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A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14 to THURSDAY, NOV. 16, 2012 VOLUME 108 ISSUE 33

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

V O I C E

www.kaleo.org

(L-R:) E. Dani Belvin, Serina Dunham, Matthew Barbee, and Nicholas Murray Husted star in “The Raku-Come, RAKUGO! Show,” directed by Yasu Ichida. PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEX MUNRO

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Page 2 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012

News@kaleo.org | Kim Clark Editor | Caitlin Kelly Associate

News K A LEO T H E

V O I C E

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Editor in Chief Davin Aoyagi Managing Editor Ariel Ramos Chief Copy Editor Paige Takeya Assc Chief Copy Editor Brandon Hoo Design Editor Beth Dorsey Assc Design Editor Bianca Bystrom Pino News Editor Kim Clark Assc News Editor Caitlin Kelly Features Editor Caitlin Kuroda Assc Features Editor Maile Thomas Opinions Editor Sarah Nishioka Assc Opinions Editor Jackie Perreira Sports Editor Marc Arakaki Assc Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Nik Seu Assc Photo Editor Chasen Davis Web Specialist Blake Tolentino Web Editor Quincy Greenheck

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Ka Leo O Hawai‘i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawai‘i at MÄ noa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 5,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit Ka Leo. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. Š2012 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawai‘i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawai‘i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Susan Lin, chair; Kara McManus, vice chair; or Esther Fung, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.kaleo.org/board_of_publications

ILLUSTRATION BY CAPRICE PAXTON KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

M AT THEW SYLVA Senior Staff Writer

N OV. 7 I N A P P RO P R I AT E GA Z E At 4:57 p.m., a female University of Hawai‘i employee reported to Campus Security that an unknown male was looking up at her dress as he walked down the stairs at the Zone 20 parking structure. When the man passed her, she noticed a camera sticking out of his backpack aimed up toward her.

N OV. 5 S E X A S S AU LT A female student reported to CS at 6:53 p.m. that she had been sexually assaulted in the fourth degree at Bilger Hall. The male suspect made unwanted contact and tried to kiss the student. Student Housing Services ďŹ led a nocontact order and the suspect was later arrested by the Honolulu Police Department. Sexual assault in the fourth degree occurs when a person compels another to engage in sexual contact, when an individual exposes his or her genetalia to

alarm another or when a person trespasses to watch someone else for sexual gratiďŹ cation. Referred to Judicial Services and HPD.

N OV. 2 DA N C E T H R E AT At 2:59 p.m., the theatre and dance department chair ďŹ led a terroristic threatening complaint with CS. A male theatre and dance student e-mailed a professor and made threats against other students in the program. The e-mail was printed and given to CS. Referred to Judicial Services.

N OV. 1- 3 THEFT REPORT

In a span of three days, a bicycle, bicycle front tire, moped and laptop were stolen from different students across campus. The bicycle was stolen from the Lokelani bike racks, the bike front tire near Hemenway Hall, moped from the Zone 13 parking lot and the laptop from Hale Noelani. This makes at least seven reports of valuables stolen from Hale Noelani this semester.


News@kaleo.org | Kim Clark Editor | Caitlin Kelly Associate

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012

News

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Scan this QR code to view the winning project’s YouTube video.

(L-R) Trent Robertson, Cody Hayashi, John Hirano and Richard Ordonez beat Aaron King’s (pictured right) eel-inspired energy converter for first place. N AOMI L UGO Staff Writer A chameleon-style bio mimicry design won four University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa engineering students first place in the UH Pacific Asian Center for Entrepreneurship Breakthrough Innovation Challenge. The students on the team – Cody Hayashi, John Hirano, Richard Ordonez and Trent Robertson – won a $1,000 prize for their design. Second prize and $500 went to bioengineering student Aaron King for his energy converter inspired by electric eels. This year’s BIC had competitors focusing on innovative designs to “solve human problems” based on bio mimicry.

