time to prepare. Flood zone maps are accessible through the Internet and local phone books. Spend an hour or two going over what to do in case of an emergency, where to go, who to call. Make sure you have supplies on hand, like clean water for drinking and sanitation, food, clothing and medication. Visit redcross.org/prepare and follow its recommendations.

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Page 8 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 7 2012

Opinions@kaleo.org | Sarah Nishioka Editor | Jackie Perreira Associate

Opinions

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a successful bloodless coup against the government in Bamako. Without the Western military intervention in Libya, Mali would still be intact. America’s military has gone beyond national defense and regularly instigates foreign regime change. The U.S. Constitution says that only Congress has the power to declare war, but President Barack Obama has continued with the precedent that he can intervene wherever and whenever he chooses. One cause of America’s $16 trillion deficit is our offensive military and its armed interventions all over the world. The U.S. currently maintains over 700 military bases in more than 150 countries. It is imperative that people educate themselves on American imperialism and its widespread undeclared military interventions so that more peace-loving leaders are elected in the future Until then, get ready for more blowback and needless violence across the Middle East.

E x c l us

on

It has been over a year since the assassination of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, the iron-fisted ruler of Libya, but living conditions in the Mediterranean country have not improved. Since the fall of the four-decade-old Gaddafi regime, the country has begun to splinter into armed militias, and former Tuareg soldiers of the regime have crossed the border and captured the entire northern half of Mali. The term “blowback” refers to unintended, violent consequences of a military operation and originated after the CIA overthrow of the legitimate Iranian government in 1953 and subsequent Islamic Revolution in 1979. Most cases of foreign military intervention by the United States have ended with unforeseen negative blowback. The U.S. military must bring home its troops from all over the world and become a defensive power rather than an offensive one.

to rebels, the anti-Gaddafi forces were able to claim control of Libya in October 2011. Since then, the blowback has been huge. Gaddafi was one of the most ruthless autocratic rulers in Africa, but he was able to provide the necessary stability to hold the three regions and multiple ethnic groups together. Western military intervention in Libya has led to lawlessness and an increase of arms and militias. An estimated 250,000 armed militants are currently operating independently inside Libya, up from the 30,000 that participated in Gaddafi’s overthrow. The current government is unable to control the widespread violence and f low of arms and militias, and the blowback has spilled over the border into Mali. Heavily armed and well trained under Gaddafi, Tuareg rebel forces crossed the desert into northern Mali in January 2012. After two months of fighting, and with the help of al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, an area the size of Texas was liberated from the Mali government and declared the new Republic of Azawad. Frustrated at the government’s inability to fight the Tuaregs, a Malian army captain led

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ROMAN K ALINOWSKI Staff Writer

Read an extended version of this article at kaleo.org

KTUH DJs

W W W . K A L EO . O R G • W W W . K T U H . O R G • 9 0 . 3 F M

The Guardian reported that the death toll in Libya prior to NATO intervention was between 1,000-2,000 people. By Oct. 11, 2011, eight months after NATO became involved, 30,000 were dead . XINHUA/ MCT


Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 9 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 7 2012

Comics


Page 10 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 7 2012

Games

ENJOY A SAVORY HOT POT TONIGHT!

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

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November 19, 2012

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3 Mozart works 4 Pal of Jerry Seinfeld 5 Retired seven-foot NBAer 6 “Say that again?” 7 “I __ Rock” 8 Fisher-Price parent company 9 Follow logically 10 Potluck staple 11 Summer on the Seine 12 Turn in for cash 13 Spain’s __ de Campos 14 Underline, say 19 Trio on a phone keypad 23 Online shopkeeper 25 Place for pampering 26 Area of expertise 27 Calligrapher’s flourish 28 Question of time, to Telemann 29 __ me tangere 31 Barbecue spit, e.g. 34 “Every Breath You Take” band 35 “Myra Breckinridge” author 37 Tickled pink 38 Scottish Celt 39 “As of yet, no” 40 Pressing need? 44 Inexact fig. 45 Throws out 46 Reservation waster 47 Spiral pasta 48 One of Dancer’s partners 49 Far-from-efficient vehicle 51 Reservations 52 Best-seller 55 Perfumery scent 57 Blistex target 59 Frat house letter 60 Flee 61 The Rams of the NCAA’s Atlantic 10 Conf. 62 D-Day vessel

