Page 1

16 «

»

: ,

– 2013

1

.

.


– 63.3 -481

:

,

;

,

.

”: –

:

,

;

.

,

:

;

:

,

:

;

,

;

,

;

,

;

,

; , ;

– –

, –

,

– –

,

; ;

, –

; ,

; ,

– 26

;

,

6 2013 .).

;

;

,

2013 .)

. (

:

6

1] 27

, . 4757,

,

1-05/3

14

22.12.2000 .

2010 .

:

.

” /

,

. –

, 2013. – 255 . ,

,

.

, ,

. ,

,

,

,

.

: .

, 33001,

. .

, 28,

. 63-16-63

2

16. –


.................................................................................................................. 7 .

. 1920.......................................................................................................................................................... 7

1930-

. . ..................................................................13 .

. ....................17 .

.,

.

. ...................................................22

Anna Ma ecka HISTORY AS PHILOSOPHY TEACHING BY EXAMPLES: A STUDY IN OSKAR SCHINDLER’S ENAMEL FACTORY ...............................................................................................................................................................26 . .,

. . : ................................................................................................................................................31

.

. .

.

...........................................................................................................37 . 1950- –

1960-

....................................................41

. . 1920-1930. .............................................................................................................................................................................46 . . . .

( )..................................................................................................................51

.

.) .....................................................................................................................................58 . . . 1960- – 1980-

..........................................................................................................................64

. . ( . 20-

. XX

)......................................................67

...........................................................................................................................73

3


. . 9020

( ) ....................................................................................................76 .

.,

. . .

.

. ...............................................................................79

. . ..........................................................................................83 . – : .............................................................................................................................87 .

. 1944-1961

.

. ......................................................................................................................92

. 30.

................................................104

.

. .

. XX

1905-1907

. ...............................108

.

– ................................................................................................................................................................................112 .

. ..................................................................................................................................................117

.,

. ........................................................................121

Piotr Badyna DIAGNOZA – CHORA OJCZYZNA I TERAPIA ZAWARTA W ANATOMII RZECZYPOSPOLITEJ … WOJEWODY STANIS AWA GARCZY SKIEGO ...........................................................................................131

............................................................................................................. 136 . . ..................................136 .

.

1980- –

1990-

.)..........................................................................................................141

. . „ ”: ................................................................................................................................................................................145 .

. ..............................................................................................................................151

4


.

. ..................156 .

.

70-

XX

...........................................................................................................................160

. . .................................................................................................................................165 . . ................................................................................................................170 . . .......................................................................................................................................................174 Marek Motyka MECHANIZMY ZMIAN WOBEC SUBSTANCJI PSYCHOAKTYWNYCH W POLSCE – UJECIE WIELOWYMIAROWE.........................................................................................................................................179 .

.

( )...............................................................................................................................................................191 .

. ....................................................................................................................................................194 . .,

.

.

1920. ................................................................................................................................................................................200 . . .....................................................................................................................................................204 . . .........................................................................................................208 . . ...............................212 . . ....217 . . : 12 1993 ................................................................................................................................................................................221 . . :

........................................................................224 . . ...................228

5


. . .......................................233 . . : .

................................237

. ..........................................................................................................................................................244

................................................................................................................................. 249 . . (1939-1945 .

. .) .......................................................................................................................................................249 . .

..........................................251

................................................................................................. 253

6


94(477) «1898/1947» .

. 1920-

1930– . .

). , .

,

,

,

,

.

.

,

, . ,

: .

,

,

. 1920-1930

.

, . ,

, ,

,

.

.

,

, . : , , . Olha Voitiuk Social and charitable activities of Studite monks in Galicia, 1920-1930th Charitable activity of Studite monks is analyzed, which was an important catalyst for social, political, national and cultural life of Galicia. It is stated, that the monks-Studites organized orphanages for many orphans and the sick peoples, raised the level of education among the peasantry, which helped Galicia, and particularly the Greek Catholic Church in the first half of the twentieth century. to endure life’s hardship and to avoid the assimilation. It is concluded that monks’s work in Galicia was helped for local Ukrainians to keep off the influence of Polish church. Thus, their activities had to some level also the national-defending value. Keywords: charitable activities, education of childrens, monks, Studites.

. .

, . (

,

),

, .

XX

. ,

,

,

. .

, –

. ,

, –

),

,

,

,

. 1918 – 1939

«

.

.

», .

1934

.

.

,

, ,

[6,

.23].

, . 170

. [9, c.11].

1936 . :

,

. ,

,

.

, .

,

, 7


[3, ,

.10]. .

,

,

,

. : ,

. , [9, .11]. – , , ,

35

, ,

,

,

. .

. . , ,

[2,

.

,

-

.5].

.

, [8, c.19]. . . :

, ,

, . 1919 – 1939

.

, . . (

.

).

,

.

,

.

.

,

, ,

, ,

,

.

. :

,

.

.

(

1924 – 1939

)

,

,

.

,

. .

.

,

, ,

,

.

, ,

. .

,

, ,

.

,

, , , [14,

. ,

50

c.276]. ,

,

, :

. ,

, 8


, .

.

,

.

,

,

,

100

. .

, [12, c.22]. ,

,

.

. ,

. ,

,

. . ,

, ,

,

. . ,

,

[3,

.10].

.

, .

. ,

,

,

. ,

[3, .11-12]. 1936 .

21

,

,

,

« :

.),

( ) [3,

( 5 «

),

(

» ),

(

),

.28].

,

;

» [3, 1937 .

». 26 ,

,

(

, « .53]. :« » [3,

.53].

, « .

, » [3,

.54].

.

(

)

.

,

. 500 . 1937 . 1936 .

[3,

. 3 . [3, .3]. , 1000 . [3,

1935 . . 1936 . – .7].

14

400 ,

( ) [3, 6

.

.35]. 1936 . « ,

». ,

( ,

, 10 , [3,

.37].

.» [3,

, » [3, .38]. 2. 875 .

)…

.37]. 11

« ,

,

.14]. , .

. : «

…, 9

23

1937 . . .


,

… ,

,

» [3,

.73].

,

,

,

,

,

. . ,

,

,

. :

,

,

.

,

.

, ,

,

, ,

,

.

, ,

,

,

,

,

. ,

,

,

,

,

,

,

. . , ,

,

[9, .12]. . . ,

, ,

,

,

,

,

.

,

,

,

,

,

.12].

[9,

, .

,

, . , ,

(

,

) ,

, ,

, [11, .49–53].

, ,

,

.

. : ,

, (

,

,

),

(

,

,

,

),

,

),

(

,

,

). .

. ,

. , ,

, , .

, ,

.

.

10

.

, ,


, ,

[10, .120–130].

.

.

,

, .

,

: ,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

. .

.

. .

,

,

). .

. ,

,

,

. , ,

.

,

,

,

. «

».

»

«

. ,

,

[13, c.4].

,

)

«

( »,

. :

,

,

,

.

, , ,

, ,

, ,

»

,

.

.

,

, .

,

.

« .

.

,

. ,

60 – 70

[12, c.64]. . .

.

,

. ,

.

,

.

, ,

[4,

.35]. ,

17

.

1930 .

.

. «

. . ».

. .

.

.

.

1938 . 1938 – 1939

. .

, .

[7, 5

,

,

.26]. 1931 .,

. .

11


,

[1,

.5].

, . 24

1933 .

«

», . 5

.

,

.

1933 .

«Pax Romana» .

. ),

,

.

,

«

»

,

3 [5,

,

.6]. .

,

29.X.1933, 3

.5]1.

.» [5,

,

50 ,

,

.

, » [5,

“ .6].

,

-

,

. ,

.

, ,

, ,

. ,

, ,

,

.

.

,

.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

, , , , , , , .

. 377, . 378, . 408, . 408, . 408, . 408, . 577,

.

. 1, . 1, . 1, . 1, . 1, . 1, . 1,

. 3, . 5. . 123, 5. . 238, . 10 . 239, 35. . 248, . 6. . 321, . 23. . 69, . 28. / . .

.–

,

, 1955. – . 19.

. . – .:

/ . , 2002. – . 11. . 12.

10.

. .

// .–

11.

. . ./ .

//

, 2005. –

:

3. – . 120 – 130. .

.

41. –

:

– , 2006. –

.49 – 53. 12. . / . . – : , 2005. – . 22. . 64. 13. // . – 1936. – 6. – . 4. 14. Korolevskij C. Le Métropolite André restaurateur de la vie monastique orientale pure Les Studites / C. Korolevskij. Metropolite Andre Szeptyckyj (1865 – 1944) – Rome, Italia: Theologica Societas Scientiarum Ucrainorum, 1964. – . 276.

1

,

. 5. 12


930:271.222(477) . . . (

IV .

,

).

. .

,

. ,

:

,

,

. .

. .

,

. :

, , , . D. R. GainetdinovThe Reformatory Activity of Metropolitan Vasyl Lypkivsky at the Head of the Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church The article studies the reform efforts of Metropolitan V. Lypkivsky, his role in the development and functioning of the Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church. Keywords: Ukrainian Autocephalous Orthodox Church, autocephaly, Ukrainian Cathedral Council Governing, Ukrainian Orthodox Church Council.

.

. (7 ) 1921 –

. 1864 – 27 1927 .,

1937

.) –

( ,

,

,

.

,

. , ,

. .

:

, 1921 – 1927 ;

, );

,

. ., ( .

. . [20][21],

.

[23] .

«

.

[9],

.

,

» (

. «

,

.

»),

. .

. .

(1883 – 1969), ,

1917 – 1936

. [4]

. . 1980-

. 1917 – 1920

. [2][3]

.

. . ,

.

) 1000-

1984

.

.

.

.

[14], .

[16], .

. .

1986 . ,

[13].

» .

« , ,

. 1989 . » [5].

.

125-

.

, 1980-

.

, 1990-

«

.

, .

.

. 13

.


[22],

.

.

.

1993 . . 1917 – 1930 . .

[8], .

,

.

[15]. »

.

. .

. ,

.

[17]. 1997 .

.

, [6].

2000-

. .

, .

2004

.

. .

[1],

.

[10][11][12].

,

,

«

» .

, , ,

[19]. . , . .

. .

, : -

. ;

-

. . . 1917 – 1920

-

. .

, ,

1686 .,

,

. ,

– , . 1

1919 .,

«

1

1919 .

» [4, c. 61], , 30

14

1921 . –

, .

),

,

[6, c. 203]. .

.

,

, . 18 .

.

. ,

«

,

» .

,

, ,

«

[6, c. 208]. 20

« «

»,

,

IV

.

», »,

,

,

,

.

, ,

[4, c. 127]. 21

.

( ,

232

).

22

,

, .

. [18, c. 98].

,

14

,

23


.

, . ,

.

,

,

« 1921 .

,

»( :«

1950 .), 1921 ,» [4, c. 137].

,

.

.

, . .

«

».

, :

,

. , 1919

1924

.

.

:

1921 . , , [19, c. 33]. ,

),

, . ,

,

( , .

[7, c. 231]. [7, . 233]. ,

:

,

, ,

,

,

. 1926 .

, (

198]. ),

[4, c. ,

,

.

,

1921 .

, « » 1926

. « –

»),

.

«

,

1926 .

« .

»

:

» ( , .,

,

,

.

. , . « 1925 . 1200 – 1300

. . , [4, c. 150].

.

», ( ;

,

10 )

,

, . 1929 . .

300

,

. .

, 1921 .

. ,

. .

.

1922 .

,

,

. 1924 .,

.

.

.

. –

.

,

, .

.

.

, [6,

c. 246]. 1926 .

.

.

: -

1926 . .

;

1926 .

; -

1926 .

. . 15

«

»;


, ,

1925 – 26

. (

) ,

.

. . 1920,

, ,

.,

. . .

,

, [7, c. 241].

,

1926 .

.

, . .

1921

1927

.

.

. –

,

20 )

(

1927 10

. .

.

.

, . ,

1926 . .

,

. . ,

,

.

1.

. . 2004 – 392 . 2. . 3. . – . 13 – 16. 4. .– 1. – 384 . 5. . 6. . . 423 . 7. . – ., 2010. - 23. – . 229 – 244 8. . – 255 . 9. . 10. . , , . — 13 — 11. . . . – ., 2007. – 95 . 12. . .– : 13. .… 86. 14. .

1917 – 1942 .–

,

) // : (19

. – 1975. 4 .–

2. – . 15 – 18;

; ., 1990. – . IV:

. 1864 – 1939) //

3.

.– .

. – 1989. – . – . 8 – 11 . – .: « ». – 1997 . –

. :

(1921–1927 (1917 – 1930).

.) //

.

.

.

.–

. 1993.

. – .:

, 1930. – 112 . // , 2005. — C. 274 – 294. , ,

: :

1917-1930-

:

:

/

, 2010. – 127 . :

,

//

;

, 22

. – 1986. – . 11. – . 70 – . . – 1984. –

1983 . //

. :

. – ., 1993. – 48 .

.

. // .– .,

17. 18. 30

. –

, 1951. – 152 . (

. . 12, 19, 26 15. 16.

:

.

.

.

. 1000-

, 1989. – . 763 – 791. . . – ., 1993. - 2 – 3. – . 48 – 57.

. //

. 1921 . (

19.

, 14 –

75. .

). //

. – 1997. - 1 – 4 (132 – 135). – . 91 – 104. (1917 – 1921 .) // . .( , 12 1996 .). – .:

– :

1997. – . 29 – 48. 20.

.

.–

16

.: “

”, 1932. – 125 .

,


21. 2. – . 198 – 302. 22. 23. .

.

io

.

/

.

i

, .

ii //

// . ., 1935.

//

. ., 1930.

. – 1989. . 2.

.

12. – . 166 – 175.

94(477) .

. –

,

, .) .

.

,

,

,

.

:

,

.

,

,

.

.

. .

-

. ,

,

, .

, , , , . A. Kyrydon Phenomenon temporality of collective memory in dimension identity. Collective memory is considered the point of temporal modes of representation. Identified causal relationships using categories of time to analyze the human being and the moral foundations of personality transformation in communicative discursive space. In the conceptual keys proved that memory as a category of preservation and modernization of the past, live in the present and greatly affects the vectors in the future. Keywords: collective memory, identity, time experience, historiography, the responsibility of the historian. :

,

1980- – ,

1990- ,

. , .

. ,

,

,

.

, ,

,

.

«

» (2009 .)

: (1991 – 2009)

:« »,

,

« » [1].

,

.

»,

,

,

. ,

. . « .

» –

1)

2)

;

,

1990-

.

,

,

: . «

» «

(

». ,

,

),

.

,

,

:

,

.

,

,

. ,

. .

,

(

)

, «

.

»

, 17


, . –

,

».

,

,

,

,

,

(

)

. .

,

,

(

).

).

. (

,

-

,

,

.). –

,

. ,

,

( , ,

)

,

,

. ,

.

.

,

,

,

,

. . «

»

:

, « ».

,

.

,

,

. . ,

. ,

«

,

»–

, ,

,

,

«

”,

».

,

,

,

. . .

( -) .

,

,

,

. .

,

,

.

,

, «

»

( :

« ( »),

, (

, ,

».

). )

, ,

«

»

.

,

«

».

, .

,

.

«

»–

, .

,

«

» [2].

– ,

«

,

.

»–

,

,

, . ,

, ,

,

,

,

[3].

,

, . 18


,

,

, . « «

[4].

«

«

«

»,

». », .

»,

» ,

.

.

.

. ,

: «

« » [5].

»

,

.

«

»,

.

«

«

»

». . ,

.

, .

,

« .

», «

»,

,

,

, . ,

,

,

,

,

,

. «

»

, .

«

»

, »

»,

, ,

» «

«

« .

, »,

,

.

«

»

,

. , .

.

: «… .…

,

…» [6]. ,

,

.

,

«

» ?

. , ». .

,

«

, «

»–

,

. «

,

» [7].

.

»–

,

,

,

,

, ,

,

,

. ,

,

,

[8]. ,

-

. ,

. ,

.

«

».

.- . ,

« ,

,

»,

:

,

,

,

,

,

,

; ,

,

» [9].

»), «

» «

». .

.

. , .

, 19


. .

.

,

,

,

.

,

,

.

. ,

.

,

. .

,

,

,

,

» [10].

,

,

«

» [11]. .

,

« , [12],

, ,

«

»

.

,

,

»,

,

,

,

.

,

, . ,

, -

. . .

, ,

,

,

,

,

.

,

,

,

.

.

:

1.

. 1776

,

,

3

2.

. 1990 .

.

,

: , (

,

3.

«

,

»).

, , ). . «

»? ,

[13].

?

,

,

, .

,

,

.

,

, ,

,

,

.

,

,

.

,

.

,

,

.

,

,

,

«

, «

.

»

»

,

,

. .

,

,

,

,

,

. , ,

. .

, . , .

.

,

.

, .

20


[14]: )

: ,

. .

)

: ,

. , .

)

.

. ,

.

«

»,

,

. : )

, )

:

,

,

( )

. ,

,

»

[15].

. ,

,

, .

,

.

, .

(

), .

,

. «

,

».

. , ,

,

,

,–

. ,

,

. . »–

. .

[16],

,

, , » [17]

,« ,

,

,

«

,

. , ,

, ,

.

1.

: .] . – .: , 2009. – . 462. 2. . / [ . .]. – 3. . – . 315–316. 4. . « »: – . – .3: . : .– : . , 2009. – . 112–116. 5. . / . // . – 2005. – 2-3 (40-41). – . 22. 6. . : / . – .: « +» « », 2009. – . 105. 7. . . – . 315. 8. . – . 315–316. 9. . . / . ./ 119–120. 10. . . – . 330. 11. . – . 116–117. 12. . – . 197, 202, 205, 207, 329. 13. . . – . 92. 14. . . – . 273–274. 15. . – . 315, 322.

:

/

.

.

.

// .

.

– .

[

21

:

, 2010. – . 315.

/ ,

/ : /

.,

. – .:

.,

, 2006. – .


16. .: 17. — .:

. . , 2008. – . 491. . .« : , 2002. — . 166–167.

:

.

/

.

.

?» /

,

. .

. –

//

:

.:

;

./

.

.

94 (477) “1921-1929”:631 .

.

,

.

. –

,

. – ). 20-

. XX

.

. ,

: .

.

,

.

,

,

.

. 20-

XX

.

. , , , . : V. M. Lazurenko, J.M. Lazurenko. Theoretical and practical activity of leaders of the cooperative movement in the development of the agricultural cooperation in the NEP period Considering the theorists` and practitioners` vision of the 1920s of the XXth century, the historiographic focus is given to the importance of agricultural cooperative building in the promotion of productive forces of agriculture in Ukraine. Keywords: agricultural cooperation, cooperation, agriculture, collective farm.

1920-

.

, .

, ,

. .

.

.

,

. , .

, 1920-

,

.

. . 1920-

.

.

, ,

. . 20-

. XX

.

. “

” .

,

,

1917 .

, . . ,

.

,

, [1].

20-

. XX

.

. , ,

,

[2]. . , [3]. 22

.

,


1920”

.

.

. .

.

,

,

”,

[4, . 10]. , .

.

,

.

, “ ,

” [4, . 30]. 1925 . ”.

.

“ .

,

, [5, . 31, 52]. ,

1920-

,

.

,

”,

. .

,

.

, .

,

.

[6]. .

,

.

. ,

.

,

.

,

.

. [7]. (6-13 ,

,

1927 .)

,

.

, ,

,

,

[8]. .

,

.

, , [9].

.

,

.

1920-

.

.

, . 51]. .

” [10,

“ ,

.

,

.

, . [11]. . , . 1923 .

. 1925

.

20

55 %

, [12, . 56 – 57]. .

[14], .

[15], .

.

[16], .

[17], . ,

[13], .

[18]. 1920-

.

, .

,

,

.

,

,

,

“ .

”. 1927 .,

,

1913 . [19, . 166].

.

, , .

, .

,

1923 .

” 1922/23 .”,

[20]. , ,

.

.

: “ , ?

, ,

. ,

”,

19201917 .

.

,

, ” [21]. .

.

,

.

, .. 23


” [22, . 478]. [22, . 483]. , ,

.

.

.

[19, . 91]. . . ”,

.

,

) ,

, [23, .63-64].

.

.

, ,

.

, ,

,

, [24, .129].

.

, ,

,

,

[24, .136].

, ,

. ,

.

.

. ,

.

” ” [25, .255-256]. , , .

. , .

[26]. [27]. “

, ,

1920.

.

, .

, .

.

” [28].

.

, 1920-

:

,

[29].

. .

,

,

.

, ,

,

[30]. ) (6–11 “

1928 .)

.

”.

,

:

,

[31].

1920-

. , [32, .14].

, , , 1920-

.),

, . .

” 1920” “

. . ”

, .

,

.

,

. ”, .

.

.

, ,

. ,

.

, . .

,

.

,

:“

– ,

, .

1920-

,

” [33, . 90].

.

,

, . . 1930

.

1922 .

[34],

,

.

,

.

, [35].

,

24

1925 .


,

1920-

. .

1. . 11. – . 8 – 20; 190 . 2. . – . 98 – 1064; 3. . . 4. . 5. . 6. .

10

7.

8. 9.

// . – ., . : “

/ . / .

.

. . ) ”, 1928. – 83 .; . – ., 1929. – . 1919 – 1927. – . : / . .– . 10– 1927. – 17 . – . 2. .

. / .

/ /

.

.– / / . / . .

. 1. –

// .– .: . – 1925. –

// /

/ 60;

/

.

. . 7 – 14; , 1928. – 43 .;

., . :

.

., 1924. – 81 .; , 1925. – 445 .;

. – 1925. – 6. , 1922. – . 1. – 108 . 11–12. – . 45–50; , 1927. – 132 .

.– .: , 1926. – 60 . / . .– .: , 1927. – 68 . . . – . : , 1927. 143 .; .– .: , 1929. – 126 .; . . – ., 1928. – 89 .; . .– .: , 1928. – 124 . / . // . – 1925. – 8. – . 51 ) / . . – . / . // . . : , 1928. – 366 . / . // :

)/

.

.–

.- . :

, 1926. – 84 .; . . – . – : . – ., 1928. – 320 . . 337. 1927/1928 p. /

.- .

. – 1927. – 10 – ”, 1925. –

.

/ .

. / .

10. .1, .3, . 6948. . – 256 . 11. .

. /

. – . : / .

.– .

. :

. , – :

. . .

, 1925. – 91 .; . .: , 1926. – 267 .; . – . : / . . – . :

. , / , 1925. – 63 .; . . , 1925. – 180 . 12. . / .– .: , 1925. – 91 . 13. . / . . – ., 1923. – 30 . 14. . , / . . – . : , 1928. – 124 . 15. . . / . . – .- . : , 1929. – 127 . 16. . / . , . .– .: . , 1927. – 64 . 17. . / . . – ., 1927. – 97 . 18. . / . // . – 1927. – 10 – 11. – . 52 – 62. 19. . 20. : / . .– .: , 1978. – 259 . 20. . 1922-23 / . . – ., 1923. – 278 . 21. . , / . // . – 1922. – 2. – . 190. 22. . . / . // . .– : , 2001. – 536 . 23. . / . // . – 1925. – 9 – 10. – . 59- 64. 24. // . . . – . : , 1988. – . 122-146. 25. . , / . // . . 7. – . : , 1952. – . 252-256. 26. . / . . – . : , 1928. – 100 .; . . / . .– . : , 1929. – 68 .; . . / . . – ., 1925. – 46 .; . . 1917 – 1927 / . .– .: , 1927. – 43 .; . , / . .– .: , 1925. – 63 . 27. . / . . – .:“ ”, 1926. – 469 . 28. . / . . – .- . : . ., 1927. – 80 .; . / . . – ., 1926. – 60 . 29. . . , , / . . – .- . : , 1926. – 194 .; . / . // . .– 1927. – 10. – . 17- 25. 30. . / . // . – 1926. – 3. – 9 – 38.

25


31.

. )/

.

32. 1. – . 7-14. 33. . 81 – 97. 34. 35. – 236 .; 1925. – 445 .;

.– .: . .

, , 1928. – 91 .

: /

/

.

.

//

// C

. – . 11. –

1922 – 1935. –

.– .:

;

. /

/

.

.–

.

, 1949. –

, 1959. – 157 .

. .

.

., 1929. –

.

.–

: / .

.–

, 1928. , , 1927. – 46 . 94 (477)

Anna Ma ecka2 HISTORY AS PHILOSOPHY TEACHING BY EXAMPLES: A STUDY IN OSKAR SCHINDLER’S ENAMEL FACTORY – (Wydzia Humanistyczny AGH )

, (

)

The paper focuses upon the philosophical message conveyed by contemporary history museums, as exemplified by Oskar Schindler’s Enamel Factory – a new generation museum opened in Kraków in 2010, housing an exhibition entitled “Kraków under Nazi Occupation”. The role of the exhibition narrative based on symbols referring to the dialectics of loss and presence is emphasized. The visitor is involved in the process of museal communication. The focus is on active and meaningful engagement with represented history, in which the aesthetic arrangement of exhibition plays essential role. The displayed exhibits assume the function of semiophores, directing the viewers’ attention to the historic processes which they metaphorically indicate. Moreover, within the philosophical insight the concrete artifacts lead beyond history, to the intangible sphere of human condition as such and its universal dimension. Keywords: Oskar Schindler’s Enamel Factory, history museum, postmodern museum, World War II, Kraków under Nazi Occupation

History is philosophy teaching by examples. [attributed to Thucydides] The 21st century museum projects have significantly changed the concept of this cultural institution. As Theodore Adorno pertinently remarked, traditional museums resembled (not only phonetically) mausoleums in which exhibits were reverently kept as dead sanctified objects bearing no vivid relationship with the concerns of present day visitors, and displayed within the poetics of distance [1, 260]. Adorno’s reflection can be related to all conservative museums, including historical collections. The most recent museums, on the other hand, focus upon the idea of participation and interactivity. This applies especially to postmodern history museums which aim at the viewers’ symbolic participation in the creatively reconstructed past. The best known of such 21st century museums is Daniel Libeskind’s Jewish Museum in Berlin, which can be compared to architectural poem designed to evoke a metaphorical experience of the tragic fate of Jews in wartime Berlin, their extinction from the city, figuratively deconstructed by the Derridian “voids” – inaccessible empty spaces that run through the museum centre as its “heart”. In Poland, the first successful attempt at establishing a postmodern history museum dedicated to the heroic struggle of Poles during the times of the World War II is The Warsaw Uprising Museum opened in 2004, to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the uprising outbreak [5, 374-376]. The new generation historical museums reconstruct the past employing multimedia and other technological solutions to vivify the past and make it closer and more comprehensible for contemporary recipients. History is transformed through the prism of recent interpretation and outlook, emphasizing the message it may yield for today’s man. By being placed within the aesthetically and narratively arranged exhibition space, concrete documents and objects change their original and utilitarian status, and assume the role of semiophores, directing the viewers’ attention to the historic processes which they metaphorically indicate. Moreover, within the philosophical insight the concrete artifacts lead beyond history, to the intangible sphere of human condition as such and its universal dimension. If we agree with Thucydides that history is philosophy teaching by examples, it can be further concluded that museums teach by “meta-examples” – as they represent and interpret the philosophical issues implied by concrete historic events and processes, reconstructed on the basis of recovered fragments and deliberately developed designs. Especially postmodern museums devoted to the martyrology of World War II, which create an aesthetic frame for the visitor’s highly emotional reception, render it possible for them to experience an ersatz of the Jasperian Grenzsituationen – limit situations which reveal ultimate horizons to one’s existence in the context of the grim wartime reality. The Oskar Schindler’s Enamel Factory in Kraków constitutes one of recent projects which contribute to redefining the shape of the history museum. The exhibition opened in 2010 as a branch of the Historical Museum of the City of Kraków in the former administrative building of the factory which before the war had been owned by Jewish

2

AGH University of Science and Technology in Kraków

26


entrepreneurs, and after 1939 managed by Oskar Schindler – a Sudeten German member of the NSDAP and agent of the Abwehr. The Museum patron was made popular especially by the book Schindler's Ark (released in America as Schindler's List) published in 1982 by Australian novelist Thomas Keneally, and later adapted into the movie Schindler's List directed by Steven Spielberg. Both the novel and the film have its share in commemorating Schindler who saved approximately 1200 Jews and was awarded the medal “The Righteous among the Nations”, as well as was requested to plant a tree in Yad Vashem. Even though containing fictional elements, both artistic productions present historical contents and show actual people and events. The Museum is devoted not only to its patron and the tragic history of Jews in the wartime Kraków. The exhibition displayed in the building at No.4 Lipowa Street bears the title “Kraków under Nazi Occupation 1939-1945”, and focuses on multifarious aspects of life in the city during the time of war. It also captures the town’s climate in the interwar years, as well as in the years that followed 1945, when the German occupation was substituted by the Soviet one. The exhibition has two objectives: to provide historical information and evoke the overall atmosphere of that period; i.e. to appeal to Logos as well as to Pathos, also to present documents and arrange the space for individual “museum experience”. As Monika Bednarek, the head curator puts it, the exhibition is an outcome of specialists representing various branches and constitutes “a scientifically, thematically and artistically coherent project aimed in the first place at providing the visitors with basic knowledge on the city’s history in the discussed period on the one hand, and at evoking certain emotions and provoking reflection on the criminal and totalitarian nature of the Nazi system and the results of putting its laws into effect, as well as the tragedy of people afflicted by war. The exhibition permits certain identification of the visitors with the city and its residents both in the past and the present” [2, 37]. The museum areas are dedicated to diversified factual and existential aspects, from the tragic to the ordinary ones, presenting details in the way that appeals to imagination. History is not reconstructed just as a sequence of barren facts, but is vividly embellished. The individual becomes a true hero of the museum narration – both as past victim of history, and also as a present perceiving subject involved in the process of museal communication. The focus is on active and meaningful engagement with represented history. The exhibition follows the line of chronology. However, the discursive analysis, rooted in a dialectic of absence and present, the loss and remaining traces, appears to be more appropriate. “History as discourse is always, to a certain extent, engaged in the evocation of loss” – Naomi Stead remarks in her paper devoted to the Jewish Museum in Berlin [8, 6]. The existential motifs of loss, death and all kinds of threats to life constitute the very core of this wartime museum, illustrating the frailty and finitude of human life. In the exhibition space, the route from the peaceful Kraków to the Nazi occupied city figuratively leads through a dark tunnel. Leaving behind the careless atmosphere of the 1930s, and the anxious days immediately preceding the war, passing through the railway station waiting room equipped with all the attributes of that period, the visitors find themselves in the middle of the war, where the noises of fighting, radio announcements and the roar of air raids can be heard. Kraków was invaded by the prevailing forces, bombed by German aircraft since the early morning of 1 September 1939, and on 6th September the Wehrmacht entered the undefended city. A photograph showing soldiers installing a Wehrmacht flag over Wawel testifies to the beginning of terror which was to last for over five years. The conversations of Kraków citizens uncertain about their fate, which can be heard in the arranged hallway of a Kraków townhouse, help the visitor to identify emotionally with the subjects of the General Government established by the Hans Frank’s proclamation of 26th October 1939, and followed by his taking residence at Wawel. The persecutions of Kraków citizens began, marked by racial segregation of Jews, illustrated in the exhibition by photos presenting the humiliation of Jews by German soldiers. This aspect of the Nazi policy is also rendered in a reconstructed tram bearing information that the entrance is barred to Jews. The first open act of terror directed against the Kraków intellectual elite took place on the 6 th November 1939 when the professors of the Jagiellonian University and other Kraków universities, including the University of Mining, were invited to Colegium Novum to a discussion on the attitude of the Third Reich and national socialism towards science and higher education, and then treacherously arrested. The dark room to which the route from the tram square leads represents lecture hall No. 56 with university benches and the original chair, where the so called Sonderaktion Krakau took place. The gloomy mood of the place is completed by Müller the Gestapo officer’s speech delivered to the academics which is played by the loudspeakers, as well as by numerous documents, photographs, copies of the professors’ letters and objects exhibited in the following room. The list of arrested professors bears 183 names, some of whom died in the concentration camps of Sachsenhausen and Dachau to which they were sent. Their tragic lot is exemplified by an authentic object: a parcel from the Sachsenhausen camp, containing the urn of Professor Stanis aw Estreicher’s remains. The farther museum spaces illustrate the acts of the occupants’ growing terror. Numerous photographs present mass round-ups in the streets, mementos and secret letters of the prisoners kept in the jail at Montelupich and tortured by the Gestapo. The most gloomy artifacts envisage death: the announcement of 1943, containing the names of the executed persons, shocking backlit photographs showing public executions in 1942 at Wodna Street and Wola Duchacka quarter, a reconstruction of a death cell at St. Michael prison, which exemplifies death rows in other Kraków prisons where thousands of people died of exhaustion in result of interrogations or were shot [6, 24]. Another branch of

27


the Historical Museum of the City of Kraków situated at Pomorska Street houses the original cells with inscriptions on the walls engraved by the prisoners in the years 1943-1945, containing their prayers and last farewells. The museum is specifically dedicated to Kraków Jews whose exclusion and eventual annihilation is rendered by diversified exhibits. Chronologically, in subsequent rooms, the photos are presented showing the removal of Jews from Kraków in 1940, and the establishment of Ghetto, where 17,000 Jews were compelled to live in the overcrowded space in Podgórze district in the years 1941-1943. The visitors figuratively follow the Jews’ route to the Ghetto, going up to the second floor, while in the staircase they can read the plaques bearing the names of the streets from which Jews were deported. As in the case of the Jewish Museum in Berlin, several architectural symbols are employed in the farther rooms to illustrate the mournful fate of Jews. The stone sky and the labyrinth of walls built in the shapes imitating Jewish tombstones – matzevah convey the idea of uncertainty and eventual loss. The threat of death permeates the whole reconstructed Ghetto space, reminding the visitors, among others, of nearly 12,000 people who were deported to the annihilation camp in Be ec. The darkness of the space intensifies the dreadful atmosphere, bearing an appeal to emotions and imagination. However, the documentary character of the exhibition is also preserved, in the form of photographs of the Jews living in the Ghetto, their apocryphal diaries based on the authentic relations, including Roman Pola ski’s memories (the famous film director as a boy was deported to the Kraków Ghetto with his family), a reconstruction of their overcrowded dwelling space. The most dramatic accent in the Ghetto history is marked by its liquidation on 13th and 14th March 1943, when 2,000 Jews were murdered, and others transported to Auschwitz or to a forced labour camp. The pictures illustrate the Ghetto liquidation, showing a crowd of people marching down Lwowska and Limanowskiego Streets, deserted streets with abandoned bags, suitcases and chairs. The atmosphere of the void intrudes, as in the case of The Jewish Museum in Berlin. To commemorate the traces of Jewish lost presence, a weird “anti-monument” was erected in 2006 on Ghetto Heroes Square in Kraków, consisting of sculptures of empty chairs, scattered in the places where formerly the inhabitants of this area used to gather. Another aspect of the wartime Kraków was forced labour. The Arbeitsamt is reconstructed in a small room, with the documentation of its operation. Both Poles and Jews were exploited in forced labour camps, such as Liban quarry and Solvay soda production plant, where, among others, Karol Wojty a, the future pope John Paul II, worked. The photographs and multimedia presentations illustrate the working conditions under occupation. The most impressive example of the forced work exploitation is provided by the reconstructed fragment of the P aszów concentration camp. The camp was established in 1942, initially for Jews, but starting with 1943 Poles were imprisoned there as well. As it was built in the place of demolished Jewish cemeteries, the tombstones were used to pave the camp paths. To make it more realistic, the floor of the exhibition room is covered with fragments of stones, and a transport bogie of the type that was used in a quarry is displayed. The enlarged photographs and films document the operation and extremely hard working conditions at the camp. Those unfit for work or caught escaping were liquidated. Three locations at the aszów camp were used as mass executions sites. The Schindler’s Enamel Factory as a history museum of war time presents not only loss but also acts of heroism. The actions of the Polish resistance movement are exemplified within the exhibition by a reconstruction of conspirers’ flat, the mementos of the soldiers of the Home Army, scouts of the Grey Ranks (Szare Szeregi) formation, and members of other clandestine organisations. Fighting for independence, they risked imprisonment, torture and death. The museum bearing the name of Oskar Schindler obviously has special space dedicated to its patron. Thus Schindler’s office is reconstructed, where the biography of the factory owner is presented, his photographs, the history of the factory, and also the selection of enamelware manufactured in the factory. The original German map of Europe of that time is placed, though the original furnishings have not survived. A central place is occupied by an artistic installation designed by Micha Urban commemorating Schindler. It consists of a glass capsule filled with pots and prefabricated enamelware patterned after those manufactured at the factory. The metal rotunda inside bears the names of approx. 1,100 Jews saved by Oskar Schindler, thus introducing the monumental aspect to the Museum. The commemorative character of this area is supplemented with 100 recordings containing relations of the former employees of the Enamel Factory rescued by Schindler. Their relations constitute part of over 52,000 interviews gathered by the USC Shoah Foundation Institute for Visual History and Education established in 1994 in California. Aldous Huxley in his essay Tragedy and the Whole Truth says that the pathetic style of tragedy as a literary genre does not allow to cover the whole truth of real events and psychological motivation of people’s acting, i.e. the ordinary elements present even in the most dramatic and limit situations [3]. Accordingly, the contemporary martyrological museum which does not present a literarily idealised and thus distorted image of past events but aspires at approaching the historic truth should embrace also the ordinary experiences of people, which make up the total dimension of human existence. Therefore a special space of the discussed exhibition is devoted to everyday life under German occupation. Entering the subsequent rooms, the visitors pass through the reconstructed streets, squares, shops, various institutions and dwellings. They are confronted with original furnishings, photographs and documents, which exemplify the everyday problems of Kraków inhabitants related to getting food, accommodation, employment, and various types of prohibitions in force. The ration cards are displayed, the witness’ discussion concerning the black market where the goods could be bought is presented. Everyday life was regulated by the Nazi’s orders, the examples of which are exhibited in the form of announcements on the poster pillar. The German propaganda films are shown on the windows of the reconstructed tram. Moving back in chronology, we have also an opportunity to feel the climate of pre-war Kraków. The reconstruction of the photographic studio in the first room of the exhibition introduces the atmosphere of 28


Kraków in the period between the wars. The pictures show Poles and also Jews who constituted over 25% of inhabitants at that time, and major events such as the celebration on B onia Common Green of 25th anniversary of Józef Pi sudski’s First Cadre Company of the Polish Legions going to battle – a national feast of independent Poland. In the following room, a spectacular genuine stereoscope (the Photoplasticon) is exhibited, which attracts the visitors’ attention by its aesthetic qualities, and which is used to show the pictures marking the essential facts of pre-war history, also those which constitute contrast to the illusionary atmosphere of peace (such as the Anschluss – the annexation of Austria in 1938). The cultural life of Kraków is illustrated by the theatre and cinema posters. This part of exhibition is supplemented with multimedia presentations, maps, photo albums. The summary of the exhibition is provided by the bright Hall of Choices, to which the dark corridor of war leads. It figuratively refers to “the universal choices that were made by people during the war and provokes a reflection on the attitudes of our contemporaries. Heroism and courage, denunciations and blackmailing, indifference” [2, 453]. The rotunda is plastered with testimonies of people who dared to oppose evil and help others, risking their own lives. Testimonies to both heroic attitudes and those ignoble ones are quoted in the white and black books containing reports of Volksdeutsche and collaborationists who turned in the people involved in resistance movement or hiding Jews, thus condemning them to death. The aesthetics of the exhibition plays a very important role in the process of “history as philosophy teaching by examples” and in the reception of such teaching. In this context it would be pertinent to refer to Roman Ingarden’s theory of the work of art [4] and adjust it to the final conclusion of the outline discussion of the Oskar Schindler’s Enamel Factory. Considered as a specific kind of the work of art, also a historical museum exhibition can be treated as an object of aesthetic experience containing the so-called places of indeterminacy which are to be concretised in the individual perception and reflection of the recipient. Within this concretising act, the visitor constitutes their own aesthetic “vision” of the exhibition, interpreted through the prism of their baggage of experience, knowledge and sensitivity. It is only then that the subsequent ontic and semantic strata of the museum exhibits and space become completed, including the ones that may be of particular interest for the history museum students: the stratum of historic events rendered by the exhibition space, and finally the deepest stratum of the so-called metaphysical qualities. In the case of history museum the historic layer (rooted in the strata of visual appearances and the presented objects interrelated with other exhibits) becomes subjectively actualized. Eventually, the ultimate and most general stratum of the phenomenologically interpreted exhibition as an intentional object is revealed – the museum layer pointing to the universal dimension of history, evoking reflections on man’s predicament in the border situation of conflict, human tragedy brought about by wars, as well as multifarious aspects of human existence and suffering, with accompanying values such as heroism, endurance, sacrifice. The aesthetic value of the exhibition is rooted in the selection of diversified documents and original objects, films, sound records, posters, and reconstructions (building spaces, squares, residence and office rooms, prison cells, railway station waiting room, labour camp site, etc), interactive devices (such as five stamping press machines which can be used by the visitors to emboss stamps of various institutions operating during the war on specially prepared cards), and also imaginative arrangement of exhibits by the curators, which artistically creates the overwhelming atmosphere of wartime Kraków. As Monika Bednarek puts it, such an interdisciplinary exhibition, “translating into reality the creative visions of the authors of the scenario and the graphic design for such a large and complex display required cooperation, involvement and work on the part of a numerous group of people and firms from diverse branches, such as graphic artists, sculptors, graphic designers, architects and constructors, carpenters and model makers, computer specialists, or lighting and sound engineers” [2, 37]. In 2012, the Museum was visited by 240,000 guests, including foreign groups. Compared to 200,000 in 2011 the number is growing. The museum has become a place of meetings and debates devoted to differentiated aspects of recent Polish history as well as the nation’s identity, and aspires at becoming “a centre of education and dialogue about the future and the matters of importance for the contemporary people living in Kraków as well as elsewhere in the world, even though it tells about problematic events from the past” [2, 37]. All this shows that memory of history is an ever upto-date matter especially if supported by museological exhibits, if they are reconstructed in an aesthetically appealing and convincing way, engaging the recipients’ interests and sensitivity.

29


Kraków under Nazi occupation – fragment of the exhibition

Kraków Ghetto – fragment of the exhibition

Labour camp in P aszów – reconstruction LITERATURE 1. Adorno Theodore, Valery Proust Museum, [in:] idem, Prisms, Cambridge, Massachusetts 1983, pp.175-176. 2. Bednarek Monika, Gawron Edyta, Je owski Grzegorz, Zbroja Barbara, Zimmer Katarzyna, Kraków under Nazi Occupation 1939-1945, Kraków 2011. 3. Huxley Aldous, Tragedy and the Whole Truth, http://wenku.baidu.com/view/42976139376baf1ffc4fad58 (access 23.05.2013) 4. Ingarden Roman, Selected Papers in Aesthetics, (ed.) Peter J. McCormick, München Wien 1985. 5. Ma ecka Anna, The Existential and Aesthetic Aspects of the History Museum at the Turn of the Century, [in:] Tymieniecka Anna-Teresa (ed.), Phenomenology and Existentialism in the Twentieth Century, Dordrecht Heidelberg London New York 2009, pp. 367-378. 6. Marsza ek Anna, Bednarek Monika, Oskar Schindler’s Enamel Factory, Kraków 2011. 7. Popczyk Maria, Estetyczne przestrzenie ekspozycji muzealnych, Kraków 2008.

8. Staed Naomi, The Ruins of History: Allegories of Destruction in Daniel Libeskind’s Jewish Museum, “Open Museum Journal” Volume 2: Unsavory Histories, August 2000. 30


015:908(477) . .

, . . : , ;

, , –

,

. ,

). , –

«

». : .

,

,

,

,

«

». :

. .

, – «

».

:

,

, , « ». . Milyasevych, S. Patrikey. Bibliographic maintenance of the scientific researches of historical Volyn: history and modern state Analysed basic stages forming of bibliographic resources is about historical Volyn, searching possibilities of regional bibliographic pointers are described of are described - to beginning of of century and electronic library «Historical Volyn». Keywords: Volyn, lokal bibliography, bibliography indexs, consortium «Historical Volyn».

. . , . .

,

,

,

, .

» [1],

, .

.

: . . » [2], . .

«

« «

» [3]. .

, [4], .

.

.

.

.

.

« .

» [5], . . » [6, 7]. ,

« ,

.

. – . , . , 1867-1907; . 1880 . . »,

,

,

»( , 1908-1918), .

, 1838 – 1917)

«

»

,

« « 1867

»

1880 50 » 1893 .

, «

, » [8]. (1838 – 1887

« .),

« 1888

(

4 – 29) »

« 20

(

[10],

31

. . ». 1867 – .

[9].

1887

.)»


[11].

. :

,

,

, «

.

«

», ,

«

» .

,

»,

.

«

«

». ,

, ,

,

, . , .

,

.

.

,

, .

,

,

, 1888-1889

: «…

.,

.

,

» [13, . 265]. ,

19-

. .

«

«

,

» 1907

(

)»,

1909

.

1887

[14]. .

[11],

. ,

, .

10

( 1908

20-

1917 »,

)

,

. . .

, 70-

.

,

.

.

. . , 1883 .

.

, . .

. .

:

.

.

,

,

,

» [15]. .,

22-

. (

,

, ,

,

. 2% ,

). (66 .

3

.

,

)

. ,

1312

,

.

,

,

,

. ,

,

. .

. –

,

, .

,

– , ), ,

. ,

,

,

,

( ,

,

(

). .

,

, .

,

.

.

.

60. XIX [16].

.

. » ,

,

. .

. .

, . .

,

,

( 32


). , 1869 . «

.

1897 .

…»

(

,

,

,

,

).

– « » [17],

.

3

.

,

1910 . ,

:« ,

. , » [17, . 33]. (771 ),

1910 .

.

,

de vizu

, ,

,

. ,

,

, .

,

,

,

, .

,

.

, ,

,

. . . , , 1911 .)

,

,

,

,

.

(

.

. ,

,

.

.

,

.

[1].

90-

.

. ,

.

. ,

, «Volyniana: », »

«

, . . ,

1893 .

,

«

»

,

.

. .

, .

,

,

,

.

, .

. .

,

. .

,

. . ,

, ,

.

.

» [18]

.

«

,

,

,

,

. ,

. ,

,

3

, ,

,

(1858 – 1930) – . .

, 1910 .

,

,

,

. . .

33


,

.

,

,

. 1934

.

,

-

, 1935 – 1938

.

.

450

. ,

1936 .

Wolynska»,

1938 .

«Z emia ,

, .

.

,

, ,

: ,

.

:

,

,

, «

»

«

»

.

, . 30. 1930 - 1939

. .

«Rocznik Wolynski». 4

. ,

.

– ,

.

1931

1939

«

», –

. ,

.

,

,

,

. : ,

,

, ,

,

,

, ,

,

. :

,

,

,

,

,

,

, . 3 (1934 .) . 4 (1935 .) ; . 6 (1937 .) 8 (1939 .) , de vizu. .

,

.

,

,

. ,

, , ,

.

, ,

. ,

,

,

,

,

. ,

,

.

,

.

,

.

« 24

»,

. .

,

.

«

. 1940 .

»,

1939 ., ,

. . , , .

. ,

,

,

,

.

4

(1896 – 1968) – ,

,

,

,

, ,

.

34

.


.

90-

, 1993 . [19].

.

.

.

.

. [7]

. .

.

.

[6],

». 2007 ».

.

– , ,

, ,

,

, . [6, 7],

: http://istvolyn.info.

«

20 1746 » (

.

,

»(

);

,

); «

»(

); «

»( ); «

,

»

, ,

); «

»(

,

,

, );

,

),

« 1746

(

-

, « »

»(

). ,

, ,

,

.

, .

, .

.

, .

, .

. [20 - 24], ,

.

,

.

.

, .

., .

.

, : .

« ,

– » [25]; . (1917-1939 .)» [26]; . « 1917-1939, 1941-1944 .» [27]; . « .» [28]. . . . « «

, , 1939–1941, 1944–2000

,

, , » [31], . . . .

» [30], . . « : , .

.

,

«

: –

» [32]

,

. -

.,

,

,

. .

«

«

»,

,

, .

1. 2. 3. 176 . 4.

. .

:

. . . . :

.

:

/ . . . – ., 1971. – 376 . , 2007. – 502 . : . .– , 2013. –

.– .:

.

( :

.

.

35

.

.,

. 1994 . –

) / . . , 1994. – . 42 - 45.

//


5.

. .,

. //

6.

.

. . : .

7.

.

. .

. :

, , 24-25 «

« » 1931-1939 . / . – 1997. - 11. – . 27 - 28. « »: / . . // , : . .. ., . 70. 2009 . – . : , 2009. – . 121 – 123. » / . . // . . , : IV .. ., , 21-23 . 2007 . – .,

, 2007 . – . 166 - 169. 8. . . , « » 1867 1880 / . .– , 1880. – 76 . 9. . . 1838-1887 . : , / . . // . - 1893. . 2. - . 265 – 278. 10. « » 20 ( 1867 – 1887) – [ .], [ .]. – 256 . – ( « » 1888 , 4 – 29). 11. . 20 ( 1867 – 1887) / . .– , 1888. - 252 . 12. . / . // . . – 1994. - 5 –6. – . 16 – 17. 13. . .[ ] // . – 1889. – . 24. – . 265. – . .: . – , 1887; 20 ( 1867 – 1887) / . .– , 1888; , 25 .– , 1888. 14. , « » ( 1887 1907 ). – , 1909. – 207 . 15. . : , , , / . .– ., 1883. – 274 . 16. . . / . . // . ..– ., 1867. – . 559 – 568. 17. . / . // . – ., 1910. – . 20, . 3. – . 33 238. 18. . . . 1847 – 1929 : , , , . – ., 1930. – , 264 . 19. . . ( ) / . . // : . .. ., . , 24-25 . 1993 . – , 1993. – . 18 - 19. 20. : 70. . : . ./ . . . .– : . , 2002. – 88 . 21. : 70. . : . ./ . . . ; . . . , . . .– : . , 2006. – 72 . 22. : 65. . : . ./ . . . . – : . , 2004. – 72 . 23. , …» : . . 12:35 : . . , , . . / . . . , . . . . . ; . . . , . . .– : . , 2009. – 112 . 24. : . .– , 2001. – 28 . 25. . . – : .. / ; . . . . ; .. . – ., 2004. – 376 . 26. . . , , (1917-1939 .) : . . / . .; . . . . . , .. – ., 1997. – 180 . 27. . , , 1917-1939, 1941-1944 . / ; . . . . , .. .– .: , 2001. – 285 . 28. . 1939–1941, 1944–2000 . / . – : . . , 2004. - 508 . 29. , , (1836-1944) : ./ ; . . . . , .. ; . . , . , . . – ., 1994. – 52 . 30. . . : , , / . . . – : ., 2001. – 360 . 31. . . – : ./ . . .– : , 2006. – 216 . 32. . . . . : , , : ./ . . . – ., 2007. – 242 .

