Issuu on Google+

A K LEO T H E

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 18 to THURSDAY, JAN. 19, 2012 VOLUME 106 ISSUE 58

Serving the students of the University of Hawai‘i at MÄ noa.

V O I C E

www.kaleo.org

‘Chow men’ near complete M ARC A R AK AKI Sports Editor

MARC ARAKAKI / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

With his staff near complete, head coach Norm Chow is out on the road to begin recruiting for the 2012 season.

 :)LYL[HUPH:[/VUVS\S\/0  

</:7,*0(3 -YLL-YPLZ +YPUR ^P[OI\YNLYW\YJOHZL ^P[OJV\WVUVY </0+

A ll but one spot has been filled on Warrior football coach Norm Chowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s staff. On the offensive side, Chow will be assisted by Tommy Lee, Philip Rauscher, Keith Uperesa and Chris Wiesehan, while Daronte Jones, Lewis Powell, Thom Kaumeyer and Tony Tuioti will aid the defensive side. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am ďŹ red up about them,â&#x20AC;? Chow said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the reason weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be successful. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get a couple of more guys to come, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re gonna be ďŹ ne.â&#x20AC;? A special teams coach is expected to be named within the week. Chowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s staff has a large mix of Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i natives, and has many young faces mixed in with veterans. Tommy Lee headlines the group of Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i-born coaches. He is the brother of former Warrior coaches Ron and Cal. Lee has over 40 years of coaching experience. He most recently coached Montana-Western, an NAIA school, from 2001 to 2007. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very excited to be home. Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i has always been home, and to have the opportunity to come back and be with family is very important,â&#x20AC;? Lee said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coaching with Coach Chow is very exciting. I felt that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the best in the country, and to be able to work alongside him is a dream come true. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always had a lot of respect for UH, even though I went away for college, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to try our [best] to continue the tradition and maybe take it to another level.â&#x20AC;? Philip Rauscher is a graduate of UCLA and served as an administrative assistant at Utah in 2011. He was a

three-year letterwinner at UCLA who played on both the offensive and defensive line. Keith Uperesa is another local boy who graduated from Punahou and BYU. He went on to play three seasons in the NFL. Prior to taking the UH position, Uperesa served as the offensive line coach at Nicholls State. Chris Wiesehan spent the past two seasons north of the border as the Winnipeg Blue Bombersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; receiversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; coach. Through his coaching career, Wiesehan has had stints with BCS conference schools including UCLA, Notre Dame and Purdue. Daronte Jones also spent last season in Canada, coaching the Montreal Alouettes. Prior to that he coached at UCLA and Bowie State. Lewis Powell was born in Honolulu and spent last season as the administrative assistant at Utah. He is a graduate of Utah, where he played three seasons on the defensive line. Thom Kaumeyer was Chowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most recent hire and will serve as Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defensive coordinator. He most recently served as the Jacksonville Jaguarsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; assistant defensive backs coach for four seasons. Tony Tuioti was the only coach retained by Chow from former coach Greg McMackinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coaching staff. Tuioti served as McMackinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defensive tackles coach for two seasons. Chow said that it was a hard decision for him to retain just one coach. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always hard because the guys before have done a great job,â&#x20AC;? Chow said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They understood. But it was important to bring in our guys to make sure our guys knew what was going on. And the loyalty that they have for us is important.â&#x20AC;?

NEWS

RICE CORAL IS RED... ...These coral are dead

FEATURES

8

ART ON CAMPUS Akihiko Izukura weaves a silk display

OPINIONS

12

IMPROVEMENT UNLIKELY Chancellorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s replacement could be same old story

COMICS

DINNER ROLLS North Koreaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future

>,+5,:+(@

Report

3

5!   M [ >!   M [ :! M [ ,! M [

;/<9:+(@ 5!  M [ >! M [ :! M [ ,! M [

13


Page 2 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 18 2012

News@kaleo.org | Kelsey Amos Editor | Emi Aiko Associate

News

BELLA MIA

PIZZERIA

NEW YORK STYLE

SEAFOOD PASTA PIZZA CLOSE TO CAMPUSšGREAT PRICESš BYOB

2222 S.Beretania Street Honolulu, HI 96822 (808) 941-4400

Every First Friday, 3 Buck Chuck Any drink at the bar is only 3 bucks

UH Mānoa closes for winter break: but at what cost to students? DAVID TER AOK A Staff Writer The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa’s Fall 2011 semester offi cially ended on Dec. 16, which caused a mass exodus that happens every year for the Christmas season. A majority of the campus was shut off in an effort to be more environmentally conscious. Libraries and most campus services were closed until Jan. 3. Only Subway, American Savings Bank, the bookstore and UH Federal Credit Union remained in operation at Campus Center. Faculty was put on administrative leave, but some buildings remained operational for research purposes. “I wish the libraries were open,” said one resident at the UH Mānoa dorms who wished to remain anonymous. “The dorms have to stay open for students not going back for winter break. But it’s still really quiet. Like a ghost town.” The shutdown is part of the Mānoa Green Days initiative, which is aimed at reducing energy costs during power-down periods

ka

Home of the $8 pitchers This weeks special: Mere Pond - Twilight, Mere Pond - inversion, and PBR

Happy hour special 2-6: Kona Long Board

Full Menu - Burgers, Sandwiches, Fish & Pizza Home of Hawaii’s only 18 inch Pizza for only $14

PUCKS ALLEY 808.447.9084

br

ea

ki

ng

le ne

o.

w

s

such as Thanksgiving break, winter break and spring break. It has been running for four years, and will collectively save one month of energy costs this academic year. Separate buildings on campus elect to join in MGD, which then operate under specific guidelines. A checklist on the MGD website indicates all electronic appliances, including computers and air conditioners, must be shut down, and aquariums and plants must be removed. MGD calculated the cost of a single-occupant office building with minimal electricity amounts to thousands of dollars a year, mostly due to climate control, lighting and water coolers. Over 50 percent of the cost is due to air conditioners and heaters. With each building holding hundreds of people during the semester, the price quickly rises. The yearly cost for lighting in the 19,000 rooms around campus is above $3 million. Facilities and Grounds was unable to comment on the costs and benefits to students of shutting down the campus.

g

We’re getting new website!

Architecture School Bachman Hall Crawford Hall Everly Hall George Hall Hamilton Library Hawai‘i Hall Holmes Hall Kamakakuokalani Center for Hawaiian Studies Kennedy Theatre Kuykendall Hall Law Classroom/Office Building Moore Hall Music Building/Orvis Auditorium Queen Lili‘uokalani Center for Student Services Sakamaki Hall Saunders Hall Shidler College of Business UH Press University Health Services Webster Hall Wist Hall

g n r o itio . o -ed e l oe a k a Le

or

•s po rts vi de a os

List of participating buildings:

ly

i a d

s• g o bl

K

Check it out on Thursday.