T H E C O L O R O F V I C T O RY

C O N T E S T B R E A K D OW N

“A primary reason the chameleon changes colors is to maintain its own body temperature,” said one of the student contestants in the winning project’s YouTube video. “Compared to traditional systems, chameleon skin focuses on the ref lection of light between the infrared and ultraviolet spectrum.” The students used this concept to come up with their winning project, “Chameleon Skin,” which used the heat-reflecting cell structure of a chameleon to offer solutions in building temperature control. The project also focused on using recycled materials to promote sustainability.

The BIC contest consists of three phases. The group first submitted “Chameleon Skin” to judges through YouTube, who then appraised it based on its marketability and how the design displayed nature’s phenomenon. For phase two, competitors were paired with a mentor who helped them prepare for the final phase – a meeting with a panel of judges. Projects were viewed and the winners were announced Nov. 1. The challenge was hosted by College of Natural Sciences, the College of Engineering and the William S. Richardson School of Law. Groups were limited to five members and UH students and faculty were eligible to compete.

Corrections In the Nov. 9 article “Funding the fight,” a passage was omitted from the text: “This study will be conducted in the Multiethnic Cohort, with principal investigators Dr. Larry Kolonel and Dr. Loic Le Marchand at UH, and Dr. Brian Henderson at the University of Southern California. The Cohort was established in Hawai‘i and Los Angeles in 1993-1996 for the pur-

pose of exploring the relationships of diet and other lifestyle factors have to cancer.” Statements attributed to Lim were also misinterpreted: U.S. cancer incidence is on the decline, especially for common cancers like colorectal cancer.

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Page 4 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012

Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Maile Thomas Associate

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The Bond film has been resurrected. With Sam Mendes as the director of the 23rd installment of the franchise, “Skyfall” dazzles as a moody, beautiful and exciting exploration of character and motivation. James Bond (Daniel Craig) is believed to be dead after being shot by Eve (Naomie Harris) – by the order of an unyielding M ( Judi Dench) – on a mission to retrieve a hard drive containing the names of undercover agents in terrorist organizations. Although exhilaration and espionage assemble the fantasy world of Bond as a projection of maleness and bravura, “Skyfall” is situated in a modern and realistic world. The landscape becomes more than a backdrop for missions and chases: It is a global arena with danger

lurking underneath. Javier Bardem plays Raoul Silva and transcends his role as a villainous cyber-terrorist from M’s past. His will for revenge and hate for M parallels Bond’s devotion to her. When M and MI6 are endangered, the threat becomes personal, as Bond must recover from being wounded, aged and ultimately vulnerable. This isn’t an overblown Bond movie with exploding pens and other gadgetry, but a celebration of the series’ 50th anniversary, which began with Sean Connery in “Dr. No” in 1962. Nostalgia runs deep with a sense of respect and renewal – but there’s grit and something more to Bond than his tailored suit. “Skyfall” is charming as a display of the hallmarks that make a Bond film exciting, but all of this is also complemented with deep-rooted emotion and

explores Bond’s psyche as he confronts his past. Although he doesn’t appear until later in the film, Raoul makes a striking introduction and cements himself in your memory in what is the buzziest scene of the film. Pain, trauma, betrayal and neglect figure into the fixations and motives of both Bond and Raoul as the pair struggles to come out on top for survival. This fi lm has a twisted and wrenched core behind its glamour and style. It’s not the fi rst time that Bond has been tied to a chair, and it won’t be difficult for the same to happen to an audience.

“Skyfall” is now playing in theaters everywhere.


Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Maile Thomas Associate

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012

Features

Finding the ‘rhythm’ of rakugo

1 2 3 4

Rakugo can be traced back to the 13th century, where it was performed for Japanese feudal lords.