36


930.1:331.582 «18/19» .

. . –

,

,

). .

.

,

,

,

,

,

. . . :

.

,

,

.

. . . ,

,

,

,

,

,

.

.

, , , : . . N. Muravik. The socio-economic situation of industrial working in Ukraine on the brink of and twentieth century as a scientific problem.Compile and analyze the state of research on socio-ekonomic position of industry working in Ukraine on the brink of and twentieth century and contemporary works of soviet historians. Analyzed the working hours, working conditions in the workplace, the variation of wages, living conditions of workers, the presence of women and children in the production of ore, provision of medical support and political rights of the workers. Summary of the achievements and shortcomings in the study of the problems and the ways of further scientific research. Keywords:, historiography,industrial workers, socio-economic status.

.

,

.

,

,

,

,

.

,

, .

,

,

.

,

, . . .

.

.

. [1,c.15].

, .

, [2,c.54]. –

[4,c.5]. .

. . [3,c.16].

.

,

. .

.

: ;

; . ,

,

.

37


. –

.

. .

. –

» ,

, [5,c. 73].

,

,

.

«

.

, ,

, 60-

.

.

.» ,

,

[6, c.86]. .

.

,

. : ,

,

,

,

,

.

,

, . .

. ,

.

,

12

.

. , ,

» [7, .142]. 1897 . . ,

,

11,5

18

.

.

, (

,

).

, ,

7-8%

,

. 24

. 81%,

.

1860-1899

32 , .

.

[7, .147].

73%, 70%[7, . 149].

, . 3,5

. «

2-2,5 5-6

.

,

.

- 3-4

.,

. - 2-

, .

70-90

.

.

10-15 %, [7,c.152]. , –

,

,

-

,

,

. . ,

1892 . 46,4% [7, .

.156]. 1882 .

,

, .

, –

. ,

,

,

,

,

. –

,

,

,

,

,

,

.

,

, , , ,

,

, ,

.

38


. 1907

,

.

.,

.

,

,

1905 .

[8, .225]. 213 , . [9, c. 101]. ,

. 1905-

, 1905 . – 205 . , .

1906 . – 231 1905

.,

1904 . – – 242 ,

1908 . .

,

1906

.,

10 15

11,5

[9,

,

.109]. , .

,

,

,

. .

. –

.

,

.

.

«

(

.)»

,

1897 .

1480 (9151

.

.) [10, .157].

»

.,

14%

, .

14,7

.,

,

«

22

.

,

[10.c.158]. ,

. 1892 .

(

),

. .

. , .

. 750 757 .

1904 .

,

, 1902 .

1250

. [11, .261].

. .

,

, .

,

2/3

[11, .271]. ,

. «

1860-1914 ». –«

. 1886 .

,

,

,

,

… » [12, .34].

,

, . 2,6

,

[12, .54].

. 1866 . .

. , 100

,

,

[12, .61]

,

,

,

. .

, ,

, ,

. .

, –

. 39

.


(1861-1945 .)»

-

.

,

,

,

.

1900 . – , 17

170-175 – 25

,

. , . [13, .121] . (80-85%)

, 39

,

1-2 %. [13, .124 ].

,

40

. 12

.

,

.

10,5 , 9070

, 1

.,

1886 ., 1891

. . 1,5

. .

. .

,

.

, .

1861 .

11,5

2-3

.

– 20

,

.

,

15-18

,

,

.

, ,

,

,

,

1897 .

20%

[13, .142 ]. .

, ,

,

, ,

.

. .

, , .

1. ./

.

. 2.

:

.

. – 2010. –

.

// 3.

– 8. – . 14-25. ./ . . – 2002. – . 52-60. – . . 27. – . 16-25. / . // .–

// . :

.

.

.

/ . // « : » . . 4. . 2001. – 4. – . 4-5. 5. . . . – .: , 1955. – 534 . 6. . ( 1979. – 474 . 7. // . . 8. . / – 724 . 9. . 1905 / . . – .: 10. . . .– : , 2009. – 364 . 11. . ./ . .– 12. . 1860-1914 . / .– , 2008. – 492 . 13. . (1861-1945 .): 384 .

40

. – 2010.

– – .

). /

. – .: .

/

.

.–

, 1967. – 566 . . .31. –

.:

, 1955. – 371 . –

( :

.:

, , 1955. .) /

.

, 2005. –536 . ./

.–

:

, 1999. –


94(477) „195/196”: 316.343.72 .

. 1950- –

1960-

.

.

). 1950«

1960-

.

».

.

:

,

,

, . .

,

,

,

,

-

.

. 1950

1960-

.

1950- -

1960-

.

». . :

,

,

, , , , , . O. A. Onischyk. Genesis of scientific and technical intelligentsia as a separate socially-professional group in the second half of 1950th - first half of 1960th. The process of forming of scientific and technical intelligentsia as a separate socially-professional group in the period of development of scientific and technical revolution in Ukraine in the second half of the 1950th - the first half of the 1960th is covered. Theoretical bases of the concept «Soviet intelligentsia» are analyzed. The author attempt to give definition to concept of scientific and technical intelligentsia. Keywords: genesis, soviet intelligentsia, scientific and technical intelligentsia, social-professional group, scientific and technical progress.

. .

, . ,

,

. . , 1950-

1960-

. 1960-

1950- –

. ,

«

»

. ,

, [7; 17; 18].

1970-80,

, . . .

-

[2]. ,

.

«

» ,

[20]. [16].

. . .

«

.

»

«

»

[15]. 90[10].

,

,

.

.

,

1950«

1960»,

. , ,

41


, , . . « 30-

.

».

.

«

»

. .

, 1930 . «

– 1954 .

»[26, .260].

«

, »[26, .260].

,

, ,

. .

,

. , ,

,

[2, .47]. ,

.

,

, ,

. . 1950-1980-

.

,

,

. . .

« –

,

,

,

,

,

,

»[8, .20].

,

«

, »[8, .21]. i . .

.

,

.

,

.

,

. .

,

i

[2; 3].

1987

«

»

,

«

, ».

«

,

, »,

,

,

,

.

»[19; 11, . 18]. , ,

, .

,

,

«

». 1950,

. , . (1955 .)

, ,

.

.

, [6, .72–73]. , ,

, 1962

»[1, .126]. . :

42

-


,

,

.

, [27, .51].

31,8

. 86,8

.

1956–1964[12, .203].

.

.

3

,

.

1960

( 42,3

1965 :

) .[12, . 206]. . 1960

4

9

.

1965

(

– . , 26 , 1959 859 , 365 – 2606 [22,

1959

15,6

). 1956 59[4, .1; 22,

.5]. ,

1961–1965

,

2

1959 5091

1965

1965 .[21, .86].

. , 986 ( 255 [5, .139; 14, .129]. .

.

.3-5; 12, .210]. .

.

1961 2,5

,

[12, . 206].

, ,

.

496 , 1487

,

)

1711 ( 4419 ),

1957

2677

212

, ,

1956 [25,

252

20

,

1962

.87; 14, .131].

,

, .

, ,

. -

,

, 4

1959

1965

.[7, .44].

,

, , ,

.

.

1955 . .

1950-

. ,

,

,

,

,

,

. .

,

,

,

,

. . ,

. , .

.

, .

,

, 1958 ,

158 [13, .169].

102

-

: ,

,

,

,

,

,

,

. 1959-1960 1960 .

. ,

, .

,

1956

14,4 22,8 1956 . 1,6

.

[22,

.236].

.

1955 , 1959

. ,

. ,

, 14

43

,


26

40

,

« 16

13

» [22,

.236].

,

. ,

,

. . , . .

,

,

,

. –

,

,

,

.

,

. , ,

, .

1959 5

.

10 .

1959 ,

,

, .

. 15-20% »

« «

»

[9, .19]. , 17

1958 . (

). ,

,

, , [23,

.39].

, ,

,

. ,

. :

,

1962 .

438

. 1957

[24,

.1]. 124960

.

1957

.,

1962

201 – 327059

.

. [24,

. .1].

, . ,

[2, .127–129].

,

, -

. , .

: , ,

,

,

-

, . , –

,

,

-

, . : 1) –

,

,

-

,

,

, ,

,

,

, ; 2)

, (

) ,

-

, ,

,

; 3)

, , 44

,

, , -


, ,

,

. .

, ,

.

, .

, ,

:

; ,

,

(

,

,

); ,

);

,

,

. .

,

,

.

1.

. . 1958-1964 . / . . , . . // . . – 2012. 5. – . 126 – 129. 2. . . / . . .– .: « », 1976. – 156 . 3. . . 20-40. .[ ]/ . . , . . .– : http://archive.nbuv.gov.ua/portal/Soc_Gum/Ltkp/2011_65/ist/ist10.pdf 4. . – . -1682. – . 8. – . 2342. 5. 1957 . – . : , 1958. – 168 . 6. , 1898-1971 / [ . 8. ., . . . . , . . ]. – . : , 1981. – . 7. – 534 . 7. . . (1959-1970) / . . .– .:« », 1975. – 207 . 8. . . / . . // . . . – 1973. 10. – . 19 – 30. 9. . . / . . // . . . – 1970. 8. – . 12 – 20. 10. . . (1980-1990 .) : . . . . . : . 07.00.01 « »/ . . . – ., 1997. – 28 . 11. . . « » / . . // . – 2008. 2. – . 7 – 25. 12. , . .– .: , 1973. – 315 . 13. « ». . 1885-2010 / [ .: . . , . . , . . .; . . . ]. – . : « », 2008. – 408 . 14. 1961 .– .: , 1962. – 151 . 15. . . / . . // . – 1986. 3. – . 110 – 115. 16. . . / . . .– .: , 1986. – 224 . 17. . (1917-1975) / [ .: . . , . . .]. – . : , 1977. – 318 . 18. . (1917-1965) / [ . . . ]. – . : , 1968. – 432 . 19. . [ . . . ]. – . : , 1987. – 227 . 20. /[ . . . . , . . , . . , . . , . . . . . ]. – . : « », 1986. – 335 . 21. . . 19591965 . / . . // . . . – 1973. 8. – . 86 – 93. 22. ( – ). – . -4621. .1. . 174. 23. . – . -5074. .1. .7. 24. . . 47. 25.

45


377.3(477.83-25)"192/193" . . 1920-1930-

. –

. . . .

, ,

). . -

, ,

. :

,

, .

,

,

,

,

,

.

.

.

1920–1930-

.

.

, ,

.

:

,

,

,

, , , . Pasitska . I. Training of workers in the Lviv Ukrainian vocational schools during 1920–1930s The features of the organization and development of students’ training in Lviv Ukrainian vocational schools are highlighted. The history of creation of vocational schools and their activity are traced, particularly the main aspects and features of the academic and educational process, the number of students and their social position. Keywords: Ukrainian vocational schools, workers, vocational training, students, education, subjects of teaching, specialities.

.

, ,

, . , , . . . .

.

[5], .

[1],

.

[2],

.

[3],

.

[4],

[6]. –

1920–1930:

. ; ; ;

. .

.

, .

, . ,

.

,

,

,

. .

,

, , . ,

, ,

, ,

,

. ,

. : «

», «

», « ,

,

»,

, «

» .

,

« «

», », «

, »,

., 14

,

, [20, . 4]. «

, » ( 1881–1912 46

.–

,

1912–1926

.–


) [13, . 1].

« ,

»

,

,

,

.

,

«

»,

, .

, 1932 . ,

– . .

,

: – . « », .

. «

.

« “

, – . « , .

”(

.

,

.

, ,

,

– 1339

« », 1936/1937 . . – 395 .

” [25, . 362]. 944 ,

) .

, ,

1922 .

,

[20, . 4]. , 95 «

. » [35, ,

:

», .

– “

.

. .

,

,

», .

»,

,

.

,

. 2]. ,

. ,

,

,

.

,

, ,

. 14 . – 160

90,

,

,

, . –

, .

[24, . 344]. 1924 . 1925 .

,

.

1925 .

, , , [33,

:

,

.

1929/1930 . .

217

, 189

. 5–7]. «

20 %)

»

(

,

15

. , –

, . 4].

[10, . 3; 33, [9, . 2].

, ,

1922 . . .

.

, 12 ( . .

, ), 1923 . – .

.

,

.

.

,5

(

.

. 2], . ,

,

.

.

(

),

, 9) [34, . ,

,

.

. [36,

. 2–3].

,

[38, . 1]. , : 1926/1927 . . 64 1928/1929 . . – 60, 1929/1930 . . – 54, 1930/1931 . . – 37 [33, . 3–7]. 1929 . 5 [11, . 6] , , , , , , « » [37, . 1]. , . . , , , . .

«

, 1 ( 1934 . – ), 1936/1937 . . – . 1911 . « » ». 1924 . » [14, . 1–2].

« , 14 (

» –

. ) [40,

.

[8, . 3], -

, ,9(

. 22]).

« «

»

,

.

),

.

,

.

( . ,

. . [22, . 145–147].

.

,

.

47


,

, .

;

, .

,

.

,

,

.

,

.

,

, .-

.

,

,

, » , [17, . 2]. . ,

« . » .

«

,

, .

,

.

. [2, . 109].

)

.

. 102 , 1926/1927 . . – 148 (116 49 , 30 – , 33 – 1928/1929 . . – 211, 1929/1930 . . – 280 [39, [14, . 1–2]. 1936/1937 . . 282 , , 9 – , 3 – . (76 ), (38 ), , , . ) , , (11 ) [39, . 15].

14–22 , 1924/1925 . . . 1923/1924 . . 32 ) [9, . 2], 1927/1928 . . – 151 , 49 – . 1–2]. 1911–1931 .

, ( ), 388

270 [30,

-

. 369]. : ,

, (84

, (73

). ,

,

. [15, . 1]. ,

, , :

.

,

,

,

1936 .

, [1, . 133].

,

,

, , .

« «

» [42,

»–

. 12, 13, 13

.].

,

.

:

», «

», «

», «

).

»,

«

»,

,

, «

»,

.

», «

», .

. «

.

», « .

», « .

», « . », «

», «

», «

», «

», « »

.

.

1928 . »,

.

50

, . «

1930 .

»,

, «

. [39, «

»,

. 11–14].

». : ,

,

, ,

,

. 112],

, ,

. ,

,

, .

, ,

.

, , [26, . 80; 29, . 197].

,

. .

, ,

. ,

. )

,

,

. ( . , . ,

.

1465 1938–1939 (

,

,

. , , 48

,

. . ,

, .) [2, .


. .

,

. , 17 (

. ,

, 1928/1929 . . – .

.

,

.

. ) ,

. .

,

,

,

.

:

,

,

,

,

, 1933/1934 . . – 78 [7, . 130], 234 [21, . 8].

,

. .

, –

.

.

, .

,

,

– .

.

,

.

,

– . [23, . 191].

.

,

. .

20

1938 . ,

,

,

1920–1930. , 1928/1929 . .

.

. 1928–1939

, –

,

– . , .

,

– –

.

,

.

, .

,

.

.

, . , ,

,

, . 33].

[41,

,

. ,

1926 . 1928 . 1937–1938 . .

. 1927–

, [31,

.1

].

[39,

. 1].

, [18,

. 7].

[19, . 5]. «

»

.

, 39, .

1913 ., .

, ,

1929–1930 . .

– .

. , ;

;

;

;

, ,

,

,

,

.

,

,

,

,

,

[6, . 9–12]. ,

, “

1936–1937 . .

70 ,

,

,

,

,

.

” [12, . 2–3].

,

,

,

.

,

, ,

«

, ,

»

, 1936 .

3

, 1930 .

.

, «

,

. ,

, .

. ,

.

»

:

, – .

– . [26, . 4]. ,

, ,

,

, –

.

,

. 1

1938 .

,

. .

1920–1930-

, .

.

., 49

[21, . 8]. , ,

.


,

,

,

,

,

, .

,

,

,

,

, ,

, ,

,

,

,

.

, ,

,

. ,

,

. .

1. . , 1999. – 208 . 2.

«

]. – 3. .

.) /

. //

.

» (1881–1939

:

,

/

« «

» : . . . 1. / [ », 2001. – . 106–112.

:

»: «

.

. .

4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42.

.) / . // . . – 2001. – 4. – . 165–173. . . – 1998. – 4. – . 40–49. .« »– / . , 1934. – 254 . . – 1923. – 9 . . – 1927. – 1 . . – 1928. – 31 . . – 1929. – 12 . . – 1931. – 12 . . – 1931. – 21 . . – 1931. – 27 . . – 1933. – 10 . . – 1934. – 5 . . – 1935. – 26 . . – 1937. – 22 . . – 1938. – 25 . . – 1938. – 27 . . – 1939. – 29 . “ ” 1921 . – , 1920. “ ” 1924 . – , 1923. . – 1932. – 15 . . – 1933. – 15 . . – 1934. – 15 . . – 1934. – 1 . . – 1934. – 15 . . – 1935. – 15 . . – 1936. – 10 . , . , . 179, . 4, . 2585, 3 . , . , . 179, . 4, . 2609, 2 . , . , . 206, . 1, . 182, 9 . , . , . 206, . 1, . 1665, 110 . , . , . 206, . 1, . 1668, 18 . , . , . 206, . 1, . 1680, 10 . , . , . 206, . 1, . 1682, 1 . , . , . 206, . 1, . 1686, 7 . , . , . 206, . 1, . 1696, 15 . , . , . 206, . 1, . 1698, 29 . , . , . 358, . 1, . 414, 118 . , . , . 590, . 1, . 1, 16

50

. – 2002. – . /

.

. .

/ ,

(

6. – . 394–401. //

/

// .–

: /

«

-

», 1998. – 56 . . – :

.


902 (477.84-24) . . ( .

) –

, ).

. . ).

( ,

. .

,

,

.

. .

, .

: . .

,

,

,

,

.

(

).

. ,

. . , , , , . : Pryshchepa B.A. Formation of Medieval Towns in Volyn Polissya (Based on the Materials from the Horyn River Basin). This work characterizes Slavonic-Rus’ hillforts in Polissya regions of Pohorynna within the boundaries of Rivne region. The paper analyzes the main results of the field works, highlights transformation processes of the settlement structures during the tribal period of the 9th-10th cc. and the formation of the towns of Dubrovytsya and Stepan in the 12th-13th cc. Keywords: Volyn Polissya, the mediaeval period, archeological sources, hillfort, town.

. [12; 14; 29].

,

,

.

.

.

10 .

(

1961

.,

.

. 1). .

1963

., 80-

. .

. 1. ;6– ;

;7– ; –

1987 ..

:1– ;9–

;8– ; –

;

51

. . [1; 2, . 213–214]. . 1954 ., . . [13; 25; 26; 27].

;2– ; 10 – –

;3– .

;4–

;5– : – .


. .

,

. .

120

,

. , ,

. .

,

,

8

.

, .

,

30 [21, c. 4–5]. . ( .).

,

,

. ,

.,

.

,

, .

,

90 , .

.

,

, (

(

),

(

,

),

). .

0,5 6060×15–35 , (

, .

« . [6, . 7], 2007 . . ), ,

. . . 1987 . [27, . 63–64]. ,

» . , 10–12

(

. 2, 1). . 0,75–0,85

,

.

. 2.

.

(1);

52

(2);

(3)


. .

,

. .

1963 , 10–12 .

,

1,5 . [3, . 217], 80×65 , ,

« 1987, 2001, 2002

15

(

. 2, 3). 7–9 3 ,

, 1,0–1,5 .

,

, 0,4–0,5 ,

. – , ,

. 3.

».

.

. 7–

. 150×50–60 .

:1–

.

;2– . 2, 3 –

.

;3– ; 4–7 – 3 . [1, . 46],

». 53

;4– .

1899 .

; 5–


[2, 1954 .

.

[13, . 37],

1961 .

. 213].

.

1935 . [31, s. 238]. [24, . 76], 1987, 2002, 2012

. .

. . 3,0–3,5

(

. 3).

, 120×200 , , 2,0–2,5 10 .

,

.

,

(

)

. 45×40

0,4–0,6

.

2–3

6–8

,

,

.

.

,

V

.

,

. [10, . 36]. .

,

– ,

.( (

. 3, 5–7) . 3, 2, 3). »,

« .

. [8, . 78–85]. , . [9, . 31, . 182–184]. ., [30, . –

, , . , . . .

. [1, . 45], 1986 . – 2,5 . 0,4 , –

[26, . 68],

«

, . 2, 2). [31, s. 246], 1976 . , 40×50 , ,

»(

1929 . . . , .

.

, 1

. .

.

. 3, 4).

. .

278, 279]. .

(

80-

2011 .

.

.

.

.

,

.

,

,

1

0,5 –

.

. .

. 0,15

0,3

, . ,

. , .

– ,

.,

.,

V ,

. [22, . 32–33].

,

.

V . . .

1

.,

. ,

, [24, . 185–186; 14, 150]. – [16, . 333, 452].

.

,

(1183 .)

(1292 .)

.

[11, . 64].

.

[15, . 9–10]. .

1150 ., [16, . 236, 238].

, .

,

.,

.

.

. .

[4, . 125].

[7, . 123]. 1183 .

[16, . 333]. .

, .

,

( ,

, [13, . 34].

, 1954 ., 350

. ,

54

,

. 4, ).


,

( ,

. 4,

).

, .

[24, . 75, 76],

.

:« » [1, . 46].

6,5

35

,

12–15

.

1855 ., ,

[19, . 143]. ,

.

. ,

. 4. .

,

.

.

.

[17, . 177, 178].

:

;

: –

;

.

. 1988, 1992

.

2012

.

. ,

« 55

»

1963 . [26, . 58], « »


.

.

,

, 0,3–0,4

(

. 4, 1, 2). .

,

100

(

. 4, 3),

0,75

1,2

, .

, .

.,

,

.

, 4,0

-

,

350 ,

3,5–

.

1292 .: « ,

,

. » [16, . 452]. »,

«

, «

» XIV

. [28,

. 219, 224, 235]. , (

. 5,

), . [25, . 41]. 2012 .

, . 15–20

1,0–1,5

. .

,

(

. . 800

. 5,

),

. (

. 5, ).

,

,

– 350 25

.

,

-

.

. 5.

. ;

: – –

. –

: ;

, [2, . 213; 1, . 45]. [5, . 85–87]. 56

;

.

. 1899

. .

,


.

80×60 . 3,5–4,0 ,

. 9–11

.

. .

1954 . . 1981

.

[13, . 38].

. 10×4 2,8–2,9

: 1) ,

0,55

.

. [5, . 87].

[20; 23].

,

0,2 ; 2) , ,

, 0,4–0,45 ,

,

1,5 0,2–0,3 , ;

, 0,5–0,6

V–

,

,

.; 5) ; 6) 1,85–1,9 ,

0,2 0,6–0,7 .; 4) ;

.; 3) ,

,

, , .; 7)

-

,

.; 8)

0,3–0,4 ,

2,8–2,85 ,

. , –

. (

,

,

),

.

, », 2011–2012 .

. «

»

«

»

. 4

.

8 (

. 5, 1, 2), . 1 2,5 .

35

55 (

.

.

. 5, 4, 5) .

,

, 2

. ,

.,

. ,

.

V

. (

,

,

).

.

.

9–12

.

. .

.

. . (

) [18, . 109–110, 119].

, ,

.

,

. ,

,

32

3

[1, .

46]. (56

)

,

(72 ) 30–35 , 2700–3700

. . ,

.

[29, . 96–97]. , . ., .

57

,

.

.


1. 1–133. 2. 3.

.

//

.,

. – ., 1899. – . 1. . , 1982. .( V .). – //

., . – .:

4. 5.

.–

. .

., 1901. – .

, 1865.

. – ., 1980. – . 82–88. 6. 7. 8.

. – . -562, . 3, . ., . .–

. ., V

9.

. , 1958. – . 1.

10. .– 11.

. 11. . – ., 2008. // . – ., 2004. – . 51–86.

.

. –

.

. , 1966. –

. 2.

,

,

,

-

,

. //

. 1-36.

. , 1985. .

12. 13. 1961. 14. 15.

.

. – .–

.:

, 1989. //

. .

V

.–

.

. 1-57. –

.:

,

. – ., 1999.

.

// .

16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

.:

. .–

. .

.–

. , 1974. :« 2-

.– .

, 2006. – . 7–16.

. – .: «

», 1989. », 1999. . – ., 2000.

.

1981

//

. – 1981/72. 21.

.

// .

22.

6.

«

». –

.

// .–

23.

. ,

10024. 25. 26. 27.

.

, 2007. – . 4–14.

, 2005. – . 25–38. //

1000

:

.

.

.

.

35.–

. ( ..,

.

. .–

, 2009. – . 4–9. IV . // .– : ). – . 384, . 15, . . 225. : . – .: 1986–91 //

, 1967. –

140. , 1982.

, 1993. – . 1. – . 41–67. 28. .« » // . – ., 1950. – 40. – . 214–259. 29. . . – .: , 1989. 30. . // .– , 1959. – 63. 31. Rauhut L. Wczesno redniowieczne materia y archeologiczne z terenów Ukrainy w Pa stwowym Muzeum Archeologicznym w Warszawie // Materia y wczesno redniowieczne. – Warszawa, 1960. – T. V. – S. 231–260.

: 94 (477/82) „18” .

. –

.) –

,

). –

.

.

(

)

.

.

: .

,

,

,

.

, (

.

58

– –

. .). .


)

. . :

,

,

, , . O. P. Pryshchepa. Educational establishments in the cultural life of Volyn towns in the 19th – the beginning of the 20th c. Analyzes the growth of the network of educational establishments. The focus is on the cultural and educational establishments of Volyn (Kremenetska) gymnasium in the presence of dominating Polish cultural traditions. The conclusion is made about the control of state structures over the educational process and their impact on the formation of the cultural and educational environment in towns. Keywords: educational establishments, towns, educational and cultural environment, Volyn County, the Russian Empire.

. –

.,

,

,

. ,

,

. .

– .

. , .

, .

, . [28; 31; 32; 44; 26; 2],

«

» [33; 19; 27],

[1].

[20; 21; 22]. ,

,

, [37].

. [17; 24],

,

, (1805–1833)

1819 . [45–48].

[39; 43; 38]. (

) [25; 3]. ,

, -

, . . , .

,

(

,

,

,

,

), , . ,

, «

. –

.

,

» («

, (

») [5, . 217]. ( )

)

. , – « ,

. », [34]. ,

,

. . , .

, –

,

,

,

[40, . 19]. . . ,

( 59

,


, .

), –

, ».

,

,

,

,

. , (

)

»

.

-

, ,

,

. , ,

. ,

. ,

.

, .,

,

– ( 1819 . –

,

. )

, 1834 . ,

. ,

1839 .

.

,

,

1868 , [4, . 79].

,

.

[35, . 21]. , (

,

,

1914

,

.

)

. ,

.,

,

,

, .

,

,

, .

1909 .[36, . 232]. , . 2].

1872

. [7,

.

. , –

1836 .

1912 .

,

(

. –

) [18, . 23]. ,

[42,

. 33]. .

28 [36, . 214–222 ].

. 3 ,

,

1912 .

. -

, ,

.

,

. ,

,

,

,

. , , ,

, .

,

, ,

, . ( ,

,

)

(

(

.) –

. .

,

60

.)

-


,

. ,

.

,

, . , .

. ,

, ),

,

(

,

,

, .

,

,

, [21].

, , ,

,

.

.

,

,

,

[41, . 39]. – ,

1

1805 . , , [41, . 28].

,

,

, , ,

. ,

,

(

),

[41, . 31]. [29, . 142].

– , . ,

,

,

,

,

.

. , . ,

. .

,

,

,

. [41, . 32, 34]. . ,

. . ,

[23, . 78]. .

,

,

,

[41,

. 37]. . ,

,

,

.

, ,

), ,

( (

, ).

, . –

,

» [29, . 144].

,

(

),

[30, . 125]. , ,

, .

,

. .

61


,

,

,

. ,

30–60-

, .

,6

1832 . .

, , , [15, .

. .].

.2 «

» [27, . 8],

. 40–60[14,

. 4]. ,

, . ,

. 1881 .: «…31

.

,

. . »

(

.– 1

)

«

.

,

50

.

7

.

.;

» [6,

. 21].

, –

,

,

. ,

,

[13,

.

157–158]. , ,

.

,

.

80-

, ,

,

,

.

,

, ,

.

,

,

,

(1904 .) [8, (1909 .) [10, . 4], 50, 100. 7], 200. . . . , . . [12, . 232 ].

[10,

. 1], 200(1911 .) [9, [9,

. 79]. . .

. 188],

. .

1905 . ,

.

,

1906–1907

.

. «

»

.

,

, «

» . [22, . 437].

.

-

. 50. 4–4

[9,

. 141], 300-

[11,

., 8]. , .

[8,

. 42].

, .

,

1908 .

, .

27

,

,

, .

,

, ,

, 62

,


. . 21].

[16,

, ,

.

,

.

,

. . .

.

30-

,

. ,

. .

1. 2. 3. . 4.

. . . – , 1894. – 148 . . . 1805–1833 : . .– .

. 1832–1889 /

.

. :

1862 . / . .– / , 2006. – 304 .

, 1863. . .-

. /

. . .

.

.

-

;

.

. – ., 1869. – . 1. – 140

. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

. ( , , , , , , , , , ,

. 215, . 215, . 215, . 215, . 215, . 215, . 215, . 394, . 394, . 555, . . .

. 2, . 2, . 2, . 2, . 2, . 2, . 2, . 2, . 1, . 1,

, 1979. – . .

. – 779 .

. 24. . 31. . 33. . 46. . 132. . 168. . 218. . 2. . 3. . 1. :

) //

/ . .– .: ), . 215, . 2, . 12.

( . – 1887. –

/ . . (1793–1917) / 2. – . 285–312;

.– .

: .–

, 3. – . 439–468;

, 2006. – 448 . :. , 1996. – 173 . 1831 ., 4. – . 649–666; . 18. – 5.

– . 52–72. 20. : 26 . – . . – . : . . . . . ,1970. – 745 . 21. : 26 . – . .– .: . . . . . , 1971. – 674 . 22. : 26 . – . .– .: . . . . . , 1973. – 654 . 23. . ./ . // . 1805–1833 : . . / . .- . . . ; . . . .– : , 2006. – . 75–88. 24. . ( ). / . // [ ]. V .– : , 2010. – . 169–171. 25. . ( –30. .): / . .– : , 2003. – 124 . 26. .] /[ . ] // . – 1882. – . 1. – 2. – . 262–300; 3. – . 441–478. 27. . / . .– . . .; . . . 28. . 1840/ . // .– 1906. – . 92. – 3/4. – . 1. – . 421–432; . 93. – 5/6. – . 1. – . 72–87. 29. . ./ . // . 1805–1833 : . . / . .- . . . ; . . . .– : , 2006. – . 137–152. 30. . / . // . 1805– 1833 : . . / . .- . . . ; . . . .– : , 2006. – . 118–128. 31. . 1835 / . // . – 1890. – . 28. – 1. – . 127–130. 32. . . [ ] ./ . .[ ] // . – 1900. – . 69. – 6. – . 1. – . 391–397. 33. // . – 1892. – . 37. – 4. – . 71–88. 34. . . 1. .– .: , 1998. – 384 .

63


35. 36. 287 . 37. 38.

1886

.– –

. . 700

: 1283–1983. .

. ,

.

, :

39.

. :

.

. . .

./ .– .:

:

. . . , 2001. – 226 . : . », :« .

:

. ./ . , 2007. – . 51–57.

.

.

.

,

.

., 1885. – 78 . .– :

, 1983. – 194 . . / . . . . , . . .

//

. :

, 2010. –

: . – . 1. –

/

.

.

. –

40. // . . , . . , . . .; . . . , . . .– .:« –2000», 2002. – 334 . 41. (1805–1833 .) // . 1805–1833 : . . / . .- . . . ; . . . . – : , 2006. – . 23–40. 42. . , . 442, . 636, . 391, . 33. 43. . 30. ./ . // . 1805–1833 : . . / . .- . . . ; . . . .– : , 2006. – . 63–75. 44. . . / . . // . – 1902. – . 79. – 11. – . 2. – . 77–83. 45. . / . .– , 2012. – 235 . 46. Beauvois D. Szkolnictwo polske na ziemiach litewsko-ruskich 1803–1832. T. . Sko y podstawowe i rednie. – Fundacja Jana Pawla / D. Beauvois. – Rzym : Redakcja wydawnictw KUl-Lublin, 1991. – 459 s. 47. Epsztein T. Edukacja i m odzie y w polskich rodzinach ziemia skich na Wo yniu, Podolu i Ukraine w po . w. / T. Epsztein. – Warszawa, 1998. – 233 s. 48. Zasztowt L. Kresy 1832–1864. Szkolnictwo na ziemiach litewskich ruskich dawnej Rzeszpospolitej / L. Zasztowt. – Warszawa, 1997. – 456 .

303.446.4:330.342.15-048.65:338.45(477)”1965/1980” . . . 1960- – 1980-

.

,

,

). , 60- – 80-

.

.

, -

,

,

.

1970-1980-

. . ,

«

»,

. :

,

,

,

,

,

.

. . 1960- – 1980-

.

II

.

. II

. 60- - 80-

.

.

– ,

, :

.

,

,

,

, , . I. Rajko. Soviet historiography of socialist competition in the industry of the USSR in the II floor. 1960's - 1980's. We study the historiographical legacy of Soviet scientists to highlight the problems of socialist competition, common in the industries of the Ukrainian SSR in the II floor. 60's - 80's. the century. Applying modern techniques and methods, critically examined the basic tendency inherent in the Soviet era - the rise of the leading role of the party and its intervention in all spheres of society, through the introduction of the movement for communist labor, to improve the economic performance of the country. Keywords: socialist competition, labor discipline, communist labor, innovation, productivity, stimulating industrial production.

. ,

, ,

. ,

64


,

, ,

,

,

.

,

,

. . .

,

.

1990.

.

.

, [1-5].

, ,

,

,

, . .

,

,

. [6-8].

,

. ,

.

,

.

:

,

,

,

;

,

. . : ,

,

. ,

,

.

,

,

, ,

,

, .

,

,

. ,

, ,

[9, .23-24; 10]. , .

,

,

, .

, . .

,

[11-13]. ,

«

».

,

, ,

. ,

,

.

,

, . . ,

. ,

,

. 1960-

– 1970-

. ,

. 1960”.

“ , .

,

1970-

.,

”, –“

14

[14, .87]. 1967 .

”,

« » [15, . 237-251]. , ,

.

,

,

,

,

, , 65

,


.

, .

,

,

, .

.

,

.

,

.

,

.

.

, «

» [16-19].

,

,

, .

150 . 1960-

. – 320, 1976 – 1977

,

1960. – 135

[20, . 126].

. . ,

.

[22] 1970 - 1980,

.

.

[21]

.

. . ,

,

.

,

.

.

,

.

,

.

, [23-24].

, ,

.

, [25-26]. [27]. , , ,

. 1970-

.

, [28-29]. ,

,

,

,

.

, [30-32]. .

, .

1960-

,

.

, .

1970-1980-

. , . ,

.

«

,

»,

,

.

,

, ,

. 1. 1998. – 142 . 2. 3.

.

:

.

:

.–

1953-1985

.–

:

«

.–

,

», 1992. – 124 .

. (1960 - 70-

4.

/

.) /

.–

. ., 2001. – 106 .

5. 2001. – 339 . 6. . . . : 07.00.01 / 7. . 1960-1990. 23 . 8. . . . : 07.00.02 / . 9. . 1965 – 123 .

., 1998. – 314 .

:

(1960-1970 :

/

.

.

.–

.

.) /

.–

70. , 2003. – 21 .

. ,

.

.

: .

.

.

.

: 07.00.06 /

.

.

.– (

.–

. 50- –

, 1996. – . 80-

):

.

., 1994. – 27 . (1961-1966) /

66

.

.–

.,


10.

.

( )/

//

.

. . 66. – ., 1974. – .59-65. 11. / . . . – .: , 1987. – 135 . 12. / . , , . . – .: , 1982. – 295 . 13. . / . .– .:« », 1974. – 224 . 14. V : . – .: . – 1976. – .1. 15. , , (1898 - 1986). – .11. – ., 1986. 16. . ./ . .– : , 1970 – 302 . 17. . : . , 1917 – 1977 . / . . – ., 1979. – 324 . 18. . . , 1917-1970 / . .– .: , 1977. – 351 . 19. . : / . , . . – ., 1985. – 221 . 20. . . / ., . // . – 1978. – 8. – . 238-244. 21. . (1966-1980) / . – ., 1982. – 231 . 22. . / . . – ., 1982. – 103 . 23. . : / . . - .: , 1976 – 143 . 24. . / . – ., 1975. – 241 .. 25. ., ., . ./ ., ., .– .: , 1973. – 108 . 26. . (1946 – 1970 .) / . – ., 1972. - 220 . 27. . ./ . – .: « », 1973. – 79 . 28. . / . . – ., 1974. – 39 . 29. ., ., . / . , . , . . – ., 1981. – 229 . 30. . , 1917 – 1977/ . . – ., 1977. – 59 . 31. ., . / . , . . – .: , 1973. – 165 . 32. ., . / . , . . – ., 1974. – 63 . –

94 (477.7) . . (

)

– ,

«

»).

, 1918

.

,

1917–

, . . ,

,

,

,

,

,

. .

. (

) 1917-

1918

.

, ,

, . ,

. : , , , , , , . . Rybko. The formation of government bodies and local self-government in Volyn in period of the Ukrainian Central Rada (historiography of the problem)

67


The state of historiographical lighting transformation processes aimed at restructuring the power hierarchy and system of government in the territory of Volyn province, in the revolutionary events of 1917 and early 1918. It is noted that despite the presence of a number of works, which cover the position of the first stage of Volyn province Ukrainian revolution. The issue of regional peculiarities of formation and activities of the authorities and self-governing institutions of the edge, still were the subject of a comprehensive study. Keywords: historiography of the problem, Volyn, local government, memoir, national movement, local history, the Ukrainian Central Rada.

.

1917 ,

1917-1921

. .

,

, . . 1917 –

1918

. . ,

. [1],

.

[2]

[3]. .

1917-

1918

,

. . 1917 –

1918

,

«

».

. . ,

,

,

,

. ,

,

.

, . ,

. 1917-1918

.

26-

" [5], . [6], (1917-1922)»[8]

.

"[4]. .

[7].

. ,

,

. 1917-

1918 27

, ,

. 1918

,

[9].

,

. ,

. 1917-1921 ,

.

,

,

,

. (1917. [11] »

1918

), [10],

.

[12].

« .

(

. 1918

.

,

)

,

. .

68

,


,

,

. .

,

90-

,

, .

,

,

1917 –

1918

, . ,

, ,

, .

[13].

,

, .

, ,

.

[14].

, .

.

1917-1918 (

),

. , , (

. : « 1917 .)» [15] « » [16].

,

.

.

1917 : « 1917

» [17], «

[18].

(

,

,

,

1917 .)»

,

« » [19, .123-129].

,

,

, . «

1914–1921

» [20]. . .

1917-1918 (1917–1918)» [21].

,

.

«

. [22, .3-5].

,

,

« », «

». ,

. .

, « » [24]. 1917-1920 . [27], .

.

[23],

. [28]

[25, .147-182],

.

[26], .

. [29], .

[30, .306;31, .99-103]. , 1917-1918

.

,

,

,

. [32; .33],

[34]. , , . 1918

1917-

,

, «

(

.)» [35, .65-73].

, .

«

XIX , 69

, .-1917 .» [36].

. ,


. . 1917 .

,

,

. «

:

» 1993-1994 ,

.

. (1900-1939 .)» [37, .69-

., « 71]. ,

. . . 1916-1919 .«

,

.» [38, .309-311].

» [39, .62-64], (1917-1920 .)» [40, .64-65]. . 1997

80-

.

« :

». :

– 8

.« )» [41, .5-7], , ( 1917)» [42, .3-5], . « 1917-1921 .» [43, .148-150].

1918

(28 -

«

. ,

, 1917-1920 .» [44, .102-108] .

.

, ( . 384],

, ).

[45], . [49, .89-101], .

.

, [46, .258-261], . [50, .76-84], .

[47, .200-215], [51, .1-2], .

[48, .372[52, .3]. ,

. , . ,

,

. . ,

,

,

, ,

,

, .

,

, .

, ,

:

,

,

. (

)

,

, .

,

.

,

1917-1918

,

. ,

1. 07.00.06 / 2. 2004 . — p.

.

1917. - ., 2001. - 234 .-

. . .

...

.

: 07.00.06 /

.

;

70

.

.

. 1918 .: ... . . : .: . 186-234. (1917 - 1921 .): . . — ., 2004. — 46 .


3.

.– )/

//

4.

.

5. 6. . 7. 8. 655 . 9.

. – .: . . . , 1957. – 56 . . . .

.

3. – . 83-89. / . . : , 1970. – 748 . / . / . .– .:

1917 . (

. – 2004. –

1917 . /

.

( .–

.

.), :

.– .: (1917-1922) / .

, , 1986. – 152 . . . , 1940. – 40 . - ., 1954. –

. . . , (1861-1939) 10. / . . – : , 1970. – 276 . 11. . . 1917-1923 . / ., :[ ], 1923. – . .– : ., 1988. – .2. .4: 1917-1922. – 364 . 12. . . / ., 1919. - 50 . 13. , . 1918 / . .: [ .], 1993. - 110 c. - ( ; .65). 14. 1917–1918 . / . . // . “ , , ”/[ . . . . ]. – . : . , 2007. – . 39 – 44. 15. . ( 1918 .) / . // . . .. ., 140. »( , 27–28 . 2009 .) : / . . . .– : . . , 2009. – . 135–137. 16. . ( – 1917 .) / // .– , 2010. – . 4.– . 20 – 29. 17. . / // : .– : . . , 2011. – .6. .– . 101 – 109. 18. . 1917 / . // .– : , 2009. . 15. - . 102-106 19. . . ( 1917 .) / . . // " ": . 612. / , . " "; . . . . .: , 2008. - .78-86. 20. . . / . . // " ". – 04/2012 . – N724: . – . 123-129. 21. . . 1914–1921 : / . . .– : , 2011. – 320 . 22. ., . (1917–1918) \ . .– : , 2009. – 96 . 23. . ./ . , . // : .: / . . .: . , 1997. .3-5. 24. . (1917-2000): ./ . ;– : . , 2001. – 484 . 25. . / ( .), , , .– .: , , 1995. – . 2. – 290 . 26. . / . // 1917-1921 . — .: , 2009. — . 4. — . 147-182. 27. . – ./ . // – .( ). . 28 – 30 2002 . – ., 2003.- . 301-306. 28. . . ( – .) / // . – 1996. – 4. – . 124. 29. . . (1917-1925) / . . .– .: . . . , 1998 . – 190 . 30. ( – )/ // . : . . .( . ). – ., 1998. 31. . . ./ . . // : / . . . . . – 2 . . 1. – , 2007. - . 301-306. 32. . – ./ . // . — 2008. — 143. — . 99-103.

71


33.

. / . . .

34.

.

, . ]. – . :

//

1917–1921 , 2007. –

.:

.

./

. 2. – . 49.

.

(

1917 -

1918

.) :

. ... . . - ., 2003. - 20 .

.

: 09.00.12 /

; . 35. . (1917-1920 .) [ ] //Studia Politologica Ucraino-Polona. . 2011. 1. – .218-223. – :http://archive.nbuv.gov.ua/portal/soc_gum/Spup/2011_1/6-2%20Studia%20Politologica%20I%202011.pdf ( : 22-03-2013). 36. . ( 1917 1918 .) / // : . / . . . . ; . . . [ .]. : . - . 3. - . 65-73. 37. . . XIX .- 1917 .: . ... . . : 07.00.01 [ ]/ . . ; . . . . . — ., 2009. — 19 . — p. :http://www.nbuv.gov.ua/ard/2009/ 09raprvn.zip. ( : 25-03-2013). 38. . (1900-1939 .) / , // : . .,1993. - .69 – 71. 39. . . 1916–1919 . / . . , . // : : . . .– ; , 1994.– . 309–311. 40. 114 , . . / . . . // / . . ., . .. , . . . , . . ; . . . .: , 1994. - .62-64. 41. . /(1917–1920 .) / . // : : . . .: .– , 1993. – .64–65. 42. , . . (28 -8 1918 )/ . . . // : .: , 1997. - .5-7. 43. ., . ./ . , . // : .: / . . .: . , 1997. .3-5. 44. . ./ . // : : . . .– ; , 1994.– . 148150. 45. , . . 1917-1920 . / . . // / . . ., . , . .. : . ., 2002. - . 25, . 1. - . 102-108 . 46. . . / ., .– , 2001. – 640 . 47. . 1917/ ., . // /[ . . . ]. – : . , 2002. – . 258 – 261. 48. , . . [ ] / . . // " : ", 750, 3-6 . 2007 . / [ . . . . ]. . - . 1. - . 200-215. 49. 1917 - 1919 / // : . ; 1994 . , 1994. – . 372-384. 50. . 1917 – 1922 / . // . .– – : . " ", 2006.- . 89-101. 51. . . / . // / .– , 1996. – . 1 : 100. – .76-84. 52. . ( )/ . // . – 2001. – . – . 1–2. 53. . . ./ // " 19171920 ". – , 1998. – .3.

72


94(477) “1921/1923” : 614.885 . . 20-

. XX – ). 20-

.

, :

, 20-

,

.

,

,

1921-1923 .

,

.

.

, ,

, .

. ,

: .

. .

,

,

. 20-

1921-1923 ,

.

. XX 20-

. .

., . .

, , , . : N. V. Rozhkov. Assistance of Association of Red Cross Society in case of overcoming of hunger in USRR in 20th XX of century. Activity of organizations of Association of Red Cross is examined on territory of USRR in 20th. Help to the population in a fight against hunger 1921-1923 became important direction of activity of Society of Red Cross USRR. An author comes to the conclusion that although activity of Society however it was of the use to the ordinary people. Due to activity of Red Cross thousands of human lives were saved. Keywords: Red Cross, fight against hunger, directions of activity, help to the population.

. . .

, ,

,

, (

).

, .

, . , (

).

,

. . . .

, [9 10; 13 15]. ». –

.

.

, .

, .

. , 1921-1923

,

. , 1920,

.

. (

).

,

,

, , . « 1921 –

.

»

, ,

, 1922 ,

,

2

3

.

.

, .

. 3,8

. (

,

15% )

– . ,

300

73

1922 . . . [15, . 77].

,


, (

,

1932 33

.,

,

)

. , .

. ,

28

.

1921 .

.

. 600

1921 .

. 84].

150000 10 200 .

, 100

.

[12, , [6, .

.

81]. ,

,

,

.

1930 .). ,

, .

,

. ,

.

,

.

, .

. ,

.

,

,

.

. 1922 . [1, , ,

,

,

, 1923 . . 4-

1922 21248 ,

. 1]. ,

, ,

,

,

. 1923 .

[10, . 20]. 50 [2,

. 35].

,

,

.

. . .

, ,

. .

1921 . ,

,

. .

1923 ,

.

[7, . 340]. ,

[14, . 74]. “

” (

),

1922 . [13, . 74]. . 2 .

, . 429

,

.,

– 294 .

.,

.

. 69 . – 410400 [7, . 340]. 1923 .

,

,

,

,

,

[10, . 20]. :

– –

; .

74


[12, . 68]. , .

40

,

.

,

[8, . 17-18].

2

.

,

[5, . 8]. , , . . 1923 .: “

,

, –

,

.

,

, ” [9, . 111]. , .

,

,

.

,

, ,

,

,

,

, 29

[7, . 340]. “ 1923 .

1923 . ” [12, . 82].

,

. ,

,

, [8, . 17].

,

. 20-

,

,

,

.

[7, . 341]. ,

,

,

, . . ,

. ,

. 20-30,

«

»

, . 1928 .

12 .

. ,

,

,

,

.

– 40

,

. .

[4,

,

. 6]. [6, .

83]. , . ,

,

:“

,

,

,

, 830

,

2

.

890

. ” [1,

,

, ,

. 10].

. . 1921-1923 .

. ,

75

1923 .


, [3, .

. 4].

,

,

, 20-

. XX

.

, .

.

.

, –

,

,

. ,

,

, ,

,

.

, .

, ,

1.

,– ,– ,– ,–

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

. . . . , 1946. – 156 . 7. . XX .): / . . – .: 8. . / . 9. . (1922 – 1930 )/ . // 10. . . . 20. 11. . 12. . . 100 13. . . – 1989. – . 10. – .77-84. 14. . ) . . 15. . ( ) . .

. 590, . 590, . 590, .

. 1, . 1, . 1, «

.

. 1. . 2. . 6. » 36-43, / . . .

, 2002. – 499 . .– : . – 2009. – /

. 1, . 109. . – .: , 1958. – 31 . / . .

« ( ) // . – .:

(20 – 30

.

. –2010. – 4(54) –

.– .: / . . .– 1921-1923

// . – .:

.:

, 1927. – 60 .

1 – .109 – 113. . //

/ .

.–

, 1935. – 17 . , 1967. – 298 . //

.:

: . 1: », 2003. – 688 .:

/ .: . . . – . 74. : . 1: / .: . . », 2003. – 688 .: . – . 74.

«

355.1(476+470)"19 . . 9020

( )

(

, ).