News@kaleo.org | Kelsey Amos Editor | Emi Aiko Associate

Page 3 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 18 2012

News

Rescuing the reef: Stress and disease take toll on rice coral

BRAZILFOX/FLICKR

Colonies of rice coral near Kāne‘ohe Bay are dying of Montipora white syndrome. Concerned citizens have formed a group called “Eyes of the Reef” to look out for diseased or damaged corals and offer free training in coral threat recognition to the public. JESSI SCHULTZ Staff Writer In the waters near Kāne‘ohe Bay, much of the rice coral is facing a life-threatening disease called Montipora white syndrome. Colonies of coral are dying by the head due to this severe outbreak, but groups of divers and other emergency response teams are joining hands to fi ght the disease.

MONTIPORA WHITE SYNDROME Rice coral is a common species found in Hawai‘i. The spreading outbreak affects the coral’s tissue, which puts a stress on the overall health of ecosystems, altering their normal flows. Crabs and shrimp tend to live among the coral, and without these morsels for little fish, the ecosystem will begin to fail. “Corals are very slow-growing animals, so when a bunch of these colonies … [suffer] from a disease outbreak, it takes the reef a long time to recover. That is why it is so worri-

some that we have had two major disease outbreaks within three years,” explained Greta Aeby, of the Hawai‘i Institute of Marine Biology. “The acute Montipora white syndrome can kill off a large colony within a couple of weeks,” she added.

ADDITIONAL STRESS ON REEFS But in addition to disease, the coral reefs of Hawai‘i have constant stressors, including people and climate change. Overfi shing, human pollution and litter can all be reduced in order to alleviate the stress put on reefs. “Land-based pollution can be reduced if we all realize that as an island state, everything that we put on the ground will eventually end up in the near-shore where the corals live. So be careful not to litter, and if you have to use pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers, then please use the minimal amount you can get away with so less washes into the ocean,” said Aeby. Aeby went on to explain that even walking or touching the coral

can cause damage. Fishermen must be aware of the correct areas to anchor and move through because boat strikes can damage living reefs. “We can no longer take our reefs here in Hawai‘i for granted if they are to be kept healthy. Everyone needs to pitch in and do their part to save the reefs,” explained Aeby in an email interview.

CONSTANT VIGIL ANCE In response to these threats, a network has been formed called “Eyes of the Reef.” It includes fishermen, swimmers, surfers and divers who are on the lookout for signs of sick coral around the island. “It is also critical that if there is a disease outbreak or bleaching event that we hear about it so we can mount a response. We offer a free training for people that are on the water to recognize threats to the corals such as coral bleaching, disease or invasive algae and to report them,” said Aeby. “The more eyes we have keeping track of our corals the better.”


Page 4 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 18 2012

News@kaleo.org | Kelsey Amos Editor | Emi Aiko Associate

News

The new year kicks off FIRST Robotics Competition in Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i

MANOA JAPANESE LANGUAGE SCHOOL (0DQRD5RDGÂ&#x2021;+RQROXOX+, Part-time positions as escort/recreation leaders are available daily, Monday-Friday afternoons. Involves aftercare of Elementary School children. Immediate openings. Applications are now being accepted.

R EBECCA BARONE Staff Writer

)RUDSSRLQWPHQWFDOO0U3\XQ at 

PART-TIME POSITIONS

GRAND OPENING SPECIAL $1 tacos w/ UH ID Cannot be combined with any other coupon/offer

WARNING: TACOS ARE ADDICTING!!!

Students from across the state, nation, and world gathered to view the live broadcast of the 2012 FIRST Robotics Competition Kickoff on Saturday, Jan. 7. The University of Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i at MÄ noa currently contributes the largest amount of FRC mentors and volunteers of any single institution in Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i. Many high school students who participate in FRC go on to mentor teams as college students. Richel Cole, a freshman at UH MÄ noa, participated in Sacred Heartsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; robotics team before becoming an intern with the Robotics Organizing Committee. Now, Cole works as an operations manager for the organization, coordinating six different programs across the state and mentoring Lancer Robotics. Cole also has a hand in organizing the Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i Regional, which takes place in late March. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This year marks the ďŹ fth anniversary of the Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i Regional,â&#x20AC;? said Cole, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and it will be more fun and exciting than ever.â&#x20AC;? In addition to featuring guest speakers such as television host Stephen Colbert, former Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, and Black Eyed Peas member will.i.am, Kickoff also revealed this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game, Rebound Rumble, which resembles the game of basketball â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but is played by teleoperated robots.

K A LEO T H E

Opening soon at 1391 KaPIOLANI BLVD. BYOB!

V O I C E

Ka Leo O Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i â&#x20AC;&#x153;An Island Tradition For Over 13 Years!â&#x20AC;? bigcitydinerhawaii.com KAIMUKI

(808)-738-8855 Just a 15 Minute Walk from Campus

WARD ENTERTAINMENT CENTER

o Diner Fin ereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s N e â&#x20AC;&#x153;Th n Big City Diner r a !â&#x20AC;? Th

$10 OFF Your Check of $45 or More Not valid on any Holiday PROUD CORPORATE

PARTNER

591-8891

Valid for dine-in food only. Not valid with any other offer, discount and/or promotion. Must present before ordering. Expires: February 15, 2012.

University of Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i at MÄ noa 2445 Campus Road Hemenway Hall 107 Honolulu, HI 96822

Newsroom (808) 956-7043 Advertising (808) 956-3210 Facsimile (808) 956-9962 Email kaleo@kaleo.org Web site www.kaleo.org

COURTESY OF ROBOTICS ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i will host its regional for the 2012 FIRST Robotics Competition on March 22-24. Here, Richel Cole, a UH freshman, works as an operations manager for the Robotics Organizing Committee.

Teams representing high schools from over 40 countries have exactly six weeks from Jan. 7 to design, build, program and test drive a robot that will be able to compete in Rebound Rumble.

EDITORIAL STAFF Editor in Chief Will Caron Managing Editor Jaimie Kim Chief Copy Editor Karleanne Matthews Assc Chief Copy Editor Candace Chang Design Editor Sarah Wright News Editor Kelsey Amos Assc News Editor Emi Aiko Features Editor Maria Kanai Assc Features Editor Alvin Park Opinions Editor Boaz Rosen

Assc Opinions Editor Justin Francisco Sports Editor Marc Arakaki Assc Sports Editor Joey Ramirez Comics Editor Nicholas Smith Photo Editor Nik Seu Assc Photo Editor Chasen Davis Web Specialist Blake Tolentino Broadcast News Editor Naomi Lugo Web Editor Jefferson Speer

ADVERTISING The Board of Publications office is located on the ocean side of Hemenway Hall.