Eight years ago, Yasu Ichida was a young college student who just wanted to make others laugh. Today, he is putting his goal into practice as an MFA candidate in theatre arts at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and as the director of “The Raku-Come, RAKUGO! Show,” running this Friday and Saturday night. “[Acting] is such a great communication tool, whether it’s magic, or rakugo, or theatre: It’s just a great way to communicate with people,” Ichida said. “I think it’s another language – like when I speak English and Japanese – performance is another language. I can communicate with kids, elders and so many people.”

U N I V E R S A L H U MO R

Rakugo is a 300-year-old Japanese theatre form wherein a single performer sits down on a zabuton, or cushion, for the duration of the act and tells a humorous first-person story. A fan and towel are the only props used and one person portrays multiple characters by changing voices and looking in different directions. At UH Mānoa, the rakugo show is performed in English. “... In rakugo, the rhythm is very important,” Ichida explained. “... I [tried] to transfer Japanese language rhythm into ... English, so

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that was a big challenge.” Ichida has performed rakugo around Japan and the U.S. and noted a difference in the humor between Japanese and American culture. “In the United States, there’s more direct jokes and there’s more political and sexual jokes,” he said. “In Japan, it’s really subtle; you don’t directly refer to things, but you think and imagine things.” While cast member Nicholas Murray Husted noted that rakugo is a more traditional form of humor than what is usually found in the U.S., he acknowledges similarities between the two cultures. “Humor is universal and I think that a lot of people are going to think that this rakugo is funny,” he said.

M AG I C A L P E R F O R M E R Ichida was inspired to act by the movie “Patch Adams,” which follows a medical student-turned-hospital clown who treats patients using humor. After finding out about a professional circus company in New York that hires hospital clowns with acting experience, Ichida enrolled at Minnesota State University Moorhead to study theatre art with an emphasis in acting and directing. He is now a professional magician who has toured with Disney’s Kids Summer Fun program and is working as a magician and children’s magic teacher at Waikīkī

Aquarium. Upon earning his master’s degree, he hopes to become a professional culture performer who incorporates Japanese music, dance and magic into his shows. “Kids are very honest and the first time you show them a magic trick, it’s such a magical moment that lives in their heart,” Ichida expressed. “There’s something about kids that’s really pure, and honest feelings come out, and I love that; that’s why I love performing for kids and with kids.” His enthusiasm for acting is contagious. “I love laughing and I love being around people that can make me laugh, and Yasu is definitely one of those people,” said colleague Murray Husted. “He’s always working, he’s always busy and he’s always bringing his art in what he does to everyone around him and it’s so admirable.”

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Page 6 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012

Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Maile Thomas Associate

Features

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IT PAYS TO FINISH COLLEGE ON TIME. Students who earn 15 credits per semester are more likely to earn better grades, have higher completion rates, and finish their degrees on time. On average, residents in Hawai‘i with a bachelor’s degree earned nearly $20,000 more per year than residents who did not earn a college degree. It pays to earn your degree; and earning it faster means you’ll make more money over the span of your career!

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BOBBY BERGONIO Contributing Writer On Oct. 21, Brianna Acosta, a senior journalism major, was named the winner of the Miss Hawai‘i USA 2013 pageant, but there’s more to her than a crown. Acosta isn’t like most pageant winners: Not many people can admit to skinning a deer in their lifetime. Just a few months before the pageant, Acosta dumped the evening gown to go through the Hō‘ea Initiative on Moloka‘i, a “survival-training program” that emphasizes an understanding and appreciation of practices of Native Hawaiian culture. “It’s ... this program using Native Hawaiian practices, and I didn’t shoot the deer, but I got to skin it,” said Acosta in an interview with Ka Leo. “It was empowering.” Acosta isn’t afraid of trying new things. Her hula dancing and modeling work may seem typical of a beauty pageant contestant, but some of her other interests may not.