90-

. 20

.

. :

,

,

,

. 90-

. 20

.

. : , , , . O. Sanzharevskiy. Russian-Belarus military cooperation during the first half of 90s in the XX century (as of Russian Strategic Forces withdrawal from the Republic of Belarus) The article deals with the problems of Russian-Belarus military cooperation installment in terms of Belarus statehood restoration during the first half of 90s in the XX century. Stressed are the features and difficulties of the developing relations in the contradict military cooperation issues, as well as the problem of Russian troops withdrawal from the Belarus territory. Keywords: the Republic of Belarus, strategic forces, nuclear weapons, disarmament.

76


( ;

)

,

, :

, .

,

,

,-

. .

,

.

.

,

,

,

, .

, [ 1, .78 ]. . (2 ,

15

, 1992 .

20

1992 .

1996 .)

.

1993 .

[ 2 ]. , , ,

,

,

,

,

. . .

,

.

1992 .

. ,

“,

, 1993 [ 3, . 140 ].

1992 . 81

,

.

-25(

, ,

, .

– 12 ) “

-1

,

, 30

“. , [ 4, . 51 ].

, ,

1987 . ,

.

, . . . 1994 .,

, .

,

[ 3, .141 ]. ,

,

, –

, . . .

1.5

.

. [ 3, c. 141 ].

, ,

, .

. . 1994 .

– 1994 .

,

, ,

,

, . , ,

,

(

24

1993

7

. .

) 1996 . – 1992 .

, ,

.

. 77

, . ,


,

, . ,

, ,

,

. [ 4, . 48 ]. 1999 . , .

, ,

.

,

.

72

,

1993 . ( )

.

32

.

[ 4, .50]. “

30 “. .

,

, .

1994 .

,

50 ,

.

,

,

,

.

, 20 –

. 30

.,

– 6, 4, 3

,

. .

46 (

, 1996 .) [ 5, .71 ].

, 1 , 305 , 497 ,

, 60 ;

.

1993 .

23

,

:

; . – 4445

, 66

.[ 4, ., 62]. ,

( 33 306 33 , 396 33 , 212 , 1176 , 314 , 825 , 3268 161 82 49 56 49 , 376 49 , 1171 ( 567 , 842 , 317 467 , 927 , 1200 , 196 107 2. 22 200 681 121 972 203 725 402 326 290 46

)

. : , 9. 03 1.12; , 24.06 1.12; , 1.09; , 1.09; , 1.09; , 1.09; , , 1.09; , , 1.09; , , 1.09. : , 9. 03 1.12; , 24.06 1.12; ), , 1.09; , 1.09; , 1.09; , , 1.09; , 1.09; , 1.09; , 1.09; , , 1.09; , , 1.09. . 667 , , 1.09. , 789 , , 1.09; , 1382 , , 1.09; , 1334 , , 1.09; 9.11 , 1004 , , 1.09; 958 , 1340 , , 1.09; 78

1994 .


953 3. 1337 4.

1

657 1668 313 5. 656

,

5436

, .

,

, 1499

1.09.

, 1098

7

, 298 .

,

, 1.07.

, 1.07;

, 294 ,

, 491

,

1.09;

, , 1.08; , 1.10.

(

),

,

1.09.[5, . 73]. , ,

, ,

,

. . .

,

15.03.93 .: 52 – 6 -

1.06

9 58 “

,

“(

9 234 – 6

). (

152 ,

,

“ 423

, .) [ 5, ., 81].

. ,

,

,

,

, ,

,

1.

.

.

.

1991 - 2009

. / .

// ,

., 2010.- 278 . 2.

.

90-

//

.-

3

/ .-

.,

.:

.,

.

./ , 2008.- 203 . . //

.

:

., 1998. - . 123-159

4. 5. 186 .

,

.915, . 2,

3,

.

3 .

218 . .. 1,

11,

2, 1994 . ,

94 (477.6)“18” .

.

,

. . .

(

.

.

,

,

. –

,

). . –

.

.

. ,

. . , .

:

. –

.

.,

,

,

. .

,

.

.

. .

.

. .

. XIX ,

.

.

. .

79


,

. :

. XIX -

.

.,

, , . O. P Samantsov., Samantsova O. V. Factors of Motivation of Labour of the Workers of Coal and Steel Industry in Donetsk Region at the End of the 19th – the Beginning of the 20th Century There are analyzed the reasons affecting the urgency of the motivational factors in the organization of the modern labour process. The main attention is focused on the necessity to analyze the experience of the industrialists of the coal and steel industry in Donetsk region at the end of the 19th – the beginning of the 20th century. The basic attention is paid to the means and factors of involving the workers in the process of production, in the industrialists’ activities directed to creating the labour conditions and opportunities for the workers to improve their economic position and also their cultural development. The authors suggest applying to the experience of the industrialists’ activities concerning providing with skilled labour force. Keywords: Donetsk region at the end of the 19th – the beginning of the 20th century, skilled workers, consumer associations.

.

.

, .

,

. ,

,

,

,

,

,

,

.

,

.

.,

. ,

,

.

,

,

,

. .

. .

.,

, . , .

.

,

,

. ,

, ,

«

, »,

. , »

«

[4; 6; 8]. ,

.

,

.

,

,

, «

»

[7]. . .

, , . ,

,

. [5; 9]. . .

. .

.

.

,

. .

.

.

. – ,

,

.

,

, ,

, .

, ,

,

, ,

, . 80


,

, . , .

, ,

«

«

»,

,

. «

,

»

»

,

,

.

,

. ,

,

:

, – 40 ,

– 60

./

./ – 25 ./ – 17 ./ – 12 ./

[1, . 190].

,

19, 5 – 27,5

./

19

./

[4, . 189] ,

,

,

. , «

» . –

,

,

,

,

,

;

,

.

, –

,

,

.

«

»

,

. .

./ 3

.

, .10

, ,

./

.

1 . 20

,

–1

. 90

./

,

, )

»

13 . 50

( [3, .190].

./

,

,

,

: ,

,

; ,

,

,

;

,

; ;

; ; . . «

»

,

. .

,

c .

«

».

,

, ,

,

.

.

,

,

«

».

. «…

, ,

, , «… …

,

, »[4, . 423]. ..

, , »[

].

,

, .

, .

, , 94

1900 400

13 4

160

[2, . 3].. ,

,

1352 , 64

,

.

. 81


1888 .

,

,

90.

,

.

. ,

.

, ,

.

,

. , – 15

24 – 32 46 ., 36

.

.

75

90-

.

.

.(

.,

,

,

).

,

,

. .

: .

, -

,

. ,

, :

,

,

. , 10 . 1

71 . 88

1900 . ,1– 3451 155 958

16

, .»[1 . 17]. ,

.

,

15

1906 . «

53

, ,5–

, -

,

:

,

,

«

,

»,

. , ,

.

, ,

. .

.

.

.

.

, .

, .

80-

»

.

.

, «

»

. . .

«

»

,

. ,«

»

,

.

« , ,

»

,

.

«

»

,

. ,

,

,

.

. –

.

– . –

..

..

. .

: . .

; . – 1914

.

.

,

,

,

,

.

« .

,

,

,

. . 82

»


1.

1900 ./

.

-

.:

.

, 1901.- 60 . 2. 3. 4. 1906. – 5.

1900 .

./

.– .

:

. .–

. 9. – . – 3. – . 422-446. .

, 1901. – 12 . , 1925. – 477 . . // .–

.: /

. .

. . 47. – .43-46. 6. . 1903.- 48 . 7. . .I / . 1980.-210 . 8. . . 9. . . : .

«

»/

.

.

.

.

. .–

. /

./

.

.

. : 1910 -

;

.

;

. :[

.],

[

.],

1912. .- .:

. ?/

// , 2013 .

:

.–

:

, 1909 . - 47 (1861- 1914) /

...

.

.

: 07.00.01 /

.

.–

, 1999. – 19 .

94(477)(092)+784.4(07) . . – ) ,

,

,

, , .

– ,

: . .

,

,

.

,

.

. ,

,

, ,

, . –

,

. : , , , . V. V. SemenchukCharacter of Ivan Gonta in historical songs Historical events and figures of the past in the texts of folk songs were considered, in particular, the character of Ivan Gonta in historical songs, his role in the liberation struggle of Ukrainian people and the his impact on the folklore, the features of imaginative vision of historical events was finding out, including a typology of creation of character and modeling the image of Ivan Gonta by means of art expression. The problem of historicism of Ukrainian folk music and the fullness and wideness of reflecting of real and concrete history of people in the folk songs was brought to light. Keywords: historical song, historical folklore, Ivan Gonta, traditions of Ukrainian folk song.

.

,

,

, .

,

, ,

,

,

,

.

. . ,

,

. . ,

.

. ,

,

,

. 83

, –

.


»), . »).

(« ,

.

,

»), .

. ,

,

.

.

,

,

.

,

(« . .

.

,

.

,

.

,

. ,

. .

, .

: – –

; . . . , .

,

,

,

. , .

,

( ,

,

). . ,

, .

: ,

,

[11, .280].

,

,

,

.

. :

,

.

.

, ,

.

,

,

,

. ,

(1833 .).

,

,

« :«

,

»,

» [8, .190]. .

.

«

» , . ,

. ,

;

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

;

»[2, .68]. , 1927 1931

«

.),

,

»

«

»

:« »[3, .5–12]. –

,

. ,

, .

.[6, .317] « ,

.

,

,

.

.

,

. ,

XVI –XVIII

. .

. .

. , , … .

… , ,

, XVI–XVIII

. 84

. …

,

.


– –

, ,–

,

, –

. .

. .

,

,

,

,

,

[4, .130–131]. XVII–XVIII , . ( ».

, , , «

), .

,

,

.

,

«

», «

». ,

, «

,

»,

.

.

1768

, ,

,

. .

, ,

. ,

,

,

, ,

,

,

,

. ,

,

,

,

. .

.

,

,

,

. . [9, .46] . . :«

,

,

,

, (

, XIX

.–

.)

» [10, .606]. 9

.

,

, .

,

.

. [9, .47–49].

. : ...

. , ... ,

,

,

, .

, ,

,

, . ,

,

. , ,

[7, .514–515]. . ,

.

– ,

– ,

,

.

(1773–1775) [9, .50]. . 14

;

.

10

,

,

.

,

. [12, .20].

,

,

,

, .

, ...

,

,

,

.

, 85


; ,

– ! [5, .135]. , ,

.

,

.

,

,

.

. , , . ,

,

, ,

,

,

, . ,

«

,

:

,

, , !» ,

, , , » [5, .135–136]. ,

, ,

.

: :

,

«

» – ( .

, ...

.

.

,

? )

,

, , ,

,

. ,

, , ,

, .

,

,

, , , , !» [5, .136–137]. , . : . , . :

, ,

, :

. , ... ,

,

, [1]. .

, ,

-

. . , ,

, .

86

,

,


. ,

,

,

, ,

,

.

. , ,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

. .

1.

.

. [ ] « ». « », 1992. ISBN 5-301-01007-7., – : http://kaschenko.uaweb.org/opovidannia/r06.html. 2. . . . .: 6 . – . 6. – , 1959. – . 68. ( . : . // . – ., 1970. – . 14.) 3. . // . . 1–13 . – .: . , 1927. – – 176 . 4. . . . / . . – : , 2004. – 320 . 5. / . . . . . – .: . , 1970. – 287 . 6. / . . . , . . , . . . – .: « », 2006. – 752 . 7. :/ . . . . . . – .: , 1961. – 1067 ., . 8. . / . . – .: , 1998. – 352 . 9. . . , . . , . . , . . , . . , . . . ( 60): . – .: « », 2001. – 266 . 10. . . . XV–XIX . / . . . . ,« », , 1998, – 687 . 11. : . – 4., . – .: , 2006, – 692 . 12. . . : .– , 1913. –30 .

94 (477,82) . – –

,

-

: ).

. . :

,

,

,

,

,

. –

. . :

,

, , , , . The article discusses the importance of studying the source base for the objective analysis of the reclamation problems of Volyn region in the end of XIX - the end of XX century. Attention is focused on the circle of the unpublished archive documents and classification of the published materials is given. Keywords: reclamation, sources of study, archived materials, statistics, legislative acts, documentary base.

. 2,5

,

.

,

1,2

.

,

. , ,

. ,

,

,

. . 87

,


. ,

.

,

,

,

,

. ,

, ,

. .

.

. .

2

.

.

. .

.

.

,

(2

2

.

),

.

.

XVI I

.,

(1494–1557),

,

. ,

. ,

.

,

,

, . XVIII 1775 .

. ,

. .

,

.,

.

,

,

.

,

,

,

.

,

,

;

:

; :

;

;

;

. –

,

.

XIX –

XX

.

, .

, [31].

– ,

.

,

,

.

107 [21] “ ,

.

”,

. , ( . 183),

,

.

, , 20–30-

. .

, .

46 “

,

”. ,

,

,

(

1)

( . 46, .

. 6).

. , ,

1937/38 20–30-

,

[12]. ( . 46,

, . 4) [26]. . .

1188

, .

88


, .

,

. .

,

,

.

[32]. “ ,

”,

1902 . [32, .401–402]. “

. ”

1912 ., [32, .431–442]. , , ”

. 26

,

[5].

[6]. 1921 .”,

26

1921 ., 19

“ “

1922 ., 1925 . [7].

22

22

1925 .

” [8]. . ,

,

,

20-

,

.

,

,

. ,

.

, . ,

,

. ,

-

. .

. –

,

.

,

. ,

. ,

.

, . ,

. ,

, .

. (1947 .) ”

)“ 1953 .

“ ”.

, ,

,

,

[16]. (1966 .)

,

“ ”. ,

, .

,

, [24].

(1966 .)

18

1971 . 1971–1985

,

”. –

,

[30]. ,

,

. 70–80.

. (1982 .) [27].

89


1984 .

,

2000 .

”.

, ,

. ,

,

[2]. , ,

.

, [10].

.

XIX

. 1912 . [17]. XX .,

.

, , XIX –

. ,

20-

.

“ ” [28].

, .

,

[1] ,

20-

[29]. 30,

,

. , .

,

,

.

, 1974 .

,

– ,

,

. .

, , . . ,

(1940–1966

,“

.)” [3],

,

,

,

[13; 15]. , .

, [4; 20]. ,

,

,

.

,

,

. .

1875 . [11] [9].

,

1912 .

[17]. ,

20[25].

. [9]. , . ,

, ,

.

, )

(

,

)

.

(

,

,

, . .

. (1966 .)

[14; 29]

90-

. [4; 20; 23]. 90


,

,

,

. ,

,

.

, [4; 18; 20; 22].

, XIX–XX

.

,

,

,

. . , , .

1. 2. 3. 314 . 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

.– . – 23 (1940–1966 .).

//

. // Dziennik Ustaw Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej. – Rok 1921. – Dziennik Ustaw Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej. – Rok 1922. – Dziennik Ustaw Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej. – Rok 1925. – Dziennik Ustaw Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej. – Rok 1925. –

, 1925. – 1(9). – 163 . 1984. – . 1. . – :

.–4 2002. – . 2 – 3. 91. – Poz. 671. 102. – Poz. 936. 75. – Poz. 524. 88. – Poz. 609. ( ). –

, 1913. – 159 . . . , 1899. – 744 .

.

.). –

.

.:

. ( (1873–1898

8

1875

) //

.

, 1899. – . 285–297.

12.

, 1937–1938

13. 14. 15.

:

(1873–1898). –

11.

, 1969. –

. //

, . 46,

. 6,

. 567, / .

//

. 1–119. . . – 12

.. – .: 1966. – . 2.

. , 1982. – 280 .

16. 1929. – 113 . 17. 197 . 18. 19. // 20. 21.

, 1979. – 264 . (

). – .:

5–8

. – .–

//

. – 11

. – 23

1954. – . 2.

, , 1913. –

1997. – . 2. .

.

//

. – 14

2000. . ), . 107, . 1, . 1964. 1993. – . 3. 1984. – . 1 –2. //

// ( 22. . : // . – 16 23. // .–8 24. . .–2 1966. – . 2. 25. . . 1–5 1926 . – : , 1926. – 49 . 26. // , . 46, . 4, . 638, . 1–19. 27. // . – 10 1982. – . 2. 28. Prokopowicz Marjan. Meljoracje w Polsce wraz z odnosnem ustawodawstwem oraz ustawa wodna. – Toru , 1926. – 339 s. 29. . // . – 14 1966. – . 2. 30. 1971–1985 , . 30 18 1971 . – , 310072. – 23 . 31. , , . // 32.

, . 70,

. 1,

. 739. .–

.– . .–

91

, 1913.


322 (477.42): 271.222(470+571)-86 .

«1944/1961»

. 1944–1961

.

(

.

.

).

, .

,

,

1944–1961

. . ,

,

.

,

,

,

. ,

: ,

, ,

,

,

,

,

,

.

. 1944–1961 . , 1944–1961

,

. . .

, , , , , , : , , , . Sychevsky A.A. Old believers communities of The Old Orthodox Church of Belokrinicka hierarchy in Zhytomyr province in 1944–1961 Life into churches of old believers of Belokrinicka hierarchy, religious mode, composition of clergy and managing organs of their communities in 1944–1961 is represented. Basic methods and forms of state influence on the old orthodox rite of Zhytomyr province in an investigated period are described. The features of anti-religious policy of public authorities are educed in relation to the old orthodox rite. Keywords: religious community, old believers, popovcy, Belokrinicka hierarchy, church, clergy, Zhytomyr province, soviet power, anti-religious policy, totalitarianism.

. .

,

,

, . – ,

. , . , .

,

. .

.

[1, .6-9], 40–80. XX ., 250, 279-281, 293], . 1970- – 1990-

.

,

, [2, c.225-226, 249-

.

,

.

. [3, c.103-105].

,

. .

, , .

,

, 92


.

, . . 1988

. –

[4]),

,

.

.

.,

1880 .

.

.

1875 , [5,

1946 . , .

,3

. [5,

.4-5]. ,

.1].

1944 .

.

, . ,

, 9 [6, .1-2 ]. [5, .4]. , 9 , , 15

, .

,

,

,

, 12 7

(

,

), 2 ,

,4

,

,3

»),

,

,

,2

.–«

2 ,3

,3

,3

,

,4

,

[6, 1944

,2

,

,

,

,2

, , 1 , , 14 .

30

.3-4].

. 7500

., 7500 1945 . . . .

11 . .–

.

– 6060 . 21060 . [7,

.

.3]. ,

.

,

(

).

.

: 6 .1]. (

[8, 25

1945 .

.

, .,

3 – .

,

),

«

20

»

5

[9, .,

« .),

.,

. [10,

»

.

. (1881 .), . (1885 .), . (1864 .), . (1879 .), . (1870 . (1869 .), . (1877 .), 30 1945 . [10, 1945

.

: ,

, , 2

,

, 3

,

, ,

» .,

.5-6].

, 11 ,

.3-3 ]. .,

. , «

: . . (1882 .), . (1876 . (1875 .), . (1885 . (1880 .), . (1878 .), .), . (1885 .), .9]. .

. (1895 .), . (1909 .), . (1876 .), .), . (1882 . (1883 .) [10,

. , 6

, ,4

.1; 10, ., .10-11].

.,

., (1872 .), .),

,

,4 ,2

,

,

: ,

,

,2

,2

. [10,

, 35 ,2 .7-

]. 31

1945 .

. (

.

)

« [10,

.12-19].

[10,

.4]. , 4 .

, , 1945 . ,

[10,

93

»,

.20-21].


11

1945

. .

. [11,

.

.1]. .

4

1875 . . . 14 . .

. , 1898 .

,

,

.

, :

1889 .

. . .

:

,

,

.

1904 .

.

1919 .

, 1927 .

. 21

,

.

.

1919 .

. . 1936 .

,

.

1940 . 1941 .

. 15

1901 .

1945

. . . 1919 . [11, .1].

.

. 1946 . [12,

8

1945

.

1876 – .

.,

. 190

[8,

:

.2-3 ].

. .

. ,

, 1945 .

. 1944

.

. . 173,6

,

.

.3-6]. . :

.

,

,

,

,

.

1880 .

,

, [5,

.

7

1946 .

,

,

.1].

.

76

. .

– ,

. .

. . .

11 , 3040 . 53-56, 4 10000 .

. .1-2 ]. . 11

[12,

1945 . . ,

35

.

,

,

.

,

,

, «

» [8,

.8 ].

,

.

.

,

,

.,

[8, 21 .

, .

.8-8 ].

1945 . :«

,

,

10 10 .

,

,

,

. » [8,

8

1944 . ,

.,

1946

,

.7].

. .

.

.

:« , .

,

,

.

, ,

.

» [13, , 11

1946 .

,

. 60

.

. .

[13,

. .1].

, . .

.4-7]. 94

.


15

1946 .

. ,

: «15 ,

,

1880 .

. .

. , .

,

1907 .

. 1914 . . 1931 ., , 1937 . 1937 . . 1941 . 22 1946 .» [13, .2-3]. , , ). , . ) . .

,

. , 1 5 2

, , 1946 .

1

[5,

. 1946

. , . .

18

, .3].

6

3

(

[13, ,

.3 ]. 10

,

1

,

,

. .

, .

,

.

,

,

,

.

,

,

20

,

1907 . .

1946

: » [12,

.

.3]. .

. 1946 .

[12, :«

. .

,

1862 ., . 18 . 22 .

10 . 3 .

.

-

.4]. , . ,

, . ,

, .

, » [12,

, , 1946 . ),

.

2

,

.

,

. (1905 10

1944 .

.

.

. (1866 ),

.,

.

. – 15, 40-50

.

.

[5, .2]. 1946 . : 30-40 40-50 . – 16, 50 . – 68.

. – 13

. – 11, 50-60 160 :

.,

,

. .

[5, 1947 . ,

.

.6]. 1946 . [5, .1].

.

.

30-40

2 .

1905 .

,

.

, 40-50

. – 10, 50 . – 28; 18-30 . – 38, 30-40 . – 16, 189 : – 51, – 138. 1946 . . : 18-30 . – 9 , . – 30; 18-30 . – 16, 30-40 . – 22, 40-50 . – 9, 50 . – 48. – 65, – 95. 18 .

.4-5]. .

, .

, [9, .4-4 ]. 1947 . ,« , 1 1947 1 1947 . , 8 , . 1948 . 68 ; 33 [9, .5-6].

.

, .,

» [12,

.4 -5]. 12

3

5

, 15 ,

(10), (6),

(44 (8),

, ,

4 , 2

.

192 (22), (7),

(6), 95

7 1

),

(7), (6),

, 2

,

1948 .: (11),

,

,

(5),

7 3 , , . (15), (6), (5),


(5), (2), 1948 . 72787

, 182

. 1949 .

(4),

(4),

(2),

(4), (1),

(2),

.( [14,

– 37099 .1-4]. .

.,

(4),

– 35688

. [9, .1]. 1949 . « » . (1877 .), . (1871 .), . (1903 . (1859 .), . (1874 .), . (1895 .), .), . (1884 .), . (1880 .), .), . (1879 .), . (1891 .), . (1902 .), . (1873 .). ., ., ., ., ., . 1949 . « . . , :« . . . , 10 . . ,

(3), (1) [14,

.).

1949 .

: .),

. . [15,

.5-7]. , :« , ,

».

:

. » [9,

. ,

,

, .1].

, 1949 .

. ( .

– 7, .

. (1872 .), .), . (1868 . (1881 . (1871 .),

. (1889 .),

. (1902 . (1879 .), . (1887 .),

»

(2), .5-10].

– 30

, .

– 4, .

– 4). .

, ,

1948–1949 .

,

,

. ,

.

.

, ,

1949 .

:« ,

– :«

,

, , ,

, 60

1

1946 30 30 ,

1949 . – 253 ,

,

,

» [9,

.1-2]. 64 ,

.

).

.

1949 . 28 . 1949 . : 1 1948 .

. . 192

.

,

1

, ,

, .

.

1949 . ,

, . 1896 . – [16, .1-4].

, 13

». ,

,

(

.

,

, [10,

1949

[9, ,

150 . 1912

.1, 3]. , 19

.

,

2

1949 . .9 ].

«

»

4

.

« , ».

. ,

,

.

.

(

), 500 – –

1930

.

)

1930–1938 . , 158 5500 . 1941 . , 230 , 709

385

, 8 1949 .

, 96

256

. ,

1949 . (78 .

. 178

.).


1949

.

,

,

,

,

[17, ,

.1-3].

«

, » [17,

, [17, 5 ,

.3].

, .4].

1949 .

. . . ,

, 2-3 1949 . ,

. ,

, : «

. » [15,

.

, . .30-30 ]. . .

1949 . . [15,

.

.

.30]. [15,

16

2 1884

.

,

.

-

.1]. .

,

, 10

.

1950 .

.,

.

. . : «

3 ,

1944

. ,

.

,

,

.

,

, . ,

,

.

. .

., 1944 .

3

22

,

1949 .

576

. , ,

,

,

,

, ,

, ,

» [7, 13

1950 . : «13

. 1950 .

.

.

. ,

.

,

,

. ,

,

, » [18,

, .

,

.

2

. 3-4]. .

,

.

.7].

1950 .

. .

10

1950 .

.

: «

, » [7,

.1]. 30

1950

.

. , ,

« .

» . [18,

». .2 .,

.2, 6]. .,

, .

1

9 ,

1950 .

. 10

.1].

97

1950 . –

1950 .

[7,


6

1950 .

, . [18,

.1],

. 1951 .

«

. (1913 .), . (1902 .),

» ., . (1887 . (1883 .), . (1871 .),

. ( .,

. 1951 .

.,

.,

., :

9 : ., ., . (1886 .), . (1890 .), . (1902 .) [19, .1]. .( ),

., .),

.

: ), . 9

1951 . » [20, 1951 .

. . (1902 . (1921 .(

. . [20,

25 « 21

.,

.3-4].

. .2]. . . .,

,

1948 .

.

,

, . .

( )

1948 1949 1951 . ,

. .

,

, .

,

., .

,

, .1-2].

» [21,

.

.

,

,

,

. .

22

.

,

, ( ),

» [21, 20

( ),

, ,

.), .), 1951 ), .,

,

.3]. 1951 .

«

» .

«

:

»

1. .

.

, 9,

1. .

. ,

, ,

(

17

, .

,

28

.

1929 .).

,

. , 9, 1

,

. ,

.

1, 100 . » [22, .1]. 1951 .

29

.

-

. ,

5

1951 . :« 1944 . ,

[20,

.1].

.

.

, . .

10 ., ,

.

, ,

2

,

, .

.

1949 . , ,

, ,

, . .

. ,

,

,

. .

,

. ,

,

,

.

,

,

.

, » [23,

10

,

.

,

,

, 9.

.

.2]. 98

, , ,


15

1952 .

. .

, .

2 1950 .

2

,

.

, [23,

15

1952 .

.

.1]. 2

.: «

.

1950

, . . 1950 .

, 9. , 9. 1950 . , ,

,

.

.

, 28

. ,

14

.

,

. , ,

– 1

. 32

.

.

.

, .

, , » [23,

.

,

, .3-4]. ,

.

, 30

1953 .

. ,

, 3

,

» [19,

.3].

.

1953 .

. .,

1947 .» [19, 28

.4]. 1953 . , 1955

20

« .,

[19,

.2].

. . .,

.

,

.

.

24

,

,

-

.

. 1954 .,

. 1955 . «

,

. »

, 24

,

30 .,

,

«

» 14 .

.

.

, .». 25.12.1954 ., 15.01.1955 ., 10.02.1055 ., . . , ., ;

. 27.10.1955

. »

, »

,

. .

. – .

,

.

. –

.

, ),

. (

. ,

,

,

« [24,

»

.1, 3-3 ].

: «

, [24,

»

.1].

, ,

1000 .1 ].

[24,

.,

, ,

.

[8, , 99

.

.6 ; 24,

.1 ]. .: ,


, . ,

«

, ».

,

,

,

,

.

,

.

, » [24,

.

, .

.1 -2]. .

. , . ,

( 22

35 1956 .

. )

[24, [25,

.1 ].

.1-6]. .

12

1903 .

.

. ,

. 1925 .

.

. .

. 15

1923 .

:« .

. , 78 . 1927 . . . 1929 . 120 . 1931 . , 1934 . – . 1937 . , 1941 . 1945 . 117 . . 1945 . . 1951 . . 1952 10 1955 . » [25, .16]. 1956 . « » 5 . : . (1883 .), . (1903 .), . (1882 .), .), . (1877 .) [25, .8]. 17 1956 . . ., . , 2 [26, .3]. : « , ., 30 1882 . 16. 17. 20 . . , . 1914 . . , 1918 . , . . , , . , , 9 , , , 2 . , 2 , , , , . . . . 1927 . 1927 . . . . 28 1931 . . ! 28 1931 20 1932 . 20 1932 . . , , , . , . 1933 . , , 15 1933 ., . . 1933 . 1955 . . 1947 . . 1953 . , , , 1955 . – . , . , . . 17 1955 . , . , » [26, .1-2]. 28 1956 . . [25, .12].

100

1920 .

1922 . 1924 .

1927 .

. (1880

.

. .

, 7 . , . ?

. 7 -12,


9

1956 .

« .: «

»

.

, . ,

10 30 « 1956 . (

.17]. 1956 . « ., 1956 . ».

,

.

. [25,

.

8

,

».

»

., [25, , [25,

.9].

) [26, .

.,

145 –

(

12 .) 1

.5]. .,

. [25, .9]. 1956 . ., ., .) [25, .13]. 1956 . » [25, .11]. 1956 . . , 67

.7].

.,

22

10

. (

.,

.,

.)

. , 34

[27,

.1-3]. 1958

. : «

. 14

.

» [26, 1958 . [26, .3].

17 1958 .

, .1].

. [28, 29

1958

.

.4]. 15

».

. .

.,

– 29

«

., 1958

.,

.,

. [28,

.,

.3].

. . .

2

1958

.

.

,

, ! .

.

,

.4].

!

,

, . .

.

, ,

,

, 17

[29, : «

.

,

,

,

» [29,

.1].

1958 . . . [29,

.3]. 1958 .

.

.

,

,

,

[29,

. 25

[8,

.5].

.6 ].

1960 .

1036 « ». 1

248

28

:« 1960 .

, : .

, 173,6

, 9,

, . ,

1935 . ,

1

.

100

,

.

. .

, .3 .

, 1944 . ,

6

, (

101

,

.),


3 2

1944 ., » [30, .3].

,

,

1960 .

1

. (

».

:« ,

.

«

)

.

.

,

,9 .

,

, , 2

-

. ,

, . .

,

, ,

2

,

.

,

10-15

,

.

, ,

» [30, .

,

.4-5]. ,

, .5]. 3

[30,

1960 .

1134 « », 1.

[30,

.6]. 1960 .

3

.

. .

. 7

1960

. [30,

.7].

.

1134 3

1

1961

23

1961 .

1960 . [30,

.8].

.,

, [31,

.1-4]. .

. .

, 1

30

. [30, .

1961 .

,

,

.1]. , ,

1961 .

,

1960 . [30, [31, .5].

,

.2].

1961 . ,

.

. . 20 ,

, [32,

.

,

, .

1944

1945 . ,

.

,

.1-4].

.

.

,

,

– « 1945 .,

,

.

», ,

. 1949–1951 .

.

: , . ,

. .

,

1950 .

2

, .

1951

.

» . .

,

,

,

: 102


. 1958

. –

1960 . , . 1958 .

,

,

, ,

. ,

. :

1960 .

1,

.

,

,

2 .

.

1.

. )/ .

2012. – 2.

.111:

( . – .,

//

. – .6-9. .

/ 3.

. . .,

,

.

.–

40–80. – .: . . :

// ). – staroobryadchestva/drevlepravoslavnaya-tserkov-v-hh-veke 5. ( – 6. ., . -6630, . 1, 7. ., . -6630, . 1, 8. ., . -6630, . 1, 9. ., . -6630, . 1, 10. ., . -6630, . 1, 11. ., . -6630, . 1, 12. ., . -6630, . 1, 13. ., . -6630, . 1, 14. ., . -6630, . 1, 15. ., . -6630, . 1, 16. ., . -6630, . 1, 17. ., . -6630, . 1, 18. ., . -6630, . 1, 19. ., . -6630, . 1, 20. ., . -6630, . 1, 21. ., . -6630, . 1, 22. ., . -6630, . 1, 23. ., . -6630, . 1, 24. ., . -6630, . 1, 25. ., . -6630, . 1, 26. ., . -6630, . 1, 27. ., . -6630, . 1, 28. ., . -6630, . 1, 29. ., . -6630, . 1, 30. ., . -6630, . 1, 31. ., . -6630, . 1, 32. ., . -6630, . 1,

XX .: , 2009. – 381 . 1970- – «

4.

.

:

103

,

1990.: / . », 2011. – 272 . ( http://rpsc.ru/history/kratkaya-istoriya-

.), . -6630, . 2. . 58. . 18. . 34. . 26. . 27. . 38. . 33. . 44. . 45. . 50. . 49. . 57. . 59. . 60. . 62. . 61. . 68. . 78. . 81. . 83. . 82. . 94. . 96. . 108. . 119. . 117.

,

. 1,

. 35.


– 94 (477) “1920/1930” .

. 30–

. XX

.

, ). 30-

. XX

.

.

“ ,

: .

.

,

” . ,

,

1930 – 1931 .

.

. 30-

. XX . 30-

XX .

.

"

" .

1930 – 1931 . : , , , , . E. M. Strizhak Repressions of bolshevik totalitarian regime against polish educators in Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic in early 1930-s. The features of repressions of the bolshevik totalitarian regime against Polish teachers in 1930-s are analyzed. The so-called "case of polish teachers" in Kyiv in the years 1930 – 1931-s is highlighted in the article. Keywords: repressions, the intellectuals, Polish Soviet educators, counter-revolutionary work, teacher/educator.

30-

XX

, –

. “

,

,

,

.

. 30( ” .

1930 – 1931

.

.

.). .

,

. XX

“ , .

, .

, .

, .

[1]. .

, . [2, . 121].

1930, .,

1930-

.

, ,

,

) ,

,

. (1933 – 1936

.),

.

,

, [3, . 58]. . ( 1938 .)

1930-

.

,

,

(

)

,

,

. ,

. , “

,

– 1934

.

, 1933 .” [4, s. 141].

,

1933 – ”. –

“ , 1933 ., [5, . 215, 243].

– , , ,

.

1930 – 1931

,

,

”,

.

,

. .

.

[6]. ,

,

,

,

1920104

., “


. . ,

,

(“

”–“ ”), – “divide et impera”.

, 11- “

,

, 10.

1928 .

” (

)

,

,

[…].

,

,

:

,

[

, 17

: “ ,

]

.

.

,

,

[…].

.

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

. […].

[…]. ” [7, . 277 – 278]. ,

” –

1926 – 1930 . –

.

. . 1928 – 1929 . – “Aleksander”, “ wiadomy”, “Stary pracownik”

” 11

.

,

.

1929 .

,

11-

, [8, s. 249 – 257], [9, . 851 – 862]. 1930 . – 1931 . : 1 1930 . ; 12 11-

, .

, 1931 . – ,

11-

; 13 4 ; 14 ,

. ,

11-

(

) 63

–“

(1920 – 1929)

11-

,

. 15

-

,

4 . “

, [10,

,

. 1, 193]. ,

“ ,

,

, ” [10, .

,

.

[10,

. 200], ”.

.

,

. . (29 ” 1930 – 1931 , . ,“ ”,

. 2]. “ .

,

, ”.

“ :“ 1931 .) [10, , 21

22 , . ), . . .

1931 . ,

. .

,

,

, ”

”, ,

,

”( .

,8

. 90]. ”

.

– “

1931 .

” “

1922 .

”: “

, ,

[...] .

[...]. 105


,

– ,

. – ,

,

.

,

” [10, “ ,

. 153 .]. ”(

1931 .):

– !

– […]. –

, ,

,

”– “

,

!

“ 20

:

, , ” [10,

1931 .

,

.

– 145].

. 201, 203].

.

11-

[11, . 144

.

,

(

)

,

1937 . 00485 11

– 1937 . [7, . 280 –

281]. ” 1930 – 1931

.

,

,

.

(

,

, . “

, ,

,

)

”-

.

. “

.

(1932 .): “ ,

.

”,

,

.

, )

,

( . .,

,

– ”, “

(“ . .

” ,“

, ” ,“

”, “ . .), ” . .”. .

,

: “

?

,

”,

,

[…]. ,

– ,

. .” ( 1931

,

,

.,

. . ”

,

, ,

, 1930 –

, , ”). “

),

.

,

:“

,

,

,

], –

,

, [...].

,

(

” ,

, . [...].

. –

,

)–

,

” [12,

. 120 – 121].

,

, ,

”,

.

. “

,

“ .

,

.

”( )”, 1930 – 1931

,

1934 . .“

– “

” ,

,

,

, […].

11 106

. : “


.

,

,

. . ”.

,

“ : “

,

” , (16 – 17-

)” [13, . 145]. ”

.

1930 – 1931

.

,

.

1933 .

,

, 10 .

,

; ,

” .

”,

”. 13

1933 .

201

... 1920 – 1930, (

),

– “

.

, :

”.

– “

( »,

«

”,

– “ .

”). .

” “

” [14, . 199]. , “

, ,

”. –

,

” –

. .,

“ .

1. Stro ski H. Represje stalinizmu wobec ludno ci polskiej na Ukrainie w latach 1929–1939 / Stro ski H. – Warszawa, 1998. – 314 s.; . . 1920- – 30: / . .– . : , ; : . , 1992. – 176 .; ., . : (1929 – 1941) / ., .– .: . , 2003. – 302 .; . .“ ” 1930 – 1931 . – 1930./ . . // . . . .: : . . .– , 2004. – . 8. – . 299 – 303; . : / . // : . – . ; : . . , 2003. – . 267 – 275. 2. . . : / . .– .: , 1990. – 143 . 3. . : 20 – 30./ . – .; : , 1992. – 148 . 4. Stro ski H. Represje stalinizmu wobec ludno ci polskiej na Ukrainie w latach 1929 – 1939 / Stro ski H. – Warszawa, 1998. – 314 s. 5. ., . : (1929 – 1941) / ., .– .: , 2003. – 302 . 6. . . “ ” :“ “ ”” 1933 – 1934 . : , , / . . // : , , . – ., 2003. – . 7: . – . 170 – 189; . . “ ”, 1930// / . . – ., 2003. – . 13: 2 . : – : . – . 1. – . 275 – 319; . .“ ” 1930 – 1931 . – 1930./ . . // . . . .: : . . .– , 2004. – . 8. – . 299 – 303. 7. . “ ”, 1930/ . // . – ., 2003. – . 13: 2 . : – : . – . 1. – . 275 – 319. 8. czkowska-Zab ocka I. Wac awa Peretjatkowiczowa i jej szko a w Kijowie / B czkowska-Zab ocka I. // Pami tnik Kijowski. – Londyn, 1963. – T. II. – S. 249 – 252. 9. Nicieja S.-S. „Polski Kijów” i jego zag ada w latach 1918 – 1920 w wietle wspomnie kijowian / Nicieja S.-S. // Przegl d Wschodni (Warszawa). – 1994. – T. II, z. 4 (8). – S. 851 – 862. 10. . – . 263. . 1919 – 1953 . . 1, . 57003. . . . . 1930 – 1956 . – 210 . 11. ., . 1930/ ., . // . – 1995. – 1/2 (2/3). – . 116 – 156.

107


12.

. .

.

1930-

.–

:“

13.

. .

.

/

”,

.,

. ., 2007. – 82 . .

.

/

. //

. – 2003. – 5. ( ), 26

14. VII 1934. – 716 .

. – 10

. 1934 . :

.

. .–

.,

.:

,

94 (477) «1905/1907» .

. .

1905-1907

.

– .

1905-1907 »

).

.,

«

»

«

. , .

:

»,

,

,

. .

.

. 1905 – 1907 . 1905 – 1907 «

»

., ».

« , .

: , « », , , . Tkachenko-Plachtiy O. P. The specific of the South Ukrainian anarchists’ expropriation practice at the beginning of the XX-th century and its transformation in the period of the Revolution 1905 – 1907. The aspects of the anarchists’ expropriations in the Southern Ukraine in 1905 – 1907 are examined, the differences of the conative affirmations in respect of the expropriation commitment of the different groups of «South anarchists» are analyzed. Much attention is paid to the main turns of the type of anarchist expropriations in the years of Revolution, particularly the gradual transformation of these actions into the ordinary armed assaults and knockovers is attended. Keywords: expropriation, «Southern anarchism», anarcho-communists, anarcho-syndicalists, the Russian Revolution of 1905.

.

, ,

.

,

, ,

. .

» «

,

», (

«

»

«

»

[19, . 82]. »

. «

»

. .

, .

. [6; 3]

[14; 4] . .

.

.

,

«

»

[19], . [11].

– ,

.

,

.

, » [11, c. 64]. «

«

,

,

» -

» [19, c. 88]. ,

1907 .,

, .

« ,

.

. «

» (

108

,


.

[18]), . . ,

1905-1907 «

.

. . . « » [18, c. 139].

.

» ,

»

,

«

, ,

,

,

.

, . ,

,

,

,

,

. ,

[21, c. 16].

, ,

,

. ,

1905 .

«

30

» [17, c. 88].

,

1905-1907 .

.

,

, ,

.

«

»

. , ,

. .

,

. .

.

.

[1, c. 27],

.

, ,

,

«

,

.

«

» [2]. »,

. .

1903

.

.

»,

, [7,

. 1].

,

,

, »

, . 1904 .

.

,

,

.

. , .

,

[15, c. 213].

«

»

,

. ,

,

,

«

», »,

« »

«

»,

,

. »,

, .

, -«

»,

»,

, , «

, (

1905 ),

, « ,

»,

« .

«

.

», «

.

,

[17, c. 56]. 1905 . , » [1, c. 113].

«

» (

) ,

50

1000 «

.

«

.), »

» ( .«

,

1906 .

, .

– 109

» ,


,

,

« [20,

»

. 95; 8]. «

»

,

.

, »,

. . [6].

, «

. ,

» «

,

, ,

,

«

», [9, c. 446].

» .

« ,

»

«

.

,

» ( <…>

«

,

» [13, c. 160]. « »

,

)

, , [13, c. 161].

1906 .,

,

( 60

[19, c. 82].

70 ,

. .

.).

.

,

,

« ...»

1907 . «

»

«

. 1907 .,

»

51 .

,

«

» [19, c. 82]. « ,

. .

,

«

»

,

, » [15, c. 219-220].

« « (

..,

»

24 ) [10, c. 329]. , » « »,

»( », . ,

.

.

«

1907 . «

, 29

.

» «

, , »

10

[19, c. 220]). ,

1906 ., . ,

».

,

1906 ., ». , , . – »

« ,

« «

»,

., ,

,

,

» [1, c. 164]. –

«

» [1, c.

164]. , 1906 .

.

«

»

, 23

, ,

» [16]. 1906 . – . .] » [1, c. 214-215]. ,

. [

,

, ,

«

«

1907 .

» , «

,

; 2.

» «1. » [12, c.

75]. ,

, ,

,

. ,«

»

,

, ( 110

.


19-22,5

),

[5, c. 96]. . , ,

.

,

,

«

,

), ,

. .

1905-1907

» -

.

, »

« . «

,

, ,

»

.

« .

»

, «

», .

, »

« .

» ,

,

«

» [19, c. 88],

,

,

,

,

«

»

. ,

.

, , .

,

« » (

«

, .

»,

),

, .

,

, .

1.

.

. 1883 – 1935 . 2 . / . 1. 1883 – 1916 . – .: « ), 1998. – 704 . 2. . . . . / . . // , 150. . – ., 1995. – . 3. http://oldcancer.narod.ru/150PAK/3-01Budnizky.htm 3. . . : , , ( XIX – XX .) / . . – .: « »( ), 2000.–399 . 4. . ( XIX – .) / , . . – .: , 2006. – 416 . 5. . . 1905 – 1910 .: .… . : 07.00.01 »/ . .– , 2011. – 229 . 6. . . 1894 – 1917 / . / . . . .– : , 1997. – 448 . 7. . – . 32, . 1, . 62, 28 . 8. . . « » 1905 – 1907 . / . . , . . // . – . / . . . . – .: « », 1996. - [ ] – : http://www.memo.ru/history/terror/dubovik.htm#back2 9. . . / . . // « »: . – .: , 2004. – . 411-487. 10. / . . . . . – .: , 22006. – 596 . 11. . . / . . // , , , . .– : « ». - 3 (9). – 2011: 3- . . 1. – . 61-65. 12. . . 1905 – 1907 . / . . // – . . XV. – .: , 2008. – . 73-79. 13. . . .– ., 1907. – 192 . 14. . – . / . . , . . , . . . . .– . . . – .: , 2002. – 952 . 15. : . – .: « » ), 2000. – 631 . »(

111


16. 17.

. – 1906. – 05 . . – «Optimum», 2006. – 248 . 18. . . .

(23

). ( 1903 – 1913 ).

. )/ .

20. 21.

//

.

. . . – 2006. -

//

. .

1905 – 1907 . / . . // . . 169. , 1991. – . 138-147 : ( . – ., 2005. – . 4. – . 81-89 , . . – . 268, . 1, . 153, 187 .

. – .: 19.

/

.–

:

. /

. .

6. – . 12-16.

94 (477.8) .

. – (

, , .

). –

. .

, :

,

.

,

,

,

. –

. .

,

, . : , , , , . The development of education in the Volyn province late XIX - early XX century. The role of municipal governments and zemstva to increase the number of educational institutions in the province. The reasons for opening new schools craft schools and vocational classes that operate in Volhynia in the study period. Keywords: Volyn, zemstvo, professional education, high school, a real school.

.

.

:

,

,

.

., .

, .

[4],

.

[5],

.

[11],

.

, . , –

.

,

. , .

815

.

1912 .

.

, 14,4 % . 71],

, – 343

, 1897 .

3

, 548 – 195 .,

.,

2 658 .

, – 38,5

.

[1,

, . [2, . 94].

– 27,7

, . ,

1897 . ,

10 2851

,

. ,

. .

,

,

,

[3, 50-51]. ,

,

, 3137, 9 347

. 90 253

.

314

,5

, 14 112

, 1080

.


– «

»

4 «

»

1

.

, 70

[3, .51]. 1883 . 1 .

1 .

.

(

1890 .

)

12

,

– 15. 19

,

[4, . 127]. . , ,

. ,

) 1

4

(

),

,

,

(

[3, . 50-51]. , ,

)

.

.

. ,

.

[5, .88]. ,

, ,

.

. ,

, ,

,

,

,

. . ,

,

. . ,

. . .

1900

, [7, .

,

.

19],

1904 .

[9,

, [6,

.

. 1-2].

1902 .

. 1].

1903 . . 15-15 .]. 20

300

. [8,

.

1901 . .

« , 27

» 40

. 1100

1896 .

. . 9-10].

« »

8.

. . [10,

3

.

. .

1

» [11, . 67]. [12, . 13]. ,

1897 .

«

,

,

,

, ,

,

. 1904 .

2948

– 2, – 3, 140 196 »

«

, – 4, – 1, 111 349

,

»,

, 11,

,

.

1449 – 1487,

«

:

28 847 »

– 5. [13, . 57]. . ,

[13, . 58.]. 113

,

,


, .

,

,

.

.

,

1904 .

, .

11 200 3

.

.,

1-

[13, . 61]. ,

.

,4

,

,

1480

.

1904

180 051 ., 103 500 .,

)

[13, . 62-63]. 4 (

.

158 285

., ,

,

.

(

)

,

,

,

,

8

.

1904 .

.

, 5

.

,2

3

,

[13, . 61-63]. . .

,

. , .

,

, .

, ,

, ,

. 1908 .

2288

,

142 752 ,

13 , 20

,

[14, . 63-64]. 1904 . . . . , 1904 . ,

[4, . 128]. ,

,

,

. ,

.

, 9

1908

. .

. [15,

. 114-116].

.

,

1900

. [16, ,

. . , 1906 . . 28-28 .],

, 1907 . 1940

. [17,

. 5]. , ,

. . ,

, 672

158 451

. ».

«

,1

1911 , ,1

1538

.

1911 . ,1 [18, . 89-90].

7 2

.

2447 »,

« 23

.

10

, , 947

.

1910

.

, .

10 114

475

,


1910 .

2

17

,

.

279

.

11 623

,

.

:

.

, ,7

,

,

[18, . 90-91].

1911 . 426 498

.1

828 405

.9

.

.

, ,

,

[18, . 90-91]. ,4

1445

2

,

. 1911 .

511 319

.

215 738 295 581

, . .

115

,

,

[18, . 93]. 1911 . .

«

» [18,

. 94]. 1911 . ., 204

130 905

520 27 795

.,

3 234 – 10 650

., ) 20 466 5,5

( 100

.

.,

., 5

., .

. ,

,

[18, .

96]. . 4076

. [20,

,

1910 . 34 735

. . [19,

5 200 . 139],

.

1911 .

. 134]. , ,

«

15-20

». [21, . 12].

,

, ,

,

. . .

,

. . , 1 1912 .

, 360 .

«

. ,

, ,

.

,

» [22, . 820-821]. .

,

3,

»

«

,

« ».

1912 . « , ,

«

» …

,

,

,

,

25 -

». ,

. 2-

. « » [23,

. 4-5].

« , 115

»,


. [23,

, . 32]. , 13 4

16

,

,

.

,

.

. ,

,

,

, . 35].

[23,

,

,

,

,

, . 1913 .

2605

165 706 . 1913 . 95-96].

,

605

.

9

,1

, 10

2

[24, .

,

. .

, ,

,

. ,

,

,

, [25, . 79-80].

, 1913 .

,

,

, 10

3

[26, . 97-104],

. . 1915 .

,

.

, 11 865 – 2000

. – 1850

., 1-

, ., 2-

.

,

,

[27, –

,

. 5-5 .]. .

. . ,

,

,

. ,

,

,

. , . ,

,

.

,

, ,

. , , .

1.

1914

.–

:

, 1913. – 549 .

2.