Ka Leo O Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i is the campus newspaper of the University of Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i at MÄ noa. It is published by the Board of Publications three times a week except on holidays and during exam periods. Circulation is 10,000. Ka Leo is also published once a week during summer sessions with a circulation of 10,000. Ka Leo is funded by student fees and advertising. Its editorial content reflects only the views of its writers, reporters, columnists and editors, who are solely responsible for its content. No material that appears in Ka Leo may be reprinted or republished in any medium without permission. The first newsstand copy is free; for additional copies, please visit the Ka Leo Building. Subscription rates are $50 for one semester and $85 for one year. Š2010 Board of Publications. ADMINISTRATION The Board of Publications, a student organization chartered by the University of Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i Board of Regents, publishes Ka Leo O Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i. Issues or concerns can be reported to the board (Ryan Tolman, chair; Ming Yang, vice chair; or Susan Lin, treasurer) via bop@hawaii.edu. Visit www.hawaii.edu/bop for more information.


Features@kaleo.org | Maria Kanai Editor |Alvin Park Associate

Page 5 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 18 2012

Features

Go with the Flo UH introduces advanced reusable water bottle refill station on campus The station is simple to use and cheaper than conventional soft-drink vending machines. For 25 cents, thirsty students can fill up their own water bottles with high quality, five -stage filtered water chilled to 42 degrees Fahrenheit. The Flo Water station gives students the options to fill up their water bottles with 17 ounces, 25 ounces or 34 ounces of water, all of which would cost well over a dollar at a convenience store. A junior college student in San Diego who wanted to make a positive impact on the ongoing plastic waste crisis developed the Flo Water station in 2008 with the intent to reduce plastic water-bottle usage. To show users how much plastic they are conserving, the Flo Water station displays a counter on the top right corner showing how many water bottles have been saved throughout the station’s existence. The number of “bottles” is the equivalent of how much water is distributed in liters, allowing users to see exactly how much plastic waste is being kept from being tossed in landfills or the ocean.

F L O WAT E R VS . F O U N TA I N S

JAYMESON HAMMONDS/KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

JAYMESON H AMMONDS Staff Writer

As students begin to settle into the new semester at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, they may discover new things on campus. One recent addition in particular is the Flo Water water-bottle refilling station by the ground level entrance to Kuykendall Hall (and a similar system placed inside Campus Center).

The Flo Water system is not significantly different from water fountains and similar systems. A standard drinking fountain, like most found in Kuykendall Hall, may not use coconut carbon filters and UV rays to clean the water like the Flo Water station does, but they do have effective cooling systems and filtration devices. The Kuykendall Hall water fountains use a flexiguard anti-microbial safety bubbler, which prevents the growth of bacteria in their cooling systems. And though the Flo Water station may encourage the use of reusable bottles, the energy used to keep the system (and tiny counter) working may be something to keep an eye on. When asked why students should use Flo Water instead of drinking fountains, Wyatt Taubman, the general manager of Flo Water, replied, “If you are currently drinking from drinking fountains, please continue to do so. Drinking fountains are the most environmentally friendly option available, are free and are everywhere on the UH campus.”

Live Band and Nightclub Daily www.clubhousehonolulu.com

C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L

S U R F & S K A T E F R I D A Y S

Corner of Kapiolani and Kalakaua Former Hard Rock Cafe

FREE PARKING Mon-Fri: 11am - 2am Sat: 9:30 am - 2am Sun: 7:30am - 2am

1837 Kapiolani Blvd Honolulu, HI 96814 Phone: (808) 520-1120

P O P P I N’ S A T U R D A Y S


Page 6 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 18 2012

Features@kaleo.org | Maria Kanai Editor |Alvin Park Associate

Features

UH Mānoa voices from Occupy Honolulu Cycle Exchang e FREE HELMET w/purchase Financing is also available. 3149 North Nimitz Highway Honolulu, HI 96819-1905 (808) 836-1144 www.southseascycles.com

Mopeds starting at $1,399 “30 years serving Hawaii and still going strong”

JUDAH LANDZBERG / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

According to deoccupyhonolulu.org, Occupy Honolulu’s next major protest will be “Occupy the Courts” in support of Move to Amend. Members plan on gathering at the corner of Punchbowl and Hale Kauwila at 10 a.m. JUDAH L ANDZBERG Staff Writer

Now open in 4 locations

Open every day 10am-10pm www.hawaiianholysmokes.com

Monday in Waikīkī, Occupy Honolulu showed up in the Martin Luther King Jr. Day parade. This group consisted of about a dozen young adults and other community members, including a University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa faculty member and student. “I feel the essence of the structure [of occupy Honolulu] is to easily incorporate new members,” said Eric Pilger, a systems engineer at the Hawai‘i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology at UH. Pilger originally found himself going down to visit the campsite headquarters of Occupy Honolulu at Thomas Square after his son had already become involved. He claims that the discussions by wellinformed and interesting people induced him to come back. In the past few months, Pilger has attended general assemblies, meetings at which participants vote on certain actions. Most of the time, these “actions” are votes on whether to endorse a member who has already planned

something that will be carried out regardless of the vote. “One key strength is that it does not rely (as much) on key players,” said Pilger. “While they are important, the movement is not defi ned by them. There is no ‘Napoleon’ or ‘Mao’ of the Occupy movement who will send it careening out of control when he loses touch with reality. Since it is anarchistic, it should also not get entrenched in its own comfortable bureaucracy.” While the small Occupy march at the parade was swept up in a sea of other organizations, its voices were not drowned out. The most popular sign held by thousands of marchers was “We are the many” – similar to the Occupy movement’s tagline “We are the 99 percent.” A large group of marchers from the Hyatt Workers’ boycott called out, “People’s need, not corporate greed,” echoing other Occupy rhetoric. A lone woman walked in front of the military marching band screaming “Free Hawai‘i.” At the campsite in Thomas Square, a middle -aged man named Nova runs the information booth and holds his post as the head contact of Occupy

Honolulu. His position is critical for Honolulu’s connection to the rest of Occupy because he has two brothers involved with Occupy Chicago. Through Nova, I was put in touch with Matthew Guss, a UH senior who is in charge of student outreach. Because of his connections with Occupy Honolulu and his experience gained as an organizer, Guss has taken his concerns to the larger UH community. “I started a group called the Student Rebel Alliance to bring together a network of students and educators from every department to fi nd creative solutions to problems in education,” he said in an email. “I don’t know if I can really describe why I joined Occupy Honolulu other than I wanted to do something,” wrote Matthew. “Personally, one of the biggest issues for me is the privatization of the education system. Tuition rates continue to rise as the quality of education stays the same.” For more information about the Student Rebel Alliance, find them on Facebook with a listing of events and scheduled meetings: facebook.com/ StudentRebelAlliance


Features@kaleo.org | Maria Kanai Editor |Alvin Park Associate

Page 7 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 18 2012

Features

Bonjour, crepes!