SELF- DESCRIBED NERD

ROA D T O M I S S H AWA Iʻ I

The 21-year-old from Waialua has tried her hand at everything from soccer to robotics, while also excelling in academics. In an interview with the Miss Hawai‘i USA competition, Acosta touched upon Hawai‘i’s educational programs, and how it relates to her unique qualities. “We do have somewhat of a stigma in having a low education system; however, you’ll also be surprised to know that we have a world championship robotics team on the North Shore of O‘ahu, in the town of Waialua,” she said. “My unique quality is that not only do I believe that I am confident, but I take pride in that I am a nerd. And I am confident to stand up here and say that I am a smart young woman, as well as a confident one.” In addition to being part of Waialua Robotics in high school, Acosta was named class valedictorian, served as class president and in the National Honor Society, and was news editor for her school newspaper.

While maintaining her honors at Waialua High School, Acosta competed in the Miss Hawai‘i Teen USA pageant from 2008-2010. She placed fourth runner-up her first year and first runner-up the following two. After years of competing in teen pageants, Acosta decided she would compete in the Miss Hawai‘i USA pageant only once. From traveling to PageantReady University (a weekend seminar workshop in Florida) to attending the Miss USA 2012 pageant in Las Vegas, Nev., Acosta was determined to make her fi rst and last Miss Hawai‘i appearance nothing but her best. “I wanted to run because I knew I could I have done better [each year],” Acosta shared. But even with her preparations and confident attitude, Acosta admitted that she was still doubtful of winning. Standing next to competitor Marissa Petsas when it came down to the fi nal two, Acosta was ready


Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Maile Thomas Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012

Features

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(808) 988-3784 The Miss USA 2013 pageant will be held in June 2013. This will be the competition’s 62nd year. The winner will move on to represent the United States at the Miss Universe 2013 pageant. The reigning Miss USA is Olivia Cupo from Rhode Island. Only four women from Hawai‘i have won the Miss USA pageant, and only one, Brook Mahealani Lee in 1997, has won the Miss Universe title.

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to accept falling just short of the title. “[Petsas was first-runner up last year and] I thought they were going to give it to her,” said Acosta. “I was already prepared to be first runner-up.” Acosta recalled nearly falling to her knees from the shock of her victory. Crying, she got up and embraced Petsas in a crown-

ing that she described as surreal. “I was such a dork,” Acosta expressed. “I thought I was going to be all confident, but I ended up crying.” Acosta will compete in the Miss USA 2013 pageant next June. But before that is another achievement: She’ll be graduating from the university this spring.

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Page 8 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012

Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Maile Thomas Associate

Features Join The B.O.P! What is the B.O.P?! It is an organization known as the Board of Publications. We help oversee student publications such as:

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Review: ‘Speed-the-Plow’ is smart, speedy satire K ARLEANNE M AT THEWS Senior Staff Writer If you head to David Mamet’s “Speed-the-Plow” at Mānoa Valley Theatre, expect to leave not knowing what hit you. It is funny, smart, thought-provoking and relevant, but the frantic pace at which it switches between these attributes in its 90-minute run can be bewildering. The play centers on Bobby Gould, a film executive (played by Tim Jeffryes), and his employee, Charlie Fox (Nicholas B. Gianforti), who has big news for Bobby: He has a profitable opportunity to bring a huge movie star to the studio for a film. But then, Bobby’s attractive temporary secretary, Karen (Julia Levanne), comes in. The men make a bet for $500 that Bobby can seduce her. He gives her a “courtesy read” novel that he has no intention of making into a film, asking that she come over in the evening to report. When they meet, Karen asks Bobby to make the book into a film, claiming that its pseudo-philosophical take on radiation and the end of the world awakened her spiritually. Having become lovers, Bobby is left with a crisis: Will he greenlight the action film for profit, or will he okay the radiation book and attempt to make a difference in the world?