, 1897

/

3. 4. 5. .) / . 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

. . 1897 . . . – 2001. –

. //

. . – 2009. –

.– .–

.– :

– 6. – . 123-132. . . – 2005. – ( ., . 568, . 1., ., . 359, . 1., ., . 359, . 1, ( 6. – . 61-69. ., . 355, . 1, 1904 .– 1908 .– ., . 359, . 1., ., . 165, . 1.,

28

., 1905. – 417 . . /

, 1898. – 52 . . .

//

(

5. – . 87-92. .), .366, . 51, . 1. . 4, . 19. . 7, . 15-15

. 1-2.

. 1,

. 441,

. 9-10. . / .

. 13. :

, 1905. – 73 . , 1909. – 164 .

: . 9, . 16,

. 42,

. .), . 3,

. 1,

.1,

. 114-116. . 28-28 .

116

//


17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 221-229. – 27.

., . 165, 1911 ., . 359, ., . 359,

. 1., .– . 1., . 1.,

. 20, . 10, . 11, //

. // ., . 165, 1913 1914

. 5. :

. 1., .– .–

, 1912. – 102 . . 139. . 134. . – 1912. – 9 . – 1912. – 11

. 24,

.–

19. – . 12. . – 42. – . 820-821.

. 4-5, 32, 35. : :

, 1914. – 106 . , 1915. – 86 . .

:

« ., . 616,

. 1.,

. 2,

. – 16-36

. . 5-5 .

», 1913. – 106 .

[94(477):338.22] «1900/1918» .

. . –

, ).

,

.

;

;

,

; . ,

: ,

,

,

,

-

.

. .

. ,

. ;

,

; . :

, , , , , . Shandra I. A. Activities of representative structures of the bourgeoisie of Donbas and Dnipro region in the beggining of the 20th century. It was given the description of representative business associations of Donbas and Dnipro region such as Congresses of Miners from the South of Russia, priorities for their work were identified. Particular attention was paid to the activities of business organizations during the First World war espessially about the provision and saving the level of concerns production which was needed; hospitals, which were supported by the Congresses of Miners were characterized; the activities of the bourgeoisie in solving problems of providing the industry with human resources were set. Keywords: Congresses of Miners from the South of Russia ,industry and trade representatives congresses, military and industrial committee, Donbas committee, provision, the First World war.

.

.

:

,

,

.

, .

,

, .

;

. .

, .,

.

.

.

«

»,

, [18]. «

. –

1917 .

[20]. ,

, 117

1914 – 1918 , .»

.,


. (

,

,

,

.). . (1874 – 1918

.),

, –

.

,

.

« 1873 . .

.

. » .

,

.

,

. ,

» [1, .10]. 14

1874

«

.

« ».

[6,

.1].

,

« » [2, .921].

. , 70-

(1879 .) – .

.

10 (1877 .)

. ,

1874 .

. ,

(1878 .) –

. .

. ; . . 80-

.

.

:

. (1885 .,

– 1899 .)

. ,

– .

,

,

.

(

,

) .

,

,

.

. (

. –

11

).

,

,

: ,

);

(

,

,

(

); ,

,

,

). 1905

. . ,

» «

». , ,

1,5

.

(1874 .) .

.

255

.,

1914 . (

)

[21, .71]. .

, :

,

,

,

, , .

1915 . [14, .23].

1,7

,

. ,

: .

.

300

.

[18, .51].

118

1917 .

250


1915 . – 13,8 %;

1914 . , : – 50 %,

15

[14, .34]. 1917 . [18, .49].

64 %

,

1916 ., «

: 14,5 %, 10 – 1916 . – 47 %, ,

– 105 %

».

70

[10, .13899]. ( –

1917 .,

1917 ., 1917 .

.) [3, .15855].

, ,

. :

.

,

[15, .75].

1915 .

803 1915 – 1916

– 1,6

.

., 15

.

1,2

16

. 479 .; –6

.;

. [14, .53]. ,

1 .

.

.,

1916 . (

: – 144

.

– 140 . .;

.

). . .; – 180

.

240

.

.;

.;

– 50

,

– 37

. – 37 .;

.

.; .

, 25

.

.;

– 27

– 475 . .; . [14, .52–53]. 1

.

300

– 1914 .,

.

. . .

(

.

,

,

,

, ,

) [15, .151].

1000

.

1914 . . 1915 ., .

(

100

)

,

.

, .

)

( 140

,

,

, [14, .53].

.

,

, .

. ,

150

,

100

.

,

,

18

.

. [15, .79]. , », – . .

2

.

[15, .77 – 79]. , 550

1916 3,3 . ,

, ,

.

[22, .77]. , 1915 – 1916

.

[14, .53]. , ( 1915 . ) [9, .14904].

74 %

86 %

, [24,

,

.7]. , 119


[19, .544].

1915 .

, [17, .128]. ,

1917 ., « ,

, , :

» [8, .366]. ,

1915 .

«

,

, ,

, … » [11, .39].

, , ,

,

,

. ,

,

, 13

. 1917 .

(

), ,

,

[18, .49]. ,

,

,

.

. ,

( ). ,

,

,

.

1915

.

[12, .628]. 50

.

, .15]. .

[4, 11

, 1916 . [23, .12984].

1918 . .

, .131.].

[5, 1917

.

,

[20, .43]. ,

«

,

,

.16601].

«

,

» [7, ,

, » [26,

.38].

1918 . [16, .16591]. 1918 . 1917 .

. 28

42

1918 . [13, .74]. [25, .84].

2 1874 .

. . , .

,

,

,

. , ,

). ,

,

,

.

.

1.

,

5-

. . 2.

«

, .

1-

1874

1857 . .– .:

», 1876. – 56 .

//

, .–

31

60. – . 921.

120

. – 1874,


3. // . – 1917. – 22-23. – . 15855 – 15860. 4. – . 2, . 1, . 159. – 160 . 5. . – . 4, . 1, . 13. – 202 . 6. . – . 3, . 281, . 161. – 2 . 7. . / . // . – 1919. – 1 – 2. – . 16598 – 16603. 8. // . – 1917. – 20 – 21. – . 363 – 368. 9. XLI // . – 1916. – 51. – . 14903 – 14905. 10. // . – 1916. – 30. – . 13897 – 13899. 11. // . – 1915. – 13-14. – C. 36 – 46. 12. // . – 1915. – 12. – . 628. 13. . . – / . . // . – . 1. – : . . . . . , 1973. – . 64 – 85. 14. XL , , . . .– : . . . , 1916. – 63 . 15. XLI 1915 – 1916 .– : . . , 1916. – 164 . 16. // . – 1919. – 1 – 2. – . 16589 – 16592. 17. // . – 1915. – 16. – . 128 – 134. 18. . . / . . , . . . – .: , 2004. – 473 . 19. I // . – 1915. – 11. – . 544 – 547. 20. . . ( – 1917 .) / . . // – ./[ . . . ]. – . . – .: , 2001. – . 42 – 81. 21. : 2 . – . 1. – : .« », 1916. – 476 . 22. XLI (24 –4 1916 .). – . 2. – , 1917. – [ . .]. 23. // . – 1916. – 7. – . 12984 – 12985. 24. , . . – . 938, . 1, . 8. – 31 . 25. , . . – . 2161, . 1, . 244. – 101 . 26. , . . – . 2161, . 1, . 272. – 53 .

.

,

.

(

,

,

. –

, ). 19

«

», :

, ,

,

. ,

,

. .

. . «

»

.

: , , , , . Olexandr Udod, Mykhaylo Yuriy. Modernization and the Ukrainian nation in the nineteenth century The article refers to the impact of the modernization factors in the 19th century on the formation of Ukrainian nation. There is also examined the problem of the "Other" as a necessary condition for nation-creating processes. Keywords: modernization, ethnos, nation, identity, community.

,

, .

,

,

«

»,

, ,

, ,

.

121

,


,

(

),

,

,

.

.

,

.

,

,

,

«

,

,

»,

(

,

, ,

,

,

«

,

»,

).

«

»,

,

, .

«

»

«

»

, . .

, (

«

»)

,

»

. «

,

»

,

. ».

« ,

, . »,

, .

, .

«

, »,

, ,

,

, ,

. ,

,

.

, .

,

,

,

,

,

.

,

«

»

.

,

,

[32]. ,

,

,

,

,

,

.

«

». »

«

,

,

. ,

, »

«

, » «

«

»,

«

,

» «

». »

,

[2, 31]. ,

. ,

),

(

.

,

,

( .

)

,

,

(

,

,

)

. , ,

,

.,

, ,

.

[32]. , ,

. ,

:

.

,

,

,

.

, . ,

, .

– ,

,

,

(

)

).

. .

(

,

) ?«

:

, » [5, 111-127]. ,

122


,

,

,

? «

, ,

»

.

, «

,

»( ,

,

.

),

. , ,

[32]. . , ,

,

.

.

, ,

.

,

,

,

, ,

.

,

,

, ,

,

, . « ,

,

, » [9, 86].

.

,

, .

, .

.

.

. «

, «

» [12, 62-90].

,

, ,

,

,

,

, ,

,

,

. ,

.

,

, « »,

,

. ,

, ,

. , .

«

» [15]. .

;

,

,

,

.

,

.

, .

.

. .

.

[11,8-15], .

[14, 16-22],

, .

[27],

[19]. . .

[33, 89-92].

,

,

»

,

,

.

«

« ,

»,

, .

.

.

:

, » «

»

, . ,

.

.

[30].

,

, .

, ,

, ,

,

, . ,

,

, 123

[16].


. «

»

«

[10],

»

,

– «

,

« –

»

.,

»

. ».

«

,

«

»

,

«

»

XVI – XVII . ,

. .

.

.

[21]

[26, 17-25], ,

,

, ,

,

,

. ,

,

,

,

.

. .

,

,

,

, .

, ,

.

,

.

. .

,

,

,

.

. .

,

.

,

,

. ,

,

,

,

. , . ,

«

» « . ,

. , –

«

»– ,

».

,

,

.

».

.

,

,

, ,

,

« ,

,

, , ,

»

. .

.

.

,

, ,

.

, ,

,

,

,

.

,

,

,

(

)

. . . ,

,

. .

.

,

, . ,

,

. «

. ,

,

,

« «

»,

. ,

«

»,

, .

».

, .

.

»,

,

,

,

,

,

,

.

, ,

.

,

, .

– . 124


. , . ,

,

,

,

( )

– ,

.

. , ,

. –

,

.

.

,

,

..

. .

,

,

.

,

, .

,

.

, ,

[35, 21-25]. ,

. ,

. «

, –

, –

. ,

,

,

,

,

.

,

,

, ,

, .

,

,

,

, » [22].

. . ?

.

.?

. « , –

.

,

. –

. .

,

,

,

, ,

,

,

» [23, 69]. ,

,

,

,

, –

,

– ,

. ,

,

,

.

,

«

». ,

,

,

.

, –

,

.

,

. » –

«

. .

.

– .

– –

. . ,

(

.

.

.

), ,

,

. .

«

». , .

.

,

.

, ,

125

« ,

».

,


.

,

,

. ,

, .

– , ,

, .

. –

. –

,

,

,

«

.

» , .

,

«

»

.,

1848 «

.

.

1782

, .

,

. »

,

» – «

.

»

2

,

,

,

. , [29, 363-364]. –

,

1859

, 1848 .

1870-

,

,

,

,

«

»

.

: « » [29, 369].

,

,

1877 . , –

. ,

,

,

. 21

1867 .

19

, », –

, «

. »,

« .

», , 1883

»,

[29, 369]. «

: ,

.

, ,

1880-

. ,

?

.

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

.

, ? . «

,

.

. [1, 134-135]. .

», – –

,

, ,

,

,

,

, ,

.

,

. ,

[13, 173-

190]. «

»,

, ,

»

, . , ,

,

.

«

,

», . «

,

» ,

», «

»

.

,

126

«


, ,

.

,

. , .

, 1830-1831 1863-1864 .

, .

,

,

, ,

»,

, ,

[22].

,

«

»

.

1862-1863

.

, «

»

,

.

«

». ,

,

«

,

»

,

. ,

, , 1772 [20, 90].

«

»

1863

1876

,

, .

,

,

, «

» ,

. .

[28],

,

,

.

. »

«

, «

»

. , , ,

(

)

,

. ,

,

,

, «

, «

. ». .

, (

»,

)

», – .

.

[17, 276].

, .

, ,

, [22].

,

, .

,

.

.

,

,

,

,

, ,

.

, –

. , .

– , «

»

, .

,

.

,

,

. ,

,

,

,

,

, 1905-1907

.

[6] ». » «

« ».

,

127

,


, .

« «

».

».

.

«

»,

.

, .

».

,

.

,

,« »

,

. ,

,

. ?».

,

« :«

,

«

, »,

«

:

?».

. ,

, , «

, ,

.

, ?»,

?» , ,

-

?»,

,

,

.

,

,

,

»

. ,

. ,

,

,

.

,

, «

,

.

,« ,

», ,–

,

, «

», «

» [34, 43]. , », « », polem os, .

,

», «

», «

,

», «

.

,

polemos,

,

,

.

,

,

,

,

.

. «

», «

», « ,

,

»,

.

,

, ,

,

«

», «

»

«

.

.

» , .

, ,

,

,

,

,

,

. ,

,

,

.

, , .

. ,

, [7, 9].

, ,

, «

»,

.

, ,

,

,

. ,

,

. .

, ,

,

,

, .

«

», «

,

,

, .

, ,

, .

.

», «

,

» ,

,

. «

»«

»,

,

, ,

.

,

,

«

, , »

, «

»

. –

» , . 1840-

, –« .

128


«

»–

. .

»,

,

..

. 1867 ,

, .

.

,

.

, ,

. . ,

.

,

;

,

. .

1871 .

.

,

. .

,

,

,

1867 ., ,

. ,

1848 .,

.

,

,

. ,

,

,

.

XIX ;

:

. ;

. . ,

,

,

,

. ,

.

, ,

.

«

,

,

,

,

,

, ,

,

, » [18, 343].

. ,

,

. ,

.

, , ,

1914 . 42 . 520 [8, 346]. . , 1907 . [8, 346].

96 .

.

6

,

.

,

,

,

. , ,

,

,

,

.

. ,

,

,

.

, ).

28 .

1907

,

1907 .

.

,

,

,

,

. .

,

40

.

, ,

,

.

,

, 1907-1914 .

102

. [8,348].

, .

.

,

, .

,

.

,

. 1908 .

.

(

),

,

. 129


,

.

. , –

. « » [8, 348].

,–

23. 12

1908 .

.

. .

. ,

XX

.

,

,

,

[31, 290].

,

: –

? ,

.

.

, [25, 44-45],

: «

» [8, 65]. ,

. ,

,

, [24].

,

. . ,

,

. , .. [4, 231].

, .

,

, ,

«

»

, ,

,

«

»

[35]. , .«

»,

,

.

, ,«

»,

, « ,

[6, 51]. ,

, «

1. //

.

. (

.

. .).

,

,

,

, »

»–

,

»,

.

:

:

. – ., 1997; 2. . – .:

.

. , 2001; 3.

. – ., 2000; 4. . 2002; 5. Buttle N. Critical nationalism: a liberal prescription?//Nations and Nationalism. 2000.

.– 1; 6. .

.:

. ., . . ,

, , 1996 – 355 .; 7. .: . . : // . – 2011. – 10; 8. , « » … « ». – , 1985; 9. Gellner E. Nations and Nationalism. Oxford, 1983; 10. . . – . – .: , 1998; 11. . // : . .– , 1995; 12. Janowski M. Wavering Friendship: liberal and national ideas in nineteenth century East-Central Europe//Ab Imperio. 2000. 3-4; 13. .: John W. Slocum. Who and When, Were the Inorodtsy? The Evolution of the Category of «Aliens» in Imperial Russia//The Russian Review, April 1998; 14. . // : . .– , 1995; 15. . . . – .: , 1999. – 352 .; 16. . : . . . 8// http://litopys.org.ua/kasian/kas13.htm; 17. . . 1863 . , , , . 1. – ., 1887; 18. ., . : . – .: , 2001; 19. . ( )// . – ., 1994. – . 1 . – 554 .; 20. .: . . – .: , 2008; 21. . .« ( ). – .: . –

.:

130


, 2000. – 265 . 22.

.

.– //www.timeandspace.lviv.ua/miller45507; 23.

. //

. , 2003; 24. .: . – //http://exlibris.org.ua/lazarovyc1/r01.html; 25. . . – .: , 1993; 26. . . « ». // . – 2011. – 1. – . 5; 27. . . – ., 1996. – 270 .; 28. . . 776. . 11. . 61 , . 41 .; 29. .: . .– .: « », 2009; 30. ., . . – .: , 1998. – 112 .; 31. . : . – .: , 1991; 32. .: . //http:/rodoslav.wordpress.com/; 33. Szporluk R. Ukraine: From an Imperial Periphery to a Sovereign State//Daedalus, 1997. Vol. 126. 3; 34. . // . – 1992. – . 1. – 1; 35. .: . . : // .– 2005. – 16. .

.–

.:

94(477) Piotr Badyna DIAGNOZA – CHORA OJCZYZNA I TERAPIA ZAWARTA W ANATOMII RZECZYPOSPOLITEJ … WOJEWODY STANIS AWA GARCZY SKIEGO –

, ,

,

,

,

,

)

Na intelektualny obraz epoki stanis awowskiej i tak zwanego polskiego O wiecenia, pracowa y ju wybitne umys y w pierwszych dziesi cioleciach XVIII wieku. Do takich wybitnych postaci na niwie ekonomicznej nale niew tpliwie wojewoda pozna ski Stefan Garczy ski (1690-1755) [1], który swe najwa niejsze dzie o Anatomia Rzeczypospolitej… uko czy ju w latach czterdziestych XVIII w. Zawar w nim wszystkie dystynktywne dla swojej koncepcji gospodarowania elementy. Praca ta zaliczana jest przez historyków polskiej my li ekonomicznej do najznamienitszych w ca ym wieku XVIII. Wielu z nich id c za my Edwarda Lipi skiego plasuje my l wojewody pozna skiego w okresie wczesnego o wiecenia. Co prawda sam E. Lipi ski, jak równie jego epigoni, wskazuj na pewne koneksje intelektualne jego koncepcji z my merkantylistyczn , lecz raczej od egnuj si od jednoznacznego plasowania jego my li w tym nurcie. W niniejszej pracy postaram si wykaza , e idea gospodarcza Garczy skiego, nie tylko ma charakter merkantylistyczny, ale wr cz przybiera posta protekcjonizmu. Natomiast system gospodarczy, który nale y wprowadzi dla efektywnego zreformowania Rzeczpospolitej powinien mie charakter systemu zamkni tego. U ywaj c wspó czesnej terminologii mo na powiedzie , i by o to my lenie w kategoriach gry o sumie zerowej, jednej z najprostszych postaci w teorii gier. Wojewoda Garczy ski buduj c sw koncepcj uzdrowienia gospodarczego, spo ecznego i politycznego ojczyzny, opar si na mechanistycznych ideach anatomicznych i fizjologicznych wypracowanych jeszcze w wieku XVII. Dlatego nie przez przypadek nada swej pracy tytu Anatomia Rzeczypospolitej… „Ja jako wi em przedsi Anatomi Corporis Reipublica, której cia o nie z czego inszego y w sobie zawiera, tylko z jednych maxym, a jako w cz owieku najmniejsze y spo eczno ci w sobie maj z najwi kszymi (…) zgo a wszystkie nervuli & venula, któremi cyrkulacja krwi dobra (…) serce ludzkie i ca ego o ywia cz owieka, zepsuta za tak d ugo omdlewa i s abi, póki miertelnym nie zmorzy letargiem” [2, s.8-9]. Jako cz owiek doskonale wykszta cony zna wojewoda pozna ski osi gni cia wspó czesnej sobie my li w zakresie medycyny, filozofii i ekonomii. Wielu ówczesnych my licieli ekonomicznych stosowa o podej cie „medyczne” do zagadnie gospodarczych. Przyk adem mog by tu, tak wybitne postacie, jak cho by: William Petty (1623-87), angielski ekonomista, z wykszta cenia lekarz, który w swej twórczo ci podejmowa problemy pieni dza, zagadnienia podatków, polityki handlu zagranicznego; a tak e François Quesnay (1694-1774), ekonomista francuski pe ni cy funkcj nadwornego lekarza markizy de Pompadour i Ludwika XV, twórca nurtu zwanego w my li ekonomicznej fizjokratyzmem. Ów mechanicystyczno-anatomiczny obraz wykorzystywany przez badaczy zagadnie ekonomicznych i gospodarczych, stanowi pok osie bujnie rozwijaj cej si w wieku XVII filozofii przyrody. Wp yw na ukszta towanie si takiego obrazu anatomii i fizjologii mieli mi dzy innymi: René Descartes (1596-1650) i William Harvey (15781657). Pierwszy z nich zastosowa analogi mechanizmu zegarowego do opisu i charakterystyki funkcjonowania organizmu ludzkiego. Harvey natomiast poda prawid owy opis dzia ania uk adu krwiono nego, jako uk adu zamkni tego, w którym krew nap dzaj skurcze mi nia sercowego. Nota bene w nie czynnik sprawczy ruchu krwi w krwioobiegu, stanowi przyczyn polemiki pomi dzy Kartezjuszem a Harveyem [3]. Dla Kartezjusza serce by o organem biernym pozbawionym ruchów w asnych, a krew porusza a si dzi ki rozgrzewaniu w nie w sercu. Organ ten s jedynie, jako akumulator energii cieplnej i radiator do krwi, która po rozgrzaniu zwi ksza a sw obj to , co wywo ywa o jej ruch. Harvey natomiast bazuj c na wielu do wiadczeniach i obserwacjach anatomicznych doszed do wniosku, e krew porusza si dzi ki ruchom w asnym (skurczom i rozkurczom) serca. Trudno powiedzie czy Garczy ski zna polemik pomi dzy tuzami XVII-wiecznej my li anatomicznej i fizjologicznej. Mo na si chyba pokusi o postawienie hipotezy, e wojewoda pozna ski, je eli j zna to, by raczej 131


zwolennikiem koncepcji Kartezjusza. Dominuj ca cz maksym (porad) jakie prezentuje w swej Anatomii… odnosi si do naprawy tego, co postrzega w organizmie ojczyzny jako krwioobieg. Przy czym nie wspomina o sprawczej dla ruchu roli serca, a skupia si na zdynamizowaniu ruchu samej „krwi” – pracy i jej wytworów, a tak e poprawie jako ci samych arterii – mieszka ców Rzeczpospolitej. Bo dopiero poprawna cyrkulacja tej e stanowi o zdrowiu ca ego organizmu Ojczyzny. Warto bli ej przyjrze si kilku kluczowym elementom, jakie buduj ów organizm i s odpowiedzialne za poprawne jego funkcjonowanie. Do tych sk adowych nale y na pewno miasta wraz z ich mieszka cami, a tak e populacja mieszka ców ca ej XVIII-wiecznej Rzeczpospolitej. W opisie anatomicznym Rzeczypospolitej jedn z kluczowych pozycji zajmuj miasta i miasteczka. By to element wg wojewody pozna skiego, w owym toczonym chorob ciele, o którego dobro i uzdrowienie nale o zadba w szczególno ci. Koncepcja Garczy skiego nawi zywa a, jak zosta o to wcze niej zaznaczone, do siedemnasto- i osiemnastowiecznych idei anatomicznych i fizjologicznych. Dla zrozumienia funkcjonowania ustroju ludzkiego istotne by o wyja nienie mechanizmu obiegu krwi w organizmie. W ekonomicznej my li wojewody pozna skiego równie zasadnicz rol odgrywa cyrkulacja dóbr, pracy, a jej wa sk adow by a urbanizacja. To w nie wi ksze i mniejsze rodki miejskie stanowi y czynnik pobudzaj cy ow cyrkulacj . Si gaj c do historii Rzeczypospolitej, wskazywa na korelacj pomi dzy rozwojem o rodków miejskich, a si – równie militarn – kraju [2, s.12]. Jako cz owiek obyty w wiecie, maj cy ogromne do wiadczenie, znaj cy dobrze stosunki panuj ce w krajach o ciennych, dostrzega analogiczn zale no w czasach sobie wspó czesnych, lecz niestety u s siadów, „(…) w naszych miastach, cho sto ecznych, tyle w ca ej ulicy gospodarzy nie masz, ile si ich znajduje w jednej, na przyk ad w Wroc awiu kamienicy i po inszych partykularnych zagranicznych miasteczkach, bo ich kondycja na samych tylko zawis a rzemios ach (…)” [2, s.26]. W odró nieniu, od dominuj cego w pierwszej po owie XVIII w. w Rzeczypospolitej przekonania, o nadrz dno ci rolnictwa nad innymi dzia ami gospodarki, Garczy ski k ad najwi kszy nacisk na rozwój wszelkich rzemios . A równomierny rozwój ich ró nych rodzajów zapewni mog y jedynie w miar niezale ne o rodki miejskie. Rozwini ty w nich „przemys ” odgrywa kilka wa nych funkcji. Po pierwsze zabezpiecza potrzeby rynku wewn trznego na ró ne towary, które w innym przypadku musia yby by importowane. Import za stanowi w koncepcji Garczy skiego z o konieczne, którego nale o si wystrzega , o ile to mo liwe. A to dlatego, „(…) aby pieni dze za granic bez potrzeby nie wychodzi y, ale lud w asny kraju, cyrkulacj swoj bogaci y (…)” [2, s.120]. Jak wida wojewoda by zwolennikiem merkantylistycznego protekcjonizmu. Industria mia y wi c za zadanie zaspokoi potrzeby rynku wewn trznego i ograniczy wymian z zagranic . Konstatacja owa wynika a w prosty sposób z za enia, e za importowane towary, jakie mog zosta wyprodukowane w kraju, nale y zap aci rodkami, które mog yby zasili cyrkulacj wewn trzn i nap dzi koniunktur gospodarcz . Wytworzone w obr bie miast towary mia yby równie za zadanie zaspokoi jak najszerszy wachlarz potrzeb mieszka ców wsi. Co oczywi cie uwalnia o od konieczno ci zaopatrywania si w niektóre towary za granic . Wie odnosi a nie tylko tak korzy . Rozwini te rzemios o w mie cie, to wi cej rzemie lników: mistrzów, czeladników i wszelkiej s by, oraz ich rodzin. Populacja ta tworzy a w sposób naturalny du y rynek zbytu p odów rolnych wytwarzanych w okolicznych wsiach. Ich producenci nie musieliby zabiega o kosztowny transport swoich towarów na odleg e rynki. Posiadali „pod bokiem” znaczny rezerwuar odbiorców. Jak wskaza wojewoda pozna ski na przyk adzie jednego – nie wymienionego z nazwy – pa stwa o ciennego, szlachcice tamtejsi „(…) warzywa z ogrodów lepiej spieni w tych miastach, ni u nas pszenice i yta” [2, s.121]. Ubolewa wojewoda niejednokrotnie nad stanem ekonomii Rzeczypospolitej, w której kluczow rol odgrywa eksport zbó . Problem tkwi nie w samym fakcie wywozu zbo a z kraju, ale w trzech elementach z nim powi zanych. Po pierwsze najwi kszy szlak wywozowy przebiega przez morze ba tyckie. Nale o wi c przetransportowa ca e zbo e na frachty do Gda ska, a czym wi ksza odleg dzieli a producenta od tego miasta tym koszta ros y. W konsekwencji dochodowo takiej produkcji dramatycznie mala a. Po wtóre pieni dze uzyskane z eksportu trafia y do r k w cicieli ziemskich, którzy zamiast inwestowa zamieniali je na importowane towary luksusowe. Czym automatycznie ograniczali produkcj takich towarów w kraju. Jak pisa wojewoda: „(…) nasze same miasta przy cz stych warsztatach opatrzy yby znaczn konsumpcj (…) i pieni dze w kraju zosta yby, a za granic nie wychodzi y (…)”[2, s.137]. Ostatnim elementem by o ograniczenie poda y zbo a na rynku wewn trznym, co skutkowa o wi kszym ubóstwem du ej liczby nieszlacheckich mieszka ców Rzeczypospolitej. Kolejn wa funkcj rozwoju rzemios mia o by zaktywizowanie i zaspokojenie potrzeb jak najwi kszej rzeszy ludzi. Rozwijaj ce si warsztaty rzemie lnicze potrzebowa yby nowych r k do pracy, a wi c powsta oby wiele nowych miejsc zatrudnienia, a co za tym idzie utrzymanie dla pracowników i ich rodzin. A rozwijaj cy si system pracy nak adczej wymaga , by jeden rzemie lnik wspó pracowa z innymi, w podzielonym na cz ci procesie produkcji, na przyk adzie warsztatu sukienniczego. Wyrysowuje Garczy ski ca sie zale no ci pomi dzy poszczególnymi rzemie lnikami, jak nale oby stworzy dla jego sprawnego funkcjonowania. Aktywizacja zawodowa du ych rzesz mieszka ców dawa a wielorakie korzy ci. Zwi ksza a udzia ludzi w cyrkulacji, zamo niejsi mieszka cy kraju wi cej wydaj na zaspokojenie swoich potrzeb, nawet tych luksusowych. To pobudza mog o do dalszego rozwoju rzemios a, które musia oby odpowiedzie na zwi kszone zapotrzebowanie rynku. Wy szy poziom ycia, to tak e wi ksza dba o porz dek, czysto , higien , a co za tym idzie mniejsza umieralno w ogóle, a dzieci w szczególno ci. W obrazie organizmu zwanego Rzeczpospolit odmalowanym przez wojewod Garczy skiego niepo ledni rol odgrywa sprawa populacji ludzi j zamieszkuj cych. O ile w krwioobiegu tego organizmu cyrkulowa powinny praca i 132


dobra b ce jej wytworami, to arterie i tkank stanowi ludzie j zamieszkuj cy. Im by oby ich wi cej tym lepiej ukrwiony by by ów ustrój, zdrowszy i pr niejszy. Wojewoda pozna ski sta na stanowisku niczym nieograniczonego rozrostu populacji mieszka ców Rzeczypospolitej. Przy czym w kwestii tej powo uje si na najwa niejszy, przynajmniej dla ówczesnej wi kszo ci, autorytet pisz c: „(…) Pan Bóg powtórzy na znak b ogos awie stwa swego niechybnego, do godziwego zamno enia ludem ziemi ca ej, a to aby mia w nich pomna aj si chwa swoj , kto si za nie wydaje na dobre i wygodne wychowanie dziatek, morzy je lub fizycznie, lub moralnie i umniejsza kreatur Boga na ziemi chwal cych, i niby b ogos awie stwu boskiemu sprzeciwia” [2, s.53]. amanie nakazu wyp ywaj cego od najwy szej, autotelicznej warto ci, któr stanowi Bóg, by o w oczach katolickiego magnata najpowa niejszym grzechem. Zaludnienie obszarów ca ej Rzeczpospolitej stanowi o jeden z g ównych celów, jakie powinni sobie postawi decydenci tego kraju. Tym postulatem Garczy ski wpisuje si w g ówny nurt koncepcji merkantylistycznej, w my l której im wi cej ludzi w pa stwie tym wi ksza jego si a. Wynika o to z przekonania, e ka dy cz owiek to potencjalna si a robocza, odbiorca wytworzonych w kraju dóbr, a przede wszystkim to rezerwuar si y obronnej. Autor Anatomii… wskazuje na przyk ady ró nych pa stw europejskich i nie tylko, które postawi y sobie za cel zaludnienie swoich obszarów, wzmacniaj c tym swoj si ekonomiczn , a tak e militarn . A w Rzeczpospolitej, jak pisa wojewoda pozna ski: „I narzekamy ustawicznie, e pusta Polska przyjdzie jaki nieprzyjaciel, to si cho ma garstk nierzy, (…) od granicy do granicy rozpo ciera, a nie ma kto da odporu i nie mo e” [2, s.56-57]. Utyskuje wi c, i w dawniejszych czasach jedna rodzina mog a ca y pu k wystawi dla obrony ojczyzny. W ró nych stanach spo ecznych problem posiadania dzieci ró nie si kszta towa i odmienne by y przyczyny niskiego poziomu reprodukcji. W domach szlacheckich ogranicza si liczb posiadanego potomstwa g ównie ze wzgl dów ekonomicznych: „(…) panowie familianci, aby domy ich nie zdrobnia y, upodobawszy sobie pierworodnego syna, albo przez sekretne sposoby drugich (…) zostawuj , aby tam mizernie niszczeli i umierali” [2, s.53]. W tego jedynego potomka inwestuje si ogromne fortuny, aby zabezpieczy mu przysz . Planuje si koligacje (nota bene tak e z jedynaczkami). A przecie jedynak to do niepewna inwestycja, je eli umrze przedwcze nie nie wydawszy na wiat dziedzic to przepadnie i maj tek, i wyga nie ród. Na marginesie mo na by si zastanowi nad s uszno ci koncepcji, w my l której posiadanie syna by o wa niejsze dla trwania rodu ni posiadanie córki. Stosunek afirmuj cy dzieci p ci m skiej i deprecjonuj cy p pi kn nie posiada silnego uzasadnienia biologicznego. Bo je eli chce si mie pewno , e wnucz ta zrodzone ze zwi zku posiadanych dzieci s spokrewnione ze swoimi dziadkami, to powinno si stara o posiadanie córki. Macierzy stwo kobiety, która urodzi a dziecko nie pozostawia adnych w tpliwo ci (mam tu na my li jedynie zap odnienia naturalne). Natomiast ojcostwo, jak wskazuj na to liczne przyk ady w historii, to kwestia w du ej mierze wiary i zaufania. Preferencja dla potomka p ci m skiej, ma charakter czysto spo eczny i wynika z patrylinearyzmu charakterystycznego dla wielu spo ecze stw europejskich. Wracaj c do g ównych rozwa , opisane wy ej dzia ania szlachty wydatnie ogranicza y cho by liczb potencjalnych oficerów, tak niezb dnych armii. Wed ug wojewody w dwóch pozosta ych stanach spo ecznych przyczyn niskiego stanu liczebnego dzieci by y odmienne, cho równie cz sto mia y pod e ekonomiczne. Bogaci mieszczanie, wzoruj c si na szlachcie z podobnych pobudek redukowali liczb posiadanych dzieci. Po ledniejsi mieszczanie jak i ch opi wielokrotnie ograniczali liczb potomstwa z powodu ogromnego ubóstwa. Innym powa nym powodem by o dla Garczy skiego lenistwo jakie trawi o du cz mieszka ców Rzeczpospolitej. Na ten przyk ad mieszczanin „(…) do maj tniejszego trafia z wizyt w obiad, aby u niego zje i tam ju z gazetami o Rzeczypospolitej, o sejmach, o meteryach publicznych gada, zjad szy do karczmy na ch odne piwo idzie, a mu dzie w tym zejdzie (…)” [2, s.54]. Ch opi natomiast wykazuj niski poziom pracowito ci z powodu ogromnych obci nak adanych na nich przez w cicieli folwarków. Jak pokaza y badania historyków gospodarczych i historyków wsi, takich jak cho by S. Inglot [4], bojkotowanie pracy zw aszcza na pa skich gruntach, by o form walki z uciskiem pa szczy nianym. Ucisk ten powodowa równie ogromne ograniczenie dochodowo ci pracy na roli. Ch opom cz sto trudno by o za wypracowane dobra utrzyma nawet skromn rodzin . Równie dzia ania zarz dców folwarcznych takie, jak cho by zatrudnianie ci arnych kobiet przy ci kich pracach polowych, mia y wp yw na liczb dzieci ch opskich. Powa przyczyn deficytu populacyjnego stanowi alkoholizm trawi cy znaczn cz mieszka ców kraju. Problem ów generowa kilka istotnych konsekwencji dla faktu posiadania potomstwa. Ju Garczy ski dostrzega ogromne niebezpiecze stwo, jakie stwarza alkohol dla ustroju nienarodzonego dziecka. A trzeba pami ta , e choroba alkoholowa trawi a w równym stopniu m czyzn jak i kobiety, równie te w ci y [5]. Przestrzegaj c przed wielorakimi zagro eniami wynikaj cymi z nadu ywania alkoholu wojewoda pisa : „Wiedz c e na frasunek dobry trunek, melancholi w pó z desperacj pomieszan alembikow z g owy wybija recept , a tym samym p ód w sobie psuje. (…) Matka powróciwszy z rozmowy z kum (suto zakrapianej trunkami – P. B.), zastanie dzieci p acz ce, ujmie si o krzywd i niby swawol karz c uderzy starsze pijan pi ci , potr ci na eb (…) kompania gorza eczk znalaz , ta za za lepi a do nieostro nego bicia, niedyskretne sprawi o dzieci ciu kalectwo” [2, s.54-55]. Na marginesie mo na jeszcze doda , e alkohol zmniejsza równie potencj seksualn . Pogarsza tak e znacznie jako gamet m skich i skich. Samo posiadanie dzieci nie gwarantowa o jeszcze sukcesu i nie dawa o wymiernych korzy ci krajowi. Potomstwo winno zosta dobrze wychowane i co wa ne równie dobrze wyedukowane. W Rzeczpospolitej sprawy te równie nie mia y si dobrze w oczach wojewody Garczy skiego, a „(…) dzieci s od rodziców le traktowane i prawie zarówno ze szczeni tami zaniedbane” [2, s.216]. A wystarczy o by wzi jak najchlubniejszy przyk ad z polskich dysydentów 133


religijnych, dla których edukacja dzieci stanowi a jedno z najistotniejszych zada . Szko y protestanckie, bo o nich ównie my la Autor Anatomii…, by y na tak wysokim poziomie, e znacznie przewy sza y jako ci kszta cenia szkolnictwo rzymskokatolickie. Nauczano w szko ach dysydenckich umiej tno ci potrzebnych ka demu bez wzgl du na stan spo eczny, a wi c czytania, pisania i podstaw wiary. Wed ug wojewody pozna skiego procesem edukacyjnym mieliby zosta obj ci wszyscy mieszka cy Rzeczpospolitej, od ch opów pocz wszy. Dobrze wykszta ceni poddani to zysk dla kraju, ale równie korzy dla pana. Dlatego te „Powinna si w zwierzchno wy sza, po miastach magistraty, a po wsiach szlachta lub ekonomowie, administratorowie, podstaro ciowie w adz nad ch opami maj cy, aby zach cali poddanych, intanta nie trzymali oppressione, a przy tym aby zach cali ustawicznie gospodarzów, rodziców ad honestatem educationem prolis, bo z dobrej edukacji ca e ycie dependuje ludzkie” [2, s.263]. W zagadnieniu edukacji ogniskuje si kilka wa kich dla koncepcji Garczy skiego elementów. W przemy leniach wojewody na ten temat mo emy dostrzec równie par istotnych kwestii, cho nie wyra onych explicite w adnym z paragrafów Anatomii. Edukacja nie stanowi a dla Garczy skiego warto ci autotelicznej, mia a charakter stricte utylitarny. Powinna wi c by nastawiona przede wszystkim na wpajanie umiej tno ci praktycznych i przydatnych w yciu zawodowym. Zaleca wi c wojewoda, poza uniwersalnymi dla wszystkich umiej tno ciami pisania, czytania i podstaw wiary, specjalizacj wyk adanej wiedzy. Ch opi i ich dzieci powinny wi c nabywa wiedz , która wydatnie wp ynie na poziom i wydajno ich pracy. Mieszczanie winni przyswaja obok wiedzy ogólnej umiej tno ci niezb dne do prowadzenia warsztatu rzemie lniczego. Istotny by te postulat jak najwi kszego wachlarza nauczanych profesji, aby zapewni specjalistów we wszystkich specjalno ciach rzemie lniczych. To oczywi cie po to, „(…) aby wszystko czego tylko prawdziwa potrzeba wymaga ludzka, w swoim znajdowa o si kraju, kruszców, minera ów ze ska dobywanie &. Zgo a wszystkie rzemios a i manufaktury (…)” [2, s.262-263]. S dz , e mo na pokusi si o wyci gni cie wniosku dotycz cego przep ywu rzemie lników z i do Rzeczpospolitej. Wojewoda Garczy ski sta na stanowisku prawie ca kowitej samowystarczalno ci rzemios a krajowego, które samo ma zaspokaja wszelkie potrzeby rynku wewn trznego. Nie widzia potrzeby sprowadzania specjalistów z zagranicy, a najprawdopodobniej wr cz by temu przeciwny. Wydaje si , e populacja mieszka ców Rzeczpospolitej ma dla wojewody charakter zamkni ty. Nie potrzebuje ani nap ywu nowego elementu, ani te odp ywu, powinna wykazywa wzrost w swoim obr bie. Dlatego te bardzo cz sto na kartach swego dzie a pi tnowa ydów [6], Ormian, Greków, a wi c te nacje, które zwi ksza y odp yw z kraju gotówki i nap yw towarów z zagranicy. Nale o wi c przeciwdzia temu stanowi rzeczy, po przez rozwój handlu prowadzonego przez Polaków, a tak e rozwija g ównie rynek wewn trzny dla zbywania wytworzonych w kraju towarów. Reasumuj c mo na zauwa , e w ka dym poruszanym zagadnieniu przejawia o si u Garczy skiego my lenie w kategoriach gospodarki, je li nie stricte, to w du ym stopniu samowystarczalnej. Wida to, bardzo wyra nie w obronie miast i ich mieszka ców. W nacisku jaki k ad wojewoda pozna ski na rozwój przemys u miejskiego, warsztatów, manufaktur. Mia o to s , przede wszystkim rozwojowi produkcji towarów niezb dnych na rynku wewn trznym. Cele takiego dzia ania by y dwa i oba mia y s jedynie wzrostowi gospodarczemu, spo ecznemu, jak równie militarnemu Rzeczpospolitej. Jednym z nich by o ograniczenie do niezb dnego minimum odp ywy pieni dza z kraju. W koncepcji wojewody, jak i innych merkantylistów przewija si przekonanie, e o sile pa stwa stanowi ilo posiadanych pieni dzy. Czym wi cej ich posiada kraj tym jest silniejszy ekonomicznie, ale tak e i militarnie. Wi za o si to z drugim wa kim celem, którym by o ograniczenie maksymalne importu towarów i us ug z zagranicy. Import obok drena u pieni dza ogranicza wg wojewody aktywno przemys ow w kraju, prowadzi do ograniczenia samowystarczalno ci gospodarczej. Zaspokajanie potrzeb za pomoc importu powodowa o zb dno rozwoju tych dzia ów przemys u i ich produktów, które zaspokajano importem. To natomiast uderza o w kolejny czynnik wa ny w koncepcji merkantylistycznej, a mianowicie wzrost populacji mieszka ców pa stwa. S abo Rzeczpospolitej tkwi a wg Garczy skiego w niskim przyro cie naturalnym, a ten by powi zany w du ej mierze, z ograniczon liczb miejsc pracy. Wielu ludzi redukowa o liczb posiadanych dzieci z prozaicznej przyczyny, braku rodków na ich utrzymanie. Odpowiedzialnymi za ten stan rzeczy czyni wojewoda decydentów, którzy robi niewiele lub zgo a nic, by zmobilizowa i zaktywizowa swoich poddanych. A to w nie ludzie u steru w adzy, czy to regionalnej, czy te centralnej powinni swymi decyzjami dba o rozwój ojczyzny. Si gaj c do egzemplifikacji z historii Polski wskazywa na kluczow rol w adców w ochronie i rozwoju kraju. Przyk adami godnymi na ladowania byli ci w adcy, którzy czuwali i swoimi dzia aniami chronili np. miasta i ich rozwój. Decydenci winni ingerowa w wiele aspektów ycia swych poddanych. Znamienna mo e by tu sprawa edukacji dzieci, m odzie y, a tak e i doros ych. Decyzji o podnoszeniu poziomu wiedzy nie pozostawia wojewoda wyborom pojedynczych jednostek, lecz scedowywa ten obowi zek na zwierzchno lokaln i centraln . wiadczy to mo e, o my leniu Garczy skiego w kategoriach protekcjonizmu pa stwa. Wielokrotnie te powo ywa si na przyk ad tych pa stw niemieckich, w których dominowa typ gospodarki protekcjonistycznej. Taki sposób podej cia do ekonomii wi e si z postrzeganiem kraju jako systemu zamkni tego, prawie samowystarczalnego. Dostrzec tu mo na du analogi do krwioobiegu, który równie by uwa any w owym czasie za uk ad ca kowicie zamkni ty. Otwarcie krwioobiegu prowadzi do wyp ywu krwi, a w konsekwencji mierci ca ego organizmu. Tak te i otwarcie „krwioobiegu” w „organizmie”, jakim by o pa stwo, musia o doprowadzi do odp ywu towarów, us ug, pieni dza, a wi c powolnego os abiania ca ego „ustroju” i w ko cu jego mierci. Relacj ekonomiczne na arenie mi dzynarodowej postrzegane by y g ównie jako rywalizacja, w której jeden z graczy mo e zyskiwa jedynie kosztem drugiego. Zysk jednego pa stwa równa si stratom innego. Nie by o miejsca na d ugofalow wspó prac i 134


koegzystencj . Sytuacj tak dobrze charakteryzuje, zaczerpni ta z teorii gier, analogia do gry o sumie zerowej [7]. W grze takiej bez wzgl du na przyj taktyk post powania (tak zwany scenariusz gry) wygrana jednego gracza oznacza strat drugiego gracza, w wysoko ci równej wysoko ci wygranej pierwszego gracza. W grze takiej nie mowy o jakiejkolwiek kooperacji graczy, których jedynym celem jest, jak najni sza wygrana przeciwnika oznaczaj ca maksymalizacja zysku w asnego. Odej cie od takiego trybu widzenia funkcjonowania gospodarki przynios y dopiero prace takich my licieli jak: Adam Smith (1723-90) i David Ricardo (1772-1823). Pierwszy z nich postulowa mi dzy innymi uwolnienie gospodarki spod przemo nej w adzy rz dów pa stw, drugi natomiast dostrzeg mo liwo odnoszenia korzy ci przez wszystkich partnerów „gry” gospodarczej (wymiana komparatywna). Rzeczpospolita w oczach wojewody Garczy skiego jawi a si jako organizm, którego stan wymaga dog bnej terapii. Id c z pr dem wspó czesnych sobie pogl dów anatomicznych i fizjologicznych postrzega ów ustrój, jako uk ad zamkni ty i mechaniczny. Taka wizja si rzeczy implikowa a potrzeb sta ej w niego ingerencji, najpierw w celu poprawy funkcjonowania, potem podtrzymywania jego sprawno ci.

1. Wojewoda kaliski, nast pnie pozna ski, wybitny pisarz polityczny, dzia acz spo eczno-polityczny. Wykszta cony w szko ach skich. Kilka krotnie zmienia sympatie polityczne, pocz tkowo po stronie Augusta II, pó niej stronnik Leszczy skiego. Postulowa w swoich dzia aniach i pismach gruntown reform spo eczn i ekonomiczn Rzeczypospolitej. Obszerniejszy biogram: Historia nauki polskiej, t. VI, Dokumentacja bio- bibliograficzna, indeks biograficzny tomu I i II, pod red. B. Suchodolskiego, Wroc aw-Warszawa-Kraków-Gda sk 1974, s. 174. 2. S. Garczy ski, Anatomia Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej. Synom ojczyzny ku przestrodze i poprawie tego co z kluby wypad o…, Warszawa 1751. 3. Szerzej na temat koncepcji krwioobiegu i polemiki Kartezjusza z Harveyem zob. R. Descartes, Cz owiek. Opis cia a ludzkiego, prze . A. Bednarczyk, Warszawa 1989, s. 83-97. 4. Zob. Historia ch opów polskich, pod red. S. Inglota, Wroc aw 1992, s. 83-88. 5. Bardzo cz sto u dzieci kobiet spo ywaj cych du e ilo ci alkoholu w ci y wyst puje odowy zespó alkoholowy. Jego nast pstwem mog by nadpobudliwo (hiperaktywno ), k opoty w uczeniu si , a tak e upo ledzenie fizyczne i umys owe. Jak wiadomo wysoko procentowe trunki spo ywane w nadmiarze bardzo cz sto wywo uj równie wzrost agresywno ci u konsumentów. Jest to konsekwencj zmian, które zachodz w o rodkowym uk adzie nerwowym. Sama choroba alkoholowa, jest skorelowana z mniejsz liczb receptorów dopaminy w mózgu, spowodowanym wyst powaniem allelu A1 genu receptora dopaminowego D2. Dopamina jest neuroprzeka nikiem odpowiada mi dzy innymi za nastrój cz owieka. Alkohol i narkotyki wzmacniaj dzia anie dopaminy, czym rekompensuj jej obni ony poziom w mózgu. Wi cej na ten temat zob. Biologia, pod red. E. P. Solomon, L. R. Berg, D. W. Martin, Warszawa 2007, s. 754, 773, 781-782, 977. 6. Na temat stosunku wojewody Garczy skiego do ydów zob. P. Badyna, ydzi w Anatomii Rzeczypospolitej wojewody Stefana Garczy skiego, [w:] Staropolski ogl d wiata – problem inno ci, pod red. F. Wola skiego, Wroc aw 2007, s. 343-350. 7. Szersz analiz gier o sumie zerowej mo na znale np. w: M. Malawski, A. Wieczorek, H. Sosnowska, Konkurencja i kooperacja. Teoria gier w ekonomii i naukach spo ecznych, wyd. II, Warszawa 2006, s. 25-28.

135


342.81:324:304 . . – ).

. . : .

2004 ,

,

.

2010 ,

. ,

.

. . .

2004 2010

. , , , , . : S. I. Havryliuk. We consider the pre-image as a manipulative technology and manipulative influence political image of the modern political process and the electorate. The basicform of the pre-election image as a manipulative technology and the role of political image in modern politics have been analize. An attempt was made to reveal theeffects of manipulative influence the image of an example of the presidential campaigns of 2004 and 2010 in Ukraine Keywords: image, the pre-image effect, manipulative technology, image-makers.

. . . , ,

. .

. . .

.

,

.

.

,

.

.

, .

.

,

.

.

.

,

. .

,

,

,

. . .

.

[13- 16].

. .

[19]

[1-3],

[10].