RELAY FOR LIFE Don't forget our Kickoff event on 1/19 at 6:30 pm in CC Ballroom There will be FREE FOOD & RAFFLE PRIZES

RelayUH.com cancer@hawaii.edu Register today to help save lives at RelayUH.com

CHASEN DAVIS/ KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Permanent hours and menu selections have not yet been set for the new Le Crêpe Café location, but students will be able to choose from a variety of sweet and savory crepes, as well as possibly sandwiches and other lunch items. ISABELLA H ASTINGS Staff Writer

The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa is kicking off the new year with L e Crêpe Café, a new kiosk located at the R ichardson School of Law. L e Crêpe Café has two other locations, one in Mānoa Valley and one downtown near Hawai‘i Pacific University. The menu at UH will be similar to the downtown location, and should include food items such as paninis, salads, sweet and savor y crepes, as well as coffee and other drinks. “We don’t have a set menu yet, as we still have to fi nalize the selections,” said Sousiane Vouharkat, owner of Le Crêpe Café, “It will be about two weeks until we can offer set hours and varieties.” Having moved to Hawai‘i from France four years ago, Vouharkat

knows how to reproduce the genuine tastes of Paris. In the three years since Vouharkat opened and operated the creperie, he has two signature items that will be on the UH menu. Out of 15 sweet crepe choices, the “Romeo and Juliet” is the most popular, featuring nutella, banana and strawberries. “Pesto Pesto” is a winning savory crepe choice, fi lled with mozzarella cheese, homemade pesto, shredded chicken and tomatoes. The French fl avors of Le Crêpe Café come from the homemade batter that is freshly mixed every morning. According to Vouharkat, Le Crêpe Café uses many homemade and organic ingredients and sauces. These include the organic coconut and spinach, as well as homemade pesto sauce used in paninis and savory crepes. “Most of our produce is from Hawai‘i,” said Vouharkat. “We buy

fresh fruits from farmers’ markets. We also buy locally grown tomatoes, basil and green onions.” Buying local produce is not the only step that Vouharkat has taken in hopes of benefitting the community. All of the utensils that customers are provided with at Le Crêpe Café are compostable. “It is more expensive, but we are making an effort to go green,” he said. “ We won’t give a customer anything plastic. Even the cups are compostable.” As of right now, the kiosk will be open from 7 a.m. until 2 p.m. While there are plans to keep the location open until about 6 p.m., there has not been a set date for the changes to be made. Once Le Crêpe Café settles in, permanent hours will be announced. Meanwhile, swing by for a Parisian break between classes and try out a crepe – or two.


Page 8 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 18 2012

Features@kaleo.org | Maria Kanai Editor |Alvin Park Associate

Features

Tunnel vision M ARIA K ANAI Features Editor If you’ve walked down McCarthy Mall since last week, you have probably noticed the enormous textile tunnel and the cloth pieces hanging from the trees. Created by internationally renowned Japanese artist Akihiko Izukura, the exhibit “Life in Colors in Hawai‘i 2012” offi cially opened yesterday and will run until Jan. 27. 69-year-old Izukura is originally from Kyoto and comes from an ancient, prestigious line of weavers who created kimonos and obis for the Japanese Imperial family. See Akihiko Izukura, next page RIE MIYOSHI/KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

In addition to those at McCarthy Mall, Izukura has displays at the Academy Art Center.

Sore gums? Bad Breath? Bleeding Gums?

No Tip! Self-Serving Cafeteria Stlye!

Dental Hygiene Services Hemenway Hall 200

Kamaage Udon $3.75

Curry Udon $5.25

MARUKAME UDON 808.931.6000 Open 7 Days 11am ~ 10pm (Last Order 9:30pm)

#1 in the Top 11 on Yelp.com for 2011

Kake Udon $3.75

EDIBLE ARRANGEMENTS MANOA Voted one of the 5 best places to work in Hawaii. A “Sweet” Job Opportunity. Seeking energetic, polite team members to join our Ohana. Tasks include taking orders, dipping fruit & building arrangements. Flex hrs/shifts avail.

Call Bob @ 988-3784 for more.

bene pesce

Services for $25.00

10% OFF With Student ID

Bring in coupon and receive free toothbrush and toothpaste after completed appointments!

Happy Hour Specials: 5-7 PM 10-11 PM

Niku Udon $5.75

FREE

SOFT DRINK

with a valid Student ID

Drinks and Appetizers: $3 Draft. $4 You-Call-it. $10 Select Pizzas


Features@kaleo.org | Maria Kanai Editor |Alvin Park Associate

Page 9 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 18 2012

Features

Akihiko Izukura: TEXTILE ARTIST SEEKS TO GIVE VIEWERS NEW PERSPECTIVE from previous page

He specializes in contemporary weaving and natural dying, and believes Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i is the perfect place for his current exhibit, which features â&#x20AC;&#x153;taiyo-zome,â&#x20AC;? known as sun dyeing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I prefer an environmentally friendly way of dyeing, by using the energy of the water, sun, grass and the silkworms,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Through using natural materials, the colors are softer and more muted, and also change throughout time.â&#x20AC;? His indoor exhibit in the UH commons gallery consists of clothing pieces, tapestries and other weavings. There is also a ball of live silkworms spinning silk, which Izukura uses for his artwork. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I got a call from UH MÄ noa complaining about the smell from the bugs,â&#x20AC;? he said with a smile. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the point. I love the smell, even though most people hate it.â&#x20AC;? The tunnel display is meant to be an interactive way for people to get in touch with nature. â&#x20AC;&#x153;About six years ago, I had a fairly big operation on my eyes and I thought of this tunnel during the surgery,â&#x20AC;?