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ACROSS 1 Dash, e.g. 5 Head-hanging emotion 10 Altoids alternative 15 Fan favorite 16 Earthling 17 Absorbed the loss 18 Tropical headgear 20 Passover ritual 21 Dix halved 22 Calendar abbr. 24 Prior to, in verse 25 Low-tech note taker 27 Deal-closing aids 30 Unblemished 31 Line winder 32 Baking by-products 33 Creative enterprise 34 On the fence 35 Six-stringed instrument, usually 36 Urbana-Champaign NCAA team 41 Two pages 42 “Zip-__-Doo-Dah” 43 Tram car filler 45 Totally absorbed 48 Hon 49 Pontiac muscle cars 50 Powerful pin cushion? 52 “It __ hit me yet” 53 Mao follower? 54 Scientology’s __ Hubbard 55 Sushi bar soup 56 Cook-off potful 58 False 63 Mixer for a mixologist 64 Boyfriends 65 Couple in a rowboat 66 Run through a reader, as a debit card 67 Footlocker 68 Sandstorm residue

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Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor| Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 11 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 7 2012

Sports

New-look ‘Bows revive Rainbow Classic The stage is set and the curtains are ready to be drawn back for the University of Hawai‘i basketball team as the Rainbow Warriors (16-16, 6-8 Western Athletic Conference; 201112) get set to tip off their inaugural season in the Big West Conference. After a one-year hiatus, the ‘Bows will once again host the Outrigger Hotels and Resorts Rainbow Classic this weekend against Maryland-Eastern Shore, Arkansas-Pine Bluff and Houston Baptist. UH looks to capture its second Rainbow Classic title in two appearances under head coach h Gib Arnold. “It’s a foundation,” said Arnold. “It’s a wayss off until conference [season] obviously, usly, so that momentum can go up and down a hundred different times with a young team. But it’s definitely the he springboard to bigger and better things.”

dependent on how I come out everyday,” said Brereton. “It’s up to me to compete everyday and make sure the team knows that we gotta bring a high level to practice [and] a high level to games every day. If not, it’s on me cause it’s my last season.” Despite averaging just 7.7 points per game last year, Brereton was the second-highest scorer amongst returning Rainbow Warriors in 2011. “Last year the other players took a lot of the attention and I was that guy that people didn’t zone in on as much. This time, it’s reversed roles.” Luckily for the ‘Bows, it appears that co-captain and preseason all-conference center Vander Joaquim will be available to play this weekend despite tearing his MCL in late September.

F R E S H FAC AC E S Seeing g how UAPB is the only UH opponent this weekend that has played the ‘Bows (2010) in the past 34 years, it is expected that all three will be unfamiliar with the Rainbow Warriors. However, ver, even UH’s own fans will be unsure what to expect xpect from a team that saw the departure of fi ve of its six leaders in minutes played d from last year. Seniorr forward Hauns Brereton, who was the only returning Rainbow Warrior to start in n last Friday’s exhibition victory over Hawai‘i Pacifi acific, looks to thrive in his new BRUCE DIRDEN / role as co-captain. captain. KA LEO O HAWAI‘I “It [being being a Freshman captain] means center Isaac that a lot off the Fotu, a native of success iss

New Zealand, scored 10 points in Hawai‘i’s exhibition win over HPU.

“Everything feels fine,” Joaquim said. “Just hesitating a little bit ... Kind of slowing down a little bit in practice, but I’m looking forward to [going] full strength in the game.” Joaquim, who led UH in scoring (14.3 per game), rebounding (9.5) and blocks (1.8), described himself as “97 percent” healthy in the days leading up to the tournament. The ‘Bows also have high hopes for junior forward Christian Standhardinger, who had a double-double with 20 points and 15 rebounds in UH’s exhibition win over HPU.

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OPPONE NTS FROM THE EAST On Friday, the ‘Bows will take Maryland-Eastern Shore at 7 p.m. on Maryland The Hawks (7-23, 4-12 Mid-Eastern Conference) finished next to Athletic Con standings last year. last in the MEAC ME After a one-day break, UH Arkansas Pine-Bluff (11-22, plays Arkan Southwestern Athletic Confer9-9 Southwe ence) at the same time on Sunday. The Golden Lions ranked just Gol 305th in the nation last year with 61.0 points per game. Rainbow Warriors end the The Rai tournament with Houston Baptist Great West) on Monday at (10-20, 3-7 G The nationally televised 11:00 p.m. T be part of the 2012 ESPN game will b Marathon, which features Tip-Off Ma 24 hours of college basketball.

SPECIAL COURTSIDE C E VE NTS During the Rainbow Warriors’ match against MarylandNov. 9 mat the student section Eastern Shore, Sho green – M ā noa Maniac will go gre will be given to the first T-shirts wil students to arrive along the 300 studen opponent baseline. ba On the Nov. 11 game against students are Arkansas Pine-Bluff, P encouraged to make signs enco to support their favorite player. Signs cannot be pl larger than 4x3 and no l sticks are allowed. Finally, the closing Nov. 12 match-up with N Houston Bap Baptist will be a blackout: Students should dress in all black. sho

RG EO.O LEO AL .KA W.K WWW

JOEY R AMIREZ Associate Sports Editor

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Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor | Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 12 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 7 2012

Sports

Ricketts becomes first to play UH softball and basketball M ARC A R AK AKI Sports Editor

ISMAEL MA / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Ricketts will play basketball and pursue a nursing degree this season.