.

[21]

.

. . . –

. . , .

, [6].

.

,

,

, ,

. .

, (

),

,

. ,

, ,

, .

«

» «

«image», », «

».

:

136

«imag » ,

,


,

,

,

,

. [5].

«

»

. ,

«

».

.

»

«

.

« ,

[12]

». », «

», «

»,

,

, . :

(

),

,

, ,

,

,

, ,

, [7]. – . ,

« , »

«

.

»

«

,

»

,

,

,

. .

, 60-70

80-

XX

.

,

, .

90-

. , «

,

»

.

,

,

. . «

»,

«

,

», »,

» [8]. .

,

.

[16].

,

,

,

,

,

«

«

.

, ,

,

. , ,

, ,

,

.

[21].

.

,

,

,

[9]. ,

.

,

, ,

,

,

,

, . (

)

(

) [6]. , ,

. ,

:

,

,

, , ,

[13]. . . , . . , ( )

, (

137

,

,

– 55 % ), 38 % -


(

,

)

7 %

,

. , , .

:

– – –

,

,

; ;

[6]. :

(

,

,

,

).

,

.

, ;

(

,

,

,

,

,

).

;

(

).

, –

[20]:

(

),

.

,

; –

, ;

– –

,

;

,

, [24].

, , ,

,

[4].

.

,

,

,

,

, ,

, .

,

»

[25]: « :«

, «

»

,

,

. ,

.

»

,

»

,

.

,

,

. », ,

,

« ,

», »–

»; « ». ,

«

»

, , ,

.

, ,

.

.

,

. ( «

),

.

. .

»

; «

»–

,

;

» – «

, »;

.

«

» ...» [3].

,

. :« –

,

: –

: « »-

-

»-

,

,

( –

(

,

,

) [18]. ,

),

,

,

.

,

.

, : –

.

( :

), ,

( ,

); [25].

, 138

» – »-

, « ;


. , ,

. 2004

. ,

,

( . .

)

( .

),

.

,

,

,

,

.

,

. . .

«

,

».

», « »,

«

».

:(

,

).

[22]. ( , «

). 2010 « »,

»

(

. . :

«

)

», .

«

. »,

«

-

.

», » [11].

«

.

», : ( .

;

-

-

);

.

-

.

(

,

). . (

, )

.

,

. »,

«

« »

-« », «

», «

», «

»,

»). ,

», .

. ,

« »

« ,

,

« ,

,

» . .

», «

».

, » ,

-

«

.

«

,

» («

.).

«

», ,

.

« .

,

, .

. ,

.

,

«

»

2010

.

. .

«

»

. », «

« («

») .

« .

»

, »

, ,

,

,

, ,

,

, .

, . ,

,

,

,

,

[23].

,

«

»,

« 139

»

(


,

) ,

.

.

, .

.

.

,

», «

, («

»). -

») [23].

2004

2010 .

,

. . . . . .

,

. . 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 472 . 7. – 17. 8. – 2009. – 9. 704 . 10.

. . . .

. . .

:

,

, , / . . .– .: , 2000. – 384 . / . . .– .: , 1996. – 144 . :[ ]/ . . .– .: , 2003. – 424 . . .] / . .– .: , 2010. – 432 . 112000 / . . . .– : , 2003. – 790 . :[ . .] / . . . .– .: « », 2008. –

:[ : .

. .

/ .

. 22. –

]/ / . .

12. . 2008. – 266 . 13. . . », 2000. – 354 . 14. . 15. . : 16. . 17. . , 1995.– 235 . 18. . . 19. . 2001. – 2. – . 57. 20. ., .

/ .

[

24. 421 c. 25.

] /

,

]/ . .

,–

2. – .6. [ .

. .

.–

,

.:

/ ] /

.

.] / . .

. . .

.

, 2005. –

.

. .–

.

.:

. —

.

.

.– . –

.:

,

.: «

»,

.:

, 1997. – 328 . , 2002. – 704 . / . .– .: , 2001.

527 . / . [

// ] //

. – .: //

:

//

.:

] /

:

. . .

.–

: [

. – ., 1997. – 91 . / . . – .: . – .: ; .:

/ . :

. .

[

. – 2000. – 21. 22. . 3. 23.

.

:[

, 2000. –528 . . , 2001. — 496 . . :

:

4. – . 13

/ .

:[

. .

11.

. – 2002. –

: . 10 – 12. .

; – .:

//

.–

.

,

.

.

, 2001. – 560 . . – 2004., 2–8

.–

. 2009-2010 . / . , 2010. – 21 : . . .

.

//

.

.

.

: : [

, ] //

, .

.–

140

.

. . – . 196–201. [ ]/ . – 2006. – 564 .

/ .

.

. .:

. , 1993. –


327 (47+497.2) .

. 1980- –

1990-

.)

.

. .

). ,

.

1988

.

. 1980- -

1990-

.,

. , . ,

: . 1980- -

.

.

»,

,

.

. 1990-

( .)

.

1980- -

1990-

. ,

. , . ,« », , . : B. P. Grushetsky. New Political Thinking in USSR and its Influence on the Foreign Policy of Bulgaria (late 1980’s and early 1990’s) It is revealed the reasons of introduction and the main components of the foreign-policy conception of the New Political Thinking in USSR. It is determined level of its influence on the foreign policy of Bulgaria in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s. It is elucidated the reasons of the NPT’s influence decrease on the international relations and the Bulgarian foreign-policy course. Keywords: New Political Thinking, M. Gorbachev, Common European Home, USSR, Bulgaria.

( 1980«

)

.

.

,

» . , .

.

, 1980-

.,

; ; ,

.

,

,

,

,

,

,

.

. » [5].

« 1990-

1980- -

.,

, ,

.

,

.

.

,

[14]. , , [2; 3; 6; 18]. :

. «

.

,

.

,

.

, . .

» [13]. [1; 9; 10; 11; 12; 16; 17; 20; 22]. [4; 21; 24]

, [8; 15; 23]. ,

1985

.

.

. .

, , ,

,

, : . .

141


1940-

.

, .

-

.

,

, ,

,

,

.

, , .

.

,

, [1, . 697].

,

,

, .

,

.

,

.

, . . .

.

.

,

: «

. ,

.

.

» [6, . 292]. 1985 . .

. ,

,

[3, . 311].

, .

.

,

,

,« ,

, » [3, . 314].

1985-1987

.

, .

.

,

«

1984 . 1988 .

» [7].

. ,

,

,

«

,

». ,

, [14,

.142].

:

,

«

». [5, . 140-141, 146]. .

.

,

,

,

[5, . 170]. , . « , "Newsweek" 1956 .

», . 18

"Washington Post"

1988 . . 1968 .

[15, . 261]. «

[4, . 245].

,7

»

1989 .,

.

:

.

, .

.

,

,

. ,

[5, . 204-206]. ,

:

[5, . 173, .

214]. . : .

,

, 142


,

,

,

. ,

. , «

»,

.

.

, [1, . 707-708; 3, . 369].

. , , .

,

.

.

.

,

,

[11, . 412; 12, . 704].

,

[2, . 140]. , .

:

.

,

1987 . [3, . 370]. .

10

1989 .

.

,

(

) .

. . .

, .

«

:

»(

1990 .)

:« …

,

. » [13, . 7].

,

.

, [8],

. ,

, [20, . 35-36]. .

, ,

. 134].

, 6

1990 ,

.8

1990 [17, .

.,

[16, . 374]. . 1990

.

,

,

-

[3, . 371-379]. . . 1990 ., : «

,

,

» [21, p. 23]. 1991

. .

.

,

1

, 1991 . [19, p. 581-582]. . ,

, ,

, [24, p. 1],

,

. : 1990-1991

. (

),

. . .

,

.

1991 .: « … -

.

,

» [23, p.

3]. 1991 .,

, .

,

143

.

1990 .


:« ,

«

, « » [18, . 16].

» ,

»

1990 ., . ,

(

!)

,

1991 .

. ,

1991 .

. ,

. ,

.

1995 .

.

, , ,

,

,

[9, . 77].

,

,

,

.

«

. 2000 .

»,

. [10, . 23; 22, p. 51]. , 1980- -

1990-

.,

.

. , . ,

,

: »(

). 1980- -

.

(1988-1989

1990.

.

.), .

.

(

1989 - 1990

.),

.

. 1991 . ,

. . , ,

, .

(1991-1996 ,

,

, , 1991 .

,

.),

. «

,

1996

»

.

. .

1.

. /

2. . . 3. 4.

/ . .

....

, . . . .

.

, . /

5.

.

, ./ .

. .

.

//

, 2010. - . 662-711. .: .« . - . 6. -

. 2. -

.:

, , 2006. - 784 . , 1995. - 653 . » «

(1985-1991) / »/

:

.

, 1988. - 271 . 6. . / . . - .: , 2001. - 446 . 7. . . / . . , . . 1984. – 296 . 8. : http://dediserver.eu/hosting/ethnodoc/data/BG19900115.pdf 9. . . // . - 1996. - 4. - . 74-78. 10. . // . 19-32.

144

.–

. . // , 1989. - . 230 - 252. / . . . - .:

.

.:

, [ .-

]. 18: . – 2001. -

1. –


11.

. 80-

12.

, / . . . . .

//

: .-

:

70, 2012. - . 402-417. «

.

. //

. 13. 14.

« .. .

// 15. / . 16. 17.

, 2008. - . 699-711. : . . . . – 2012. -

. , . . . - .: . . . - 2011. - . 4. - . 373-378. . . . . . 1991 :

40» (1985-1989) / . »: / .

: / .

//

. - 1990. :

,

4. - . 3-8. ,

/

.

.

2. – . 136-152. : , 2004. - 383 . / . / . .-

.

, . . . - 2009. . - .:

:

.

//

// 11. - . 132-137. , , 1997. –

18. / . . 336 . 19. Bideleux R. A History of Eastern Europe: Crisis and Change / R. Bideleux, I. Jeffries. - New York: Routledge, 2002. – 691 p. 20. Demirtas-Coskun B. Turkish-Bulgarian Relations in the Post-Cold War Era / B. Demirtas-Coskun // The Turkish Yearbook. 2001. - Vol. 32. - P. 25-60. 21. Izvestiya Threat: Medgyessy Reaction // JPRS Report: East Europe. - 1990. - 6 March. - P. 23. 22. Katsikas S. Negotiating Diplomacy in the New Europe: Foreign Policy in Post-Communist Bulgaria / S. Katsikas. - London: I. B. Tauris, 2011. - 267 p. 23. Statement by Dr. Zhelyu Zhelev, President of the Republic of Bulgaria, in the North Atlantic Council (Brussels, November14, 1991). UN Doc S/23231, Annex [Electronic resource]. - Mode of access: http://daccess-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/ GEN/N91/395/54/IMG/N9139554.pdf 24. Warsaw Pact Disintegration Welcomed // JPRS Report: East Europe. - 1991. - 22 April. - P. 1.

: 329.17 (477) : 81’272 . . „

”:

,

, ). „

.

„ „ ”,

.„ „

” „ , ”:

,

.

,

, .

,

.

. „

” .

.

.

, .

„ ” „ ” . .„ ”, , , , , . Ukrainian discourse of «banal nationalism»: observation one day. Abstract. The article deals with the Ukrainian discourse of «banal nationalism» based on one day activity of national massmedia. Using the methods of the founder of «banal nationalism» conception M. Billing the author made the contextual analysis of the content concerning nation and country. This approach gave the possibility to define the functional role of «banal nationalism» in every day life of the Ukrainian nation. Keywords. «Banal nationalism», discourse, mass-media, deixis, national consolidation, the Ukrainian nation.

. , . ,

, .

[28, . 13–14]. „ ,

. – .

.

. ,

[19, . 174]. ,

145


”.

. .

1995 ”,

[4, . 34–35]. .

,

,

. ,

,

. (

,

,

)

( ”.

„ „

”, „

)

, ,

”, „ ”, [4, . 35–36].

„ „

”, „

” ”(

”, „

),

, ”(

) „

”(

).

, ”

. .

,

,

( ,

,

). „

”, , .

. ”,

”, „

5

2013 ., ”,

„ Mail.ru

Ukr.net. .

,

.„

, „

.

.

,

:

,

,

,

,

,

. (

,

,

)

,

,

. , . ,

, „

.

” [41].

. [38].

” .

: „… ,

,

, ”

, ” [13]. ,

, ,

” [21]. : „… ,

.

,

.

, [48].

,

. :„

, ” [1].

,

, ,

,

.

. „

, ” [32]. .

„… , ,

,

” [37]. , . . :„

40%

14

12 ,

.

18 ,

, – ” [23].

.

8

. ,

”. ,

„ „

:

„ ” [43].

, 146


,

, ,

” „

”.

,

,

. , . . :

,

. ,

,

:„ .

. ” [22].

– ,

,

. : „

,

” [26].

, : „

,

,

,

,

,

” [8]. „

”:

vs

:

?”

[5]. ,

,

,

. ,

,

,

”: „

,

, .

” [20]. , . „ ”.

” – : „… ” [45]. , , „

:„

,

. , !” [24].

,

,

… .

!” [39].

,

,

. , ,

,

,

,

. ,

:„

,

,

.

,

, ”

” [6].

. „

. .

” –

, [10]. „

0%”, „ [15; 14].

,

0,1%” – ,

,

.

. „

”,

, :„

?…

”. ,

.

” ,

[46].

147

,


,

”. „

„The Economist ”–

,

[49]. .

”, ,

. „

. „

”: „ …” [12]. , „

:

”:

” [25].

”, :„ ,

,

100

” [17]. . ”–

„… [35]. : „ ,

,

” [3].

: , ,

( ).

” ,

. , .

,

,

, ,

, : „… ” [2]. : „

,

…”, – [30].

, „…

:

” [29]. . ,

”,

, . :„

:

,

, ” [42]. Colorados”. , .

„Los : „ ” [36]. : „… „

”– ”, ,

!” [27].

, ,

.„

,

,

,– [27].

”– „

” ,

. . . ,

:„

.

,

…” [33]. . : „

, „

”… –

148

” ” [16].


. ,

:„

, ,

,

”,

0,7%” [47]. ,

, . „ ”, „

,

”.

, „ …”, „

20 ”, „

”, „

, -2013…

…” – „

”, „

,

”, „

.

,

”, „… [18; 40; 31; 44; 11; 9]. ” ”

, (

,

). ,

,

, . ,

, „

,

”.

,

(

,

) [7]. , . ,

.

”, ,

,

?” (

, 50%) [34, . 88].

” ,

, . „

. ,

.

,

, ,

,

, ,

,

,

„ ?”.

,

, ,

,

:

, ,

,

. , ,

. ,

, ,

1.

: :

(05.04.2013). – 2. :[ ]. – 3. // (05.04.2013). – 4.

. –

.

.

– [ ] // :[ ]. – http://obozrevatel.com/politics/78153-azarov-vseukrainskaya-aktsiya-oppozitsii-politicheskij-turizm.htm . : , [ ] // : http://www.pravda.com.ua/news/2013/04/5/6987443/ (05.04.2013). – . . [ ] / :[ ]. – : http://www.epravda.com.ua/publications/2013/04/5/368823/ . / // . – 2007. – 1 (58). – . 34–71.

149


5. vs : ? [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://obozrevatel.com/politics/26847-bilshist-vs-menshist-rozluchennya-po-ukrainski-onovlyutsya.htm (05.04.2013). – . 6. . [ ] / // :[ ]. – : http://obozrevatel.com/author-column/84726-stihiya-proti-vladi.htm (05.04.2013). – . 7. : . [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://life.pravda.com.ua/person/2013/04/5/125798/ (05.04.2013). – . 8. . „ ” [ ] / // :[ ]. – : http://www.pravda.com.ua/columns/2013/04/5/6987212/ (05.04.2013). – . 9. : „ , ” [ ] // dynamo.kiev.ua : [ ]. – : http://dynamo.kiev.ua/news/137973.html (05.04.2013). – . . 10. : [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://obozrevatel.com/politics/67182-dobryij-vecher-stavka-na-natsionalnoe-syire.htm (05.04.2013). – . . 11. [ ] // Mail.ru : [ ]. – : http://sport.mail.ru/news/tennis/12629065/?frommail=1 (05.04.2013). – . . 12. . : [ ] / , // :[ ]. – : http://gazeta.dt.ua/macrolevel/borotba-zekonomichnimi-zlochinami-kamo-gryadeshi-_.html (05.04.2013). – . 13. : [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://www.pravda.com.ua/news/2013/04/5/6987484/ (05.04.2013). – . 14. 0,1% [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://finance.obozrevatel.com/business-and-finance/87935-zolotovalyutnyie-rezervyi-ukrainyi-vyirosli-na-01.htm (05.04.2013). – . . 15. 0% [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://finance.obozrevatel.com/analytics-and-forecasts/72318-inflyatsiya-v-ukraine-sostavila-0.htm (05.04.2013). – . . 16. . „ ”[ ]/ // :[ ]. – : http://gazeta.dt.ua/CULTURE/korotki-metri-novoyi-hvili-_.html (05.04.2013). – . 17. , 130 , 14 [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://glavcom.ua/news/121469.html (05.04.2013). – . . 18. :„ ”[ ] // :[ ]. – : http://www.champion.com.ua/football/2013/04/4/529369/ (05.04.2013). – . 19. . / // . – 2009. – . 4 (15). – . 155–174. 20. . , „ ” „ ”[ ]/ // :[ ]. – : http://www.pravda.com.ua/articles /2013/04/4/6987239/view_comments/page_1/ (05.04.2013). – . 21. „ ” [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://www.pravda.com.ua/news/2013/04/5/6987514/ (05.04.2013). – . 22. . [ ] / , // :[ ]. – : http://www.pravda.com.ua/articles/2013/04/5/6987464/ (05.04.2013). – . 23. 21 [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://life.pravda.com.ua/society/2013/04/5/125771/ (05.04.2013). – . 24. [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://www.pravda.com.ua/news/2013/04/5/6987511/ (05.04.2013). – . 25. „ ”: [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://dt.ua/ECONOMICS/novi-geroyi-ofshornogo-vitoku-ukrayinskiy-milyarder-i-gruzinskiyprem-yer-119960_.html (05.04.2013). – . 26. – [ ] // Mail.ru : [ ]. – : http://news.mail.ru/inworld/ukraina/global/112/politics/12632281/?frommail=1 (05.04.2013). – . . // 27. . ? [ ] / :[ ]. – : http://gazeta.dt.ua/CULTURE/hto-rozlyutiv-ukrayinciv-portret-yanukovicha-yakprivid-dlya-manevru-_.html (05.04.2013). – . 28. . . : . . . . . : . 23.00.02 „ ”/ .– ., 2013. – 20 . 29. [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://www.epravda.com.ua/news/2013/04/5/369415/ (05.04.2013). – . 30. : [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://www.pravda.com.ua/news/2013/04/5/6987469/ (05.04.2013). – . 31. – [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://www.champion.com.ua/athletics/2013/04/5/529460/ (05.04.2013). – . 32. [ ] // ZAXID.NET : [ ]. – : http://zaxid.net/home/showSingleNews.do?svobodivets_proti_radikalizmu_v_sotsmerezhah&objectId=1282179 (05.04.2013). – . 33. . : , / // :[ ]. – : http://life.pravda.com.ua/person/2013/03/28/125311/ (05.04.2013). – .

150


34. 2011. – 336 . 35. :[ ]. – 36. ] //

. .

: .

:

/

. .

.–

.:

,

[ ] / // : http://life.pravda.com.ua/columns/2013/04/4/125714/ (05.04.2013). – . Los Colorados: , [ :[ ]. – : http://life.pravda.com.ua/person/2013/03/29/125339/ (05.04.2013). –

. 37.

[ ] // Mail.ru : [ ]. – : http://news.mail.ru/inworld/ukraina/global/112/politics/12629319/?frommail=1 (05.04.2013). – . . . . – [ ]/ :[ ]. – : http://www.pravda.com.ua/articles/2013/04/5/6987492/ (05.04.2013). – . .„ ”– ![ ]/ // :[ ]. – : http://narodna.pravda.com.ua/nation/50aacc736043b/ (05.04.2013). –

38. // 39.

. 40. „ ”[ ] // :[ ]. – : http://www.champion.com.ua/boxing/2013/03/9/526748/ (05.04.2013). – . 41. [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://www.pravda.com.ua/news/2013/04/5/6987471/ (05.04.2013). – . 42. [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://gazeta.dt.ua/CULTURE/ukrayinskiy-teatr-pid-aktualnim-praporom-_.html (05.04.2013). – . 43. . „ . ” ] / // :[ ]. – : http://www.pravda.com.ua/articles/2013/04/5/6987512/ (05.04.2013). – . 44. . „ ”, – „ ” [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://www.champion.com.ua/checkers/2013/04/5/529461/ (05.04.2013). – . 45. . – [ ] / // :[ ]. – : http://dt.ua/columnists/ukrayina-krayina-oficiyno-dozvolenogo-katuvannya118342_.html (05.04.2013). – . 46. . [ ]/ // :[ ]. – : http://www.epravda.com.ua/publications/2013/04/4/369215/ (05.04.2013). – . // :[ ]. – 47. . [ ]/ : http://gazeta.dt.ua/science/nauka-v-universitetah-_.html (05.04.2013). – . 48. , , [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://www.pravda.com.ua/news/2013/04/5/6987480/ (05.04.2013). – . 49. The Economist , [ ] // :[ ]. – : http://www.pravda.com.ua/news/2013/04/5/6987487/ (05.04.2013). – .

: 32.327:159.922.4 .

. –

.

»).

,

,

.

, ,

,

. , ,

: .

. .

,

,

,

.

,

.

. ,

,

.

, , ,

. ,

, . : , , , , . Lesya Dorosh. Stereotyping of state image in the context of providing international and national security It’s researched the image of the state as consciously constructed and relayed notion of it, using associative characteristics, stereotypes, symbols and myths. It’s considered the researches which analyzed the positioning of the state in the international arena and the stereotyped notion of them, their potential in the context of providing international and national security, the ability to

151


influence on international relations. It’s underlined the correlation between state image and formation of the relations of the state with other countries, prospects of its political and socio-economic development. Keywords: stereotype, image, state image, international security, national security.

.

, –

,

. ,

.

,

, , ,

,

. ,

,

, , ,

,

«

», «

», «

[6, .46].

»

, ,

,

.

, ,

, ,

.

(

)

,

,

,

, ,

.

, ,

[14, . 26].

,

,

, ,

,

(

),

.

,

,

,

, [23, . 42]. ( » [24, . 34].

.

,

.

« ,

),

(

, ,

)

,

,

.

, ,

, ,

,

,

,

. – ,

», «

»(

, ,

», «

»

«

«

). «

»

, »,

», , ,

. , .

.

, , –

,

. ,

– ,

,

,

. [20].

,

,

– ,

– ,

«

», «

», «

,

– ,

. .

»

,

, .

,

.

, », «

: «

,

», «

», «

»

, », [4].

, ,

,

, [12, .203].

, ,

[11];

, ,

, ,

.

,

. 152

, « ,

.

» ,

.

,


.

,

.

,

.

, .

,

.

,

, .

,

.

.

,

,

[16, . 559]. . . ,

.

, ,

, [9].

,

. , . «

»

«

, »,

[2]. .

,

,

. ,

– ,

,

«

«1/6»

»

),

.

,

,

. ,

,

– –

,

,

,

,

. –

; –

– –

, –

;

;

;

;

;

). . ;

,

; –

;

. -

;

,

,

. » « ,

«

,

;

,

– »;

, –

,

, .

,

-, –

;

,

, .

;

,

; [6].

«

», . ; 2)

: 1)

, ; 3)

[1]. ,

. «

,

,

»

.

,

,

.

,

,

,

.

,

,

,

,

,

. ,

[11]. , , .

,

, , .

,

,

, , [2]. , ( 91].

) ,

,

,

.

,

[13, .

, , 153

,

,


, . ,

,

, ,

– [8].

,

.

,

,

,

, .

(

)

.

(

),

, ,

[21]. .

,

( . (1945-1991

).

.)

. ,

), ,

, (

«

»).

.

,

«

»

. («

») ,

,

,

«

,

) .

» (

,

, (

»).

, «

»

(

)

,

, »

,

,

,

«

»,

«

»

, «

»,

. ,

«

»

de jure.

de facto (

).

,

,

,

,

,

. «

, »

«(

)

». (

), .

» ( ,

«

«

»

,

»

).

,

,

,

,

.

,

»

,

, ; ,

,

,

[13, . 155–156]. , , , « », «

,

»

,

,

,

( .), ( 1994 .).

» (« »). «

«

,

«

» « (1917-1991

,

», «

»)

, ».

« .

» («

»(

,

,

,

,

, (

)–

,

) [3; 22]. ».

, : «

», «

»

«

»( «

,

«

». , »,

-

,

«

«

».

» [15]. .),

) [5].

– .

, 154

«

»

»,


.

,

«

»

( , ,

,

[7].

«

»

»,

)

,

«

»

.

,

,

, « » [17, . 35]. ,

)

[19,

( ,

. 19].

, , .

, « [18].

»

«

»

, ,

,

: (

, ;

), ,

,

( ,

«

»)

; , ,

. ,

(

)

,

,

,

, . . ,

, .

,

. –

,

, ,

,

,

. ,

(

),

,

, «

» (

)

.

,

,

» ,

. , ,

.

, ,

,

,

)

. ,

,

, – ,

(

.)

[10].

,

,

« ,

, «

»

»

,

,

»/

.,

, . 1.

. . //

« . – 2010. –

2.

. . [

]. –

3. – .75-90. : : http://mediascope.ru/node/252.

155

/

.,


3. – . 24-28. 4.

.

? . .

:

...

, .

/

.

//

. – 2003. –

1.

: 12.00.01 / / : http://disser.com.ua/content/224449.html. 5. . . / . . [ ]. – : http://archive.nbuv.gov.ua/portal/Soc_Gum/Vchdpu/psy/2011_94/Drozd.pdf. 6. . . : / . . // . 2003.– 3. – .46-69. 7. . . « » « » / . . // . – 2008. – 1. – . 31-39. 8. . . (2000-2007 .): . ... . . : 23.00.02 / . . . – ., 2008. – 128 . 9. . . , / . . [ ]. – : http://archive.nbuv.gov.ua/portal/soc_gum/Nvamu_upravl/2010_4/42.pdf. 10. . ( )/ [ ]. – :http://www.experts.in.ua/baza/analitic/index.php? ELEMENT_ID=86424 11. . . / . . [ ]. – : http://archive.nbuv.gov.ua/portal/Soc_Gum/Vchdpu/psy/2011_94/Lisnev.pdf. 12. . . : / . . // . – 2000. – 22. – 1. – . 202-210. 13. . . : ./ , . – 2., . . – .: , 2003. – 528 . 14. . . : / . ., . . // . – 2009. – .30. – 3. – . 16-27. 15. . . : : ./ . . – .: «LAT & », 2009. – 300 . 16. . . : . ./ . . , . . . – .: , 2006. – 663 . 17. . : , , / . // . – 2000. – 5. – . 35-38. 18. . . / . . [ ]. – : http://www.politstudies.ru/fulltext/2008/5/2.pdf. 19. . . : / . . , . . // . – 2008. – 5. [ ]. – : http://www.politstudies.ru/fulltext/2008/5/3.pdf. 20. . / [ ]. – : http://www.alleng.ru/d/psy/psy019.htm. 21. . : / . [ ]. – : sevntu.com.ua/jspui/bitstream/.../229/1/politologiya.84.2007.55-62.pdf. 22. Cottam M. Introduction to political psychology / Cottam M., Dietz-Uhler B., Mastors E., Preston T. – NY: Psychology Press, 2010. – 404 p. 23. Dinnie K. Nations Branding: Concepts, Issues, Practice / Keith Dinnie. – Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann, 2008. – 264 p. 24. Jervis R. Perception and Misperception in International Politics / R. Jervis. – Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1976. – 444 p. . – ., 2006. [

.

]. –

327:[34:007:304:659] .

. –

, ) ,

, .

,

,

,

,

:

,

, »

»

-

.

, ,

«

,

,

«

.

: , , . The article focuses on the ommunication within cross-border cooperation between Ukraine and Romania on the level of states’ heads, on the interparliamentary level, governments’ heads, foreign affairs departments, on the «people to people» level and in the frames of normative legal acts, the EU programs. Keywords: communication, cross-border cooperation, the EU programs .

[6]. 156


,

[7]; ,

:

,

.

, -

,

,

,

,

. . . –

, – .

, .

. – .

,

.

, .

,

.

.

,

.

,

.

,

,

. – ,

,

. ,

, .

, . .

,

: ,

:

,

1961

. 1997 , .

, .

1975 .

, 1997 .,

– 2004 . : .

, ,

, , ,

; :

«

»,

,

,

, .

, ,

(

)

[3]. , , ; («

:

;

; », «

», «

»),

;

. . ,

– 23 2

1997 . ( 1997 .);

– 14 ,

12 ,

20 . , 1997 .,

17

2004 ., 3

–5 1992 . (

, 2004 .); 14.03.1995 .). 22

17

,

2003

(

): (22

2012

. .

,

.

. ). ,

157

.


.

: ,

,

»

; ( 27

,

2007 . « »); 2007–2010 (

– ) [1].

(

., ), ,

, ;

;

,

,

, ,

, ,

,

.

:

; ;

,

,

; ,

. :

1)

:

.

2

1997 .

,

. ;

.

,

; 17-19 2003 .

; 17

27-28

1999 .

2002 .

. .

, ,

,

,

; 21-22

. 2007 .

. 2007 .

; 15

; 1

. .

.

2005

.

2006 . ; 30-31

; 20

2008 .

;

2) 1992 .;

:

. .

.

1993 .; 2009 .

2003 .; 6-7 ;

3)

:

.

.

2002 .;

1996 .;

4)

:

1992 .;

1997 .;

1999 .;

.

. .

2004 .;

22

– .

10

– – 18 2011 .;

9-10

2001 .;

23 2011 .;

18 2009 .;

2005 .; 2005

.;

2008 .;

. –

. –

5)

,

,

. «

»,

: . ,

», «

«

», «

». «

2004 ., 10 », « »,

; » –

.

, :«

« «

,

», «

, , »,

». »

«

».

426,8

158

[4];


, . . . 150

2011 . 160

. ,

, 2007-2013 –

– [9]

. –

2007-2013 .

» [2],

, ,

,

2004-2015 ,

, :

. [10] .

. [5],

,

. ,

2007-2013

. [8],

. [8],

: ,

; . –

– –

2007-2013 2006 . [11], ,

.

2007-2013 –

.

1638/2006

24 ,

. – Programme Romania-Ukraine, 2004-2006) , »;

2004-2006

, : PHARE/TACIS (Neighbourhood

. ,

«

2007-2013 . (European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument Cross-Border Cooperation Strategy Paper 2007-2013) , , ; , , ; « »; 2007-2013 . (ENPI CBC Black Sea Basin programme 2007-2013) , , ; 2007-2013 (ENPI Eastern Regional programme 2007-2013) , 2007-2013 . 2007-2013 . Tacis (2004-2006 .) , , ; Interreg IVC 2007-2013 . , . , , , , , , « » , . 1. 27 2006 http://www.kmu.gov.ua/control/uk/cardnpd?docid=60690971. 2. « http://zakon1.rada.gov.ua/laws/show/1861-15.

.

1819 ».

159

[

2007–2010 //

. ( ].

) :


3.

.

.

/

: 4.

.-

. ]. –

.

. //

3(8). – 2008. – . 225-233. /

.

.

: http://buktolerance.com.ua/?p=1205.

5.

2015 : . 2006 . 1001 // . – 2006. – 3. – . 21-32. 6. . . : : . ... . : 22.00.06 / . . . , 2006. – 278 ..: . 256-278. 7. Action Plan to improve communicating Europe by the ommission [Electronic resource]. – Available at : http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/communication/pdf/communication_com_en.pdf. 8. Aitai M. Alba county: towards a balanced development of the territory based on its cultural heritage. // Acts of International Conference of Territorial Intelligence, 2007. [Electronic resource]. – Available at : http: // intelligence-territoriale.eu. 9. Hungary-Slovakia-Romania-Ukraine ENPI Cross-border Cooperation Programme, 2007-2013. [Electronic resource]. – Available at : http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/where/neighbourhood/regional-cooperation/enpi-cross-border/documents/hungaryslovakia-romania-ukraine_adopted_programme.pdf. 10. Joint Operational Programme Romania-Ukraine-Republic of Moldova, 2007-2013. [Electronic resource]. – Available at : http://ec.europa.eu/europeaid/where/neighbourhood/regional-cooperation/enpi-crossborder/documents/romania_ukraine_republic_of_moldova_adopted_programme.pdf. 11. Regulation (EC) No 1638/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 October 2006 laying down general provisions establishing a European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument. [Electronic resource]. – Available at : http://ec.europa.eu/world/enp/pdf/oj_l310_en.pdf. 21

32.019.52+316.64:008.2«19» .

. 70-

XX

. –

,

, ). 70:«

»

.

, «

»

» » »

»

, «

, «

» » »

»

:

,« .

,

,

.

. XX

.

XX

.

.

, «

,« «

XX ,« «

7070-

, , . : Kolisnichenko R. M. A place of globalistion consciousness is produced in western futurology developments of middle of 70th of the XX century. The analysis of place of globalistion consciousness is produced in western futurology developments of middle of 70th of the XX century. Keywords: globalistion consciousness, global problems, futurology.

. ,

, .

,

, ,

,

,

. . ,

70,

,

XX

, ,

.

, ,

. ,

,

. . 70-

XX

. .

,

, ,

,

,

,

160

[5].


,

«

» (1970 .)

. ,

,

, ,

.

,

,

,

,

, ,

,

,

.

,

,

, ,

,

,

.

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

(

) [13, .4-24]. ,

,

[13, .4-7]. ,

,

,

,

,

,

,

[13, .7-8]. ,

,

, [13, .201-202]. «

»,

, , [13, .4-7].

,

, ,

,

,

,

. , , «

[13, .201-210]. , , ,

» ,

, [13, .216-231].

,

,

[13, .4-7].

,

, ,

,

,

,

( ),

[13, .173-182]. «

» ,

,

,

,

, .

, « [13, .182-201].

»

,

, «

(1971

»

.),

, : ,

,

,

[14]. ,

,

,

,

, .

.

XXI

.

, 75%

,

.

. , ,

,

, [14].

.

, .

, «

(1972

.).

- 3»,

«

» , ,

, , XX

,

.

, 161


,

; . ,

. , ,

[6; 15, .239-250]. ,

,

,

, ,

[15, .239-250]. «

»

«

»,

, .

,

.

,

,

, ,

. ,

,

,

,

,

XX

,

, [2; 7; 15, .239-250]. , » (1973 .) , , ,

.

. ,

,

«

» (1976 XIX

.)

., , .

»

,

,

.

, 17, .146-158].

,

,

[3, .645-664;

, ,

.

XX

.

, . . ,

.

»,

.

, ,

,

, [3, .645-664;

, 17, .146-158]. 1974 «

». ,

,

,

,

,

,

. , [4; 8, .66-68; 11]. « ,

,

», , ,

.

«

», ,

.

,

5%,

2,5%. , . [4; 7; 8, .66-68; 11]. « , . «

»

,

, 162

,

» (1974 .) , ,


,

.

[2; 9, .681-691]. «

» (1974 .) [10].

,

,

,

,

,

. ,

. ,

.

,

,

,

,

[2; 16, .36]. « » (1975 .) ,

,

. , .),

,

,

, «

» ,

, , [2]. « ,

»

1976 [11].

, ,

,

,

,

,

,

«

»

, [12, .47].

«

.

,

»

, » [1; 12, .85]. ,

« ,

, [12, .39-42].

,

,

. . ,

. .

,

, [12, .202-203].

, , ,

,

,

,

[12, .204-207]. , ,

«

,

»

[12, .35-37]. [12, .37], , ,

,

, ,

,

,

, [12, .163-164].

,

,

, [12, .174-194].

( ,

,

,

),

, ,

[12, .199-200]. 163

,


, ,

, [12,

,

.35]. ,

, ,

, ,

, ,

,

» [12, .153-157]. 0,7%

(

«

»

), .

«

»

,

, ,

.

,

[12, .158-163]. ,

,

,

, ,

,

,

[12, .215-

218]. ,

. ,

, «

»

,

,

,

[12, .165-172]. ,

,

, ,

,

,

,

,

. , ,

,

,

[12, .211].

, ,

,

,

, ,

[12, .86-87]. . ,

. ,

)

,

(

,

, ,

«

».

, , [12, .140-141].

, »

, , .

,

,

,

«

»,

[12, .141]. ,

,

,

,

.

,

. . 70-

XX

,

.

, ,

. , ,

.

164


1.

. . – 2011. – . ., ]. –

// 2. 90 . [ 3. . 2- , . .– 4. – 2010. – 12. [ 5.

« »: / . . 44 ( 2). – . 602–609. . . : . . – .: , 2003. – : http://www.info-library.com.ua/books-text-7139.html . / . . .: Academia, 2004. – 788 . . : / . // . ]. – : http://www.economy.nayka.com.ua/?op=1&z=409 . . . ) / . . // . . – 22. . 8. – . 14–21. , . / , // . – 16 (799). – ]. – : http://expert.ru/expert/2012/16/malo-ne-pokazhetsya/ / . // . – 2011. – 4 (23). – . 29-33. . / ., ., ., .– : « », 2002. – 384 . . . , . . , . . .; . . . . – .: , 2004. –

(

. – 2012. – 6. 23. 04. 2012. [ 7. . . 8. ., 9. / 776 . 10. . ]. – 11. .

. . / . – .: , 2004. – 590 . [ : http://textbooks.net.ua/content/view/7219/46/ « » / . // . – 2011. – . 57. – . 17–22. 12. . : . . / ; . . ; . . .– : , 1980 . – 416 . 13. . : . ./ .– .: , 1997. – 464 . 14. : / . . – .: . – 2004. – 1072 . ]. – : http://dic.academic.ru/dic.nsf/enc_philosophy/1314/%D0%A4%D0%9E%D0%A0% D0%A0%D0%95%D0%A1%D0%A2%D0%95%D0%A0 15. : ( ): . . – 2., . / . . . – .: . – 2012. – 621 . 16. . / .. – : , 2000. – 77 . 17. Bell D. The cultural contradictions of capitalism. / Bell D. – N. Y.: Basic books, 1976. – 334 p.

: 32.019.5:316.662.4 . . –

). ,

.

. .

: .

,

.

,

,

.

.

. , . .

. : , , , . Y. Malyovana . Features of the political symbols development in conditions of the political system’s transformation. The author investigated features of creation, development and functioning of political symbols during the political system’s transformation. Democratization processes became the impulse for changes in the symbolic system. The political symbols are considered as a mean of imaging the social and political transformations. Keywords: political symbols, political system, public consciousness, political system’s transformation.

. ,

, . ,

, ,

, 165

,


. . , , .

,

,

,

,

, .

.

,

,

,

, .

. ,

, ,

.

. .

,

, .

.

,

.

,

, .

.

,

. ,

.

. ,

.

,

.

,

.

. ,

,

. .

.

, .

,

.

,

.

,

.

,

. . . . .

.

,

«

,

»

, » [4, . 141].

,

,

.

,

, ,

. . :

,

,

« ;

;

, » [3, :

. 207].

, ,

,

,

.

, :

,

,

;

,

,

, ,

.

.

.

«

,

,

;

op ,

»:

,

,

» [1]. . . , ,

,

.

,

,

,

. ,

,

,

,

. ,

,–

.« ,

,

,

. ,

,

. 174].

,

, .

» [5,

, ,

, 166

,


, . ,« .

,

,

,

,

,

,

» [6, . 50].

,

. . : ,

. , . ,

,

«

,

.

,

,

,

.

, – ,

,

,

,

,

,

.

. «

»

, .

, ,

» [6, . 51].

,

,

, .

,

.

,

,

,

,

,

, ,

,

,

.

,

,

,

, . ),

(

,

).

,

.

, . ,

.

«

,

.

,

, » [1]. ,

,

,

, , ,

,

. ,

,

,

. .

,« ,

. ,

, ,

;

,

» [2, . 205]. , . , , .

,

,

.

,

« ,

.

,

,

. ,

,

.

, ,

, ,

, , 167

,

, » [1].


,

. ,

, . ,

. ,

.

, .

, .

, ,

,

. ,

, ,

.

. ,

.

«

»

, ,

»

. ,

,

( ,

.

, « ),

,

,

,

,

, ,

,

» [2, . 194]. , . .

.

,

,

,

,

. , .

, ,

, ,

,

-

,

[1]. .

,

,

,

. , . . , .

.

,

, «

,

.

,

,

,

.

: ;

,

, » [1]. ,

,

,

,

.

, .

, ». ,

, .

, ,

. ,

,

. : ,

, ,

-

.

,

. , .

.

,

« .

168


«

»

,

,

.

, .

»

[1].

. ,

. ,

, . .

,

,

,

.

,

,

,

,

. .

,

, . ,

. ,

. .

,

,

, .

,

,

,

. ,

,

.

,

, ,

,

,

, , ,

. ,

. , ,

. ,

, , .

,

, ,

. .

.

1. . [ ] / . . – : http://www.segorov.ru/index.php?show_aux_page=15 2. . . / . . . – . : Academia, 2004. – 352 . 3. . : [ ] / . . – : http://political-studies.com/?p=304 4. . . / . . // : . . . : . – 2011. – . 123. – . 141-144. 5. Blumer H. Symbolic Interaction : Perspective and Method / H. Blumer // Berkeley : University of California Press, 1969. – 214 p. 6. Mach Z. Symbols, Conflict and Identity : Essays in Political Anthropology / Z. Mach // New York : New York State University Press. – 1993. – 318 p.

169


: 321.01:342.228 . . – ,

,

).

. .

.

,

, . ,

:

,

,

.

. . .

,

. , , , . : Mamontova E.V. Ideology as a factor of formation of public policy and a source of symbolic production Specificity of ideology as a complex of spiritual life and the source of symbolic production in politics are determined. It attempts to classify the key ideologies of modernity based on the disclosure of their arsenal of symbolic creation. It is shown that ideologies as a design tool in the mass consciousness of alternative world views are the most important resource of political development. Keywords: ideology, symbolization, political modernization, public policy.

, ,

,

,

, ,

,

.

,

, . : , –

.

. «

»

,

, . , , ( . ,

, .

,

.

,

.

. [8; 11; 13-14; 18]), ( . , . ( . , . ( . , .

10]), ( .

, .

. [3; 6]), , . ,

( . . [5; 10;])

,

. . [7; 19]),

. [1-2; . [15-20]), . [4; 9; 12; 17]), ( . ,

, .

. «

» .

. »,

«

»,

– XVII –

. XI

.,

, , ,

.

, ,

-

, ,

170


, .

,

,

,

, , ,

.

, ,

,

,

. . ,

,

, ,

.

,

, .

, ,

. , . ,

, .

,

,

-

, ,

,

,

, ,

. ,

,

,

, . , ,

,

,

. .(

,

»

).

,

, , –

.

,

, . , (1914-1919) ,

, ,

,

,

,

,

,

( (1939-1945), . ,

)

,

,

. ,

,

1946 .

,

« ,

».

, .

. ,

,

,

,

. . ,

. .

,

«

, », «

171

», «

», «


», «

», . , ,

».

:

-

», «

, ,

,

, «

;

, –

»

,

»

( ,

»,

,

).

,

,

, .

,

,

(

,

, .

,

,

.

,

,

, ( (

, )

-

,

), , ).

, , XVII

.

,

,

. , – ,

,

,

,

.

,

, .

,

,

, , (

)

,

.

,

, , .

, ,

,

, , ,

,

. ,

,

,

, , ,

, .

,

,

. ,

– ».

, , ,

. ,

,

.

,

, ,

,

: . , 172


( ),

, (

,

).

,

,

.

, . ,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

, ,

,

,

. , . , ,

.

, ,

,

,

. , .

:

,

,

, ,

. ,

,

,

, . , , .

,

,

,

, , ,

, ,

1.

. ;

.:

.

/ . , 2007. — 288 . « »/ .

;

.

.

.

.

.

. —

.:

2. . // . – .: , 1992.– .1.– 1.– .17–37. 3. . / . ; . .– .: .: Ad Marginem, 1997. – 527 . 4. . / . ; . . . . // .– . 20. – 2006. – . 264 – 279. 5. . / . . – .: : , , , 2006. – 176 . 6. . // . ; . . . .; .. . . - .: , 1994. – . 7 – 260. 7. . . . 1. / . , . . . 7. – .: , 1984. – 812 . 8. . / . ; . . // . - 1994. - 10. - . 187—198. 9. . / . ; . . - .: , , 1996. — 352 c. 10. . . / . . , . . – .: , 1995.– . 223–237. 11. . . / . ;– . . — .: : , 2002. - 624 . 12. . : / . // . – 2003. - 4.- . 32-44. 13. . . . / . ; . . — .: , 1992. — 176 . 14. . / . ; . .— .: , 2000. — 380 . 15. Easton D. A Systems Analysis of Political Life / Easton David. - Univ of Chicago Pr (Tx), 1979. - 508 . 16. Kress G. S., Language of Ideology / Kress G. S., Hodge R – London: Routledge, 1993.-163 . 17. Lasswel arold D. Psychopathology and Politics / arold D. Lasswell. - University of Chicago Press, 1986. – 358 . 18. Michels R. Political Parties / Robert Michels. - N.Y.: Free Press, 1968. - 380 p. 19. Pareto V. Trattato di sociologia generale. 2-da edizione. V. I—III. / Pareto V. - Firenze, 1978. 20. Parsons T. heories of society / Talcott Parsons. – N.Y.: Free Press, 1965. - 1479 p.

173


323.2(477) . .

(

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

, ).

, .

, . . :

;

;

;

;

; . .

;

;

.

. , . . : ;

;

;

;

;

;

;

. N .B. . National peculiarities of Ukrainian politicians perception in the mass consciousness The article deals with a problem of forming the political leader's image in the mass consciousness of Ukrainian citizen in terms of national peculiarities of public consciousness and modern political culture, particularities of the national social ideal. The author presents a comparison of images' particularities of Ukrainian politicians in terms of public perception of their positive and negative leadership characteristics. Keywords: public consciousness, image, leadership characteristics, mass consciousness, image of a political leader, imagestereotype of a national political leader, political leader, social consciousness.

,

,

,

,

,

.

, , ,

[11, .25]. .

,

,

, ,

.

. , . [3],

,

,

[5; 6],

[7],

,

[4],

[10]

,

. . . -

,

,

, ,

.

,

,

,

( )

, ,

-

,

(

) ,

.

174


[1; 2]. , (

,

),

).

(

,

,

,

,

,

;

,

. .

.

,

. ,

, ,

. ,

«

,

»

2000

18 (face to face)

, 3%,

.

: 2,6%,

30% -

50% 10% -

1,8% . .

[9] ,

,

: 1)

; 2)

; 3)

.

1-3 [8,

.11],

. 1 ,

. 1 «

»

)

10 8 8 5 4 2 1

11 8 3 2 4 5

6 2 1 2 2 1 (

.

9 3 4 3 4 4 .1),

4 2 3 2 2 11 .

,

,

,

.

,

, »,

« ,

,

. . ,

;

, . .

, ,

( ,

2%)

,

,

,

. .

, .

175

, ,


. 1.

.

,

, ,

. , . 2. ,

,

.

,

, , ,

,

,

, . 2 »

« )

2 ,

20 14 11 10 9 8

26 7 10 10 8 5

11 7 10 4 13 5

10 4 13 5 10 6

7 2 7 1 1 1

7 4 3 2

6 5 6 4

7 2 1 1

8 2 3 6

2 2 2 10

( ,

,

.

176

.

.2).


. 2. .2,

,

.

,

, «

»,

. .

,

, ,

,

.

,

.

,

, ,

.

,

,

. .

,

,

,

. 3 «

»

)

37 31 22

35 34 24

3 ,

27 19 12 (

,

,

177

.

22 14 9

22 14 9

.3). .


. 3. .3,

, ,

(

), 10%).

(

,

,

,

. , . . , , . , ,

1.

.

.

[ )/ .

2.

.–

. :

2011. – 1. – 576 . 3. . . 4. : . [ .] ; 2008. - 352 . 5. . . 6.

.

.

/[ :

] :

– http://www.niss.gov.ua/articles/915/. – / . // . . . , . ]. – . : /

. .

: [

] / . . , 2001. - 270 . .

/

. ,

; /

.

.

.- .:

7. . . . / . . SMART BOOK, 2009. - 574 . - ( ). 8. [ ] / „ : - http://ratinggroup.com.ua/ upload/files/RG_Rysy_politykiv_092011.pdf. – 9. « »: [ ]. – – . 10. . . " " (60- 90. .) : [ ]/ . . ; , . . . .- .: . . . , 2010. - 268 . 11. . . : ... . . : 23.00.02 / / — ., 2006. — 219 .

178

. ,

– ., 2007. – 365 . : . .- .:

.- .: : . .

.

; , 2006. - 296 . . - 6.,

”. – .

, . -

. :

2011. – : http://ratinggroup.com.ua. : .

. :


342.4 Marek Motyka MECHANIZMY ZMIAN WOBEC SUBSTANCJI PSYCHOAKTYWNYCH W POLSCE – UJECIE WIELOWYMIAROWE –

,(

). ,

. ,

,

.

,

,

, .

, .

, . . : Streszczenie: W ci gu ostatnich trzech dekad zaobserwowano w Polsce post puj liberalizacj postaw wobec narkotyków oraz osób je u ywaj cych. W artykule opisane zosta y mechanizmy wp ywaj ce na dokonuj ce si przemiany. Uwzgl dniono wp yw transformacji ustrojowej, rol perswazji i manipulacji w Internecie, uwarunkowania rodzinne i rodowiskowe, postmodernistyczne implikacje, zmiany w sposobie za ywania i wiele innych istotnych dla omawianego procesu czynników. Przytoczone przyk ady ukazuj , e proces przemian wobec narkotyków stanowi ca ciowo zbiór po czonych ze sob czynników obejmuj cych szerokie spektrum aktywno ci cz owieka. Kluczowe s owa: narkotyki, przemiany, Polska. Abstract: Over the past three decades has been observed in Poland progressive liberalization of attitudes towards drugs and people who use them. The article describes the mechanisms affecting the transformation taking place. Take into account the impact of the transition, the role of persuasion and manipulation on the Internet, family circumstances and environmental implications of postmodern, changes in drug use, and many other important factors to this process. These examples show that the process of change to drugs is a whole set of interconnected factors, including a broad spectrum of human activity. Keywords: drugs, changes, Poland .