Izukura explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Undergoing the surgery felt like going through the tunnel. Most people see things from the outside, but I realized how important it is to have a different perspective from the inside. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what humans are supposed to do.â&#x20AC;? Since the tunnel is large enough for people to walk through, the soft colors of grays, blues and reds are meant to affect their feelings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The grays make you calmer, while the reds get your temperature up. It shows how you communicate with nature and its colors,â&#x20AC;? he said. He created the tunnel using a surprisingly small loom, and because the piece is created from light silk â&#x20AC;&#x201C; much like the rest of his artwork â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it is compact and easily portable. He encourages UH MÄ noa students to pursue their art the moment they are inspired. Although he admires people who can plan out art projects before starting, he ďŹ nds he cannot work that way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I tend to head into things at the moment, or otherwise I end up changing my mind,â&#x20AC;? he admits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not so bad

RIE MIYOSHI / KA LEO O HAWAIâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I

In addition to art installations, Izukura creates fashion garments. sometimes. I encourage students to go with the ďŹ&#x201A; ow, so to speak.â&#x20AC;? He believes that all artists should

do what they want to do, instead of being limited to a genre that they were told they should stick to. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ev-

eryone has a wonderful talent,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All you need to do is ďŹ nd a way to show that to the world.â&#x20AC;?

2012 KA LEO

GAMES BOOK The games book has FURVVZRUGVZRUGĂ&#x20AC;QGV VXGRNXPD]HVDQGPDQ\ RWKHUIXQJDPHVWKDWDOORZ VWXGHQWVWREHHQWHUWDLQHG ZKLOHVLWWLQJDURXQGFDPSXV

Look for it 1-23-12

2440 S. Beretaina Honolulu, HI

<]j]cOYjĂ&#x161;]d\Yf\l`]Qgmf_Ogd^]Lgf]k

Dan]LjY\alagfYdEmka[^jgeAj]dYf\ :ggZH;kb^gl&P^]%*(+.903,)if 9ddY_]kk`go$mf\]j)0k_]laf^j]]$:]f]Ă&#x161;l[gf[]jl^gjl`]Kl&HYlja[ckHYjY\]

Ma^BkblaKhl^&LZm'*(+1913))if 21+ only

@^g^kZe:]fbllbhg+) FbebmZkr(Lmn]^gm*. =hhebgKZd^lmh_heehp[hmaI^k_hkfZg\^l' Mb\d^mlZoZbeZ[e^Zm:ggZl%Ma^BkblaKhl^%HMhhe^l D^eerHG^belhgebg^Zmfosphawaii.ning.com/events

Hma^klahplZm:ggZll )'*)%Jgk[g]GfoYj\=l[& )'*(%O`akc]q9n]f_]jk )'*/Egkl@a_`

Khgfkgj]\Zq


Page 10 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 18 2012

Opinions@kaleo.org | Boaz Rosen Editor | Justin Francisco Associate

Opinions

Medicare fraud: America is hemorrhaging TREVOR Z AKOV Staff Writer

NANCY STONE/CHICAGO TRIBUNE/MCT

Though Medicare was intended to â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and often does â&#x20AC;&#x201C; help provide care for the aging, it is inadequately protected against scammers. are listed as founders or CEOs of these fake medical centers. The next step in the bust-out scheme is to directly charge Medicare or indirectly charge other

Medicare Advantage Plans. Of course, medical services were never actually rendered, but the bills for reimbursement can list any medical operation covered by Medicare,

W HY WHY WH Y SH S H OU SHOULD O LD I HIRE OULD H IR IRE E YOU? YO O U? U

Ka Leo is looking for highly motivated students. We are recruiting Jr. Account Executives and Advertising Account Executives for our growing program.

kaleo.org/jobs APPLY TODAY! www.kaleo.org/jobs

SKATE SHOP MOPED SHOP

WW

W.K

AL

EO

.O

RG

i

BIKE SHOP HEAD SHOP DIVE SHOP SURF SHOP DISCOUNT STORE VIDEO GAME STORE BOOKSTORE

Vote for the best business

TATTOO PARLOR

in each category and submit it to Ka Leo ofďŹ ce at Hemenway Hall 107.

NAME EMAIL

Correction In a photo that appeared in the Jan. 9 issue of Ka Leo, a group of protesters should have been identified as Occupy East-West.

WHY SHOULD I HIRE YOU?

Ka Leo is looking for highly motivated students interested in gaining real world work experience. We are recruiting Web Developers p for our growing g g program. p g .

*,,-;YehmkJgY\@]e]foYq@Ydd)(/0(0&1-.&/(,+

getary constraints within the federal government serve as yet another barrier to catching the bad guys. All successful insurance companies have whole departments dedicated to fraud detection. Likewise, Medicare must hire people to sniff out fraud; if not, things will only get worse. Medicare fraud, when stripped down to its bare-bones reality, is people trying to defraud the government, perhaps because they see the government as an endless source of money. But despite these problems, Medicare does serve many people, and there is still some reason to be optimistic that Medicare can be salvaged. But this can only happen if the government is able to improve current measures to prevent fraud.

APPLY TODAY!

.. ..

Color Copying Faxing Binding and more!

WWW.KALEO.ORG

Medicare ďŹ rst became law in 1965, with the goal of providing government-funded medical care to people 65 and older. Medicare still serves many vital purposes, but has become fundamentally ďŹ&#x201A; awed due to its immense size and scope. There are numerous reasons as to why Medicare is now out of control, but one glaring fact is that Medicare fails to effectively prevent ďŹ nancial fraud. Medicare fraud can come in many shapes and sizes, but one recent and extremely alarming example of Medicare fraud is known by the authorities as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;bust-outâ&#x20AC;? scheme. The strategy is sinister, but not very complex. First, someone looking to scam the government incorporates a false medical business to act as a shell company. Abandoned barns or vacant ofďŹ ce units are chosen to serve as the supposed physical address of these ďŹ ctitious medical centers. Even more egregious is the theft of physiciansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; identities, whose names

ranging from cancer treatment to complex (and therefore expensive) operations and procedures. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;bust-outâ&#x20AC;? scheme is so titled because the only goal of a shell company is to bill the government for as many services as possible, as quickly as possible, before the authorities become suspicious. Like a parasite on the system, approximately 10 percent of all Medicare payments are eventually categorized as â&#x20AC;&#x153;improper payments,â&#x20AC;? meaning tax dollars were given to deceitful claims or entirely artiďŹ cial entities. Law enforcementâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts to ďŹ nd the real sources of fraud are made difďŹ cult by long paper trails, and every state has its own systems of records management and accountability. Currently, states ask for very few personal details when someone submits paperwork to establish a company. On the federal level, Medicare is facing the perfect storm of problems. Bills proposed in Congress that would rewrite the Medicare documentation requirements from each state are continuously voted down. Bud-

i

2445 CAMPUS RD. HEMENWAY HALL 107 808.956.7043

KALEO.ORG/JOBS

APPLY TODAY! Located in the UH Manoa Bookstore

Rainbow Business Center | 956-9750 manoa.hawaii.edu/auxent/rbc

We are recruiting Public Relations Representatives for our growing programs. Do you like business, marketing and promotions? Then check out the options at Ka Leo.

