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JUTE Volume I


TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Cover:

Aaron McPolin’s Diamond In The Rough Find more on Pg. 58

Volume I Editors: Lynzi Judish Kadie Murphy Cam Parsons Design: Cam Parsons Writers: Christi Bode Nicole Schaap

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LETTER FROM EDITORS We are excited for you to experience Jute and hope that our hard work and love for art and fashion comes through in this premiere issue. We have to tell you, putting together a magazine is much tougher than originally thought. With visions of high-powered fashionistas in our heads, we thought we would sift through the thousands of editorials that came pouring in daily while drinking cocktails and dishing out harsh judgments. We would only allow the creme de la creme to rise to the pages of Jute. This was, after all, our Meryl Streep “Devil Wears Prada” fantasy. The reality of starting a magazine sunk in quickly. We begged for editorials, clamored for submissions, and all but bribed a talented graphic artist to fashion our page layouts. Once we convinced all the artists included in this issue to give us a chance, we knew we owed them an amazing spread. We poured over fonts, combed through color schemes, and tried layout after layout. These photographers were taking a chance on us! We had to produce! We are extremely proud of Jute Volume I and all of the editorials included. Our collection of editorials range from eccentric to elegant, all of which focus on expression. Our cover story, Diamond in the Rough by Aaron McPolin, titles our experience with this first issue perfectly. So with great pleasure, we introduce to you our diamond, Jute Magazine. XOXO, Lynzi, Cam, and Kadie Editors For submission information, visit www.jutefashionmagazine.com

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SUGAR CANE BACK LANES PHOTOGRAPHER/CREATIVE: TONY WEBSTER (BIG BAD LLAMA) HAIR & CLOTHING STYLIST: KELSEY SIMPSON MODEL: KAT KIRK

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Photographer : Stanislaw Jagiello assistANT: Donovan Alonso-Garcia Stylist : Kate Aronsson-Brown Hair stylist : Christophe Lambenne Make-Up Artist : Florence Bracaval Models : Sarah C. & Laura M. @ Flag Models Agency Special Thanks to Hotel Berger


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FOCUSING ON THE RAW BEAUTY AND SEXINESS EXUDED IN THE FEMALE FORM, PHOTOGRAPHER, FINE ARTIST, AND MIXED MEDIA CREATIVE JOE FRIEND PRODUCES PROVOCATIVE YET TASTEFUL IMAGES IN HIS ON-GOING SERIES “SEXY VANDALISM”. WITH HIS LENS, JOE STRIVES TO CAPTURE THE UNINTENDED MOMENTS OF BRILLIANCE AND SEDUCTION THAT OTHERS OFTEN MISS OR OVERLOOK. THESE ORGANICALLY BEAUTIFUL AND UNINTENDED MOMENTS ARE THE INSTANT THAT IS CAPTURED WHEN ALL RESERVATIONS HAVE BEEN CAST ASIDE, LEAVING ONLY GENUINE AND SENSUAL POSES. BY DEFACING THE PHOTOGRAPHS IN THIS SERIES, IT FORCES THE VIEWER TO APPRECIATE THE FEMALE FORM IN ALL ITS BEAUTY AND SEXUALITY WITHOUT ANY PRECONCEIVED NOTION OF PERSONAL IDENTITY. THE DEFACEMENT WRAPS THE WOMEN IN A CLOAK OF ANONYMITY TO SEAL THEIR SINGULAR IDENTITIES AND ACCENTUATES THEIR ORGANIC FORM.


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LUKEWARM

YOUTH PHOTOGRAPHY: SOPHIA KAHLENBERG

STYLING:

GOSIA JEDRASIAK

GROOMING:

BETHANY SWAN

MODELS:

TOM & JASPER {LITE LONDON}

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A Mother and Father’s Lesson

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Photographer: Drew Fritschel Hair: Ray Hornback Makeup: Sara Gilliom Model: Tiger Kaufman

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Gucci to Guess to Goodwill: A Gal’s Guide to Getting the Goods

Story by: Nicole Schaap www. cremedelacouture.com For the first time ever I’ll let you in on a few little secrets. Yes, you! I want to show you how to get every bang for your buck, whether you’re going gang busters straight to Gucci, taking time and dipping into Guess, or you’re busted and walking to the Goodwill. Here is how you can get top quality. There are rules to this game. 1. Quality over quantity. Do yourself a favor and clean out the crap in your closet. 2. You can have it your way, just don’t get crazy. That means don’t get greedy; you’ll see what I mean. To kick off the series, we’ll stat with what’s on everyone’s mind; it’s all sex and handbags. It’s the arm candy, the statement, the entity that holds your entire life. Maybe I’m being dramatic, but we all know I’m not. BUYING A BAG 101: If you’re ready to dive into the big dogs and snap up that Gucci Jackie Python shoulder bag, the Hermes Black Pebbled Leather Birkin bag, or the Chanel black quilted Caviar, then baby go to Neiman Marcus or Hermes and fork over the few extra for the real deal with authenticity to go with it. Here’s why: We’ll use the ever

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popular Louis Vuitton Monogram Speedy 30 for an example.