Wprowadzenie. Wyznanie Bila Clintona, dotycz ce palenia przez niego w m odo ci marihuany, wypowiedziane podczas kampanii o fotel prezydencki, wzbudzi o po ród opinii publicznejw 1996 roku niema sensacj . Nie przeszkodzi o mu to jednak e w obj ciu stanowiska g owy wiatowego mocarstwa, jakim niew tpliwie s Stany Zjednoczone. Po raz pierwszy w historii wspó czesnej osoba piastuj ca tak wysoki urz d przyzna a si publicznie do korzystania z narkotyków. Wyznanie to dla wielu zwolenników konopi by o niepodwa alnym dowodem mo liwo ci rozwoju i kariery pomimo korzystania z tego rodka. Wypowiedziane przez Clintona s owa, e „pali , ale si nie zaci ga ”, przesz y do historii, a powo ywanie si na nie na sta e wesz o do kanonu zabawnych racjonalizacji palenia marihuany. W 2002 roku na amach tygodnika „Wprost” ukaza si artyku w którym autorzy przedstawili kolejnych ytkowników tej budz cej kontrowersje ro liny. Do palenia narkotyku przyznawa a si piosenkarka Olga Jackowska, burmistrz Nowego Jorku Michael Bloomberg, rektor Uniwersytetu skiego profesor Tadeusz S awek, wokalista Krzysztof Jaryczewski. Za jego legalizacj natomiast opowiadali si m.in. re yser Maciej Dejczer i piosenkarz Krzysztof Kasowski. Ca stanowi a interesuj i popart licznymi argumentami rozpraw o potrzebie legalizacji marihuany [1]. Dekad pó niej, pomimo e kwestie legalizacji nie zosta y wci jeszcze rozwi zane, has o „marihuana” niemal zupe nie przesta o budzi negatywne konotacje po ród polskiego spo ecze stwa. W poni szym artykule podj ta zosta a próba ustalenia najbardziej znacz cych mechanizmów, których rola we wspó czesnym postrzeganiu psychoaktywnych specyfików, jak i osób, decyduj cych si na korzystanie z ich w ciwo ci, wydawa si mo e szczególnie donios a. Transformacja ustrojowa. Zrozumienie mechanizmów zmiany stosunku do rodków zmieniaj cych nastrój nale y do wysoce z onych, a ustalenie pocz tków tego procesu stwarza niema trudno i ci ko jest jednoznacznie ustali jaki szczególny przedzia czasowy, w którym przemiany owe si rozpocz y. Jednak e za okres, w którym daje si zaobserwowa znacz ce w naszym poszukiwaniu symptomy, mo na by uzna pierwsze lata transformacji ustrojowej rozpocz tej po 1989 roku w Polsce. W okresie tym, w zwi zku z mo liwo ci podejmowania prywatnych inicjatyw, korzy ci zacz y osi ga osoby przedsi biorcze, sk onne do ryzyka, energiczne, ale jednocze nie posiadaj ce takie zasoby jak wiedza, umiej tno ci, nierzadko kapita [2, s. 5]. Ci natomiast, którzy owych zasobów nie posiadali, coraz cz ciej do wiadczali goryczy, poczucia niesprawiedliwo ci i innych trudnych do zniesienia stanów emocjonalnych. Sytuacja taka dotyka zacz a i m odzie – otwart i zainteresowan nowymi mo liwo ciami, gotow na innowacje i zmiany, a jednocze nie, z powodu recesji gospodarczej w pierwszych latach przemian ustrojowych, pozbawian miejsc pracy i mo liwo ci rozwoju zawodowego. W zwi zku z redukcjami etatów to w nie najm odszych pracowników zwalniano na pierwszym miejscu. To oni te przez d ugi czas po uko czeniu szkó zawodowych, które w tym czasie „produkowa y” bezrobotnych, musieli zmaga si z brakiem zatrudnienia, narastaj cym z tego powodu napi ciem, poczuciem bezsilno ci wobec ca ej tej sytuacji, jak i pojawiaj cym si u wielu l kiem egzystencjalnym. Zjawiska wspó wyst puj ce w tym czasie to równie fatalne niedoinwestowanie systemu o wiaty, pogorszenie szansy uzyskania samodzielnego mieszkania przez m ode ma stwa, a w zwi zku ze zmniejszeniem si liczby kin, bibliotek, domów kultury, ma ych klubów sportowych, czy osiedlowych wietlic, kurczenie si mo liwo ci po ytecznego i warto ciowego sp dzania czasu [2, s. 5-7]. Pogorszenie nastroju cz ci spo ecze stwa nie wydaje si wi c tutaj zjawiskiem zaskakuj cym. Naturalne jest równie to, e w takich sytuacjach ludzie zaczynaj szuka sposobów na popraw samopoczucia lub wybieraj taktyk , 179


przy pomocy której do wiadczanie tych stanów staje si bardziej zno ne. Jedn z indywidualnych strategii radzenia sobie z traum zmian ustrojowych by cyniczny hedonizm, czyli korzystanie z ycia tak d ugo i w takim stopniu, jak tylko by o to mo liwe [3]. Naczelnym sposobem natomiast, z uwagi na dost pno , legalno i spo eczne przyzwolenie, sta o si picie alkoholu, który zarówno szybko, jak i niezwykle skutecznie pomaga m odym w osi ganiu oczekiwanych stanów. U schy ku XX wieku spo ywanie alkoholu sta o si jednym z elementów stylu ycia polskiej m odzie y. Codzienne picie, bez potrzeby celebrowania jakiego wydarzenia, sp dzanie wi kszo ci wolnego czasu przy wysokoprocentowych napojach wypiera zacz o dotychczasowe prywatkowo – zabawowe, okazjonalne spo ywanie trunków. Nasilanie si konsumpcyjno – rozrywkowych wzorców kulturowych stanowi o kolejn wa przyczyn wzrostu zagro . Jak ju zaznaczono wcze niej, postawy prezentowane m odym przez idoli, propaguj ce cz sto kultur przyspieszonego osi gania stanów przyjemnych, stanowi zacz y w ród tej niezwykle podatnej materii, jak s ode kszta tuj ce si osobowo ci, wzory do na ladowania. Naturalna potrzeba, jak niew tpliwie jest budowanie niezale no ci i poczucia swobody, zdobywana przy pomocy rodków zmieniaj cych nastrój sprawia a, e stan nietrze wo ci uto samia zacz to w nie ze swobod i niezale no ci . W tym czasie imprezy, na których serwowany po promocyjnej cenie alkohol by nieod cznym ich elementem, mno y si jak przys owiowe „grzyby po deszczu”. czy o si to ze wzrostem niebezpiecznych zachowa do jakich dochodzi o w stanie nietrze wo ci: przygodnego seksu, si gania po rodki narkotyczne, wypadków czy napadów agresji. Nieoboj tne jest, e w okresie tym wi cej abstynentów da o si znale w grupie 25–30-latków ni w ród m odzie y miedzy 15 a 18 rokiem ycia [4]. Znacz rol w obserwowanych przemianach przypisa nale y telewizji oraz elektronicznym mediom, których popularno z ka dym rokiem zyskiwa a coraz wy sze notowania. Z obserwacji wynika o, e m odzi za spraw mediów przyjmuj cz sto sposób postrzegania rzeczywisto ci z poziomu osób dojrza ych, zamykaj c bezpowrotnie dzieci cy wiat wyobra , a pomijaj c przy tym wykszta cenie si , niezb dnego do odró niania dobra i z a, krytycyzmu. Z bada przeprowadzonych pod kierownictwem prof. Anny Przec awskiej w latach 2003 – 2004, którymi obj to gminy rejonu p ockiego, wynika o, e wzrostowi roli mediów elektronicznych w yciu nastolatków towarzyszy jednocze nie spadek znaczenia tradycyjnych instytucji propaguj cych dotychczas kultur : bibliotek, domów kultury, teatrów, a tak e, e czytanie dla coraz mniejszej liczby osób czy si z pozytywnymi i poszukiwanymi doznaniami. Kultura obrazu ewidentnie dominowa zacz a nad kultur s owa, co z kolei czy o si z odrzucaniem tych form uczestniczenia w kulturze, które od odbiorców wymaga y aktywno ci intelektualnej, kompetencji i cierpliwo ci [5]. Mechanizmy perswazji i manipulacji w Internecie. Otwarcie granic, zw aszcza tych, które dotyczy y przep ywu informacji, by o milowym krokiem w przeobra aniu dotychczasowego odbioru zarówno narkotyków, jak i ludzi, którzy je za ywali. Pierwsze stwo przed innymi mediami nale y si tu Internetowi, który dzi ki nieskr powaniu z uwagi na anonimowo , dost pie na ka dej d ugo ci i szeroko ci geograficznej, jak i przy jednoczesnym braku cenzury spo ecznej i prawnej, sta si idealnym instrumentem s cym indoktrynacji. Tomasz Zakrzewski z Krajowego Biura ds. Przeciwdzia ania Narkomanii w swoich publikacjach opisa co najmniej kilkana cie technik wykorzystywanych do tego celu w Sieci [6, s. 11]. Jednym z najbardziej istotnych manewrów u ywanych do promowania rodków psychoaktywnych jest tworzenie pozytywnych skojarze wobec poruszanego tematu, czy jakichkolwiek substancji narkotycznych. Narz dziem s cym do tego celu jest m.in. humorystyczne ukazywanie sytuacji zwi zanych z za ywaniem. Wywo ywanie miechu, wykorzystywanie ironii czy o mieszanie pewnych warto ci – poprzez du e nasilenie emocji podczas przekazu – hamuje w odbiorcach krytycyzm i mo liwo przyj cia w ciwej oceny zjawiska. Przyk adem mo e by tutaj rysunek, przy pomocy którego próbowano tworzy pozytywny obraz zwolenników marihuany: unosz cego si w powietrzu czyzn ze skr tem „trawy” otacza napis: „nie prowadz po pijanemu – po prostu pal i odlatuj ”[7]. Innym sposobem propagowania rodków narkotycznych jest odwo ywanie si do odmiennych stanów wiadomo ci zwi zanych z za ywaniem oraz opisywanie tych e stanów. W Sieci istnieje obecnie niezliczona ilo forów dyskusyjnych, na których ludzie dziel si swoimi do wiadczeniami i opisami wydarze , odczu i zachowa po za yciu. Jest to wielce skuteczny sposób promowania narkotykowej subkultury. W prze amywaniu barier strachu w ród odych osób niebagateln rol pe ni te filmy celowo skonstruowane tak, aby ukaza wy cznie pozytywne doznania zwi zane z za ywaniem, przy ca kowitym zakamuflowaniu jakichkolwiek negatywnych dozna . Je eli jednak e takowe ujawniane, to okre la si je jako incydenty przydarzaj ce si tym, którzy nie wiedz co oraz ile za ywa [6, s. 11-12]. Twórcy internetowych portali lub blogów zach caj cych m odzie do korzystania ze rodków psychoaktywnych nierzadko odwo uj si tak e do takich warto ci, jak wolno wyboru czy swoboda w kierowaniu swoim yciem w taki sposób, by by o ono jak najbardziej komfortowe i wolne od wszelkich niewygodnych barier. Podkre lanie poczucia zniewolenia przez ró nego rodzaju zakazy oraz radykalizm stanowi tutaj niezwykle skuteczne mechanizmy wzbudzania buntu w ród ludzi dotkni tych tego typu ograniczeniami. Tym bardziej, e dzieje si to w czasach, gdy w skutek istniej cych trendów kulturowych przestrzeganie dotychczasowych norm spo ecznych ulega znacznemu rozlu nieniu. Odzwierciedleniem trendów prezentowanych przez nadawców w Sieci, które s maj wyznaczaniu nowego stylu ycia, jest plakat „Modern lifestyle chart” [8]. Ilustracje na których rozpozna mo na marihuan , grzyby halucynogenne i piwo zestawiono tu z rysunkami ukazuj cymi codzienne zachowania – relacje z partnerem, zakupy, spo ywanie posi ków, sp dzanie wolnego czasu. W humorystyczny sposób ukazane jest równie , co robi , aby unikn nieprzyjemnych konsekwencji za ywania, przez co bagatelizuje si i sp yca potencjalne zagro enia. To kolejny ze 180


skuteczniejszych sposobów docierania do m odych ludzi oraz perswazji wiod cej do za ywania narkotyków – humor, wi ksze mo liwo ci intelektualne, brak hamulców, dobra zabawa, interesuj ce doznania, a przy tym skrótowo przekazu i hipnotyzuj ce barwy, tworz w umys ach pozytywne skojarzenia zwi zane z tymi rodkami. Je eli doda do tego jeszcze ró nicowanie substancji psychoaktywnych przez tworzenie etosu tzw. mi kkich narkotyków, stanowi to wszystko razem kolejne i silne narz dzie wp ywu [6, s. 12-13]. Inna, równie skuteczna strategia wzbudzania zainteresowania, to opisywanie, na pozór bezstronne, niepotwierdzonych nowinek ze wiata nauki dotycz cych eksperymentów medycznych z narkotykami, opisywanie potencjalnych mo liwo ci wynikaj cych z u ywania danego rodka albo powo ywanie si na tzw. wiarygodne ród a. Zastanawiaj ce jest to, e tre ci o charakterze pronarkotykowym zdecydowanie przewa aj w stosunku do tych, opisuj cych negatywne skutki brania. Tworzy to kolejny, iluzoryczny mechanizm daj cy odbiorcy jasny przekaz: „nie bój si - narkotyki tylko czasami bywaj niebezpieczne”. Gromadzenie doniesie o interwencjach policji i innych s b, zwi zanych z przestrzeganiem prawa, a dotycz cych rodków psychoaktywnych, to kolejne zamierzone dzia anie. Celem jego jest wzbudzanie u odbiorcy efektu reaktancji przez zmian jego przekona , b ich umocnienie. Reaktancja psychologiczna to efekt sprzeciwu w stosunku do dzia , które pozornie s nam narzucone i jest d eniem do przywrócenia wolno ci w asnego wyboru. Mówi c kolokwialnie – najbardziej smakuje to, co zabronione. Kolejny sposób, to ukazywanie narkotyku z szerszej perspektywy. Wystarczy wspomnie , e konopne sznury i nici nale do bardzo wytrzyma ych, a stosunek do marihuany zaczyna ulega zniekszta ceniu – buduje si pozytywny obraz narkotyku, mimo, e wprost nie odnosi si do jego dzia ania. Do innych, równie wa nych mechanizmów nale y porównywanie nielegalnych rodków do tych dost pnych na ka dym kroku. Zestawianie ilo ci wypadków po marihuanie z wypadkami spowodowanymi pod wp ywem alkoholu ma za zadanie zminimalizowa nast pstwa ywania tych pierwszych. Natomiast usuni cie kulturowego kontekstu w opisie obejmuj cym histori jakiego narkotyku, czy powo ywanie si na wypowied osobisto ci ze wiata nauki, tworz prymitywne, lecz skuteczne argumenty wp ywaj ce na postrzeganie tych e rodków: skoro Indianie w Peru za ywali kok i nic im nie by o i je li do tego pozytywnie wypowiedzia si o niej jaki naukowiec, to có stoi na przeszkodzie eby samemu spróbowa [9]. Mo liwo wymiany w Sieci pogl dów, informacji czy do wiadczanych emocji sprzyja tworzeniu si lojalno ciowych postaw spo eczno ciowych i budowaniu to samo ci grupowej mimo braku sformalizowania. Portale dla sympatyków rodków psychoaktywnych celuj w tych procesach. Klimat wspólnego zagro enia (np. ze strony policji) wp ywa na tworzenie granic mi dzygrupowych: My – Oni; wspólne symbole i j zyk – na kszta towanie grupowej wiadomo ci, natomiast wytworzenie norm grupowych – w tym wypadku buntu, d enia do wolno ci i prawa do samostanowienia – budowaniu wi zi spo ecznej. Wykszta cenie si grupy wp ywa z kolei na wewn trzgrupowy konformizm dotycz cy za ywania tych e rodków, któremu jednocze nie towarzyszy spo eczny nonkonformizm. Pojawiaj cy si tu syndrom my lenia grupowego – w tym wypadku akceptacji stanów po narkotykach – wynika z l ku przed odrzuceniem i pragnieniem bycia osob akceptowan . Nieprzestrzeganie istniej cych norm wi e si z zepchni ciem na margines, co nawet w tak anonimowej spo eczno ci jak Internet jest do wiadczeniem niepo danym [10, s. 18-19]. Podsumowuj c opis mechanizmów perswazji, z jakimi mo na spotka si w Internecie, zaznaczy nale y, e dzia anie ich jest niezwykle wysublimowane z tego wzgl du, e oddzia uj one na poszczególne, niezmiernie wa ne w funkcjonowaniu cz owieka obszary. Atrakcyjna w kolorystyce i swoich formach wizualizacja, jak te pos ugiwanie si znakiem identyfikacyjnym, np. li ciem marihuany, czy oryginalno tre ci, jaka jest przekazywana, oddzia uje bezpo rednio na zmys y, ukazuj c narkotyk jako jedn z wielu powszechnych u ywek. Przez ukazywanie pozytywnej energii, humorystyczne przekazy dzia ania tych rodków, ironi , puszczanie tzw. „oka do klienta” oddzia uje si z kolei na emocjonalny stosunek do przekazu, ukazuj c je w neutralnym, a nawet przychylnym wietle. Na sfer poznawcz wp ywa si poprzez ukazanie argumentów „za”. W tym wypadku, oparcie o tzw. „wiarygodne ród a” czy opinie ekspertów, jak równie specyficzny j zyk i pronarkotykow argumentacj w kontek cie religijnym, kulturowym, czy medycznym. Poprzez opisy dzia idoli czy tzw. presj wi kszo ci („ka dy kiedy próbowa ”, „wi kszo bierze od czasu do czasu”) próbuje si wp ywa na zachowanie wobec tych zjawisk. Podprogowy, niezbyt zreszt ukryty przekaz jest dostatecznie wyra ny – „inni bior , to i ja mog spróbowa ”. Dope nienie tego wszystkiego utrwala oddzia ywanie na sfer normatywn . Buduje si etos narkotyków „mi kkich”, czyli o niskiej szkodliwo ci, tworzy nowe pronarkotykowe grupy, przy czym podkre la si dychotomi poprzez podzia : My – Oni, a przy tym – przez nowe grupowe normy i warto ci – d y si do ich uznania przez grupy „obce” [11]. Eufemistyczna terminologia i j zykowe manipulacje. W Polsce liberalizacja stosunku do rodków psychoaktywnych od kilku lat przybiera na sile, natomiast narkomania ukazywana bywa jako minione, niemal mityczne zjawisko. M odzi ludzie natomiast coraz bardziej d do niezale no ci od czegokolwiek, kogokolwiek, b – jak sami twierdz – swobody, wolno ci, nieskr powania pod jakimkolwiek wzgl dem [12]. Na tym podatnym gruncie wybiegi marketingowe stosowane przez dystrybutorów, jak i specyficzne, wieloznaczne i zabawne s ownictwo, doskonale trafi y zarówno w gusty, jak i oczekiwania m odego pokolenia. „Produkty kolekcjonerskie”, „kolekcjonowanie” to jedne z pierwszych s ów, których pierwotne znaczenie uleg o diametralnej zmianie. Kolejne jakie powstawa y „kolekcjonowanie przez nos”, „mieszanki warte skolekcjonowania”, „pe en euforii efekt kolekcjonerski”, „produkty dla pocz tkuj cych kolekcjonerów” to aktualnie nowy, w pe ni funkcjonuj cy w okre lonych grupach j zyk, s cy wymianie informacji i do wiadcze zwi zanych z za ywaniem dopalaczy. Nale y doda , e „klaserem” w którym „kolekcjonuje” si te produkty, jest oczywi cie organizm wspó czesnego „filatelisty” [13]. Jak zauwa a Marek 181


Dziewiecki: „Manipulacje j zykowe, typowe dla ponowoczesno ci, nie maj wr cz granic i prowadz do takich form cynizmu i przewrotno ci, jakich nie stosowano nigdy wcze niej”[14, s. 57]. Narz dziem kszta tuj cym wiadomo odbiorców jest specyficzny, pe en eufemizmów j zyk propagandy. S owa „narkoman”, „ pun” nie wyst puj zupe nie w tym przekazie. Zamiast nich mamy „u ytkowników substancji psychoaktywnych”, „poszukiwaczy wra ” lub „podró ników”. Narkotyk natomiast, okre la si jako „ rodek poszerzaj cy wiadomo ”, „stymulant”, „depresant”, czy jeszcze bardziej tajemniczo – mianem „entheogen”. Sposób przekazywania tre ci o substancjach psychoaktywnych jest w tym wypadku tak skonstruowany, aby jak naj agodniej dociera do odbiorców, jednak e – z pomoc „drugiego dna” – przekszta ca ich postrzeganie oraz my lenie na ten temat. Funkcj j zyka jest równie podtrzymywanie spójno ci grupy. Slang narkoma ski idealnie si tu sprawdza. Jednocze nie pozwala zakamuflowa rzeczywiste znaczenie i przekaz, jak i dzi ki swej specyfice wp ywa na budowanie granic pomi dzy tymi, którzy go znaj , a tymi, którzy nie wiedz jak si nim pos ugiwa . Je eli jednak i te wyrafinowane metody w jaki sposób nie by yby w stanie dotrze do m odych umys ów, to pozostaje jeszcze inny rodzaj „pomocy”. Najwi ksza internetowa wyszukiwarka uruchomi a m.in. funkcj „suggestion”. Je eli wpiszemy jakie s owo, to naprowadzi nas ona na wszystkie portale zale nie od naszych oczekiwa czy potrzeb. Wystarczy np. wpisa „marihuana” a obok wy wietli si kilkana cie podpowiedzi: „nasiona”, uprawa”, „hodowla”, „skutki”, „tapety”, „zdj cia” itp. Znamienne jest to, e nie ma tam podpowiedzi odnosz cych si do prawnych konsekwencji zwi zanych z tym narkotykiem [10, s. 19-21]. Niedomówienia, manipulacja i eufemizmy stanowi wspó cze nie niezwykle skuteczne narz dzia, stosowane z premedytacj przez osoby, b ca e grupy ludzi, zarabiaj ce na handlu wszelkimi narkotycznymi specyfikami, d ce przez ich wykorzystanie do w asnych, indywidualnych, wymiernych ekonomicznie korzy ci. Uwarunkowania rodzinne. Jako niezmiernie wa ny czynnik zmian nale y równie uzna uczestnictwo osób znacz cych dla m odych – w tym wypadku rodziców, w tzw. „wy cigu szczurów”. Walka o przetrwanie w dynamicznie zmieniaj cych si warunkach oraz notoryczny stres wynikaj cy z l ku o utrat aktualnego statusu znacz co uszczuplaj kontakty i ingerencj rodziców w okres dorastania m odzie y. W wielu sytuacjach tak e, pogo za rodkami umo liwiaj cymi stworzenie godnych, a w wielu przypadkach, niestety, niezb dnych warunków do funkcjonowania w istniej cych obecnie warunkach, istotnie wp ywa na prawid owe i niezb dne relacje z dzie mi w tym trudnym dla nich czasie, a raczej ich niemal zupe ny brak. Rodzina jest dla m odego cz owieka niezwykle istotnym uk adem normatywnym. To w niej w nie kszta tuj si oczekiwania rodziców wobec dzieci, jak i ustalane zostaj zachowania niepo dane. Umiej tne dzia ania wychowawcze w stawianych wymaganiach, poparte wzmacnianiem ich realizacji przez bliski, emocjonalny i nies abn cy kontakt, maj korzystny wp yw na prawid owy rozwój dziecka. Nieprawid owe relacje w rodzinie to jeden z g ównych czynników jakie wp ywaj na za ywanie narkotyków przez m odzie . Zosta o to potwierdzone w 2004 roku badaniami przeprowadzonymi przez Fundacj Komunikacji Spo ecznej dla Krajowego Biura ds. Przeciwdzia ania Narkomanii [15, s. 13-18]. Znaczenie tych e relacji podkre lone zosta o równie przez badaczy z Pracowni Profilaktyki Centrum Metodycznego Pomocy Psychologiczno – Pedagogicznej w Warszawie. Brak wi zi w rodzinie, niekonsekwencja lub brak dyscypliny w wychowywaniu oraz nieprawid owe relacje ze znacz cymi doros ymi zosta y uznane za g ówne czynniki sprzyjaj ce rozwojowi uzale nie [16]. Na znacz rol rodziny zwrócono uwag w 2005 roku podczas spo ecznej kampanii Krajowego Biura ds. Przeciwdzia ania Narkomanii pod has em „Bli ej siebie – dalej od narkotyków”. By o to pierwsze tego typu zorganizowane dzia anie, w którym po ono zdecydowany nacisk na pozytywne wzmacnianie rodziców, jako osób znacz cych w zapobiegawczych antynarkotykowych dzia aniach. Podczas akcji zach cano rodziców do zwracania szczególnej uwagi na potrzeb ich uczestnictwa we wchodzeniu dzieci w doros . Jednym z celów akcji by o podkre lenie wagi codziennych rozmów [15, s. 15]. Równie w trakcie bada empirycznych przeprowadzonych w Przemy lu zim 2010/11 w ród m odzie y szkó rednich cz ste relacje z rodzicami stanowi y znacz cy czynnik chroni cy m odych ludzi przed si ganiem po narkotyki [17]. Kazimierz Pierzcha a zwraca uwag na szereg nieprawid owych postaw rodzicielskich, które w konsekwencji mog doprowadzi do si gni cia przez dziecko po rodki odurzaj ce. Nale do nich m.in.: „[…] brak lub os abienie wi zi emocjonalnej pomi dzy rodzicami i dzie mi; brak wyra nego i konsekwentnego systemu wychowawczego; destabilizacja uk adu z ojcem jako g ow rodziny; matka nadmiernie chroni ca, zmienna emocjonalnie; rozwód lub separacja rodziców; wysoki poziom konfliktów w rodzinie; brak kontroli i dyscypliny lub nadmierna kontrola i dyscyplina” [18]. Sytuacj w wielu polskich rodzinach zacz to okre la w ostatnich latach jako kryzysow . Uogólniaj c, mówi si przede wszystkim o kryzysie warto ci, jaki dotyka wspó czesn rodzin oraz za amaniu jej funkcji opieku czej. Za czynniki bezpo rednio wp ywaj ce na tak sytuacj uznano m.in. ekspansj indywidualizacji jednostek, kreuj cych swoj w asn histori i podejmuj cych w niej w asne subiektywne wybory [19]. Nierzadko dokonywane bez uprzedniego przygotowania i samo wiadomo ci, pod wp ywem sugestii, perswazji, b manipulacji. Pozwalanie na samostanowienie osobie w okresie adolescencji mo e stanowi dla niej co najmniej ryzykowne rozwi zanie. „Narkotykowe” subkultury. Niemniej znacz rol w rozpowszechnieniu za ywania rodków odurzaj cych przypisa mo na subkulturom, jakie w ostatnich czterech dekadach wyst powa y na terenie Polski. Idee, jakie za sob nios y przyw drowa y m.in. ze Stanów Zjednoczonych, Jamajki b Wielkiej Brytanii, kultur znacz co ró nych od

182


polskiej, jednak e dosy szybko zosta y zasymilowane przez rodzime grupy kontestatorów. W ka dej z nich korzystano z w ciwo ci psychoaktywnych specyfików. W subkulturze hipisów, której pocz tki w Polsce datuje si na 1967 rok [20, s. 79], marihuana i rodki halucynogenne s mia y pocz tkowo wewn trznemu poznaniu. Uznawali te oni siebie za ekspertów od wiata ywek, a swoje umiej tno ci i znajomo zmieniaj cych nastrój medykamentów próbowali wykorzystywa przy pomaganiu narkomanom opiatowym w uwolnieniu si od uzale nienia [20, s. 53]. Z biegiem czasu jednak, polscy hipisi, podobnie jak ich ameryka scy pobratymcy, u ywali coraz cz ciej wszelkie dost pne narkotyczne substancje. Pocz tkowo by y to rodki przemycane z Europy Zachodniej, leki dost pne na polskim rynku, wziewne substancje chemiczne i mleczko zbierane z dojrza ych makówek. Z ko cem lat siedemdziesi tych na polskim rynku narkotykowym pojawi a si tzw. heroina gda ska (kompot). Ruch hipisowski zaczyna zanika , natomiast rozrasta zacz y si grupy narkomanów opiatowych [21, s. 63]. Stwierdzenie, e narkomania wywodzi si od hipisów by oby w tym wypadku krzywdz cym wobec minionej ju subkultury, udzia jej jednak w dynamice zjawiska narkomanii z ca stanowczo ci uzna nale y za istotny. Rastafarianie, okre lani te w Polsce mianem – rastamani, to subkultura wywodz ca si od powsta ego na Jamajce spo eczno – religijnego ruchu czarnoskórej ludno ci. Wyznaj oni boga imieniem Jah, natomiast charakterystyczne poskr cane w osy (dredy) symbolizuj ce wi tego Baranka sw magi chroni maj przed zgubnym dzia aniem wszechobecnych demonów. Co prawda religia zabrania im u ywania narkotyków, jednak e dla rastafarian marihuana stanowi wi te ziele, a korzystanie z niego uznane bywa co najmniej jako sakrament [22]. Muzyk Bob Marley, uznawany za proroka ruchu, przez lata swojej artystycznej dzia alno ci korzysta z dozna , jakie dostarcza mu ten narkotyk. W Polsce, jako subkultura, rastamani istniej i dzia aj od lat osiemdziesi tych XX wieku. Ju w po owie lat dziewi dziesi tych zwrócono uwag na nasilenie si po ród jej cz onków zjawiska palenia marihuany i haszyszu [23, s. 137-139]. Wspó cze nie narkotyki te stanowi swoist wizytówk fanów muzyki reggae – popularnego nurtu muzycznego po ród osób uto samiaj cych si z t subkultur . Punk to kolejny przyk ad przej tej ze wiata „Zachodu” subkultury m odzie owej. Ruch ten stanowi wyraz buntu odzie y wobec recesji dotkliwie odczuwanej w po owie lat siedemdziesi tych, zw aszcza na terenie Wielkiej Brytanii. Frustracja, rozgoryczenie i niepewno jutra znalaz y swój wyraz w nowo powsta ym ruchu. Nazwa „punk” – oznaczaj ca mieci, rzeczy nie posiadaj ce warto ci, odzwierciedla a naczelne cechy nowej subkultury: bunt, prowokacj oraz nihilizm [21, s. 67-68]. Ruch ten przenikn na ziemie polskie pod koniec lat siedemdziesi tych XX wieku. Demonstrowali oni lojalno i akceptacj w obr bie w asnej grupy oraz dezaprobat wobec reszty spo ecze stwa. W Polsce, podobnie jak w innych krajach, najbardziej popularnym sposobem manifestacji postaw kultury punk by a muzyka. Najbardziej popularnym miejscem z kolei, na którym mo na wówczas by o spotka si z tego typu przes aniami by festiwal muzyczny w Jarocinie [23, s. 113-116]. Koncertom, na których spotykali si zwolennicy tej subkultury najcz ciej towarzyszy o spo ywanie du ych ilo ci taniego alkoholu oraz narkotyzowanie si . W polskiej rzeczywisto ci by y to zazwyczaj substancje wziewne, m.in. klej butapren, preparat do czyszczenia skór „Roxy” oraz rodek chemiczny „Tri” [21, s. 69-70]. Wspó cze nie natomiast, za przyk ad subkultury, w której wyst puje za ywanie narkotycznych specyfików, pos mog tzw. hipsterzy. Nazw t , wywodz si od slangowego zawo ania „hip”, b „hep” u ywanego przez czarnoskórych bardów, jak podaje Aleksandra Litorowicz, „[…] zacz to okre la kogo zorientowanego, trzymaj cego na pulsie, a nawet wyrafinowanego. Hipster to zatem ten, który wie, ten, który jest wiadom, a wi c i ten, który jest wtajemniczony” [24, s. 13-14]. Cech charakteryzuj przedstawiciela owej subkultury, jaka cz sto przewija si w opisach, jest m. in. palenie marihuany. Upojenia alkoholowe i narkotyczne, po ród wielu innych dewiacyjnych zachowa , traktowane bywa y w przesz ci jako afirmacja ycia przez hipstera w jego najbardziej pierwotnych, prymitywnych przejawach [Ibidem, s. 33]. Wspó cze nie, w ponowoczesno ci, bycie hipsterem to bardziej styl ycia trudny do okre lenia jednoznacznymi ramami [Ibidem, s. 143-144]. Palenie marihuany jednak, podobnie jak na pocz tku narodzin subkultury, pozosta o zdecydowanie jedn z wielu cech, jakie przypisuje si jej cz onkom. Przyj równie mo na, e w subkulturach wspó czesnych, podobnie jak w subkulturach dekad minionych, funkcjonuje bezwarunkowe przyzwolenie na za ywanie psychoaktywnych rodków, a nawet – jak twierdz niektórzy – rodowiska te wyró nia z otoczenia [25]. Przytoczone powy ej subkultury s jedynie przyk adami wielu podobnych, powstaj cych, b reaktywuj cych si grup m odych ludzi, po ród których substancje zmieniaj ce nastrój znalaz y sobie sta e miejsce. Powo tu mo na si jeszcze na s owa autorki pracy o hipsterach: „[…] fragmentaryczna to samo ponowoczesnych subkultur, tak ró na od grupowej to samo ci subkultur nowoczesnych, stoi w kontrze do silnego poczucia autentyczno ci subkulturowej. Postmodernistyczny przesyt i brak granic, a tak e rzesze na ladowców i pozerów sprowadzaj autentyczno subkulturow na manowce” [24, s. 100]. Tak sta o si mi dzy innymi z hipisami, którym przez lata przypisywano rozpowszechnienie narkomanii, czy punkami postrzeganymi w rezultacie jako alkoholicy i w chacze kleju. Tak równie dzieje si wspó cze nie, kiedy osoba, uto samiaj ca siebie z kontestacyjn ideologi korzysta ze rodków narkotycznych. Dzia anie jednak e w ramach przyj tej ideologii pozwala usprawiedliwi przed samym sob , jak i otoczeniem, podj cie decyzji o u ywaniu tych e specyfików. Postmodernistyczne implikacje. Procesy przemian spo eczno – kulturowych dokonuj ce si we wspó czesnym wiecie zdecydowanie oddzia uj na polskie spo ecze stwo, na preferowane nowe style ycia, wzorce dzia ania czy przyjmowane warto ci. Przemiany, jakie dokonuj si na naszych oczach nie maj wszelako jednoznacznego przebiegu. 183


Jak podaje profesor Maria ski: „Z jednej strony zaznaczaj si jeszcze silne procesy instytucjonalizacji i tradycji, powoduj ce umocnienie si tradycyjnej struktury spo ecznej, dzia aj ce hamuj co na zmian spo eczn , przystosowuj ce m ode pokolenie do istniej cych warto ci, norm i wzorów zachowa . Z drugiej nasilaj si procesy indywidualizacji, nios ce za sob cyrkulacj przelotnych ról i statusów, poczucie silnej ambiwalencji religijnej i moralnej, niebezpiecze stwo g bokiego rozk adu warto ci, norm i wi zi mi dzy lud mi (anomia), ale i szanse wolnego, samodzielnego oraz odpowiedzialnego kszta towania w asnego projektu ycia (samosterowno )” [26]. Konsekwencj owej dwutorowo ci stanowi mo e zachwianie dotychczasowych zinternalizowanych warto ci, przestrzeganych norm spo ecznych, moralno ci czy prawdy. Wed ug postmodernistów we wspó czesnych czasach nie istniej adne uniwersalne warto ci, poniewa nie mo na odnale ich fundamentalnych podstaw. „Dobro i z o maj wi c charakter konkretny i jednostkowy. Ka dorazowo stanowi o nich osoba. Nikt nie potrzebuje te usprawiedliwia swoich wyborów ani przed sob , ani przed jakimkolwiek autorytetem” [27, s. 8]. Wybór nale y wi c do jednostki i ona to decyduje, jaki kierunek przyjmie oraz co w danym momencie stanowi dla niej b dzie nadrz dn warto . W procesie socjalizacji jednostki, jak opisuje to Jean-Claude Kaufmann: „Atutem niezmiennej wagi przyzwyczaje i codziennej socjalizacji […] jest regularno : jednostka zawsze do niej wraca. […] Socjalizacja ustanawia swego rodzaju barier ochronn dla bycia sob , nadaj c kierunek biograficznym trajektoriom”. W czasach pó nej nowoczesno ci natomiast, proces socjalizacji jednostki odtwarzany bywa w coraz mniej jednoznacznej postaci [28, s. 63]. Chaos, przyj ty w postmodernistycznych ideach, niezgoda, odrzucanie sensu jedno ci i adu, ród o swoje bior paradoksalnie z konsekwentnego poszanowania wolno ci ka dego cz owieka. Pluralizm i tolerancja dla innych s tu maj jako stabilizatory relacji mi dzyludzkich [27, s. 10]. Powo uj c si na s owa Zbigniewa Sare o: wed ug postmodernistów „Ka dy ma prawo post powa zgodnie z w asnymi prze wiadczeniami. Nie istnieje nic, co pozwala oby ocenia czyje post powanie. Z tej racji adnych warto ci nie wolno nikomu narzuca , ani te zabrania pe nienia po danych przez niego czynów. Wobec wyborów dokonywanych przez innych ludzi trzeba przyjmowa postaw respektu i szacunku. Tolerancja w uj ciu postmodernistycznych filozofów, winna i tak daleko, aby nikt nie potrzebowa usprawiedliwia podejmowanych decyzji ani przed innymi, ani nawet przed sob ” [Ibidem, s. 11]. Stanowienie o sobie w ponowoczesnym uj ciu, to przyjmowanie subiektywnych warto ci, czasami pod wp ywem „klimatu opinii”, jakie aktualnie wobec danego stanowiska wyst puj , b du ej elastyczno ci wobec dotychczas respektowanych norm. W postmodernistycznej rzeczywisto ci jednostka niejako tworzy siebie na nowo w zale no ci od pojawiaj cych si indywidualnych potrzeb, nowych pogl dów, zderzenia dotychczasowych i „nowych” warto ci. Cytuj c raz jeszcze Kaufmanna: „Bycie sob nie jest czym , co posiada si samo przez si , jest tocz cym si procesem, opartym na wyobra aniu siebie” [28, s. 31]. Tworzenie swojej osobowo ci, wiata warto ci, moralno ci czy potrzeb pozostawia si wi c niemal wy cznie wszelkim wp ywom, jakim poddana zosta mo e dana jednostka. Istotne znaczenie w piel gnowaniu dotychczas przestrzeganych norm przypisa nale y religii oraz roli Boga w yciu cz owieka. W oparciu o regu y obowi zuj ce w danej doktrynie, cz owiek, staj c przed jakimikolwiek wyborami, decydowa si na ten wybór, który by zgodny z normami wyznawanej przeze religii. Obecnie jednak, jak podaje Anna Sobolewska, wierzenia religijne ze sfery tradycji zwi zanej z miejscem urodzenia przesun y si do sfery wolnego wyboru. Autorka zwraca równie uwag , i wspó cze nie 40% spo ród polskich katolików nie wierzy w ycie wieczne, natomiast 20% studentów uznaj cych si za katolików jednocze nie przyznaje, e nie wierzy w istnienie Boga [29]. Post puj ca sekularyzacja to równie niebagatelna cecha ponowoczesnego spo ecze stwa. Poj cie to oznacza, e zasadnicze obszary z jakich sk ada si ludzkie ycie: rodzina, szko a, praca, kultura, ekonomia, polityka, nauka, traktowane bywaj jako zupe nie niezale ne od norm religijnych. Religijno natomiast postrzegana bywa na równi z reszt równowa nych i niepowi zanych ze sob yciowych segmentów, nie posiadaj cych jakiejkolwiek mo liwo ci wp ywu na funkcjonowanie cz owieka. Wraz z sekularyzacj wyst puje równie indyferentyzm religijny, czyli przekonanie, e istnienie, b nieistnienie Boga przestaje mie dla jednostki jakiekolwiek znaczenie [30, s. 242]. Wspó czesny badacz zale no ci pomi dzy postmodernizmem a pojawiaj cymi si coraz cz ciej patologiami spo ecznymi – w tym uzale nieniami – Marek Dziewiecki zwraca szczególn uwag na wp ywy ponowoczesnej kultury na pojawiaj cy si kryzys wychowania jednostki. W swoich obserwacjach wyró nia typowe dla tej e kultury cechy wraz z wp ywem, jaki wywieraj one na rozumienie i prze ywanie przez cz owieka siebie i otaczaj cego go wiata. Jedn z wyró nionych przez niego cech ponowoczesnego spo ecze stwa s dynamiczne przeobra enia w podstawowych obszarach funkcjonowania cz owieka. Z racji intensywnych zmian, zw aszcza obyczajowych i spo ecznych, dotychczasowe warto ci zast puj pojawiaj ce si nowe, uznane za lepsze od wcze niejszych i bardziej warto ciowe jedynie z racji swojej nowo ci. Bezkrytycznej akceptacji, czasami nawet kontrowersyjnych kwestii, sprzyja wed ug badacza skrajny relatywizm wobec wszelkich dotychczasowych obszarów ycia ludzkiego [14, s. 1213]. Znacz ce jest równie postmodernistyczne ujmowanie poj cia, czy raczej stanu, jakim jest wolno i jej rozumienie. Nawi zuj c do postmodernistycznych za , w ród ludzi wyst powa mo e przekonanie o tym, e w yciu prywatnym ka dego cz owieka nie musz wyst powa jakiekolwiek tzw. prawdy obiektywne, jak i niezale ne warto ci czy normy moralne. Przekonania te zdecydowanie wp ywaj na podejmowanie dzia podlegaj cych wy cznie subiektywnej ocenie, zgodnej z wyst puj cymi w danym momencie pragnieniami i potrzebami jednostki [31, s. 23]. Dochodzi tu mo e w rezultacie do zaw enia b zniekszta cenia pojmowania wolno ci. Osoby, kojarz ce j z nieskr powanymi niczym postawami, rezygnuj c z dotychczasowych warto ci i aspiracji, zaczynaj tak e powoli 184


zatraca swoj wolno . Powo uj c si na s owa Marka Dziewieckiego: „Zagro eniem dla wolno ci jest jednak nie tylko kryzys pragnie , ale tak e kryzys my lenia. Jednym z bolesnych paradoksów naszych czasów jest sytuacja, w której cz owiek ma coraz wi ksze aspiracje aby w wolno ci, a jednocze nie ma coraz wi ksze trudno ci, by swoj wolno rozumie w sposób realistyczny i pog biony. Z kolei b dne rozumienie wolno ci prowadzi do nieodpowiedzialnego z niej korzystania. Nierzadko poci ga to za sob tak bardzo naiwne wyra anie w asnej wolno ci, e powoduje to jej okaleczanie, czy wr cz utrat ” [Ibidem, s. 21]. Inn z kolei cech ponowoczesno ci stanowi tendencja do egoistycznego indywidualizmu oznaczaj cego: „[…] przyznawanie jednostce absolutnej warto ci i postawienie jej w centrum rzeczywisto ci jako jedyne kryterium odniesienia oraz oceny postaw i zachowa ” [30, s. 238]. Konsekwencj tego natomiast s postawy hedonistyczne – poszukiwanie wszelkimi mo liwymi drogami przyjemno ci, stanowi ce z czasem jedyne kryterium post powania [Ibidem, s. 239]. Osi ganie stanów subiektywnie uznawanych za atrakcyjne, po danych i poszukiwanych w niemal ka dych okoliczno ciach, uznawane bywa w nie jako owa specyficzna wolno , do której d y wspó czesny postmodernistyczny cz owiek. Wolno do za ywania, wolno od nakazów, zakazów i wszelkich ogranicze . Niema e znaczenie w pojawianiu si zmian postrzegania rodków odurzaj cych przypisa nale y ponowoczesnym wp ywom w wiecie nauki. Pojawienie si wspó cze nie odmiennych pogl dów na temat za ywania psychoaktywnych substancji po ród rodzimych przedstawicieli wiata wiedzy równie posiada mo e swoje uwarunkowania. Jak zauwa a prof. Ewa Doma ska, postmodernistyczny sposób my lenia, jaki pojawi si w ród polskich intelektualistów po 1989 roku, traktowany by jako alternatywa wobec dotychczasowego – cz sto w duchu marksistowskiego sposobu my lenia – podej cia do bada i postrzegania rzeczywisto ci. Postmodernizm, w tzw. okresie przej ciowym w Polsce, traktowany by przez nich jako antidotum na „komun ”, stanowi istotne pod e do budowania opozycyjnej wiadomo ci, mia przemianie wiata i nauki poprzez dekonstrukcj jej podstaw [32]. Stosunek teoretyków i badaczy do zjawiska narkomanii, przedstawiany we wspó czesnych publikacjach, mo e stanowi pok osie owego „buntu” wobec minionego, niechlubnego okresu. Przyk adem b tu m.in. publikacje filozofa Kamila Sipowicza, kontestuj cego w latach siedemdziesi tych i osiemdziesi tych XX wieku miniony system polityczny, czy profesora Vetulaniego, którego stanowisko wobec rodków zmieniaj cych nastrój mo na uzna za co najmniej wysoce liberalne. Pluralizm warto ci, z jakim spotyka si ponowoczesny cz owiek, pozostawianie jednostce mo liwo ci wyboru, sekularyzacja niezwykle istotnych obszarów ycia, zachwianie wiary w Boga, egoistyczny indywidualizm, a wraz z nim post puj ce postawy hedonistyczne zdecydowanie tworz pod e do poszukiwania przyjemno ci w doznaniach, jakie niesie ze sob u ywanie rodków o narkotycznym dzia aniu. Poparte naukow argumentacj s w stanie tworzy niezwykle skuteczn racjonalizacj , z pomoc której wyt umaczy mo na podejmowanie nawet najbardziej nieracjonalnych zachowa . Relatywizm normatywny. Szczególnie istotn rol w pojawiaj cych si przemianach przypisa nale y wykorzystywaniu relatywizmu normatywnego do zmiany dotychczasowych postaw. Jak podaje Jacek Zieli ski: „Relatywizm normatywny – to teoria dotycz ca tego, jak nale y odnosi si do grup i jednostek o odmiennych hierarchiach warto ci od naszych. Zabrania ona pot pia inne przekonania b podporz dkowa je swoim. Jej za eniem jest, i ró ne systemy etyczne s tak samo solidnie uzasadnione, wi c wszystkie systemy s s uszne i nale y im si ten sam szacunek i traktowanie” [33]. O ile generalnie teoria ta zasadna jest przy zetkni ciu si wielu kultur i odnosi si m.in. do poszanowania odmienno ci przestrzeganych w nich norm i regu , to nie ulega w tpliwo ci, e aktualnie wykorzystywana bywa przez zwolenników rodków psychoaktywnych w domaganiu si prawa do samostanowienia, wolno ci wyboru, czy uznaniu norm wyst puj cych w tej e spo eczno ci. Egzemplifikacj wykorzystania owej teorii w d eniu do akceptacji za ywania narkotyków, zw aszcza marihuany, b przytoczone wcze niej przyk ady dzia partii „Ruch Palikota”, w których to cz onkowie ugrupowania domagaj si zniesienia sankcji karnych dla osób korzystaj cych z tego narkotyku oraz uznania ich przekona i potrzeb [34,35]. Innym przyk adem – nieco subtelniejszym – odwo ywania si do tej teorii s owa filozofa i publicysty Kamila Sipowicza we wst pie do jego pracy na temat marihuany. Autor zdecydowanie opowiada si za prawnym uznaniem – jak sam podaje – „odwiecznego zwi zku cz owieka i ro lin halucynogennych”. Wyra a te bunt wobec w adzy stanowi cej prawo, którego celem jest jedynie umacnianie pozycji osób sprawuj cych adz , a nie ulepszanie cz owieka czy spo ecze stwa. Przyznanie jednostce prawa do samostanowienia, wolno ci wobec wyboru korzystania – b nie – z narkotyków, jak wynika z kontekstu, to normy o których uznanie zabiega Sipowicz. Jak twierdzi, celem napisanej przez niego ksi ki jest „[…] wprowadzenie do spo ecznego dyskursu wci istniej cego ‘konopnego problemu’, czyli doprowadzenie do nowego otwarcia w nowym spo ecze stwie” [36]. Wspó cze nie, w ponowoczesnym wiecie pe nym niejednoznaczno ci i ambiwalencji, nierzadko daje si zauwa wielopostaciowo moralno ci czy religijno ci, których wk ad w przestrzeganie dotychczasowych norm jest wysoce znacz cy. Wchodzenie w doros w spo ecze stwie charakteryzuj cym si niepewno ci i nieprzewidywalno ci , stanowi skomplikowane i wymagaj ce rodowisko dla funkcjonowania m odego pokolenia [26]. Frustracja, jaka pojawi si mo e w tak niespójnym wiecie, mo e stanowi dla wielu adolescentów zbyt wysokie wyzwanie. Pojawiaj ce si mo liwo ci wykorzystania odurzaj cych substancji do agodzenia tego typu dozna , stanowi z kolei mog niema pokus do ich u ycia. Odwo anie si do relatywizmu normatywnego zdecydowanie atwia przyjmowanie nowych – odmiennych ni przyj te w procesie socjalizacji – stanowisk wobec narkotycznych specyfików.