www.kaleo.org/jobs

BARTENDERS WANTED Up to $300/Day Fg=ph&F][]kkYjqLjYafaf_Hjgna\]\ 9_])0#GC 800-965-6520 Ext:172

ATHLETIC MEN 4 MODELING

$

$50-$200/hr paid. No exp. necess. :g\qemklZ]Ă&#x161;l$o]dd\]Ă&#x161;f]\&.hY[ck9#)0%*1qjk& gfdq&Kmj^]jk$kcYl]ZgYj\]jk$klm\]flk Yf\eadalYjq]f[gmjY_]\& K]f\h`glgkklYlklgk]f\kfYhk`]j]8_eYad&[ge


Opinions@kaleo.org | Boaz Rosen Editor | Justin Francisco Associate

Page 11 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 18 2012

Opinions

Keep reality TV where it belongs: donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t join the Kardashian â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;kultâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; JENNA WHEELER Staff Writer

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be the first to admit that the Kardashians are entertaining. I look forward to the new episodes of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keeping Up with the Kardashians,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kourtney and Khloe Take Miami,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kourtney and Kim Take New York,â&#x20AC;? and any other show that involves two Kardashian members â&#x20AC;&#x153;takingâ&#x20AC;? a major U.S. city. However, as much as the Kardashians are a guilty pleasure of mine, it should end there. Kim Kardashian seems to be more famous than celebrities who actually have talent, and is treated like royalty â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and for what reason? People around the world are obsessed with the Kardashians and want to be like them so much that it almost seems like the Kardashians are attracting a cult. Everyone seems to have forgotten that Kim Kardashian is only famous because she had a sex tape with rapper Ray J.

Custom Tees

Also, everyone needs to remember that Kim wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be this famous if she wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t so beautiful. The girl has no talent, and even though the other Kardashians donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t either, at least they have personalities. Kim is too concerned with her appearance and the way people perceive her to do something goofy. On â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keeping Up with the Kardashians,â&#x20AC;? most of the entertainment comes from Kourtney and Khloe. On a recent episode of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kourtney and K im Take New York,â&#x20AC;? Kim went on a â&#x20AC;&#x153;businessâ&#x20AC;? trip to Dubai and she was greeted by screaming fans in a scene reminiscent of the Beatles landing in the United States. I was confused as to why people would be so excited to see her. I mean, I would be excited if I got the chance to see her, but I am not from Dubai. This is a country with strict, conservative principles. Why would they be screaming for someone who has a sex tape, frequently uses sex appeal

to her advantage and has posed for Playboy? A fter Kimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wedding, I read an article titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are the Kardashians the new royal family?â&#x20AC;? It compared Kim to Kate Middleton and K ris Humphries to Prince William because they both went away to college (donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t most people?), Kourtney to Pippa Middleton, and Scott Disick (who is Kourtneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s boyfriend and baby daddy) to Prince Harry because they are both party boys. I shut the article when it compared Kris Jenner, the overbearing and attention-hungry mother, to Queen Elizabeth herself. Reality stars should be just that: reality stars. Nothing more. They are meant to be watched on TV (possibly in secret), not to be idolized or seen as royalty. While I continue to watch the Kardashians for entertainment purposes, I am not about to write essays about how Kim is my role model. And I am certainly not about to join their â&#x20AC;&#x153;kult.â&#x20AC;?

BRIAN VANDER BRUG/LOS ANGELES TIMES/MCT

An E! Online article recently compared reality TV stars Kim (left) and Kourtney Kardashian and their family to the British royals.

Surf Outlet

Looking for New Graphic Designers and Artists for Their Own Clothing Lines. CUSTOM SHIRT DESIGNS & STICKERS Official carrier of Hinano Bags, SUP, Surf and Body Boards Surfvivor Media, Inc. 94-1388 Moaniani Street Unit 202 Waipahu, Hawaii 96797 Phone: (808) 676-0700 www.surfvivor.com

Proud to be Voted Hawaiiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s #1 Greek Food FREE DRINK WITH UH ID AND PURCHASE 3040 Waialae Ave. Honolulu, HI 96816 SKÂ&#x2021;ID[ ZZZWKHIDWJUHHNQHW


Page 12 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 18 2012

Opinions@kaleo.org | Boaz Rosen Editor | Justin Francisco Associate

Opinions Do you like business, marketing, and promotions? Then check out the options at Ka Leo!

APPLY TODAY! Ka Leo is looking for highly motivated students interested in gaining real world experience.

WWW.KALEO.ORG

WHY SHOULD I HIRE YOU?

Expect another useless chancellor

i

2445 CAMPUS RD. HEMENWAY HALL 107 808.956.7043 KALEO.ORG/JOBS

Gain skills that will set you apart from other students graduating with your same degree. We are recruiting Jr. Account Executives and Advertising Account Executives for our growing program.

promotions? Then check out the options at Ka Leo!

is loooking for fo highly motivated d sstudents interested int inte intere sted ed in g ga ing gain ng g real real world experience. experien

WWW W.KALEO.ORG OR RG G/JJOBS OBS

ka leo ka leo wa wan nt yo nts you! ou u!!

Need A Job for SPRING?

Ka Leo is looking for highly moti tiivat tiv vated tu udents interested d in gaining g re real worrld work ex xperience.

¡

We are recruiting Jr. Account W Ex xecut tives and Advertising Accoun c nt Execut tives for ourr g growing pro ogram.

RAPHERS forr our grrowin owing owi w g proog wi ogra ram.

writte ters

APP PLY TO ODAY!

¡ ka leo is s lo lo oo oking forr highly g mo ottiv ot ivated stud iv dents intere tere err sted in gaining real ere world ld workki king experie ence. ¡ gain g skillss tth hat will illlll se set et you ou ua apa art frrom om the th other othe studen studen ude uden udent d ts de ts grra aduating duati duatin ua g with uat your your ur ssame am ame me e de degree. gre gree ¡ www.kale www kale leo.o le o org o. rg/job rg/jo rg/ /job obss ob ¡ apply today y!

W WWW.KAL KA A EO..O .OR ORG/JOBS

¡2 24 445 ca cam amp am mpus mpu mp m pus p rd. h hem eme em menw me nw way ay a y hal ha l 1 10 07¡

Ka Leo Wants W You!

JOB FAIR 1-24-2012 Kaleo- 2445 Camp pus Rd. Hemenway Ha all 107 808-956-7043

WHY SHOULLD I HIRE YOU?