Following four seasons on the Rainbow Wahine softball team, Stephanie Ricketts never thought she would wear a University of Hawai‘i jersey again. But that all changed this fall. After playing professional softball in the summer and returning to UH for nursing school, Ricketts attempted to stay in shape and joined an intramural basketball league. That is when the UH Rainbow Wahine basketball coaching staff fi rst noticed her. “We really didn’t recruit her,” head coach Laura Beeman said. “She actually wanted to get in shape and she came out and played kind of like as a scout person. We went through all the compliance stuff, and when she was done, she was like, ‘Wow, I really miss it.’ I’m like, ‘We got a spot. We would love to take you.”

And Ricketts has liked the transition. “I just like her whole coaching style and the whole coaching staff,” Ricketts said. “It was something that I couldn’t really turn down.”

ʻ T H AT ʼS P H E N OM E N A Lʼ Basketball is a big transition from the softball diamond, but Ricketts is well prepared. In high school, Ricketts has three letters in basketball compared to her two in softball. But her attitude is what led Beeman to bring her on to the team. “We’re going to work with her schedule,” Beeman said. “Parttime Stephanie is better than no-time Stephanie. So I’ll work with her as much as we need to work with her – make sure that nursing stays her priority. The attitude she brings is tremendous. The depth at our post is what is tremendous. She’s going to push

some of our post players that are now gonna have to work.” For her former softball coach Bob Coolen and teammate Kelly Majam, they did not even have a clue this would happen. “I was the last person to find out,” Coolen said. “I had no idea she was remotely interested in picking up the basketball again. I heard she was very good in high school. She’s in good shape – kudos to Stephanie for having that athleticism. “Her desire was to play collegiate softball. This showed everyone that not only was she an overlooked player in high school for softball, but she became an All-American by her hard work. It’s going to be phenomenal when she steps out on the court. They know her from here and for her to go and assist with another program and be that much of an athlete where she can make that transition – that’s phenomenal.”

“I’m surprised but not really surprised that they would want her to come and play because she is such a great person to have on a team,” Majam said. “She is a winner and she is able to bring people together.” But if Ricketts can teach a lesson, it is that you can do anything if you try. “I really don’t have time to do anything,” R icketts said. “ Walking home, if you see me with my head phones in, I’m listening to my lecture. If you see me on my phone, I’m on f lash cards. I never go out anymore, and it ’s just something that I chose to do be cause I knew I could do both of them. A nd it ’s been hard hearing people tell me I’m craz y. If you wanna do something, then make it happen.” UH kicks off the regular season on Friday at the University of San Francisco. Tipoff is set for 5 p.m. HS T.

‘Bows take on Seasiders M ADDIE SAPIGAO Staff Writer No. 9 Hawai‘i (21-2, 14-0 Big West) will take a break from conference play to take on BYU-Hawai‘i (20-2, 15-0 Pacific West) this Thursday at 7 p.m. at Stan Sheriff Center. By defeating Cal Poly in straight sets last week, the ‘Bows clinched the Big West Conference title. The Seasiders have also locked up the Pacific West Conference crown with their last win over Chaminade. “It is nice to know that we won the Big West conference title – and now we can get back in the gym to prepare for BYU-H,” said junior outside hitter Emily Hartong.

C RO S O N BAC K Last week the ‘Bows re ceived a boost in the form of

sophomore outside hitter Jane Croson, who made her return from suspension by playing two impressive matches against UC Santa Barbara and Cal Poly. Croson posted eight kills in Hawai‘i’s sweep over UCSB and also added a personal seasonhigh 19 digs. She followed up that performance by bur ying 13 kills as Hawai‘i emerged victorious over the Mustangs. “ The few weeks I was out was really hard and [it] feels good to just be out there. Now that I am out there, I just really want it more,” said Croson.

KEEPING UP THE FOCUS Because the ‘Bows have one game this week instead of their usual t wo, they w ill be able to focus on the speci f ics of their play.

“In prev ious games, we all k now what we need to work on,” sa id Croson. “ So each pract ice we got to st ay mot ivated, and even i f the players are on the bench, it ’s good for them to compete too. I k now we have been st r uggling on our passing and that is something we’re go ing to have to work on.” A lthough their inter island opponent may be a Div ision I I team, the ‘Bows k now this is not a team they can underes t imate. I f the R a inbow Wahine lose to the Seasiders, it w ill hur t their chances of hosting in the regional round of the NCA A Women’s Volleyball Championship tour nament . “ We are going to have to play our game and not play dow n to their level,” sa id junior set ter Mit a Uiato.

MATINA WILSON / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Sophomore Jane Croson was suspended for violating team rules on Oct. 3 and returned last week. Croson is second on the team in kills with 3.80 percent.

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