185


Dost pno rodków odurzaj cych. Mi dzynarodowe organizacje zajmuj ce si zapobieganiem i zwalczaniem zjawiska narkomanii informuj , e wspó cze nie w co najmniej 21 pa stwach wiata uprawia si na skal masow naturalne ro liny narkotyczne, natomiast ponad 30 krajów wytwarza na swoim terytorium narkotyki syntetyczne [37]. Otwarte granice zdecydowanie sprzyjaj przenikaniu na polski rynek wszelkich mo liwych do zdobycia specyfików, które do 1989 roku pojawia y si na nim epizodycznie i w niewielkich ilo ciach. Wraz z transformacj ustrojow Polska sta a si aren na której przecina y si szlaki przemytu substancji narkotycznych z Ameryki Po udniowej oraz Azji do krajów Europy. W zaistnia ych okoliczno ciach wszelkie, dotychczas egzotyczne, specyfiki dociera zacz y równie do polskich odbiorców [38, s. 60]. Narkotyki projektowanie, potocznie nazywane dopalaczami pojawi y si stosunkowo niedawno w Polsce, jednak w bardzo krótkim czasie zdoby y sobie znaczne grono zwolenników. Od 2007 roku tzw. dopalacze naby mo na by o wy cznie przez Internet za po rednictwem pozna skiej firmy „Konfekcjoner” zajmuj cej si dystrybucj tych rodków, oferuj cej je, na podstawie niepisanej umowy z klientami jako eksponaty dla osób prowadz cych zielniki, czyli – mo na powiedzie – fascynatów, zbieraczy czy bardziej fachowo – kolekcjonerów. Pod koniec 2008 roku media informowa y, e w Polsce funkcjonuje ju kilkadziesi t sklepów oferuj cych legalne rodki o dzia aniu zbli onym do narkotyków. Naturalnie wszystko w majestacie prawa pod szyldem wyrobów kolekcjonerskich. Ustawa o zapobieganiu narkomanii precyzyjnie okre la a substancje prawnie kontrolowane, w zwi zku z czym, korzystaj c z luki w prawie, na rynek wprowadza zacz to wszelkie naturalne rodki psychoaktywne, jak równie te, które da o si „skomponowa ” w laboratoriach, a które w przytoczonej ustawie wymienione nie by y. Zasada „co nie jest zabronione, jest dozwolone” w pe ni zacz a si tu potwierdza . Zjawisko pojawienia si sieci sklepów zupe nie „zbi o z tropu” osoby, których zadaniem by o monitorowanie zjawisk zwi zanych z odurzaniem si . Tym bardziej, i s dzono, e substancje te nie wzbudz specjalnego zainteresowania. Brak niepokoj cych doniesie na temat konsekwencji zwi zanych z ich za ywaniem, równie powstrzymywa ingerowanie w zjawisko. Eskalacja zjawiska wyst powa a niemal jednocze nie w ca ej Europie, w zwi zku z czym nikt wcze niej nie mia mo liwo ci przeprowadzi rzetelnych bada , które mog yby potwierdzi szkodliwo dopalaczy. Polska pod tym wzgl dem by a wi c doskona ym terytorium do zaistnienia dla firm rozprowadzaj cych te rodki. Mimo ró nego rodzaju epizodycznych protestów ze strony w adz samorz dowych w ró nych cz ciach naszego kraju sklepy z dopalaczami powstawa y wsz dzie tam, gdzie by o na nie zapotrzebowanie [12, s. 26-28]. W sierpniu 2010 roku ich liczba przekroczy a kilkaset placówek. Dopalacze w dalszym ci gu reklamowano jako „produkty kolekcjonerskie”, zaznaczaj c przy tym, e nie nadaj si do spo ycia przez ludzi, mimo powszechnej wiadomo ci, e rodki te dzia aj pobudzaj co, halucynogennie b wywo uj nies ychanie siln eufori [39, s. 499]. Pomimo ustale prawnych handel syntetycznymi rodkami psychoaktywnymi nadal ma miejsce w polskiej rzeczywisto ci, natomiast witryny w Sieci i komunikatory internetowe wraz z cz sto zmienianymi telefonami komórkowymi na kart , stanowi wspó cze nie najbardziej popularn form dystrybucji narkotyków [40]. Wraz z pocz tkiem drugiej dekady XXI wieku zaobserwowano równie alarmuj cy wzrost uzale niania si od dopuszczonych legalnie do obrotu substancji, m.in. leków dost pnych bez recept czy rodków wzmacniaj cych [41]. Odnotowane zjawiska to równie poszukiwanie narkotycznych dozna przez wykorzystywanie specyfików takich jak yn do czyszczenia felg samochodowych – zawieraj cego substancj odurzaj – GBL [42], odurzanie si gazem do zapalniczek [40, s. 49], czy próby osi gania psychoaktywnych dozna poprzez s uchanie, specjalnie w tym celu skonstruowanych, sekwencji d wi kowych [43]. Zjawiska te ukazuj zarówno wysoki popyt na rodki odurzaj ce, jaki równie pod aj za tym zjawiskiem poda – jej wysublimowanymi formami i manipulacj . Zmiana sposobów za ywania. Kolejny, równie znacz cy wp yw na postrzeganie narkotyków wynika ze zmiany sposobów ich za ywania. Od budz cej powszechn groz strzykawki, zaniku , stanów zapalnych ko czyn, w które dokonywano iniekcji i gro by AIDS, poprzez wypalaj ce luzówki w nosie i kubki smakowe w prze yku – ma o atrakcyjne na d sz met metody przyjmowania tych substancji, do zdecydowanie mniej inwazyjnych sposobów za ywania w czasach obecnych. Mo liwo przyj cia substancji psychoaktywnych pod postaci pigu ki, naparu, p ynu, czy jako wypalanego skr ta stworzy y istotny grunt dla zjawiska dopalaczy wyst puj cego na polskiej scenie narkotykowej od 2008 roku [39, s. 498]. Wspó cze nie zakup, a przede wszystkim za ycie wszelkich substancji psychoaktywnych nie stanowi jakichkolwiek barier zwi zanych z l kiem przed bólem, utrat kontroli czy mierci . Nabywane – bez potrzeby posiadania recepty – farmaceutyki o odurzaj cym potencjale mo na przyjmowa jako pigu ki w dowolnym czasie i w niekoniecznie pozbawiaj cych wiadomo ci dawkach [44]. Stosowanie z pozoru zwyk ych zió ek lub grzybów powszechnie uznanych za jadalne, równie nie stanowi szczególnych róde niepokoju w ród osób decyduj cych si na ich u ycie, pomimo wiadomo ci wyst powania zagro enia zdrowia. Cz ciej kojarzone bywa natomiast z mistycyzmem i czno ci ze wiatem pozamaterialnym, a wobec takich argumentacji zjedzenie kilku nasion, b przyj cie narkotyku pod postaci wywaru znajduje swoje uzasadnienie [39, s. 491]. Mo liwo prze ycia psychodelicznych dozna poprzez s uchanie sekwencji d wi ków przez odpowiedni sprz t do odtwarzania i w specyficznych warunkach, to kolejna nieinwazyjna metoda podejmowania prób odurzania si przez m odzie [45]. Wspó cze nie przyj cie nawet tak silnego narkotyku, jak heroina, pod postaci ulatniaj cego si dymu, w zwi zku z pozornie niewinnym sposobem u ycia, nie wywo uje w ród osób decyduj cych si na za ycie go szczególnych barier. Zmiany w polityce narkotykowej. Podstawy prawne polityki narkotykowej w Polsce pod koniec XX wieku zawarte zosta y w Ustawie z dnia 24 kwietnia 1997 o przeciwdzia aniu narkomanii. Istotnym elementem ówczesnych strategii maj cych za cel powstrzymanie zjawiska by o represyjne podej cie do osób uzale nionych. W my l art. 48, 186


„Kto wbrew przepisom ustawy posiada rodki odurzaj ce lub substancje psychotropowe podlega karze pozbawienia wolno ci do lat 3” [46], osoby u których znaleziono w trakcie rewizji rodki o narkotycznym dzia aniu traktowane by y na równi z przest pcami. Jeden z przepisów (art.48 ust.4) uwzgl dnia jednak e, i posiadanie nieznacznej ilo ci narkotyków na w asny u ytek mo e by okoliczno ci wy czaj prawne konsekwencje. Ustawa nie przewidywa a zupe nej dekryminalizacji tzw. „nieznacznej ilo ci”, a tylko depenalizacj . Jakakolwiek forma posiadania substancji psychoaktywnych, w my l przepisów by a czynem zabronionymi karalnym. „Drobne posiadanie” by o tutaj okoliczno ci wy czaj kar , nie przest pstwo. Niestety, w ustawie nie by o zdefiniowane co znaczy owa „nieznaczna ilo ”. Przepis ten uchylono 3 lata pó niej. Posiadanie narkotyków w znacznej ilo ci natomiast, zgodnie z ustaw by o zbrodni , za któr grozi o do 5 lat pozbawienia wolno ci. Penalizacja samego posiadania narkotyku by a zasadniczym zwrotem w dotychczasowej polityce narkotykowej [38, s. 60]. W dniu 29 lipca 2005 roku, Sejm uchwali now ustaw o przeciwdzia aniu narkomanii. Nowe regulacje utrzymywa y prohibicyjne podej cie do narkotyków, równocze nie jednak przekonanie ustawodawcy, e narkomani to osoby chore wymagaj ce leczenia, a nie przest pcy, wp yn o na pojawienie si kilku okoliczno ci maj cych na celu sk onienie uzale nionego do terapii. Ustawa umo liwia a zawieszenie post powania karnego w przypadku osób, które podejm si leczenia, co zale ne by o od decyzji prokuratora wydawanej na podstawie efektów terapii [47]. W kolejnych zmianach wprowadzanych do obowi zuj cej od 2005 roku ustawy, dominowa o prohibicyjno – represyjne stanowisko wobec ci gle ewoluuj cego zjawiska. W ostatniej nowelizacji z 2011 roku, w ramach liberalizacji dotychczasowego restrykcyjnego prawa, po Art. 62 wprowadzono Art. 62a, o brzmieniu: „Je eli przedmiotem czynu, o którym mowa w art. 62 ust. 1 lub 3, s rodki odurzaj ce lub substancje psychotropowe w ilo ci nieznacznej, przeznaczone na w asny u ytek sprawcy, post powanie mo na umorzy równie przed wydaniem postanowienia o wszcz ciu ledztwa lub dochodzenia, je eli orzeczenie wobec sprawcy kary by oby niecelowe ze wzgl du na okoliczno ci pope nienia czynu, a tak e stopie jego spo ecznej szkodliwo ci” [48]. Zmiany te wesz y w ycie z dniem 1 pa dziernika 2011 roku. Przyj te konwencje k ad szczególny nacisk na leczenie osób uzale nionych od narkotyków, a nie, jak dotychczas, zamykanie ich w zak adach karnych. W my l nowych ustanowie prokurator w indywidualnych przypadkach osób, u których stwierdzono posiadanie narkotyków, wymierzenie sprawcy owego czynu kary mo e uzna za niecelowe i tym samym odst pi od cigania [49]. Polityka narkotykowa to jednak e ca e spektrum dzia wokó aktualnej sytuacji rodków psychoaktywnych. W sprawie modyfikacji ustale prawnych wobec niektórych narkotyków, zw aszcza marihuany, niemal ka dego miesi ca podejmowane s debaty na temat legalizacji marihuany. Jedno z ugrupowa politycznych – Ruch Palikota – liberalizacj prawa w tym zakresie obra o sobie jako jeden z elementów programowych [38, s. 62]. Podejmowane dzia ania, w których zrezygnowano z represyjnego podej cia wobec osób posiadaj cych narkotyki, z du ym prawdopodobie stwem wp yn y na wspó czesne rozmiary u ywania marihuany. Jak wynika z bada przeprowadzonych przez Mazowieckie Centrum Profilaktyki Uzale nie aktualnie odnotowuje si wyra ne zmiany w stosunku do legalizacji niektórych narkotyków w porównaniu do sonda y przeprowadzanych kilka lat wcze niej. Za ca kowit depenalizacj posiadania ma ych ilo ci marihuany opowiada si 51% procent gimnazjalistów, uczniów szkó rednich, studentów oraz m odych do 25 roku ycia. W ród doros ych natomiast 17% opowiada si za depenalizacj ma ych ilo ci narkotyków. Wyniki bada ukazuj równie , e niemal 22% doros ych i ponad 30% m odych Polaków spotka o osoby za ywaj ce narkotyki, 18% uczestników imprez masowych i dyskotek spotka o si z propozycj sprzeda y rodków psychoaktywnych, a ponad po owa (54%) odpowiedzia o twierdz co, e wie gdzie w ich okolicy mo na naby narkotyk [50]. Moda na za ywanie narkotyków. Opisuj c czynniki wp ywaj ce na wzrost zainteresowania tymi rodkami pami ta nale y równie o tym, e jedn z dominuj cych cech dojrzewania jest silna ciekawo wiata, a wszelkiego rodzaju eksperymenty zwi zane m.in. z próbowaniem wszystkiego co jest dost pne, s ci le powi zane z wchodzeniem w wiat doros ych. Ruth Maxwell podkre la, e u ywanie rodków odurzaj cych jest cz sto efektem ch ci ich poznania i trudnej do powstrzymania dociekliwo ci [51, s. 50]. Pami ta nale y równie , e okres adolescencji u cz ci m odych osób charakteryzuje si buntem do otaczaj cego wiata i przekor do dzia i zachowa nie aprobowanych przez rodziców, wychowawców, czy dzia aj cy system prawny. Robienie rzeczy „zakazanych” przynosi satysfakcj o wiele bardziej intryguj ni t , osi gan poprzez dzia ania powszechnie przyj te i akceptowane. Zakup alkoholu przez osob niepe noletni , jego wypicie, a nawet przykre efekty zdrowotne organizmu na drugi dzie , to dla wielu fascynuj ca przygoda. Dochodzi tu jeszcze pozornie pozytywna atrakcyjno rodka wynikaj ca z jego dzia ania. Przyp yw energii, zrelaksowanie, wyzbycie hamulców w relacjach z innymi, czasami specyficzna empatia, rozmowno przy jednoczesnym braku dotkliwych skutków zdrowotnych, dzia a dodatkowo na korzy i ma si nijak do niebezpiecze stw roztaczanych przez doros ych. Na „plus” w tym wypadku dzia aj równie historie ekscesów gwiazd popkultury ukazywane w specyficzny atrakcyjny sposób: „gwiazda Harry Pottera pali trawk ”, „Koterski te bra amf ”, „odloty Kukiza” itp. Poza tym dost pno i powszechno w obecnych czasach rodków odurzaj cych, jak i instytucji zajmuj cych si pomaganiem narkomanom, maj równie niebagatelny wp yw na postrzeganie, jak równie sytuacje zwi zane z nadu ywaniem i pojawiaj ca si w wiadomo ci m odych mo liwo „zatrzymania si ” w za ywaniu. W wielu wypadkach o rodki zajmuj ce si leczeniem tej niezwykle podst pnej choroby traktowane s jak sanatoria do których mo na si uda , kiedy ju si „przesadzi” z narkotykami [Ibidem, s. 5152].

187


Istotnym zjawiskiem maj cym wp yw na rozpowszechnienie si osobliwo ci, jak jest za ywanie rodków zmieniaj cych nastrój jest wykszta cenie specyficznej mody na odurzanie si . Osoby za ywaj ce we w asnych rodowiskach przestaj by traktowane jako autsajderzy, natomiast obcowanie z nimi, a w konsekwencji za ywanie narkotyków, postrzegane bywa jako zachowanie akceptowane a nawet na czasie – jak dajmy na to, posiadanie najnowszego modelu telefonu czy odtwarzacza plików multimedialnych. Narkotyki staj si powoli niemal immanentn cech m odzie owej kultury. Ch doznawania stanów psychicznego rozlu nienia, przekraczania progów ludzkich mo liwo ci podczas przygotowania do egzaminu, nawi zywania relacji z innymi, budowania „pozytywnego klimatu” podczas imprez, to aktualnie norma funkcjonuj ca w niejednym rodowisku. Powszechne tabu, jakim przed laty by y narkotyki, przeobrazi o si w niebagatelny detal wspó czesnego wizerunku m odzie y [52]. W obecnych czasach, jak podaj w swoim raporcie Maj i Kowalewicz, za ywanie rodków psychoaktywnych nale y do zachowa jawnych, akceptowanych spo ecznie w rodowisku i uznawanych za normalne. Niech spo eczna do narkomanów i zwi zany z ni wstyd osób za ywaj cych te rodki to z kolei zjawisko zanikaj ce. Narkotyki uto samiane s g ównie z dobrym nastrojem i spotkaniami towarzyskimi. Obecno ich w otoczeniu jest powszechna dla ka dego, kto tylko wyrazi potrzeb spróbowania, natomiast si gaj po nie – nie jak kiedy - jednostki wyobcowane spo ecznie, ale te, które przez za ywanie pragn podwy szy , b utrzyma swój status w grupie rówie niczej. Branie niektórych narkotyków: amfetaminy, kokainy, bywa te t umaczone potrzeb osi gni cia dobrych wyników w nauce, pracy, rywalizacji zawodowej. Gro ba uzale nienia w tych okoliczno ciach nie stanowi adnego hamulca w podejmowaniu decyzji o za ywaniu [53]. Podsumowanie. Jak ukazano w niniejszym artykule, na ca okszta t zmian wobec postrzegania rodków o narkotycznym dzia aniu oraz zmiany postaw wobec zarówno tych e rodków, jak i osób je za ywaj cych, wp ywa niezwykle wiele ró norodnych czynników. W podj tych rozwa aniach ukazano wp yw przemian ustrojowych, jakie mia y miejsce w Polsce po 1989 roku. Ówczesne pogorszenie nastroju cz ci polskiego spo ecze stwa z jednoczesn eskalacj konsumpcyjno – rozrywkowych wzorców zachowa oraz potrzeb swobody i niezale no ci, zdecydowanie wp yn y na zmiany stanowiska wobec narkotyków. Wyró nione w tym rozdziale mechanizmy prowadz ce do przemian, to równie manipulacja i perswazja w Internecie, pojawienie si eufemistycznej terminologii u ywanej zarówno w odniesieniu do narkotyków, jak równie wywo ywanych za ich przyczyn stanów oraz osób je za ywaj cych, czy konsekwencje wynikaj ce z pojawiaj cego si w wielu polskich domach tzw. kryzysu warto ci i za amania si funkcji wychowawczo – opieku czej rodziny. Zwrócono tak e uwag na rol opinii osobisto ci wiata wspó czesnej nauki, którzy zdecydowanie inaczej, ni przed kilkoma dekadami, wypowiadaj si na temat psychoaktywnych rodków, w kszta towaniu si w ród spo ecze stwa postaw wobec tych e specyfików. W dalszej cz ci artyku u zaprezentowano kilka przyk adów wyst puj cych wspó cze nie w Polsce subkultur, w ród których za ywanie narkotyków uzna by mo na za cech niemal immanentn tych e spo eczno ci. Znacz rol ma tutaj równie wp yw rodowiska, w którym m odzi przejmuj wzorce zachowa od osób dla nich istotnych. Oprze si w tym wypadku mo na na teorii kontroli spo ecznej Travisa Hirshiego oraz integracyjnym modelu LeBlanca pozwalaj cych zrozumie podejmowanie – m.in. przez m odzie – zachowa dewiacyjnych od „istotnych bliskich”, w tym si gania po rodki psychoaktywne [54]. Bior c pod uwag zasadnicz tez teorii kontroli spo ecznej, jednostki, u których wi zi z konformistycznym porz dkiem zosta y naruszone b zerwane, wykazuj wyra ne sk onno ci do czynów niezgodnych z przyj tymi normami. Travis Hirshi za , e cz onkowie danego spo ecze stwa posiadaj jeden, wspólny dla wszystkich jego cz onków, system norm i warto ci. Skonstruowa on równie cztery socjologiczne zmienne, powi zane wzajemnie ze sob oraz maj ce wp yw na podejmowane przez cz owieka dzia ania. Nale do nich: przywi zanie, czyli emocjonalne zwi zki jednostki z wa nymi w jej otoczeniu osobami; zaanga owanie w stosowanie przyj tych norm i regu ; zaabsorbowanie dzia alno ci konformistyczn ; oraz przekonanie, czyli wewn trzne poczucie o s uszno ci i konieczno ci przestrzegania przyj tych norm [55]. wiadomo wp ywu poszczególnych zmiennych pozwala zrozumie mechanizmy sprzyjaj ce pojawianiu si zachowa patologicznych, w tym uzale nie . Przywi zanie do osób bliskich wyst puj cych w otoczeniu, zw aszcza rodziny, sprawia, e jednostka poczuwa si do przestrzegania przyj tych w danej spo eczno ci norm i regu , natomiast wiadomo braku akceptacji, od osób dla niej wa nych, zachowa wykraczaj cych poza nie oraz krytyka spo eczna z tym zwi zana powstrzymuj j od wszelkich zachowa dewiacyjnych. Jednocze nie korzy ci zwi zane z praktycznym stosowaniem przyj tych regu , do których zaliczy mo na m.in. wszelkie pochwa y czy przejawy akceptacji, sprzyjaj ich internalizacji. Zaanga owanie z kolei w dzia alno konformistyczn – w zwi zku z dokonanym przez jednostk bilansem zysków i strat zwi zanych z przestrzeganiem b negacj przyj tych regu – stanowi dla niej czynnik chroni cy przed zachowaniami niezgodnymi z przyj tymi powszechnie. Zaj cie si dzia alno ci konformistyczn , m.in. pe nienie okre lonych ról i wype nianie zwi zanych z nimi zada , nie stwarza z kolei sposobno ci anga owania si w dzia alno dewiacyjn . Przekonanie natomiast, o s uszno ci i przestrzeganiu wyst puj cych norm, ma kluczowe znaczenie dla jednostki i jest najistotniejsz zmienn chroni j przed podejmowaniem dewiacyjnych zachowa [56]. W modelu teoretycznym Marca LeBlanca funkcja „przekonanie” zaczerpni ta z teorii Hirshiego, zast piona zosta a zmienn „kontrola wewn trzna”, natomiast „przywi zanie” zyska o miano „kontroli zewn trznej”. Autor ten do poprzedniego modelu do czy dodatkowe zmienne spo eczne, do których nale poziom rozwoju psychicznego oraz antagonizm destruktywny. Zauwa on, e „Im bardziej nieletni b dzie opó niony w rozwoju psychicznym, tym wi ksze jest prawdopodobie stwo jego zachowa dewiacyjnych, i im wi kszy jest antagonizm destruktywny, tym to 188


prawdopodobie stwo b dzie wzrasta ” [54]. Wed ug badacza tego, trwa e i uznane za pozytywne wi zi jednostki z osobami dla niej istotnymi ze spo eczno ci konformistycznej, wraz z prawid owym rozwojem psychicznym, przyczyniaj si do podatno ci na kontrol zewn trzn , która – o ile oka e si skuteczn – z czasem przyczyni si do wykszta cenia si u tej e jednostki najskuteczniejszej ochrony przed podejmowaniem dewiacyjnych dzia – kontroli wewn trznej [56]. Koncepcje teoretyczne Travisa Hirsihego oraz Marca LeBlanca mog obecnie, w dobie dynamicznych przemian, pozwala lepiej zrozumie podejmowanie, zw aszcza przez osoby bardzo m ode, zachowa dewiacyjnych, w tym równie si gania po psychoaktywne substancje. Jak wskazuje m.in. Stanis aw Kawula, w czasach wspó czesnych znacz co maleje rola rodziny w ramach pe nienia funkcji kontrolnych. To natomiast skutkuje brakiem czynników determinuj cych, maj cych istotny wp yw na ukszta towanie si w dziecku kontroli wewn trznej. Obecnie zjawisko to zauwa alne bywa ju na poziomie dzieci w wieku 10 – 12 lat [54]. Przyk ady ilustruj ce wyst powanie opisanych teorii w rzeczywisto ci spo ecznej, to m.in. wyniki przeprowadzanych bada ukazuj ce, e w latach 80 -tych XX wieku narkomani w zdecydowanej wi kszo ci wywodzili si z rodzin o zaburzonych funkcjach kontrolnych – rodzin rozbitych, konfliktowych, o ma o stabilnym wp ywie wychowawczym [57]. Czynnikach, wobec których internalizacja powszechnie przyj tych w spo ecze stwie zasad stanowi niebagatelne wyzwanie. Zbie ne jest to równie ze spostrze eniami Philipa Robsona, który zauwa a, e sie zwi zków interpersonalnych budowana przez jednostk – w tym z cz onkami rodziny – nale y do bardzo wa nych czynników kszta tuj cych postawy wobec narkotyków. W rodzinach w których regu y post powania s jasno okre lone i przestrzegane, a dzieci przyzwyczajone s do pos usze stwa wobec autorytetów, sk onno do przekraczania okre lonych barier i podwa ania ich s uszno ci wyst puje znacznie rzadziej ni w rodzinach, w których zachowanie rodziców wobec dziecka jest bardziej liberalne, pob liwe [58]. Podobne stanowisko przyjmuje Bogdan Karpowicz, wed ug którego rodzina stanowi rodowisko, w którym u m odego cz owieka kszta tuj si warunki i predyspozycje okre laj ce czy u danej jednostki wyst pi ryzyko nadu ywania narkotyków, a w konsekwencji uzale nienia si od nich [59]. Równie wspó cze ni badacze przyjmuj stanowiska zgodne z teoretycznymi za eniami Hirshego i LeBlanca. Profesor Zygfryd Juczy ski proces ten, wynikaj cy z okresu dorastania i dojrzewania okre la jako rodz si potrzeb autonomii i rozwoju w asnego „ja” [57]. Jednak e, jakkolwiek proces ten b dziemy nazywa , dotyczy on b dzie czasu, w którym rola rodziny, osób istotnych dla jednostki, mo e znacz co wp yn na utrwalenie, b os abienie dotychczas przestrzeganych zasad. Rozlu nienie wi zi z rodzin , stanowi dla dorastaj cego cz owieka ramy prawid owych i bezpiecznych zachowa , zmiana autorytetów wyst puj ca w tym okresie oraz presja wynikaj ca z kontaktów z grup rówie nicz , prowadzi mog do zachwiania zinternalizowanych regu zachowa posiadaj cych fundamentalny wp yw na stabilno kontroli wewn trznej u jednostki. Na decyduj rol rodziny w u ywaniu, b nie u ywaniu narkotyków zwracaj równie uwag Mariusz drzejko i Piotr Jab ski. Wed ug badaczy tych najwa niejsze czynniki ryzyka pojawiaj ce si w omawianym obszarze, to m.in. zaniedbania dotycz ce wyra nego i konsekwentnego systemu wychowawczego, niejasno okre lone regu y post powania, brak konsekwencji, brak okre lonych granic zachowa , kontroli tych e, nieokre lenie w asnych oczekiwa wobec dziecka, niskie wsparcie ze strony rodziców, nieobecno ojca w domu – tak e psychiczna, oraz przyzwalanie dziecku na korzystanie z obszarów, do których nie jest ono jeszcze przygotowane emocjonalnie. Deficyty w zaspokajaniu tak podstawowych potrzeb, jak bezpiecze stwo, akceptacja, mi czy zrozumienie zdecydowanie oddalaj dziecko od rodziny, skutkuj c jednocze nie wi kszym wp ywem grupy rówie niczej korzystaj cej z narkotyków [60]. Niebagatelne znaczenie w dokonuj cych si przeobra eniach przypisano równie postmodernistycznym wp ywom, m.in. nasilaj cym si procesom indywidualizacji i autonomizacji jednostek, przemianom w dotychczasowym ujmowaniu norm i warto ci, dzia aniu pod wp ywem „klimatu opinii”, d eniu do samostanowienia, postawom hedonistycznym. Za czynnik istotny uznano równie post puj sekularyzacj zasadniczych obszarów ycia cz owieka oraz indyferentyzm religijny. Wyst puj ce zjawiska w znacz cej mierze wp ywaj na wyst puj cy wspó cze nie – uznany za pok osie ponowoczesno ci – relatywizm normatywny. W okoliczno ciach takich, wprowadzenie do legalnego obiegu zakazanych dotychczas narkotyków stanowi zaczyna temat dyskusji i rozwa , natomiast podj cie decyzji o ich u yciu, pozbawione dotychczasowych moralnych barier, równie wydawa si mo e o wiele atwiejsz , ni w przesz ci, czynno ci . PI MIENNICTWO 1. Sijka Agnieszka, Sadowski Grzegorz: Marihuana dla ka dego, „Wprost” 2002, nr 30, [online] http://www.wprost.pl/ar/?O=13578 , dost p: 03.10.2010. 2. Szyma ski Miros aw: M odzie wobec warto ci. Warszawa: Instytut Bada Edukacyjnych 2006. 3. Piróg Tomasz: M odzie w Polsce. Kraków: Oficyna Wydawnicza Impuls 2006. 4. Mellibruda Jerzy: Alkohol a m ode pokolenie Polaków u progu XXI wieku. „ wiat Problemów” 2000, nr 2, s. 13-14. 5. Kossowski Pawe : Przemiany w dziedzinie uczestnictwa dzieci i m odzie y w kulturze. „Problemy Opieku czo Wychowawcze” 2007, nr 3, s. 6-8. 6. Zakrzewski Tomasz: Mechanizmy perswazji i reklamy rodków psychoaktywnych w Internecie. „Serwis Informacyjny – Narkomania” 2009, nr 1, s. 11-15. 7. http://img2.allposters.com/images/PYR/MPP7037-Drink-Smoke-and-Fly.jpg, dost p: 17.03.2013. 8. http://electrodance.org/uploads/posts/2008-09/1222641219modernlifestylechart.jpg, dost p: 17.03.2013.

189


9. Zakrzewski Tomasz: Mechanizmy perswazji i reklamy rodków psychoaktywnych w Internecie cz. II. „Serwis Informacyjny – Narkomania” 2009 nr 2, s. 11-13. 10. Zakrzewski Tomasz: Mechanizmy perswazji i reklamy rodków psychoaktywnych w Internecie cz. III. „Serwis Informacyjny – Narkomania” 2009, nr 3, s. 28-21. 11. Zakrzewski Tomasz: Mechanizmy perswazji i reklamy rodków psychoaktywnych w Internecie cz. IV. „Serwis Informacyjny – Narkomania” 2009 nr 4 s. 35-36. 12. Ko odziejczyk Marcin: Impreza dla kolekcjonerów. „Polityka” 2008, nr 48, s. 26-28. 13. Rotkiewicz Marcin: W pogoni za szczurem. „Polityka” 2010, nr 41, s. 12-14. 14. Dziewiecki Marek: Komunikacja wychowawcza. Kraków: Wydawnictwo SALWATOR 2013. 15. Bie ko Mariola: Bli ej siebie – dalej od narkotyków. „Problemy Opieku czo Wychowawcze” 2005, nr 7, s. 13-17. 16. Macander Dorota: Profilaktyka uzale nie w szkole. „Serwis Informacyjny –Narkomania” 2007, nr 1, s. 17-23. 17. Motyka Marek: M odzie przemyskich szkó rednich wobec dopalaczy. Raport z bada przeprowadzonych na prze omie 2010/2011 roku [online] http://www.przemysl.pl zalaczniki/16757.pdf, dost p: 23.02.2013. 18. Pierzcha a Kazimierz, Cekiera Czes aw: Cz owiek a patologie spo eczne. Toru : Wydawnictwo Adam Marsza ek 2009. 19. Zbyrad Teresa: Kryzys funkcji opieku czej wspó czesnej rodziny wyzwaniem dla instytucji pomocowych – przyk ad domów opieki spo ecznej [w:] Klimek Marek, Wi ckiewicz Bogdan (red): Problemy wspó czesnej rodziny polskiej. Lublin: Wydawnictwo KUL 2012, s. 189-206. 20. Sipowicz Kamil: Hipisi w PRL-u. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Baobab 2008. 21. Piotrowski Przemys aw: Subkultury m odzie owe. Aspekty psychospo eczne. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Akademickie ak 2003. 22. Sroka Artur: Teologia narkotyku. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Psychologii i Kultury ENETEIA 2008. 23. Cekiera Czes aw: Ryzyko uzale nie . Lublin: Wydawnictwo Towarzystwa Naukowego KUL 1994. 24. Litorowicz Aleksandra: Subkultura hipsterów. Gda sk: Wydawnictwo Naukowe Katedra 2012. 25. Dobroczy ski Bart omiej: Mi so bogów. „ZNAK” 2013, nr 2, s. 22-32. 26. Maria ski Janusz: Przedmowa [w:] Tu owiecki Dariusz: Bez Boga, Ko cio a i zasad? Kraków: Wydawnictwo PETRUS 2012, s. 5-11. 27. Sare o Zbigniew: Postmodernizm w pigu ce. Pozna : Pallotinum 1998. 28. Kaufmann Jean-Claude: Kiedy Ja jest innym. Warszawa: Oficyna Naukowa 2013. 29. Sobolewska Anna: Mapy duchowe wspó czesno ci. Co nam zosta o z nowej ery? Warszawa: Wydawnictwo W.A.B. 2009. 30. Dziewiecki Marek: Zagro enia w epoce postmodernizmu [w:] Jankowska Maria, Ry Maria, Cwalina Teresa (red): W trosce o rodzin . W poszukiwaniu dobra prawdy i pi kna. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo UKSW 2007, s. 233-251. 31. Dziewiecki Marek: Nowoczesna profilaktyka uzale nie . Kielce: Wydawnictwo Jedno 2005. 32. Doma ska Ewa: Historia egzystencjalna. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN 2012. 33. Zieli ski Jacek: Relatywizm w obrazie pometafizycznym. Relatywizm w procesie strukturowania wiata i systemu. „Studia ckie” 2010, nr 12, s. 113-128. 34. Ruszpel Maja: Jointem w parlament. „Przekrój” 2012, nr 7, s. 14-15. 35. Kurkiewicz Roman: My, partia ycia. „Przekrój 2012, nr 7, s. 16-19. 36. Sipowicz Kamil: Czy marihuana jest z konopi”. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Baobab 2011. 37. J drzejko Mariusz, Neroj Alicja, Kowalewska Anna, Wojcieszek Krzysztof: Teorie uzale nie od substancji psychoaktywnych [w:] J drzejko Mariusz (red): Narkomania. Spojrzenie wielowymiarowe. Pu tusk – Warszawa: Akademia Humanistyczna im. A. Gieysztora – Oficyna Wydawnicza ASPRA-JR 2009, s. 65-140. 38. Motyka Marek: Polityka narkotykowa na wiecie oraz jej implikacje na terenie Rzeczpospolitej Polski od II po owy XX wieku. Przegl d tendencji. „ ” 2012, nr 14, s. 58-62. 39. Motyka Marek: Zmiany kulturowe wobec substancji psychoaktywnych w Polsce na prze omie XX i XXI wieku. „ ” 2012, nr 23, s. 488-504. 40. Informacja z dzia Policji w zakresie zapobiegania przest pczo ci oraz patologiom spo ecznym w 2011 roku, Warszawa 2012, [online] www.policja.pl/download/1/91190/ Raport_2011.pdf, dost p: 27.02.2013. 41. Ulman Piotr: Spo eczne i rodzinne uwarunkowania uzale nie u dzieci i m odzie y. „Kwartalnik Naukowy” 2011, nr 4, s. 74-86. 42. Wato a Judyta: M odzi zatruci p ynami czyszcz cymi do metali [online] http:// wyborcza.pl/1,76842,11246696,Dopalacze__Mlodzi_zatruci_plynami_czyszczacymi_do.tml, dost p: 01.03.2013. 43. Motyka Marek: Niebezpieczne d wi ki. „Bez Toastu” 2012, nr 5, s. 11. 44. Motyka Marek: Haj z apteki. „Bez Toastu” 2011, nr 3, s. 12. 45. Grzybowski Szczepan: D wi kowy odlot. „Charaktery – magazyn psychologiczny” 2012, nr 8, s. 64-66. 46. Ustawa z dnia 24 kwietnia 1997 o przeciwdzia aniu narkomanii. Dziennik Ustaw 1997 nr 75 poz. 468. 47. Ustawa z dnia 29 lipca 2005 roku o przeciwdzia aniu narkomanii. Dziennik Ustaw 2005 nr 179 poz. 1485. 48. Ustawa z dnia 1 kwietnia 2011 roku o zmianie ustawy o przeciwdzia aniu narkomanii oraz niektórych innych ustaw. Dziennik Us ug 2011 nr 117 poz. 678. 49. Krajewski Krzysztof: Narkotyki i uzale nienia w ustawodawstwie polskim [w:] Erickson K. Carlton: Nauka o uzale nieniach. Warszawa: Wydawnictwo UW 2010, s. 266-287. 50. Marihuana. Znacz cy wzrost akceptacji w ród m odzie y. Mazowieckie Centrum Profilaktyki Uzale nie [online] www.mcpu.edu.pl, dost p: 01.04.2012. 51. Maxwell Ruth: Dzieci, alkohol, narkotyki. Gda sk: Gda skie Wydawnictwo Psychologiczne 2005. 52. Sowa Ewa: Moda na branie. „Edukacja i Dialog” 2007, nr 4, s. 32. 53. Maj Zbigniew, Kowalewicz Tomasz: M odzie wobec narkotyków. „Serwis Informacyjny – Narkomania” 2009, nr 3, s. 42. 54. J drzejko Mariusz i wspólnicy. Teorie uzale nie od substancji psychoaktywnych. [w:] Wspó czesne teorie uzale nie od substancji psychoaktywnych. J drzejko Mariusz (red.) Akademia Humanistyczna im. A. Gieysztora-Oficyna Wydawnicza ASPRAJR, Pu tusk-Warszawa 2009: 77-155.

190


55. Rogala-Ob kowska Joanna: Przyczyny narkomanii. Wyja nienia teoretyczne. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Warszawa 1999. 56. Pytka Les aw: Pedagogika resocjalizacyjna. Wydawnictwo Akademii Pedagogiki Specjalnej, Warszawa 2005. 57. Juczy ski Zygfryd: Narkomania. Podr cznik dla nauczycieli, wychowawców i rodziców. Wydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWL, Warszawa 2008. 58. Robson Philip: Narkotyki. Medycyna Praktyczna, Kraków 1997. 59. Karpowicz Piotr: Narkotyki. Jak pomóc cz owiekowi i jego rodzinie? Instytut Wydawniczy Kreator, Bia ystok 2002. 60. Jab ski Piotr, J drzejko Mariusz: Narkotyki i paranarkotyki (perspektywa polska). Oficyna Wydawnicza ASPRA-JR, Warszawa 2011.

351.713

.

. ) –

.

). 1991- 2012

.

, : . .

,

, .

,

,

,

.

,

( 1991 - 2012

). , .

.

,

, , , : , , . VP Neyman. Kraine and Russia cooperation in the field of customs policy (historical - legal aspects) The paper provided an analysis of relations between Ukraine and Russia on customs policy in 1991 - 2012 years. It is concluded that this question is important in the regulation of economic, political and social sphere. Keywords: customs relations, customs policy, economic policy, social policy, customs law, technical problems.

. . ,

. ,

.

,

. . .

. ,

, , ,

,

,

, . » «

: «

, », « », «

», «

», «

: . ,

.

, .

, .

», « .

» ,

.

,

», «

.

,

»,

.

,

. -

(

,

, , ,

.

(

???)

),

.

. ( 1991- 2012

). :

-

,

;

, ;

-

. 191

.


. ,

.

.

,

,

.

,

.

100

1991

,

. [1;114]

,

:

, .

20

1991

:"

.

-

,

,

-

,

.

1990 p.,

,

,

".[15;

128] ( .

8

)

2005 .

.

.

. [3;

348] ,

,

,

,

. 2010

.

, .

2011 . 2008 . ( . ), 17 2005-2009 .

12

: 22 2010 . ( .

), 26

2006 . ( .

2010 . ( .

),

).

.

,

,

. . 2010 .

5

. ,

. [18; 122]

,

, ,

.

, . ,

,

.

. ,

,

,

,

. , , . [6; 84] 2010 . ,

26

-

-

, . [18; 122]

,

,

,

: ;

-

;

;

-

. ,

. . [18; 122] , .

,

2003 . , 192


,

,

,

. ,

. :

,

. [14; 12] , . , . . ,

. [14; 12] .

. ,

: 2011

,

,

,

,

,

,

. , . .

,

,

,

. .

21 .

, ,

. . ,

, ,

, ,

.

, . , . ,

.

,

, :

,

,

. ,

. .

,

,

. , . , ,

. , ,

.

. . ,

:

, .

, »,

« .

– , .

193

.


1. 2.

. .

.— // „

” 14

:

.— 1999.— . 114-135.

1995 . /

.

.

.–

: , 1995. – . 25–

.:

32. 3. 348 . 4. 5.

.

// 6. 7. 8. 9.

:

. . .— 2000.— . ,

?—

:

, 2002

//

.—1997.— .— 2002.—

10(2761).— . 6.

: 207. //

.— 1999.—

2.— .84-89. 31.05.97. 23.06.92. 1998-2007 27.02.98. 4.

31.05.97. :

10. . 11. 12. 13. . 1.— . 12-17. 14. . 15. . 16. . 9.— . 128-135. 17. . 87-95. 18. . .—

// . ./ :

/ .

.— 2000.— 1.— . 96-105. . – ., 1996. .— .— 2010.— . 13-14. //

. .

: //

// . – 2005. –

.— 1998.—

.— 1998.—

6 (75).— .96-111.

13. – . 12. // . //

.— 1999.— .— 1999.—

3.— .

2010

/

.— 2010.— . 122

: 32.019.51 .

.

, .

).

.

,

,

. ,

, . ,

:

,

,

,

,

. .

.

/

.

,

,

. , , .

:

,

,

,

, , . Pikula N.N. The impact of social networking and blogging on the political consciousness of modern society. Investigated the communication aspects of the formation of political consciousness in the emerging information / network society. Noted some advantages of feedback that is using social networks, blogs and forums aktivnoyuy of the population. Characterized the main influences on the formation of interactive communication of the political consciousness of society, the specificity of action of social networks and the blogosphere for her, to formulate proposals and recommendations on the use of social networks and blogs in the development of political orientations of the public. Key words: blogosphere, interactive communications, internet, network society, political consciousness, social networks.

. , . , . 194


,

,

,

,

,

. , ,

,

,

. .

, . [13];

.

,

. [3]; ,

[5]; .

.

.

,

,

,

, [14]

.

,

. . , . , . ,

,

,

,

,

. . ,

90-

, .

. ,

.

,

.

.

,

1. 1

1995

[22] % World

1995 2000 2005 2010 2012 2013

. . . . . .

16 361 1018 1971 2497 2749

0,4% 5,8% 15,7% 28,8% 35,7% 38,8% 2012 .,

.

Internet : 34,1 %

World Stats, (

. 1.).

, 5,2%

Facebook –

[21]. . 1. , ,

[17, 55–56]. , .

2.

.

, ,

, «

, »,

«

, »[

3.

.

: 2, 397].

, :

,

. [2, 242]. 195

,

,

(

)


4.

, . ,

,

,

,

. ,

,

, [4, 242-243].

5. , , ,

( ),

,

, (

).

6.

, , «

», . ,

, . 1.

-10

. . , » – «Homo web» –

. «

, , [6]. .

,

,

65% 10%

. ,

,

,

,

[8]. ,

,

: 1. 2.

,

,

. ,

[18]. 3.

, ,

,

,

. .

,

. ,

korrespondent.net, ,

60% [11, 23]. 4.

, ,

,

,

. (

.

[1]

, [12]) [7].

.

, .

.

, . :

, ;

,

; ,

[19]. .

«

»

,

,

,

,

»

.

, . ,

, ,

.

,

.

,

. , 196


,

,

,

.

.

.

, [16].

,

, , 1.

,

,

,

,

. ,

,

,

,

. 2.

(

)

,

. ,

3.

.

,

,

,

, ,

, .

,

« «

», «

. : 1) , 7)

«

»

, 2)

«

, 3) , 8) . 2).

, 4) , 9)

. 2.

»

».

» ,

,

«

»

, 5) , 10)

» (1) – «

, 6) , 11)

» (2)

,

«

»

, . (24,7% 37,4%), (23,5%), « (19,8%),

, » –

(18,4%). (9,8%).

– «

» , (1 –

, , ).

(3 . 3. ?!» (24,7%) «

(33,1%). , .

197

),

(2 ?

) : « .

»


. 3.

« (

. 4.)

. (33,3),

(43,3%)

» –

(15,9%).

. 4.

«

,

« – .

5.).

.

».

», ,

,

,

«

»(

, «

»

. ,

.

. 5. «

»

« 198

»

.

.


. , , . ,

:

;

;

[15]. , , . ,

,

. ,

: ,

,

,

, ,

,

,

,

, . ,

«

»

( ,

) [9].

, ,

.

,

,

. ,

, ,

, . , ,

,

,

, ,

,

,

.

,

, ,

. ,

. ,

,

, .

.

,

,

. .

,

,

,

, ,

.

.

.

1. [ ]. – : http://mihailobrodskiy.livejournal.com. 2. , . : . . – .: " ", 2004. – 432 . 3. . . [ ]. / . . , . . . // . . – 2011. – 150. 162. – . 4-8. – : http://lib.chdu.edu.ua/pdf/naukpraci/politics/2011/162-150-1.pdf. 4. . . : : / . . .– : , 2011. – 462 . 5. . . Quo Vadis? [ ]/ . . , . . . // Russian Cyberspace. – 2009. – Vol.1, 1. – . 81-100. – : http://www.digitalicons.org/issue01/pdf/issue1/Political-Interactions-in-the-Russian-Blogosphere_O-Goroshko-and-E-Zhigalina.pdf. 6. . / . , . . [ ]. – : http://discourse-pm.ur.ru/discours7/danilova.php.

199


7. .[ 8.

. . / : . . ]. – . 1. – . : , , 2011. – .47-48. : [ ]. – : http://www.stimol.ru/issledovanie-sotsialnyie-seti-imeyut-vse-bolshee-vliyanie-na-psihiku-lyudey. 9. . .–[ ]. – : http://cyberleninka.ru/article/n/informatsionno-obrazovatelnaya-sredakak-uslovie-formirovaniya-setevoy-kultury-uchitelya-matematiki. 10. . Internet : .– : http://lib.chdu.edu.ua/pdf/ukrpolituk/1/41.pdf. 11. . : « »/ .– , 2008. – . 23. ]. – : http://j-school.kiev.ua/images/uploads/textblog/08_10_Lulko_Andriy_dyplom2008.pdf. 12. [ ]. – : http://twitter.com/lesyaorobets. 13. . ( “ ”) / . : . ... . . : 09.00.10. – . : 2007. – 17 . 14. . -PR / . // «Socio : », 1(10). – . 13-16. 15. , . : / . , . , . . – 3, .– : , 2008. – 576 . 16. ( 2): [ ]. – : https://peoplefirst.org.ua/ru/articles/politics-as-an-internet-hostage. 17. . Internet : // .– 18: , 1999. – 4. – .65-73. 18. Castells M. Obywatel rodzi si w sieci / Manuel Castells // Gazeta Wyborcza – 2009. – 10 [ ]. – : http://wyborcza.pl/1,76842,6907318,Obywatel_rodzi_sie_w_sieci.html. 19. Florence Passy Socialization, Recruitment, and the Structure/Agency Gap. A Specification of the Impact of Networks on Participation in Social Movements. April 2000 / Florence Passy. [ ]. – : http://www3.nd.edu/~dmyers/lomond/passy.pdf. 20. Handbook of political communication research / edited by Lynda Lee Kaid. –London, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, publishers Mahwah, New Jersey, 2004. – 561 p. 21. Internet and Facebook Usage in Europe [ ]. – : http://www.internetworldstats.com/stats4.htm. 22. Internet growth statistics [ ]. – : http://www.internetworldstats.com/emarketing.htm. .

. .

329.4 (477) . .

, .

. 1920, , . , , .

. ( ).

1920,

.

(

.

,

. :

,

,

,

. 1920-

.

,

, . : , , , . The article analyzes the concept of the future Ukrainian state in the policy documents and publications of the party's most influential Ukrainian legal parties in Western Ukraine in the second half of 1920 found that despite the ideological contradictions both political structures justify the need for the revival of an independent Ukrainian state, which was reflected in their policy documents. Keywords: political party, ideology, party application independence.

,

-

, .

200


, ,

,

,

. , , ,

, 1920-

. .

. ,

( (

)

( . .

),

) , «

.

1925 . –

,

»

[1, . 207]. 1925 . .

.

.

11

1925 .

,

, –

(

).

. ,

[2, .2 ].

«

, » [3, .1]. 1925 ., 19 – 20

,

,

1926 .

,

, [4, . 172]. . .

,

,

: « , , , ,

, ,

, » [6, . 1]. ”

« ,

, ,

1927 . . (

» [5, . 41]. 1927 . « » ,

,

)

, ».

-

«

, .

,

,

,

,

, .

. ,

,

...

, ,

,

» [7,

. 253. ].

, .

, , «

,

,

...». , , «

,

,

».

.

, ,

,

, 201


. [7,

. 256]. , ,

. ». , ,

«

, ,

,

, ,

, » [7,

. 256].

, , .

,

,

,

« »,

,

« ;

» [7, ,

,

,

,

, ,

,

,

, » [7,

. 256].

«

,

. 250].

,

« ».

, . , , «

, , ».

,

, , ,

,

:

. ,

[7,

.

251]. , . ,

,

,

,

.

, . , , . .

1925 –

1926

.

( (

, , 26

) . 1926 .

) , 24

,

. ,

, . 14

1926

. (

).

. . .

, ,

. .

. .

. , [8, . 193]. »,

. «

,

,

. 1930 .

: « ,

,

.

,

,

,

» [9, . 2]. 202

,


,

1926 . . . ,

, .

. ,

. . «

, », –

«

» [10, . 2]. ,

, , « » [11, . 2]. , ,

«

». »

,

«

,

-

,

. ,« ,

,

,

,

» [11, . 8-9]. ,

,

,

.,

, ,

»,

«

,

». 4-

.

,

,

». «

». , «

,

,

«

»

,

,

», «

» [13, . 128]. ,

, ».