Kaleo is looking for highly motivated d students interestted in gaining real world w working experie ence. Gain skills that w will se et you apart fro om

9 am - 2 pm

Section edito ors

In front of Ka Leo OfďŹ ces, Hemenway Hall 107

PPLY TODAY!

hg nce. looking for rld experirie Ka Leo is ng real wo loping d in gaini aand deve intereste creative o. ing be at Ka Le e design, e opptions Doo you lik eck out th r our fo ch n rs the ne s, Deessig c hi p omotion pr ap Gr cruiting We are re program. growing

eo is looking for highly motivated stu tudents interested in gaining real world

k exxperience. Gain skills that will set you ou apart from other students graduating with same me degree.

The national award winning Ka Leo has a number of opportunities that will help you gain real world working experience that will help you get the coveted ! JA TS job H you you graduate. DEN STUafter Yseek EY E =7 MEHA?D=

re recruititing Public Relations Repre esentativess for our growing programs.

ou like bus usiness, marketing and promotionss? Then check out the options at Ka Leo.

Campus Rd. nway Hall 107 56-7043 kaleo.org/jobs

DEM :?:OEKAD

a

K97D;7HD9 OEK

M;>7L 7L;7DKC8 8;HE< EFFEHJ JKD?J?;IM M?J>0 Â&#x161;MH?J?D D= Â&#x161;F>EJE= =H7F>O Â&#x161;;:?J?D= Â&#x161;97HJEED D?D= Â&#x161;=H7F>?9: :;I?=D Â&#x161;7:L;HJ?I?D D= Â&#x161;C7HA;J?D= Â&#x161;FK8B?9H;B7J J?EDI 7D:CEH;$$$

H;:?JM

Address: 1200 A la Moana Bl Hours: Monday - Thursday 9:30 p.m.; Fridayy - Saturday 1 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m. - 8:30 p

K

KKA

N I S H I MO N C H O R A M E N

Ka Leo is accepting applications, and the sooner you get involved the more experience you will have for your future. Seer v i ng

t he st udents

straigh ht: Nishi M et a lot of foo Ass wi witth most ram w om mbination pac u ccan get a bow steew,, and gy gyoza eciall about this t maake it bad. N ck bu us ride away noa M Market Place e,

of t h

Type: Ramen Price: Under $1 10

D Dress C Code: Code e: Cas C su l A L APPL LY YAddress TO OD Yâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;sual Y! s: 45 4511A Piâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i P ikoi iko ko St., S , Su uite 105

Hours Hou urs :M Monday - Thu ursda aOBS y, y 10 a.m m. - 1 W W.K WWW ALEO.O L ORG G/J Jay O

KA LEO O HAWAIâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I

WILL CARON/KA LEO O HAWAIâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I

Ga Gain ain inn ski kill kill kil ills lss that h will willl se set et yo you y ou apart from otther o studen ennts ts graduating with ith thh y yo oouur same degree. e.

a.m.; Fr iday - Satturdayy, 10 0 a.m. a - 3 a.m.; Sundayy, 10 a.m. - 9 p.m m. Parkin ng:

&DPSXV5Gf+HP PHQZD\+DOOf  

Ka Leo eo is lookin kingg for highly g y motivated students inteeressted in gaining g g real world wo work expe p perience. Gain skills that will set you y aapa p from the other part students nts gradua uatingg with your y same degree. g We are re rectruiting Web D Developers p for our growing g g pprogram. g m.

www.kaleo.org/jobs

in ad it

Prin

e nlino.org O r t o .kale w

ww

DANIEL HUGO Contributing Writer Chancellor Virginia Hinshaw ends her term this semester. She deserves to be remembered as a blithering hypocrite and charmless doorknob, always feathering her own nest while wagging on about common sacriďŹ ce. Among cut faculty positions and hiked tuition rates, she expanded her own administrative staff. These include a â&#x20AC;&#x153;University Advancement Teamâ&#x20AC;? of nine press ofďŹ cers. Do we need that many people to churn out meaningless slurry about momentum and progress? She supported the mandatory athletic fee over student government objections, citing our programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ nancial challenges. Very well, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t much mind contributing, but I wish the chancellor had paid for her own season tickets: $14,000 worth gifted from Intercollegiate Athletics since 2008. With a salary exceeding $300,000 annually, this â&#x20AC;&#x153;strong advocate for athleticsâ&#x20AC;? surely could afford it. Nor do these ďŹ gures account for other perks, such as airfare to the Task Force on Public Reporting and Transparency, all the more amusing given this chancellorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history of shifty, unaccountable management. Why do we hire such mediocrities? The fault lies less in the specific occupant than in the governance

structure. For years, the university president served as MÄ noa chancellor. In 2002, the ofďŹ ces were ďŹ nally and quite properly split, given potential conďŹ&#x201A; icts of interest. That division remains purely nominal, though, while the Board of Regents appoints both president and chancellor. For the regents themselves are chosen by, and ultimately subservient to, our wretched political class. On the most crucial issue arising during her term â&#x20AC;&#x201C; budget cuts â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Hinshaw did little more than carry water for a Legislature and governor determined to pare this university to the bone. After all, she owed her comfortable salary, press secretaries and season tickets to them. So long as politicians exercise decisive control over our administration, future chancellors will likely follow Hinshawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s example. A public university arguably must accept some oversight from public ofďŹ cials. But they are not the sole or even primary stakeholders. As Professor Majid Tehranian, former director of the Toda Institute for Global Peace and Policy, explained in a perceptive letter written just before the great statewide education strike of 2001: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hawaiian power elite does not have a vital interest in improving the education system. â&#x20AC;Ś Unlike the major industrial states on the Mainland, where business interests have a vital inter-

est in supporting educational excellence, the tourist industry in Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i seems to be content with the low levels of education and skill that the current public system supplies.â&#x20AC;? That indifference and complacency manifests itself in our neglected facilities (with the notable exceptions of Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i and Bachman halls, which somehow bravely weather every budget crisis). And it also operates more subtly: talented faculty lost to other universities, students transferring for better opportunities, lower alumni giving rates. Faculty and alumni could collectively check this trend. Much more than politicians, these groups have a real stake in the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s longterm success. They should elect â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and recall, as necessary â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the Board of Regents. The Legislature would still exercise power of the purse, but the university community could hold the regents genuinely accountable. This proposal would not solve everything, but it would remove one essential contradiction in this universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s administrative culture. ConďŹ&#x201A; icts emerge when the leadership owes exclusive loyalty not to their subordinates or even the institution, but to a hostile and competing faction. That represents the true relation between politics and the academy in Hawaiâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i, and why, absent sweeping reform, we can expect another useless chancellor.