Q UA L I T Y AC T I N G The best acting of the production

comes in Bobby and Karen’s scene at his house. Instead of playing a slick and soulless exec, Jeffryes, plays along, and his Bobby seems uncomfortable with Charlie’s profanity and greed. Thus, it’s more believable when he is convinced by Karen to attempt to make movies that improve the world; despite his cynicism, he longs for connection. Levanne is subtle as Karen, and she plays between having truly been transformed by the book and sharing with Bobby, or manipulative with her sexuality. When she starts pouring him drinks and quoting the book at him, it raises the age-old question of who is taking advantage of whom.

man in a particular industry and time – not a broader discussion of humanity. The production lacks the freshness to overcome the feeling that the play is old news. The distance created by the setting dulls Mamet’s satire and allows the audience to escape the implications of the critique on their lives. Despite its flaws, “Speed-thePlow” touches on elements familiar enough that the satire is generally relevant, and often either funny or moving. But the speed at which it plows through material and emotions hurts the production. There’s nothing to do but buckle up and enjoy the ride – and sort out what it all means the day after.

T O O DAT E D? Unfortunately, not all elements of the play are as timeless. “Speedthe-Plow” debuted in 1988, and the production team at MVT has chosen not to update it. The program note indicates that the play takes place in Hollywood “now,” but the set and costumes date the play. Many productions have attributed Charlie’s manic rhythm to cocaine use. And Bobby and Charlie are extremely patronizing toward secretary (not “assistant”) Karen. Charlie even calls her both “dear” and “honey” without objection; it’s hard to imagine that taking place in 2012. However, the play reads as historical commentary – the crisis of one

‘SPEED-THE-PLOW’ When: Runs through Nov. 25; see website for showtimes Where: Mānoa Valley Theatre, 2833 E. Mānoa Rd. Cost: $15 ages 25 and younger, $25 seniors and military, $30 general admission Contact: 808-988-6131 or manoavalleytheatre.com Note: The play is intended for audiences age 11 and up.

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In David Mamet’s “Speed-the-Plow,” film executive Bobby Gould (left) must choose between naive secretary Karen (middle) and making a fortune on a film proposed by unscrupulous studio employee Charlie Fox (right).


Features@kaleo.org | Caitlin Kuroda Editor |Maile Thomas Associate

Page 9 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012

Features

The hunt for art supplies BR ANDON HOO Associate Chief Copy Edior

For artists, fi nding a place to shop for supplies is essential. While stores like Ben Franklin Crafts and the campus bookstore offer art materials, they may still be lacking. Check out these three stores for a better selection.

F I S H E R H AWA Iʻ I

Fisher’s main store, located in the industrial Kaka‘ako area, is a warehouse that offers supplies for school, crafts and the office. While it mostly provides office supplies, many of its items are available at a cheaper price than other stores and it shelves abundant selections. Although it may not always have the art medium that you need, it’s worth your

time to walk around the store – you may find something you didn’t know you needed. Address: 450 Cooke St. Hours: Mon-Tue, Thu-Fri 7 a.m.-6 p.m.; Wed 7 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Contact: 808-524-8770 or fisherhawaii.biz

ONE SHOT SUPPLIES Finding One Shot may be diffi cult: The store is located up a truck ramp, barely visible from the road. What’s available is geared specifi cally toward the needs of artists, but it’s also pricier than Fisher. For those that are interested in silkscreen printing, One Shot offers a two-day class during the last two Saturdays of the month.

Location: 815A Waiakamilo Rd. Hours: Mon-Fri 7 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Contact: 808-841-7683 or oneshotsupplies.com

Join The B.O.P! What is the B.O.P?! It is an organization known as the Board of Publications. We help oversee student publications such as:

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H AWA I I A N G R A P H I C S Located near the university, Hawaiian Graphics is a convenient go-to spot for students. Supplies here are also pricey, but the store offers quality products. Many of its employees are knowledgeable about art and can help you fi nd supplies to suit your needs. Students with a valid ID can also get a 10 percent discount. Location: 1923 S. Beretania St Hours: Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Contact: 808-973-7171 or hawaiiangraphics.com

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Page 10 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012

Opinions@kaleo.org | Sarah Nishioka Editor | Jackie Perreira Associate

Opinions Join The B.O.P! The Board of Publications is recruiting board members to help oversee Ka Leo & Hawaii Review

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Don’t erase native culture According to Noenoe Silva, a political science professor at the university, the prioritization on written over oral language was another method of cultural erasure against native Hawaiians.