,

,

:

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

[13, . 128]. , »

«

«

»

« » [13, . 128-129].

. »,

, . «

: «

» [13, . 129].

, ,

,

,

”,

“ ,

, , ».

,

,–

«

», ,

« ,

». «

,

» [13, . 129]. , ,

«

»

, «

» [13, . 130]. ,

, , «

».

203


. , . «... », 1926

.

,

« ,

, , , »,

, , [14,

,

,

. 32].

,

,

.

, . ,

1920-

.

. 1. 2. 3. 4. –[

.

: //

.]: 5. 6. 7. 8.

. 9. 10. 11. 12.

. – 1925. – 15 //

, 1983. – 429 . ., . 46, ., . 46, . . . – .: ,

. 9,

/

.

/

. 495, . 41. // . – 1927. – 17 . 237, . 250-256.

.

– . – 1926. – 20

.– .–

:

, 1993. – 288 .

”[

, .

.- . .

. – . 1.

: , 1996. – 360 . //

.

. – .:

. – . 1.

. – . 2. // //

.:

/

.

. – 1926. – 27 . – . 2. . – 1926. – 6 . – . 2. ( ). –

.

13. .

.9 ,

: . – . 2. . – 1925. – 15 :

.]. – 39 .

:

/

:

14.

., . 60,

. 1. –

, 1934. – 137 . . 32.

. 11. –

327:004.738.5:32.019.5 . . –

,

, «

.( .

).

.

.

:

,

,

,

.

. . : , , , . The article discusses the features and possibilities of using the Internet as a tool of information warfare in international relations. Special attention is paid to the propaganda aspect of the use of information and communication possibilities of the Internet by state and non-state actors. Keywords: Internet, information warfare, cyber warfare, propaganda.

.

,

, , 204


.

, , ,

.

,

. , —

, .

.

,

, , .

, . . , .

, . , . . .

, ,

.

.

,

,

, .

,

.

, ,

, . .

,

. . .

.

, ,

,

.

.

,

;

. .

,

.

.

,

. .

,

,

,

,

.

, "

"

,

. , ,

,

, , , ,

),

(

", , . .

,

. .

. -

,

.

,

, .

,

,

,

,

.

i

, . [0, .39].

,

, . The SANS Institute, , [2],

,

, ,

, ,

, ,

,

. ,

,

,

, ,

,

(

,

), .

,

, ,

, . "

" ("Inside Cyber Warfare", 2009 .)

,

-

, — ,

)

, ,

. 5-

(

,

. .

,

,

,

.

205

. 1):

,


. 1.

(

,

: [3])

,

, . ,

.

,

,

.

, ,

. ,

, Unit, USCCU) , ,

. (United States Cyber Consequences , 2008 , " [4].

2009 "

,

,

, .

,

,

,

,

, "

"

,

.

.

2007

, . " "

" [5],

",

" [3,

. .

,

" .180].

( ) , ,

,

,

,

,

, ;( )

,

.

, ,

,

, USCCU,

,

.

, "

,

", " , " [4].

,

-

( , Stopgeorgia.Ru).

2008 ,

,

.

— ,

(

,

. " ). . DoS-

"

", ,

.

,

" —

,

, . Denial-of-service — ,

(

, ),

— ,

. 2013

, 18

: , Syrian Revolution Electronic Suite " [6].

,

"

, ,

,

,

. ,

. , .

, , ,

,

, ,

,

,

.

206

.


, , .

. —

10 000

.

(

) ,

, .

, ,

,

. .

,

CNN

30

,

.

" CNN,

", "

", "

, 30[7, .145–146].

5

2008–2009 . "Gazprom Ukraine Facts", .

4-

2008 ",

"

, "Google"

Naftogaz Ukrainy

". ,

gas dispute.

"Yahoo!"

, ,

,

,

[8].

, . . , .

,

, 12

2008 .

, — www.gazpromukrainefacts.com —

2009 WHOIS

,

,

,

,

.

,

.

,

,

,

, .

( ), : " ",

"

"

" (Sendero Luminoso)

[10]. , "

"

, .

: 1. :

,

— "

"

;

.

2. " "

"

.

3. ,

.

, ,

.

, ,

,

.

4. "

"

, .

5.

,

, ,

"

" . 207

,


,

,

XXI

.

. . / . . , . . // . — 1999. — 2. — . 37–43. 2. The Future of Information Warfare [ ] // SANS Institute. InfoSec Reading Room. — : http://www.sans.org/reading_room/whitepapers/warfare/future-information-warfare_819 ( 14 2013 ) 3. Carr J. Inside Cyber Warfare / Jeffrey Carr. — Sebastopol, CA: O’Reilly Media, 2010. — 213 p. 4. Beaumont C. Russia 'helped co-ordinate' attacks on Georgian websites [ ] / Claudine Beaumont // The Telegraph. — 2009. — 18 . — : http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/6048978/Russia-helped-co-ordinateattacks-on-Georgian-websites.html ( 2 2013 ) 5. Elkus A. The Rise of Cyber-Mobilization [ ] / Adam Elkus // GroupIntel. — 2009. — 13 .— : http://www.groupintel.com/2009/02/13/the-rise-of-cyber-mobilization/ ( 2 2013 ) 6. [ ] // . — 2013. — 18 . — : http://ria.ru/incidents/20130318/927718451.html ( 2 2013 ) 7. . . : / . . , . . . — .: . . ., 2007. — 252 . 8. . [ ] / // . — 2009. — 16 . — : http://gazeta.dt.ua/POLITICS/povchannya_yagnyat.html ( 14 2013 ) 9. Gazprom Ukraine Facts [ ]. — : http://www.gazpromukrainefacts.com/ ( 14 2013 ) 10. . . [ ]/ . . // . — : http://www.iimes.ru/rus/stat/2005/03-10-05.htm 14 2013 ) 1.

327:316.752 . . , «

»). , ,

. , . ,

: .

,

.

. , ,

.

,

. : , , . M. I. Tereshchuk. The Policy of Nation Branding as a Tool of National Interests Promotion on the International Scene This paper discusses the nature and characteristics of the country brand as a marketing concept that is used in a new context, shows the role of policies and technologies of national branding in national interests promoting. Special attention is paid to the characteristics of areas where the policy of national branding can be successfully used as an instrument of national interests promotion on the international arena. Keywords: nation branding, country brand, national interests.

. .

, ,

,

. . ,

, ,

, ,

, , ,

and Public Diplomacy"

. ) 2005 ,

( , "Place Branding

. 208


. . .

, ,

.

.

, . , .

.

,

, . , .

, , .

.

.

, ,

: . , .

.- .

.

, .

, . , .

, . ,

.

,

. ,

, , . ,

,

.

.

.

, , .

. .

, , ,

,

,

.

,

.

,

.

,

.

. . "

"

"brand", ,

" Association),

.

.

, "

"

,

,

(The American Marketing ,

, , [0, .274].

, "

.

"

"

".

,

. (

.

. 1): 1 "

"

"

" (

(

,

)

,

).

[2, .3].

. —

[3, .95].

,

,

,

,

. —

,

, [4, .4].

,

.

, —

,

[5, .18].

, [5, .23].

,

[6, .11]. ,

,

(

,

,

)

,

,

).

, ,

,

.

. , ,

.

,

,

(, ",

"

,

( (

,

)

)

,

,

).

,

,

, )

(

. ",

: " ,

, ,

"(

,

,

,

.

[7, .64]). , .

, .

,

,

, ,

,

, (

).

,

,

, [8, .42].

,

,

. , , 209

,


. .

,

,

.

, ,

. ,

,

:

,

, ,

. ,

(

,

,

,

, ,

.46]),

,

[9,

,

, (

,

— ,

, [10, .317]). ,

, ,

,

— , . ,

,

,

(

,

/

).

, ,

, (

)

,

, [11]).

,

, ,

, —

: , .

:

,

, ,

, — .

, ." , .

,

, [12, .50])

.

,

"—

,

" ( , ,

,—

,

. ,

.

( )

.

,

PR , (

, ,

,

. [13]). ,

PR

,

,

PR ,

[14, .17].

, .

,

PR,

: , .

,

"

"

— ,

. ,

,

,

. , , .

,

,

,

, .

210


, ,

. . " "

"

, ,

, "

". — "

".

,

, ,

,

[15, .13]. ( , , ,

: ), . —

:

( ,

"

"

,

. , )

,

.

,

, . , ,

. . ,

,

.

,

" ,

. ,

"

,

:

(

– –

;

); (

,

,

); –

. .

, ,

: 1)

,

, , ; 2)

,

PR

, ; 3)

,

, ,

(

"

"),

. , .

1. Kotler Ph. Marketing management / Philip Kotler, Kevin Keller. — Twelfth ed. — Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2006. — 729 p. 2. Haig M. Brand Royalty: How the World’s Top 100 Brands Thrive and Survive / Matt Haig. — London: Kogan Page, 2004. — 314 p. 3. Clemons L. Branding Texas: Performing Culture in the Lone Star State / Leigh Clemons — Austin: University of Texas Press, 2008. — 173 p. 4. Anholt S. Competitive identity: The New Brand Management for Nations, Cities and Regions / Simon Anholt. — N.Y.: PALGRAVE MACMILLAN, 2007 — 134 p. 5. Munar A. M. Challenging the Brand / Ana Maria Munar // Tourism Branding: Communities in Action. — Bingle: Emerald Group Publishing, 2009. — P. 17–35. 6. Kapferer J.-N. The New Strategic Brand Management: Creating and Sustaining Brand Equity Long Term / Jean-Noël Kapferer. — 4th ed. — London: Kogan Page, 2008. — 560 p. 7. Hanna S. An analysis of terminology use in place branding / Sonya Hanna, Jennifer Rowley // Place Branding and Public Diplomacy. — 2008. — Vol. 4, 1. — P. 61–75. 8. Dinnie K. Nation Branding: Concepts, Issues, Practice / Keith Dinnie. — Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann, 2008. — 264 p. 9. Kunczik M. Images of Nations and International Public Relations / Michael Kunczik. — Mahwah, NJ.: Relations Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1997. — 337 p. 10. . . / . . . — .: " ", 2004. — 528 . 11. Raftowicz-Filipkiewicz . Nation Branding as an Economic Challenge for the Countries of the Middle and East Europe on

211


the Example of Estonia / Magdalena Raftowicz-Filipkiewicz // Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy. — 2012. — Vol. 7, Issue 4. — P. 49–59. 12. . / , . — .: , 2010. — 232 . 13. Definition of public relations in Oxford Dictionaries (British & World English) [ ]. — : http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/public-relations ( 25 2013 .) 14. . . ?/ . . — .: , 1989. — 239 c. 15. Zahran G. From hegemony to soft power: Implications of a conceptual change / Geraldo Zahran, Leonardo Ramos // Soft Power and US Foreign Policy: Theoretical, historical and contemporary perspectives / Ed. by Inderjeet Parmar and Michael Cox. — N.Y.: Routledge, 2010. — P. 12–31.

327:339.92(477+061.1:4+5) . . – ,

,

). c .

,

, ,

, . : ,

, ,

,

.

. .

. .

, , ,

. , , : , , . E. B. Tykhomyrova Subject-substantive field of information legislation of the CIS. Analyzed subject and substantive field of legal support information cross-border cooperation between Ukraine and the CIS countries. The author argues that in the absence of specific regulations that should govern the direction of cross-border information of CIS cooperation, an important factor in its success has regulations that define the principles and features of information and communication relations within the Commonwealth. Keywords: information and communication relations, regulatory support, cross-border cooperation, the CIS, Ukraine.

.

,

,

, , ,

.

– « ,

»

[7]. ,

, , ,

. . [1],

[6], [8],

[13], [14], [16], [19],

[22]

. , . .

» [4, . 56]. ,

.

.

,

,

,

,

,

[3]. .

212


. . .

, [15].

. ,

. , , , . . . , –

,

,

.

. ,

,

,

, . , ,

, .

, ,

. , , [7]. , ,

,

[7]. .

1.

[9]. .

,

1992 .

, .

90-

,

.

, , (1992),

(1992), . (1993). , (1994), (1999).

(1993),

, – 2008

(2008), 2010

(2006), (2009) (2009). – 2015

« »

(2012).

1995 . – (1995), 03.11.1995, (1995) 213

2010


(1996), (1998), (1998), (1999),

, (1999).

« »,

« » (1992),

)

« «

» (1993), (1992), (1994),

»

« «

«

» (1995),

» (1997),

» (1997),

(1999), (2003),

,

, (2004), (2004), « » (2011), « » (2012), »

«

«

24» -

(2013). (2005) [17], (2009). ,

, –

(1992),

(1992), (1999),

-

(2004)

(2009). ,

. , (

) (1997), (1998) (1996).

90-

, (1998), (1998).

,

« » (1993), «

» (1996), «

» (1997), « » (1998), « » (2002), «

» (2000), « » (2003), «

» (2004), (2005), «

( » (2011).

» (2008), « ,

)» (2008), «

. (1995), 2005 (2003),

(2001), -

(2007), (2008). 214


2. ,

[2]. , , , , , .

(2002)

,

,

, ,

,

. 3. ,

,

, .

»

2010 ,

,

.

,

,

[18]. (2010). .

,

,

, ,

,

,

,

,

,

[10].

4. ,

– , , «

.

(1993)» [5], « » (1995) [12].

5.

,

(

,

[11], )

(

-

[20]

, .

6. , ,

, .

. «

, »

. , «

. »

.

,

« » [21].

.

,

, . , . , . , , ;

,

; ,

,

,

,

,

, ,

.

, .

1.

. 5, 2008. – . 20-22. 2. « http://base.spinform.ru/show_doc.fwx?rgn=7413.

/

.

//

»

»

215

[

].

:


3.

.

. / . . ]. – : http://monitor.chernigov.net/analitika-ta-doslidzhennya/transgranichnoesotrudnichestvo-chernigovskoy-i-gomelskoy-obl.html. 4. . , / . . – 2.– .: ; . . . . , 1983. – 344 . 5. . 27 1993 1995 [ ]. – : http://www.businesspravo.ru/Docum/DocumShow_DocumID_65349.html 6. . . / . , . // : . – .: . 2011. – 168 . – C. 24-25. 7. , . . ( ): . … . . : 12.00.13 – / . . ; . . . . – .: 1999. – 50 . 8. . . / . – .: , , 1998. – 240 c. 9. [ ]. – : http://cis.minsk.by/reestr/ru/index.html#reestr 10. [ ]. – : http://www.belregion.ru/news/3340.html 11. . 2009. [ ]. – : http://www.viniti.ru/download/russian/ MKSNTI/conceptfinal.pdf 12. : 1995 [ ]. – : http://www.sbras.ru/win/laws/russ_kon.htm 13. . ., . . // http://www.science-education.ru/pdf/2012/5/125.pdf 14. ., . / . , . // : . – .: . 2011. – 168 . – C. 82-84. 15. . . : . . . . : 08.10.01 / . . ; ; . . – ., 2005. – 21 . 16. . / . [ ]. – : http://www.itsec.ru/articles2/focus/ vladimir_matyuhin_pravov_osnovy_doveriyu_uchastnikov_transgranichnogo_obmena_elektron_dokumentami 17. – – 25.11.05 [ http://cis.minsk.by/reestr/ru/index.html#reestr/view/text?doc=1876 18.

].

:

, , ,

[ ]. – http://cg.gov.ua/index.php?id=21862&tp=0 19. . : , – . 119-122. 20. ( [ ]. – : http://zakon.nau.ua/doc/?code=997_n24 21. « » ]. – http://mmr.ua/news/id/unian-i-ria-novosti-pidpisali-ugodu-pro-spivpracju-831/ 22. . ., . . « » / . , : : . . . ./ . . . . , . , .– . 1. – .: « . », 2011. – 306 . / . 267-270.

216

: , 2011,

6. –

) : . .

// .-


324(477) . . – ) „ ,

"

. .

,

. ,

: . .

,

,

, «

,

.

»

«

»

. .

, . : , , , , , Tkachenko L.V. The problem of non-participation of voters in the voting as the phenomenon of political behavior The author tried to make the specification of "absenteeism" and voting "against all" citizens of Ukraine for further comprehensive analysis. We consider the phenomenon of absenteeism as a form of citizens’ electoral behavior and its impact on power. And also made an attempt to classify phenomena and distinguishing factors that influence the phenomenon studied. Key words: elections, electorate, absenteeism, voting, electoral behavior, factors of absenteeism.

,

. –

. . , . ,

.

, ,

, . . ,

.

,

.

,

.

,

.

.

,

,

.

,

.

,

: .

. .

,

,

. . ,

XX . ,

[9, . 210]. ,

.

– , . ,

– , –

,

. . . ,

:„ , „

. , ” [10, . 5]. “absent”, “absentis” – „

” ,

,

. ,

.

– ,

. .

,

,

(

,

,

,

.)

:

.

, [4]. – .

,

,

.

,

” [5]. . 217

:


– . ,

;

( ,

,

.).

,

[6, .153]. –

, ,

.

;

– .

,

, ,

,

.„

”. „

,

,

,

,

”.

,

. )

( : –

,

” (

,

).

,

.

. ,

. . )

: (

).

, ,

.

,

, ,

. ,

[8].

. . [3, . 25-26]. : .

. ,

,

,

.

, . „

, (

)

” [1, . 52-53]. ,

. ,

.

,

,

,

. .

,

. , . – – –

,

:

; ,

.; , ;

– –

,

; . ,

,

, ,

,

. .

,

: – –

(„ („

,

”);

,

”); –

. .

,

3

, 218

: (

,

.);


,

,

; –

, ,

.

.

,

,

.

, .

,

.

,

” [2, . 6-9]. (

,

,

,

,

(„

,

.).

”),

,

,

. . ,

.

, .

,

,

,

.

,

,

. . ,

, . ,

,

,

.

, , ,

,

. ,

,

.

,

,

”. ,

,

,

,

,

,

. ,

,

,

– ,

. .

. , ,

, –

, –

,

.

,

,

,

,

, „

”–

,

,

, .

,

,

,

. ,

(

),

,

,

,

(

”)

, :

,

,

.

,

, .

,

,

,

, ,

. , ,

. ,

,

, „

.

” ,

, 219


: ,

. „

,

. ,

. ,

.

. . , „

”,

,

.

, 52% : 17%,

. „

.

”,

2012

,

,

. ,

,

,

,

,

. , . ,

,

.

,

,

,

,

. ,

,

, .

,

,

,

: , (

).

,

,

,

. ; ,

,

,

.

,

,

,

; ,

(

,

,

); , ,

1.

.

23.00.01 / 2. 3. / 4.

.) [7, . 98-102].

.

: .–

, 2007. – 180 . / .

. .

//

.– ., .

.–

.:

. . .

., 2005. – 134 . ., . ., 2002. – 432 . . – ., 2005. – .319. : .

. 23. – . 98-102. 8. . .: 9. . 10. , .

./ . / ». –

,

.–

:

1. – . 6-9. . .

.

.

. :

,

.

:

: 22.00.04 /

. – 2-

.,

.

/ . , 1996. – 556 . . – .: « », 1996. – . 210-211. /[ . ., 7. . ., «

220

.

:

. :

. – 2004. – :

. . .

5. 6. 480 . 7.

( ,

.– .:

, 2002. –

/ , 2011. – ;

. . .

.

.

.

.] ; . . », 2006. – 228 .


: [342.573:342.4] (470+571) . . : –

12

1993

,

). . .

: .

.

,

,

, :

. 1993

12

. .

, . , , , . : Khavruk I. Constitutional proceses of the Russian Federation: referendum on December, 12, 1993. The role of the institute of referendum in constitutional proceses of the Russian Federation is analyses in this article. Attention applies on their value in these processes, taking into account opposition of executive and legislative power. Keywords: constitution, constitutional proces s, constitutional referendum, legitimation.

,

, ,

[4, . 15-

20 ].

. .

,

,

,

,

, . ,

.

,

.

,

.

,

. ,

.

:

22

1990 . "

"(

– 16

1990 .)

,

-

:

1990 .; ; 1990 . [8, . 63-64]. , ,

,

,

,

.

,

, ,

, .

,

,

,

(

)

.

, ,

17

1991 ., 17 69,85%

25 1991 .

1993 . (

,

),

, ,

. 25

1993 .,

58,7%, – 53% , 67,2% –

[9],

; 49,5 ,

, [7, . 116],

. , – 24 ",

, ,

, 221

[1,

. 48].


[11, . 112].

,

– 29

[2, . 53].

1993 . ",

" . (

,

15

),

, 17 1993 .

1993 . [1, . 49-51]. 17

: [11, . 114].

4

, ,

.

"

",

,

"

,

"

"

" [11, . 117] – .

: , ,

,

,

,

[1, .

114]. . –

, – .

:

,

. .

,

, , . 12

,

.

, .

"

"

"

", 2/3 [11, . 148].

, ,

. 1993

.

, ,

. "

"

" , "

[11, . 149]. 25

"

,

. 21

1993 . .

1400 "

"

,

, ,

"

, " [10, . 3597].

, (

, –

,

). . .

.

.

. "

"

, 4

,

1993

.

,

"

. 15

1993 .

12 , (

,

1993 . 10 .

, :

".

. [11, . 208]. , ,

, ,

), .

222


,

[11, . 208-209]. .

" 1993 ", 50% , 1993 .

12 15

22 [6, . 47].

.

, ,

.

,

,

.

, .

,

,

. –

,

,

, . . ,

,

.

,

,

. ),

( (

)

,

[9].

,

: [3, . 103]. ,

. ,

50%,

, ,

. 12

1993

. . 8- (88%

, ,

58 100).

54,8%

56,6%

.

, ,

.

, ,

( [5, . 148-161]),

,

. , , . .

17

1991

.

.

, .

, ,

. 25

1993 . ,

.

, , . ,

, . , . . 1993 .,

12 .

.

,

,

. ,

,

.

223


1. 155 . 2. – . 53-56. 3. 4. 5. . . 6. . . 7. . .

. .

(1990-1993) [ ?(

]/ . .

" /

. , 2002. – 158 . . . .– . ., , . . . . // , .

.: "

", 1998. –

") //

. . – 2001. – :

.–

.

. – 1993. – //

I.

-

1. – . 86-107. [

]/ .

.–

: (1917-1993) [

:

, 2000. – 214 . . . . – 2003. –

//

9.

]/

: 9. – . 43-58.

/ :

: ,

.

.

(

)). –

,

8.

(

.

/ .

,

, 2001. – . 113-119.

"

" // 9. 1991-1993 . [ ., 1995. – 10.

. ., ]/

11. . .

.–

. – 1990. – 4. – . 63-67. . . , . . . , . . / [ : www.hrights.ru/text/sob/index.htm – 2.05.2013. " . –1993. – 39. – . 3597- 3599. . . : (1988 – 1993) [ : , 1997. – 248 .

]. – " // ] /

32-027.21:327-051 . . : – .).

.

,

»

«

».

,

« »–«

»

, , .

,

, , «

,

».

, « »

.

: .

,

,

« », «

»

.

: . . « »

,

, «

».

, «

».

:

,

, « », » Tsyrfa I. A. Construction of the foreign policy identity of the actor of international relations: key mechanisms and their nature. It is analyzed the main components of identification of the actors of international relations as the key mechanism of the formation of their foreign policy identities. It is proved that the construction of the latters is directly related to the perception of the concrete «Selves» of the specific «Others». It is established that the foreign policy identity is not a constant phenomenon which is permanently influenced with the interactions with these « thers». Keywords: foreign policy identity, mechanisms of identity construction, definition of «Self», «Other»

. ,

, «

,

,

» (

), , .

, 224

. identificare –

,


, , ,

,

«

,

,

»,

« ».

,

,

, ,

,–

,

. , , , ,

,

. (

,

,

) . .

.

, .

.

,

.

,

.

.

,

, .

– . .

.

, . ,

, .

, .

,

.

, .

.

. .

-

( )

«

»

. ,

(

) ,

,

,

. «

»,

, «

, »

. « « ».

,

« ,

,

», ,

, ,

,

.

,

,

,

, » [13, c.

224]. ,

.

,

« », , [1, . 110]. « »

, . ,

»,

, .

.

,

,

.

,

, ,

.

, ,

,

,

.

,

, (

, ,

,

,

,

) [2, . 4].

, ,

. , .

, ,

, .

,

,

. «

, ,

,

,

,

.

,

-

,

, .

,

, ,

,

» [6, . 9]. , .

« , ,

«

»-

,

,

»

», « »

. 225

,

,

,


, 36].

, »-

«

«

» [12, . 35-

, ,

.

, ,

«

».

, ,

. ,

[7, c.

52]. ,

« »

«

».

, , , . , , ,

,

,

.

,

: [4, c. 54-67].

,

« » ,

,

,

,

. :

, , [9, c. 72].

,

: , [5, c. 236]. «

,

, »-

, « ,

»,

,

,

,

.

,

.

,

, ,

,

,

,

,

.

, , ,

«

»

.

«

,

» ,

[3 , . 251]. (

,

,

,

),

, , ,

«

».

,

,

,

,

. , ,

, « »

«

».

.

,

. »

,

,

«

».

, ,

[10, . 150-152].

«

,

( «

« » ,

«

»,

,

»,

, . ,

«

» )

».

226

,

,


«

», . ,

,

,

. , ,

.

, [11, c. 3]. , ,

.

» –

« »

,

« «

»

,

« », »,

«

»,

,

,

. « «

» « »,

« », ,

»

« »

.

,

«

,

»,

« »

« « »

«

» de facto « »« »,

. « « » [8, c. 185-186].

, ».

. «

»

».

,

,

« » . « » « »

, , ,

.

,

, .

,

«

»

« »

. ,

«

»,

« ». ,

« »,

«

,

»

« » ,

.

«

,

« »,

( , 1.

« ,–

»,

« »

») .

. .

.–

:

./ . «

.// ,

», 2006. – . 109-111. 2. . ., . . : ./ . . , . . . – .: « », 1999. – 466 . 3. .« » ./ . .// , 2005. – 5. – . 11-15. 4. Bourdieu P. The Field of Cultural Production./ P. Bourdieu. – Cambridge: Polity Press, 1993. – 190 p. 5. Bretherton C. and Vogler J. The European Union as a Global Actor./ C. Bretherton, J. Vogler. – London: Routledge Pub., 1999. – 316 p. 6. astells M. The Power of Identity. – The Information Age: Economy, Society and Culture./ . astells. – V. 2. – MadlenOxford-Carlton: Wiley-Blackwell, 2004. – 540 p. 7. Delanty G. and Rumford C. Social Theory and the Implications of Europeanization./ G. Delanty, C. Rumford. – London: Routledge, 2005. – 232 p. 8. Fain S. and Spencer S. Prejudice and Self-Image Maintenance: Affirming the Self through Derogating Others./ S. Fain, S. Spencer.// In Stangor C. (ed.) Stereotypes and Prejudice: Essential Readings. – London: Psychology Press, 2000. – P. 172-191. 9. McLaren L. M. Identity, Interests and Attitudes to European Integration./ L. M. McLaren. – New York: Palgrave Pub., 2006. – 232 p. 10. Neumann I. B. Uses of the Other: The East in European Identity Formation./ I. B. Neumann. – Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 1999. – 246 p. 11. Norton A. Reflections on Political Identity./ A. Norton. – Baltimore: John Hopkins University Press, 1988. – 209 p. 12. Taylor C. Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity./ C. Taylor. – Cambridge: Harvard University Press: 1989. – 613 p. 13. Wendt A. Social Theory of International Politics./ A. Wendt. – Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. – 429 p.

227


327.7 . . -

). .

,

,

. .

:

, .

. .

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

.

. ,

,

. . : , , , , , , , , , . R.Shahmatenko. The theoretical basis of Asia-Pacific integration research The theoretical basis of the integration processes in the Asia Pacific region are studied. The process of forming a regional free trade area in goods, services and investment, which is based on the principles of open regionalism. The main problems and challenges to Pacific integration are analised. Keywords: Asia-Pacific integration, regionalization, r gionalizm, globalization, APEC, ASEAN, NAFTA, the WTO, the EU.

,

. (

), .

,

, ,

,

. , 28

,

44 ),

.

,

,

, (

)

.

, 1994 ,

. , .

.

. – ).

( ,

. ( ,

)

(

)

.

, . :

,

,

, ,

(

)

(

). .

,

, . «

»

.

, ,

.

, .

, ,

[1, c.73-74].

,

, : .

[3], «

»

« 228

.

.

– [2, c.89];

[4], » [5, c.206-208];

.


.

[6]

.

[7] –

,

,

;

.

[8], .

[9] – ;

, .

,

. , «

»

: [11, c.44-109].

[10, c.80-84]. »,

« ,

,

, , 65]. .

[12, c.60.

, . ,

,

. , «

», «

»

«

».

1970 – 1980,

, « ,

». ,

«

– «

» »

-

«

».

,

, , » «

« « [12, . 63-65]. 1990. « » « », , . ,

» , , », «

«

. ,

.

» , ,

.

,

». ,

, «

» , ,

[14, c.459]. , [15, c.470]. , « , .

.

»

» [13, .240-241]. « ,

,

-

,

,

,

, , »(

)

,

, [16, c.41]. -

.

– .

, .

,

,

,

,

«

,

»

, :

, ,

[12, c.62-64]. , (

)

,

.

,

,

, +3,

[17, c.7]. ( , «

) «

»

.

»

.

: [12]. 1980, . 229

.


: , («

» 1986 – 1994

.

«

, 2001

»,

1980.);

, ;

,

,

. ,

«

»,

,

(1986-1994

«

» ; 2)

; 3) .

.).

: 1) .

,

,

2001 ., ,

.

,

,

, ,

.

,

, 1990-

,

. [18]. ,

, . . .

.

,

, , « , «

.

.

,

1995–1998

.

» ,

», ,

[19]. ,

, .

,

,

-

. ,

,

, .

. ,

.

,

.

,

,

,

, ,

. ,

[20],

«

»

.

« «

»,

»

, . ,

.

. ,

.

.

, ,

.

,

.

(

,

« , ,

. «

)

», . ,

»

«

». .

,

,

, .

, «

»,

230


, [20, c.115, 125-130]. , , ,

,

,

,

.

,

,

, .

,

,

» . ,

. , ,

, . « ,

»

[21].

, . [22],

.

[23; 24].

(

.

)

,

,

, »

. , ,

,

. ,

,

. ,

. «

».

,

,

,

,

. ,

,

.

, ,

: ;

, ,

;

,

. «

» – .

:

,

(

),

. ,

,

, , ,

.

,

, [25].

,

, ,

, ,

,

. ;

,

,

, ,

.

, «

»

[18]. , . , , .

,

,

, 231

,


,

«

»

. ,

, XX

,

.

.

, ,

. ,

, ,

XX

.

. «

,

»

.

,

,

,

. ,

,

. ,

,

,

.

,

,

,

,

.

,

,

. –

,

,

,

,

,

. ,

.

1.

. . : / . . // . – 2008. – 140. – . 72-75. 2. Rostow W. W. The Stages of Economic Growth: A Non-Communist Manifesto / W.W. Rostow. – Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1960. – 324 p. 3. Morgenthau Hans J. Politics Among Nations. The Struggle for Power and Peace / Hans J. Morgenthau. – Second Edition, Alfred A. Knopf: New York, 1955. 4. Bobrow D. B. Prospecting the Future / D. B. Bobrow // International Studies Review. – Vol. 1. – No. 2. – Prospects for International Relations: Conjectures about the Next Millennium. – Summer, 1999. – P. 1-10. 5. Deutsch K. In The Nerves of Government: Models of Political Communication and Control / K. Deutsch. - New York: Free Press, 1963. – 315 p. 6. Kaplan M. Is International Relations a Discipline? / M. Kaplan // Journal of Politics. – 1961. – Vol. 23. – 2. – P. 462-476. 7. Rosecrance R. New Concert f Powers / R. Rosecrance // Foreign Affairs. - 1992. - Spring. –Vol. 71. – 2. – 1992. – P.6482. 8. . : . ./ . . – .: « »: »; .: Terra Fantastica, 2004. – 602 . 9. . / . . . – . : Academia, 1999. – 786 . 10. Smith Anthony D. The Ethnic Origins of Nations / Anthony D. Smith. New York, 1987. – 268 p. 11. . . « » / . . .– .: , 1997. – 255 . 12. A. 2000/ . // . – 2010. – . 8. – 1 (22). – . 58-73. 13. Acharya A. How ideas spread: whose norms matter? Norm localization and institutional change in Asian regionalism / A. Acharya // International Organisation. – 2004. – No 58. – P. 239-275. 14. Hettne B. Theorising the rise of regionness / B. Hettne, F. Soderbaum // New Political Economy. – 2000. – Vol. 5. – No. 3. – P. 457-474. 15. Milner H. International Theories of Co-operation among Nations: Strengths and Weaknesses / H. Milner // World Politics. – 1992. – No. 44 (April). – P. 466-496. 16. Hettne B. Theorizing the Rise of Regioness / B. Hettne, F. Soderbaum // New Regionalisms in the Global Political Economy. – London, 2002. – 459 p. 17. Beeson M. Regionalism and Globalisation in East Asia / M. Beeson. – New York, 2007. – P.3-16. 18. . . / . . – ] / . . – . 212-221. – : http://www.nbuv.gov.ua/portal/Soc_Gum/Nvdau/2012_18/32.pdf. 19. . : / . –[ ]/ : http://fmpgugn.narod.ru/pop2.html. 20. International Relations Theory and the Asia-Pacific / G. John Ikenberry and Michael Mastanduno (eds.). – New York: Columbia University Press, 2003. – 450 p. 21. . / . – [ ] : . – . 10, 2(29). – – 2012. – : http://www.intertrends.ru/ sixth/022.htm. 22. , . . . (1945-1995) / . . .– .: , 1997. – 278 c.

232


23. . . , 2007. – 190 . 24. . . ; . .-

./ . .

.– /

. . .

.,

. . , 2007. – 1040

( ) / . : http://geopolitics.ru/common/regions/asian.htm.

;

)

.–

.

.:

.:

. 25.

. ] : Geopolitika.ru. – 2006. –

431.123:061.2 . . –

). . ,

. :

,

, ,

. ,

,

», «

,

», «

»,

».

. .

. .

,

,

,

.

,

,

,

.

, , « », « : », ,« », « ». Shvab M. The UN about the statute principles of the non-governmental organizations activity. The article finds out the issue about statute principles of the non-governmental organizations in the West European world. It highlights the fundamental characteristics, aims, functions, methods of the non-governmental activities. It stresses on the structural transformations in the non-governmental organizations, which are closely connected with the political, economical, cultural world globalization. Keywords: non-governmental organization, private organization, “interests group”, “pressure group”, transnational organization, “grass-root organization”, “community organization”.

.

,

,

,

. ,

.

,

, ,

. ,

,

, . , . . [11],

.

:

[2],

[7],

.

, .

[4], .

, .

[10]

. .

. , . . »( (1945

.).

1910

) 132

.

,

, (

,

,

) [11].

1919 – 1920 ,

.,

, . –

1945 .

.

, ,

(

,

. 233

).


,

(

),

.

, .

70 «

,

, , » [7, c. 201].

», »

« »

«

»

«

71 « .

»

1970-

.

, .

.

. .

,

(

,

(

)

) [5].

,

. ,

,

,

,

,

. ,

,

.

, ,

,

[11].

,

,

.

«

»

[1, c. 153]. «

»

, ,

«

,

.

»

«

[4, c. 175]. »

«

»

. : ,

[2, c. 58].

»,

.

« ,

,

,

,

.

« –

»

«

»

.

: ,

.

.

,

[6, c. 138]. ,

.

, .

, ,

.

:

,

,

. , ,

: ,

,

[6, c. 140]. . »

«

»,

»

. ,

.

», «

«

»

,

«

»

.

«

«

»

, »,

», [2, c. 66]. » ( )

» «

»

. ,

.« »

, » [1, c. 105]. « », « .

«

«

»

, [5]. , ,

«

1970234

» [8]. .


»

;

,

;

,–

,

,

,

,

. [8]. . ,

«

.

»

. .

,

,

,

.

,

[4, c. 336].

,

, . ,

,

,

.

, .

, [3, c. 112].

, .

,

. [2, c. 106]. , – [11].

.

, .

. « » [7, c. 233].

1968-

1296 (XIIV) 1996

.

,

,

, 1999

, [1, c. 126]. . «

».

,

. .

,

,

, .

,

1296

,

, [7, c. 250].

2000

, ,

,

.

[11]. , ,

. , .

, ,

,

, .

1990-

,

,

[6, c. 198]. 1992 [6, c. 48]. ,

. ,

, ,

[6, c. 50]. ,

. ,

. [5]. 1999 . ,

,

235

.


. ,

,

,

[6, c. 128]. 2000 ) 1996 ,

( 1993 ,

[2, c. 275].

. . . ,

,

, .

,

[5].

, .

,

, , .

.

,

,

, .

,

,

, ,

[2, c. 167].

. . [5]. ,

,

,

,

. (

.

),

,

,

,

. .

,

,

.

,

,

[3, c. 238]. ,

«

,

»

,

,

.

1990-

, [9, c. 273]. .

, . .

1990-

,

1992 1995 »

[7, c. 194]. «

,

,

»

. «

», « ,

».

»

,

, , », «

»

«

»

[5]. . , ,

. 71

,

,

, [7, c.

,

147]. .

1970.

,

1996

.

,

,

, ,

[7, c. 154]. ,

. ,

,

,

, .

[10, c. 136]. ,

. .

.

,

,

, ,

236


. .

, .

,

,

, [11].

,

, .

,

,

,

.

, [6, c.

107]. .

,

,

.

,

.

1. Humphreys D. Forest Politics. The Evolution of International Cooperation /D. Humphreys. – London: Earthscan, 1996. – 299 p. 2. McCormick John The Global Environmental Movement / John McCormick. – Chichester: John Wiley and Sons, 1995. – 312 p. 3. Meyer M. K., Prügel E. Gender Politics in Global Governance / M. K. Meyer and E. Prügel. – Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 1999. – 315 p. 4. Moore M. & Stewart S. Corporate governance for NGOs? / M. Moore & S. Stewart // Development in Practice. – 1998. – Volume 8, Number 3. – P. 335 – 342. 5. NGOWatch / NGOs [Internet recourse] / NGOWatch. – Access way: http://www.ngowatch.org/ngos.php. 6. O’Brien R., Goetz A. M., Scholte J. A. and Williams M. Contesting Global Governance. Multilateral Economic Institutions and Global Social Movements / R. O’Brien, A. M. Goetz, J. A. Scholte, M. Williams. – Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. – 260 p. 7. Pei-heng Chiang Non-governmental organizations at the United Nations : identity, role, and function / Chiang Pei-heng. – New York : Praeger, 1981. – 355 p. 8. Risse-Kappen T. Bringing Transnational Relations Back In: Non-State Actors, Domestic Structures and International Institutions [Internet recourse] / T. Risse-Kappen. – Access way: http://ebooks.cambridge.org/ebook.jsf?bid=CBO9780511598760 9. Rootes C. Environmental Movements: Local, National and Global / C. Rootes. – London: Frank Cass, 1999. – 316 p. 10. Thomas A., Carr S., Humphreys D. Environmental Policies and NGO Influence. Land Degradation and Sustainable Resource Management in Sub-Saharan Africa / A. Thomas, S. Carr, D. Humphreys. – London: Routledge, 2000. – 201 p. 11. Willetts P. Consultative Status for NGOs at the UN [Internet recourse] / P. Willetts. – Access way: http://www.staff.city.ac.uk/p.willetts/NGOS/CONSSTAT.HTM 316.454.300.32

. . : (

– ).

.

, . :

,

,

,

,

. , . , , , , . The article deals with the analysis of the basic features of the political subculture of youth and defines the main directions of its formation in Ukraine. The author`s paying special attention to the dynamics of political activity of youth allowed to outline the influence of political culture on social and political processes. Keywords: political culture, youth political culture, mentality, political portraits, political activity. :

, ,

.

, ,

, .

237


, ,

,

,

. ,

— ,

,

,

[6, c. 204]. , .

, . .

.

,

.

,

.

,

.

,

.

.

,

.

,

,

,

. . : ; . . ,

— .

»

— ,

.

,

,

— . . , « (

»

.,

),

. . , , .

:

,

,

,

:

[5].

, :

. ,

. , , .

( . , 30-35

.

.

. 1).

,

, .

, .

,

1) 2)

:

; ;

3) 4) 5)

; ; . . ,

,

, .

. : ,

,

,

. ,

. 1991

« , 2004

» «

»

. :

1)

,

; 238


2) 3) 4)

(

)

;

; .

,

,

, .

.

: ) )

; . :

)

;

,

1. 2. , 3.

.

. . , .

. 1.

.

.

, , ,

. » [4].

« ,

, «

, ».

,

, (

)

.

. , ,

. , . . .

— ,

, .

.

239


» [3])

, . ,

, .

: ; ,

, «

»

,« ,

»

. .

,

. — . : ,

1)

,

; 2)

,

,

,

; 3) 4)

; , ;

5) 6) ,

; , ,

.

, —

. , ,

,

.

.

,

. ,

,

,

. , . .

,

»,

, —

. , .

,

. ,

,

. . « .

: «

»,

.

, «

»

,

,

.

,

,

,

» [9, . 104]. .

. . : .

, (

.

, (

.

240

. 2).

)


, ,

: .

.

. 2.

(

)

. , (

,

.

. 3).

, , ,

.

, .

, ,

.

7 ;

21

38 ;

;

.

34 . 3.

. ,

. 3.4,

,

(

,

,

). .

,

, , ,

241


.

,

, . :

,

,

,

.

.

, . ,

, :

«

»,

.

, .

.

. [8, . 42-43], . .

1997 , 1)

: 1996

2)

1999

3)

2004

1999

, 80-

[1, c. 72]

.

1997

,

,

; 2004 , ; 2005 ,

« ,

4)

2005

2007

»

,

,

,

,

;

,

. , ,

,

[2, 7, 10]

. , : ,

, ,

,

. ,

.

.

,

( ,

,

),

. ,

,

,

.

,

, . .

,

,

, .

,

,

,

. ,

«

»

.

. .

,

,

,

, . :

. ,

,

, .

, . ,

, .

:

1) 2) 3) 4)

; ; ; . :

1)

; 242


2) 3)

,

«

»

;

,

.

, , .

,

,

. , —

:

,

,

,

, . , , ;

,

,

,

;

, .

,

1. 2.

, ,

. .

-

;

.

/ .

.

. — 2007. —

3. — . 7-12. / .

.

//

. // . — 2010. — 1-2. — . 124-132. 3. .« — »[ ]/ . // . — 2011. — 18 . — . : http://slovoprosvity.org. 4. . . — [ ] / . .— : http://www.rusbeseda.ru/index.php?topic=3066.0;wap2. 5. . / . // . — 2002. — 10. — . 92-102. 6. . / . // . — 2009. — 39. — . 204-211. 7. . [ ]/ . // : . — 2011. — 45. — : http://nbuv.gov.ua/portal/Soc_Gum/Gileya/2011_45/Gileya45/P11_doc.pdf.– . 8. . / . , . . — .: , 1997. — 130 . 9. . / . // : , , . — 2005. — 3. — . 94-122. 10. . / . // [ ]. — 2011. — : http://kds.org.ua/blog/yanenko-o-shlyahi-pidvischennya-efektivnosti-suspilnoi-adaptatsii-molodi-do-suchasnih-umov-derz. — .

243


327:330.101 .

. – ,

, (

)

).

,

/

. ,

:

,

. .

.

. (

/

).

, . :

,

,

B. Yuskiv. Subjects and objects of the cross-border cooperation information and analytic assurance system. The article deals with cross-border cooperation (CBC) information and analytic assurance functions characteristics. Subjects and objects of the CBC information and analytic assurance system are determined. Keywords: cross-border cooperation, information assurance, information assurance function, subjects and objects of the CBC information and analytic assurance system

.

,

,

( .

)

. . ,

. . ,

,

.

. . ,

.

,

, –

.

,

.

,

.

,

.

, .

.

,

.

,

.

.

.

.

.

.

,

,

.

,

. ,

.

,

. .

,

.

,

.

,

,

.

,

.

.

[1], .

,

,

,

,

. ,

,

.

: – – – .

; ;

,

[1]

. ,

,

. .

" ,

,

,

, ,

, ,

, " [2].

,

. , 244


,

,

,

,

,

,

, . [1, .33],

(

)

"

, ,

,

, ; ".

(

, [1, c.48-49]), ,

, :

– –

; . , ,

,

,

,

,

.

,

,

,

,

,

(

) .

,

,

,

,

,

. –

, , ,

. , [3, .236] , ,

. : (

; ,

,

;

( , ;

; ;

, , , );

,

);

;

;

. . , ,

.

,

, .

.

,

.

.

[1, .32]

: ; . .

[4, .96-98],

: –

,

"

",

; – –

(

),

,

;

, ;

(

)

,

. .

.1

. [5, .134], "

(

")

.

,

,

,

. . ,

245

.

,


1

,

, ,

, ,

) ,

,

, ,

) , (

, , ,

)

, ,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

,

)

: [5, .135] , , –

. ,

, ,

. " ,

,

– " [1, .31].

,

, ,

,

. . 1. :

1– ; 2– ; 3 – ; 4– ; 5– ; 6– ; 7 – ; 8 – .

246


(

8

)

7

(

)

1

6

2

5

)

3

A)

4 1

– – . 1.

[1, .32]

; C – citizens,

(A – administrations, ; S – students,

,

; B – business,

), :

– A2A (administration-to-administration) – – A2B (administration-to-enterprise) – – A2C (administration-to-citizen) – – A2S (administration-to-students) – – B2B (business-to-business) – – B2C (business-to-consumer) –

; ; ; ; ; . ,

,

,

. 2. 2 (

) )

)

. +/ +/

+/ +/

+/ +/

+/ +/ +/

+/ +/ +/

+/ +/ +/

+/+ +/+ +/+

+/+ +/+ +/+ +/

+/ +/ +/ +/

+/ +/ +/ +/

+/+ +/+ +/+ +/+

+/ +/

+/ +/

+/ +/

+/+ +/

+/+ +/+ +/+ +/ +/

+/+ +/+ +/+ +/ +/

+/+ +/+ +/+ +/+ +/+

+/+ +/+ +/+ +/+ +/+

.

, .

,

V.

,

247


(

) ) +/ /+

+/ +/+

:

) +/ +/+

+/ /+

, ,

. :

. .

,

, ,

,

,

-

, ,

,

. , .

: . , –

,

,

.

,

,

,

1.

:

.

.

.

/ .

.

,

,

.

.–

:

, 2005. – 214 . 2.

(21

1980 ., . 3. . .

).

.–

/

// 4.

. – 2006. – . .

. – 35 .

8. –

:

/ . :

5.

(14–15 .

2013 ., .

.

,

.

: , 2006. – . 234-240. ): 2 ./[

I .

. / .

, 2004. – 395 .

248

.]. – .1. – .– :

:

.

// , 2013. – .92-99.


. . . (1939-1945 .:

.) /[

,

;

. , 2013. – 880 c. +

]. –

– ,

:

.) ,

"

,

")

, ,

,

.

” . ,

.

,

, , , ,

.

, ,

.

.

, .

,

,

. ? ?

, ? – ?

,

”. ,

,

.

,

. . , .

-

,

.

, . . .

.

, , . , .

,

,

,

,

” ,

,

.

,

, ,

, , 249

,

:


.

:

,

,–

,

,– ,

.

, , .

” ,

”,

“ .

,

,

,

,

.

,

,

, .

,

,

,

,

. , . .

, .

” “

”,

.

– .

, “

. ”

.

“ ,

.

,

1943-1944 ,

,

.

,

, . ,

-,

.

,

.

,

,

, ,

.

,

, ,

,

. ,

.

,

,

, .

,

, .

,

.

. ,

,

, .

, .

, ,

.

,

, . ,

250


. , .

, . , ,

.

-

.

,

. ,

,

, ,

, ,

.

,

,

.

,

,

, .

, . ,

,

, ,

,

. , ,

,

,

.

659.4(075) .

. . .:

. .–

: , 2013. – 216 .)

:

/

– ,

,

)

, . ,

,

.

. . (

. –

.:

, 2001. – 560

. . ("

.).

")

,

–"

". "

"

"

".

"

, ". ,

, .

:

".

, ,

. , : –

; –

. :

, ; )

;

;

;

. : ;

;

,

;

. ,

. 251


, .

,

,

,

,

,

,

. .

:

, ;

– .

"

"

",

, ,

,

.

.

:

. ", "

– – – – –

,

– "

", "

",

"; ; (

); ; ;

CNN

. , .

:"

»"; "

«

. «

«

»"; "

«

»"; "

»«

"; "

!»".

,

. ,

.

"

"

,

. "

"

,

,

, ,

.

, .

252


1. , 2.

,

,

,

,

,

. –

. .

.

3.

– ..

4.

IV .

,

5.

. –

. .

( .

6.

).

, .

7.

– ».

« 8.

,

,

, .

9.

– ,

,

"

10.

,

".

,

, .

11.

,

,

. 12.

, .

13.

– .

14.

– , Wydzia Humanistyczny AGH ) –

15.

(

)

. 16.

, ,

17.

.

, ..

18.

– "

,

,

,

".

19.

, .

20. 21.

(

.

,

,

. 22.

– .

.

23.

– .

.

24.

,

. . . .

, .

25.

26. . 27. 28.

, 5

«

,

, . 253

»


29.

,

,

) 30.

– , «

».

31.

– .

32.

,

,

. 33.

,

. 34.

35.

,

– .

36. 37.

, –

. .

.

38.

,

(

, .

39.

);

, .

40.

, «

41.

».

– «

».

42. , 43.

,

. – .

44.

– .

45.

– .

,

46.

.

,

,

47.

, , .

48.

.

– .

49.

, .

50. 51.

-

.

– .

52.

– .

53.

,

. 54.

– , .

254

,


16

: ,

. . . . . , . . . .

. .

60 84 1/8.

. . . 100

:. .

. .

01. 07. 2013 . . . . 32,5 68/8

„ , 33000, . .: 0-362-24-50-710.

255

”, , 64,

.

SlovVisnyk 16  

Словянський вісник, 16

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you