Comics@kaleo.org | Nicholas Smith Editor

Page 13 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 18 2012

Comics


Page 14 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan, 18 2012

Games

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

BACK TO SCHOOL

SALE

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column, and every 3x3 box contains the digits 1 thru 9. Puzzles will become progressively more difficult through the week. Solutions, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

20% OFF ACROSS 1 Summoned, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;forâ&#x20AC;? 5 Skedaddle 9 Travolta facial feature 14 Symphony member 15 Okla., from 1890 to 1907 16 Pick up 17 Carnival sight 18 Slight advantage 19 Plus 20 Redundant position? 23 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Time Machineâ&#x20AC;? people 24 Low in a lea 25 Redundant alert? 32 Traffic stopper 33 Beauties 34 South American vacation spot 35 IRS employee 36 Pay 38 Pizzeria fixture 39 Poetic time of day 40 View from Toledo 41 Sitcom set at Melâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Diner 42 Redundant habit? 46 Nothing but __: perfect hoops shot 47 Kiss and cuddle, British-style 48 Redundant guesses? 55 Trunks 56 Prefix with stat 57 All-night party 58 Oscar night VIP 59 Detective Peter of old TV 60 Canadian tribe 61 Hamlet in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hamletâ&#x20AC;? and others 62 Auto pioneer 63 Driven drove

ANSWERS AT KALEO.ORG

DOWN 1 VMI program 2 Victim in Genesis 3 Taboo 4 Settles a score 5 Apply, as a brake 6 Comedian __ the Entertainer 7 Golden Fleece vessel 8 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jurassic Parkâ&#x20AC;? menace, briefly 9 Dins 10 Tissue abnormality 11 Houston-to-Tampa direction 12 Glenn of The Eagles 13 Explosive letters 21 Stylish vigor 22 Mosque officials 25 Anouk of â&#x20AC;&#x153;La Dolce Vitaâ&#x20AC;? 26 Sturm und __ 27 Halloween vandal, perhaps 28 Teeny 29 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Empire Strikes Backâ&#x20AC;? director Kershner 30 Reunion attendee 31 Departed 32 Silver fineness meas. 36 Ire 37 __ Jordan: Nike brand 38 Member of a small ruling class 40 Poetic laments 41 Speck 43 New 44 Belgian seaport 45 Marriages 48 1960 Olympics city 49 Sea predator 50 Consequently 51 Rabbiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house of worship 52 Container weight 53 Penultimate fairy tale word 54 Future flower 55 Address bk. entry

Go to www.kaleo.org for this puzzleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s solution.

select school supplies

10% OFF

USB flash drives & select art supplies & MORE!

LARGE ONE TOPPING PIZZA $10 808â&#x20AC;&#x201C;592â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7272

.DSLRODQL%OYGÂ&#x2021;+RQROXOX+,Â&#x2021;KWWSZZZSDSDMRKQVKDZDLLFRP

PLUS Bring in this ad for your

FREE TOTE BAG! Sale & offers end Jan. 21, 2012

Manoa Bookstore bookstore. hawaii.edu /manoa Regular Hours M-F 8am - 4:30pm Sa 9am - 12:30pm

$1 OFF ON ANY PURCHASE over $5

MANOA MARKET PLACE 2752 WOODLAWN DR. 988-4310 European Style Bakery

Not to be used with any other offers and one coupon per customer.


Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor| Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 15 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 18 2012

Sports MASSAGE SPA

WW

W.K

AL

EO

.O

RG

i

NAIL SALON HAIR SALON COSMETICS STORE YOGA HEALTH FOOD STORE FITNESS CENTER FLORIST

Vote for the best business in each category and submit it to Ka Leo office at Hemenway Hall 107.

NAME EMAIL

LOCAL BOUTIQUE LOCAL DESIGNER

WW

W.K

AL

EO

.O

RG

i

MORNING RADIO SHOW SWIMWEAR BANK CELL PHONE SERVICE FARMERʼS MARKET ALOHA ATTIRE STORE MOVIE THEATRE

Vote for the best business in each category and submit it to Ka Leo office at Hemenway Hall 107.

PLACE FOR PAU HANA

NAME EMAIL

BATHROOM ON CAMPUS

CSO

WW

W.K

AL

EO

.O

RG

i

CAMPUS HANG OUT PLACE ON CAMPUS TO NAP

UH PROFESSOR STUDY SPOT ON CAMPUS

KTUH DJ FACIAL HAIR DREADS Vote for the best in each

PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWN GUESTS

category and submit BRUCE DIRDEN / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

Led by senior guard Zane Johnson, the Rainbow Warrior basketball team will host a pair of WAC games this weekend.

it to Ka Leo office at Hemenway Hall 107.

NAME EMAIL


Sports@kaleo.org | Marc Arakaki Editor | Joey Ramirez Associate

Page 16 | Ka Leo | Wednesday, Jan. 18 2012

Sports

Rainbow Wahine look to increase fan base M ARC A R AK AKI Sports Editor

NIK SEU / KA LEO O HAWAI‘I

The Rainbow Wahine basketball team will play double headers with the men’s team tomorrow and Saturday.

The Rainbow Wahine basketball team stands tall with four players over 6 feet – but not so much with its attendance. Hawai‘i averaged 1,459 fans in each of its 13 home games so far; however, things may change this week. Not only will the men’s and women’s teams play the same schools, but also they will do it on the same nights. Hawai‘i will play Louisiana Tech on Thursday (women’s at 5 p.m. and men’s at 7 p.m.) and New Mexico State on Saturday (same times). All games will be in the Stan Sheriff Center, and all University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa students will get in free with a validated ID.

The men’s team averaged 6,254 fans in each of its 10 home games so far this season, and a good chunk of them will make it in time to catch the women’s game as well. “Just the fact that we play double headers is something that we enjoy because we talk about a basketball family here at UH, and I think that’s a prime example,” Rainbow Wahine head coach Dana TakaharaDias said. “People who come and support can support both teams, and hopefully at the tail-end of our games we pick up a few interested people. It’s a win-win situation.” And if the ’Bows are able to gain more fan support, according to Takahara-Dias, it will help the team immensely. “The sixth man, which are the fans, is so critical,” Takahara-Di-

as said. “When you are trying to protect your home and you have a home-court advantage, that just takes us over the top and really makes us feel that we’re supported and we have all the elements in place for a successful game.” Rainbow Wahine junior guard Kanisha Bello admits that playing in front of a large crowd will increase the internal butterflies among the team. “Any game I play I always get nervous – ever since I started playing basketball,” Bello said. “It doesn’t matter who we played or where we played, I always got nervous. We always want more supporters, and I think that the fans that do come out, we thank them. And hopefully we can get more fans, especially with the amount of girls that are from here.”


Ka Leo Issue