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SAR AH NEAL Senior Staff Writer On Oct. 15, I wrote an article entitled “Unexploded ordnance, impending problem” and referenced the special relationship Native Hawaiians share with the land. Unfortunately, due to word count constraints and because I included the reference to Native Hawaiians as an afterthought rather than as the bulk of the sentence, it was determined to be inconsequential to my argument and removed. While it is true that the unexploded ordnance littering the islands is a problem for all residents, these potentially dangerous weapons are more offensive to Native Hawaiians who have ties to the land that non-native residents cannot claim. Forgetting or ignoring the way these weapons damage Native Hawaiian ties to the land is an act of erasure.

U N I N T E N T I O N A L E R A S U R E? The benign edit made to my article can be interpreted as an unintentional act of Native Hawai-

ian erasure. Cultural erasure is a tool, typically employed by colonial powers, to suppress or “erase” the culture of another group. Ethnic studies professor Davianna Pōmaika‘i McGregor noted the erasure located in Hawaiian place names with shortened or renamed titles: “For example, the area named Lanikai is really Ka‘ōhao; Enchanted Lake is Ka‘elepulu; Diamond Head is Lae‘ahi … Calling Kamehameha Highway ‘Kam Highway.’” McGregor also cites the failure of the state to recognize “that geothermal energy is the life force of the sacred deity Pele, and that its development would assault and deplete her being,” as contributing to the erasure of Hawai‘i’s indigenous people and culture.

A N AT I V E P E R S P E C T I V E We who are not indigenous to these islands may be able to understand the plight of Native Hawaiians who attempt to preserve and honor their sacred sites and prevent the further desecration of the islands, but we do not share their ancestral

record, nor do we practice the religious ceremonies performed here. We have not been tasked with aloha and mālama ‘āina, a responsibility to love and care for the land. We do not share in the same horror when mountains are destroyed in the name of building highways or when large American corporations expose ‘ōiwi from burial sites to the sun and then store the remains in a closet under a parking garage. We do not view the bombing of Kaho‘olawe as akin to bombing a living deity, as do practitioners of Native Hawaiian religion who recognize that island as the kinolau, or avatar, of the god Kanaloa. Non-natives do not share in this spiritual and ancestral relationship with the land, but those who align themselves with Native Hawaiian causes should actively campaign for a recognition of their ties to these islands and join in efforts to identify and rectify acts of erasure whenever we encounter them, even if those actions are unintentional or created by our own hands.


Opinions@kaleo.org | Sarah Nishioka Editor | Jackie Perreira Associate

Page 11 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012

Opinions Print media in a digital world

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Print media – from newspapers to magazines to pamphlets – is a way to keep readers physically connected to the news and culture of their world. But with growing environmental concerns and easier access to the Internet, information is increasingly dominated by a digital space. The evolution of online news has sped up rates of consumption and need for content. Instead of investing time into one physical medium, we speed through articles only to get to the next thing. Regardless of the technological advance, society and the world must pay attention to the news and information that is put out there by responsible news organizations.

READ IT ON CAMPUS An article published in September 2010 by the Poynter Institute, an organization dedicated to the perpetuation of journalism, noted that “the printed versions of college newspapers continue to thrive.” “College newspapers are niche publications. Students like to pick it up, read it over lunch. It’s still a community newspaper,” said Lloyd Goodman, director of student publications at the University of Texas at Arlington, to Poynter. However, environmental concerns do need to be addressed.

Print news production takes more time, money and resources to create than digital media. In 2011, Christopher Newport University proposed cutting funding for the student newspaper, The Captain’s Log, due to a green initiative on campus. The university later changed its plans after questions of censorship were raised.