Louis Vuitton Suggested Retail Price: $875.00 This bag sold on a very popular auction site for $1250 plus $30 in shipping. It’s the exact same bag! THE EXACT SAME BAG (I had to repeat myself because it’s ridiculous). It doesn’t require any math mind to see the sick difference here. Someone paid an extra $405 to grab it online with the illusion of getting a deal. Not all Louis Vuitton costs thousands. I get it, some of us are intimidated, but that’s silly business right there. I don’t care if you’re in your yoga clothes with some sort of pox outbreak. Louis Vuitton provides an iconic quality, with that comes an iconic quality in customer service. You’ll leave Louis Vuitton with a dust cover, authentication card, box, and a fancy bag to carry your even fancier bag to the car in. That

is a gift, you gave it to yourself. They just wrapped it up for you. Embrace it, enjoy it, and acknowledge that you absolutely deserve it. For those of us not ready to fork over a mortgage payment on arm candy, we don’t need to skimp on quality. There are legit “Bridge” brands. It’s called a “bridge” because ideally you’re crossing it to get into designer. That’s where we want you. Seriously $200 can get you a bag that will last you longer than you’ll be able to stand it. Here is an example of a Michael Kors cross body bag.

Micheal Kors Suggested Retail Price: $188.00 This is a quality bag that will stand the test of time for a whole lot less. Want to know some great places to score middle of the road bags for a steal of a deal? Marshall’s, Ross, Local Consignment Shops (that you are comfortable with and trust of course). Brands like Kors, Hobo, Tignanello, even Nine West, will get you quality without spending more than you can afford. Lastly, for the fabulously frugal, I


mean frugal with a capital F, there is a very special place called the THRIFT STORE. Macklemore went and opened his big mouth about it, unleashing the secret score. I know I’m not the only one who gets some sort of bizarre high from finding a diamond in the rough. It’s the magnificent wonderland for those of us with only $20 in our pocket, but it isn’t for the faint shopper. Yes it’s gross, yes you have to dig, and yes you have to commit the time. That’s another value to consider. Is the 45 minutes of mindless digging worth the $100 extra bucks for grabbing it new? That’s on you; it’s your life, your time. If you are going to the thrift shop hoping to find your Louis Vuitton Speedy 30 check yourself. This is a “grab what you love because who cares it’s almost free” shopping. Don’t risk buying a fake. Obvious fakes aren’t cool, but if you’re buying a bag because you love it. THE G DUB IS WHAT’S UP! Handbags fit every size, shape, color, body…. they are fun. They allow us to make a statement. So whether you’re at the Gucci, Guess, or Goodwill time in your life, be fabulous. There is no excuse not to be.

Check out Nicole’s latest thrift shop finds!

Balenciaga

Giant 12

Pewter Day Retail: $1495 Scored for: $180

Isabella Fiore

Retail:$428 Scored for: $36

Authentic Vintage Nettie Rosenstein

Ostrich Valued at: $1300 Scored for: $27 JUTE MAGAZINE

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LADY

IN THE WATER Photographer: Michela Riva Model: Martina Klimic |Be Nice Model Agency| Make Up Artist: Cecilia Carbonelli Hair Stylist: Alina Brichese |The Beauty Room| ‘ | Fashion Stylist: Michela Puzzer |UllalA Photo Assistant: Cristina Salvi 52


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DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH

| Photographer: Aaron McPolin | Styling: Obscure Couture Scotland | | Model: Lauren Andrews | JUTE MAGAZINE

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Highlands photographer: mike larremore styling: stefania pruscino HMUA: sara gilliom assistant: ariana moore model: jiana davis america's next top model cycle 20 70


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&

Callum

Christina

Photographer: Salal Crossley Models: Christina Dawn Roost & Callum Shandley (Coultish Management) Assistant: Alaura Lewis

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“I “I just just did did not not understand understand why why girls girls my my age age wanted wanted to to be be taking taking care care of of plastic plastic babies.” babies.”