THE FUTURE OF PRINT The question is whether or not print newspapers are impactful enough to be preserved when outlets are upgrading to keep up with a climate-concerned world. But all it takes is the consumers’ next step – recycling the copy they picked up or passing it on to the next reader – to minimize their environmental impact. Online news sources strive to be the fi rst to get the next big story out and may need to sacrifice quality and accuracy to do so. Movement to online sources and the dissipation of print copies takes away from quality news, so it’s necessary to slow down and keep our print news alongside accurate online updates. Print media should not disappear completely, but it’s certainly being challenged. The digital age is past looming – it’s already here. But letting print media die in lieu of the digital is not the answer. A balance between the two is key.

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Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 13 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012

Comics


Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor | Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 14 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012

Sports

Ka Leo Player of the Week: Mike Edwards Honorable Mention

JOEY R AMIREZ Associate Sports Editor Junior cornerback/kick returner Mike Edwards has been named Ka Leo Player of the Week for his role in Hawai‘i’s 49-14 loss to Boise State. Edwards was a silver lining for the Warriors as the Cleveland, Ohio, native set new school records for kickoff return touchdowns in a season and career with a 100-yarder in the fi rst quarter. Edwards is far and away the nation’s leader in kickoff return yardage, with 1,180 (31.1 yards per return), while Eastern Michigan’s Tyler Allen is second in the country with just 836. In his role at cornerback, the defensive co-captain made three tackles, including one for a loss.

UH SPORTS MEDIA RELATIONS

Additionally, he has made 31 tackles on the season. Twentynine of these have been made solo, which is second-best on the team. Edwards is also 15th in the nation with 1.44 passes defended per game for a total of 13.

CHASEN DAVIS / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Edwards was named to Phil Steele’s Midseason All-America third team in October.

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Hauns Brereton Forward Men’s Basketball Brereton led his team as the Rainbow Warriors fought their way into the Outrigger Hotels and Resorts Rainbow Classic championship game against Houston Baptist. The UH tri-captain shone in the Rainbow Warriors’ 76-64 season-opening victory over Maryland-Eastern Shore. Brereton set the tone for the night by draining back-to-back-to-back three pointers to start off the game and did not look back as he finished with 24 points, three rebounds and two assists. The senior from Bartlett, Tenn., followed up by leading the ‘Bows to an 81-54 victory over Arkansas-Pine Bluff in the second day of the tournament. Brereton had a game-high 15 points and narrowly missed reaching a double-double with nine rebounds. He also recorded three assists and one turnover against the Golden Lions.

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Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor| Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 15 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012

Sports JOEY R AMIREZ Associate Sports Editor

Change is coming for the University of Hawai‘i football team (1-8, 0-6 Mountain West). UH has lost seven games in a row by an average score of 48-16 and by at least two touchdowns against every FBS team it has faced. Many of the Warrior faithful have placed the bulk of the blame upon the team’s passing attack headed by junior quarterback Sean Schroeder, whose numbers tell the tale of the fans’ frustration. Schroeder ranks last in the Mountain West in completion percentage (51.7), yards per attempt (5.3), touchdowns (9), sacks (29) and quarterback rating (99.2). The Duke transfer also is second to last in the MWC in yards (1,546) and interceptions (10). This lackluster production has resulted in head coach Norm Chow reopening the competition for starting quarterback between Schroeder and sophomore Jeremy Higgins in the week before UH’s road tilt

with Air Force (5-5, 4-2 MWC) this Friday at 4:30 p.m. “We are gonna let Jeremy and Sean take equal amounts of reps this week,” said Chow. “We will make a [decision] later. Jeremy certainly deserves a chance, but Sean doesn’t deserve all the criticism he’s getting.” For his part, Higgins has played solidly, albeit late in the game, against backup defensive players. The Saint Louis High School grad has completed 15-of-22 passes for 210 yards and one interception. Higgins has also scored one rushing touchdown. “It’s different practicing with the [first team] now,” Higgins said. “But not that much different. The talent level’s kind of similar. Going into this week, my preparation shouldn’t change cause I’ve been preparing to be the starter this whole time.” Whoever winds up taking snaps for Hawai‘i will be expected to at least manage some improvement against the Falcons’ defense, which has given up 28.9 points per game. However, the Warriors will need more than that to pull off the upset,