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Interview by: Christi Bode www.christibode.com “What are little girls made of? Sugar and spice, and everything nice, That’s what little girls are made of.” British poet Robert Southey wrote this nursery rhyme dating from the early nineteenth century. Call me sassy with a sprinkle of cynicism, but we have entered the Era of Twerks and Tits: overtly sexualized 4 year olds getting spray tans and weaves, children as young as 6 diagnosed with an eating disorder, and teenagers purposely becoming pregnant for a chance to become the next hottest teen idol on an asinine reality show. Have girls traded in their dolls for dildos? Perhaps the cute gay little boys stole them or Blair Bost snatched them for her next creative endeavor. Hey Blair, could you start out by introducing yourself? My name is Blair Ryukyu Bost and I enjoy creating images. Early this summer, I finished my Bachelor’s degree in photography at 23 years old. I never felt like a desk job was right for me, so I pursued a career that let me be expressive, and do something a little different with my time. It’s hard to imagine that I am not a dark person after looking at my doll images, but in fact, I smile, wear dresses, and I have a pet bunny. I primarily shoot pretty images of food and still life, but my favorite subjects to shoot are dolls and rotting food. *flips hair* What does “being creative” mean to you? To me, being creative does not necessarily mean that you’re

good at art. It’s just noticing things that could be there. It’s like putting a puzzle together and some of the pieces are missing, so you draw (metaphorically) in the empty spaces with what you think could go there. Sometimes it looks terrible and sometimes it looks amazing. What are you trying to communicate with your art? I am fascinated in society’s interest in plastic, and the emotional expressions on the dolls faces. I find it strange that we give imaginary life to plastic objects in the shape of human offspring and perfect bodies. The rest is up to viewer analysis. My images tend to be open-ended. Where do you draw your influences from? I remember watching a show a few years ago about a woman who was obsessed with her baby doll, and I think she truly believed it was her real baby. She carried it around in a stroller, and took it with her everywhere. There was another show about a man that fell in love with his life-sized sex doll. Their stories definitely had some influence on me. Female stereotypes drive most women crazy. Is this why you photograph deranged dolls? We are all stereotyped. The dolls especially are. Did you play with dolls as a young Blair? What did you think of them then? Honestly, I did not play with dolls. They always felt very foreign to me. I remember being in kindergarten and the teacher asked why I was not playing with dolls like the other girls, and I didn’t have an answer for her. I just did not understand why

girls my age wanted to be taking care of plastic babies. I preferred Legos and finger painting. When I got a little older, I had Barbie dolls to play with, but they always ended up with tattoos, piercings, bald heads, and cut limbs. Would you consider this series feminist in nature? How does this play into your own beliefs about women in today’s society? Not necessarily. Yes, women are not to be treated like plastic,nor should we feel the need to look like it, but these images are more about looking into the imperfect worlds of dolls, primarily females but males are not excluded. What role does humor play in your work? How does it spin your message? I certainly hope people can find humor in my images, because they are not meant to be taken in a serious manner. Humor is a great way to get your viewpoint across, without offending the people with a sense of humor. What are you working on right now? Right now I’m about to start round 2 of my rotten series, and continue with decomposing fall vegetation in the north woods (Minnesota) when the season hits. Blair Ryukyu Bost is a commercial photographer based in Minnesota, USA. Check out more of her work at www.ryukyuphotography.com

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“When “When II got got a a little little older, older, II had had Barbie Barbie dolls dolls to to play play with, with, but but they they always always endended ed up up with with tattoos, tattoos, piercings, piercings, baldheads, baldheads, and and cut cut limbs.” limbs.”

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Teenage Dirtbags Photographer: Kim Akrigg

Styling:

Alana Ferguson

Make Up/Hair: Rose Moffat

Models:

Kia {Tamblyn Models} Madelyne {Busy Models} 102


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R A A

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Z A B W O

RY E O M E K N M E H A D N IN E R V E A L D N : R A E Y R E E PH D M A E R RA CHRO G O Y T E PHO : WHITN RAH S A S S T : S I L STYL MODE

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Black

Forest 130

Photographer: Lynzi Judish Wadrobe Provided By Creme De La Couture Wardrobe Stylist: Nicole Schaap HMUA: Kadie Murphy Model: Tyler Vines Black Forest. CO


k

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In Mid-June, a tragic fire tore through the Black Forest region of Colorado. Within two days of ignition, the Black Forest Fire marked itself as the most destructive fire in Colorado history. 511 homes were destroyed. Tyler Vines, the beautiful model in this series, was one of the residents evacuated from her home. The fire destroyed her garage, but miraculously, the

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flames switched direction and avoided her home. When she returned to her residence, the destruction around her was all too real. Her neighbors’ homes were reduced to piles of ashes, molten metal and glass, and charred remnants of dÊcor. Tyler knew that she had to help someway that would raise awareness to the loss in the area, so she contacted us to set up an edito-

rial. We hope that seeing these hauntingly beautiful images will resonate with you and that the damages we hear about can have a deeper impact. We urge anyone moved by the images to donate to the relief funds for the Black Forest Fire of 2013. Donations can be given at www.tri-lakescares.org


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Jute Magazine - Volume I