as Air Force should be able to score at will against UH. AFA features the nation’s second-best running game (335.3 yards per game), while Hawai‘i has given up 209.8 ypg on the ground and an FBS-worst 31 rushing touchdowns. “Higgins coming out [made] a big difference in [last week’s] game,” said sophomore running back Joey Iosefa. “It’s just another person stepping up. Whatever our coach’s decision [about] who the starting quarterback is, I’ll support.” While Schroeder’s tenure as UH’s signal caller has been far from a masterpiece, one advantage that he still has over Higgins is experience against first-string defenses. “I haven’t felt the pressure yet cause I’ve always had to go in when it was late in the game,” said Higgins. “I bet I’ll feel that pressure this week.”

Scan this QR code for interviews with Joey Iosefa, Ryan Hall and Norm Chow.

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Junior wide receiver Chris Gant is just one of three Warriors with two receiving touchdowns.

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Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor | Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 16 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Nov. 14 2012

Sports

14 down, 4 to go: Rainbow Wahine hope to host NCAA MARC A RAKAKI Sports Editor As the Rainbow Wahine volleyball team prepares for its last road trip of the season, it realizes the job at hand. No. 7 Hawai‘i (22-2, 14-0 Big West Conference) heads to play Pacific (20-8, 8-7 BWC) and UC Davis (15-13, 9-6 BWC) before coming home for its last two games of the regular season. But since the Big West does not have a conference tournament, these road games have larger implications.

HISTORY SPEAKS FOR ITSELF

It’s not the AVCA Coaches Poll that determines who gets to host the NCAA Tournament, but the Ratings Percentage Index that chooses. Hawai‘i is currently No. 19 in a poll that takes into account not only wins and losses but also strength of schedule. Since Big West teams do not have high RPI ratings, it is important for Hawai‘i to win out in order to host during the fi rst and second round. “It would be better to [win out] so we don’t have to worry about it that

much,” junior setter Mita Uiato said. “We have to do as much as we can to help that situation.” For junior Penn State transfer Ali Longo, the Nittany Lions did not have to worry as much about the RPI, as they played in the more competitive Big Ten Conference. “We didn’t talk about it that much,” Longo said of being at Penn State. “[Nittany Lions head] coach [Russ Rose] kept track of that. We didn’t talk as much as we are now [at UH] because we’re in a tough situation where we are close to making it and close to not making it.” Last season, Hawai‘i hosted during the fi rst and second round of the NCA A Tournament. The ‘Bows defeated Northern Colorado in front of 7,193 fans and Colorado State in front of 7,861. “It makes a huge difference, especially this year because we are struggling on the road,” Uiato said. “If we play here with our fans, our court, our atmosphere, it will really help us and intimidate the other team. It really intimidated the teams that came last year. When

8,000 people roots against you, I think it’s really intimidating.”

IN FOR A DOGFIGHT But Hawai‘i knows it must take care of business one match at a time. And it all starts with what may be Hawai‘i’s toughest road trip of the season. Pacific took the ‘Bows to five sets while the Tritons lasted four sets earlier this season. Hawai‘i plays Pacific on Friday and UC Davis on Saturday. First serve for both matches is set for 7 p.m. PT (5 p.m. HT). “We have a little bit of motivation because they [Pacific] took us to five,” Longo said. “We want to play well on our last road trip and show them that we’re a lot better than when we played here, and it’s going to be a tough g match for them.” Follow us on Twitter @kaleosports for upto-the minute updates live from Mā noa. MARC ARAKAKI/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Sophomore outside hitter Jane Croson has averaged 3.5 kills per set since returning from suspension on Nov. 1.

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