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Architectural Thesis Kaavya Shakunthala


Architectural Thesis U n d e r G r a d u a t e

Final

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Year

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Project

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Multi-cultural Hub Using Architecture as a catalyst for the development of vanishing cultural values.

Kaavya

Shakunthala.CT


CULTURAL HUB ARCHITECTURAL THESIS

EDUCATION LEVEL SUPERVISORS PERIOD

UnderGraduate in Architecture Final Semester Ar.Madhumathi Ar.Santhana Iyappa Jan2016 - May2016


INDEX BREAKING STEREOTYPES

01

INTRODUCTION

03 THE NEED VISION GOAL LIMITATION

BASICS

07

METHODOLOGY CULTURAL DATA CULTUAL VARIATIONS PROGRAMM

DESIGN-GUIDES

21

CASE STUDY ANALYSIS SITE STUDY & ANALYSIS FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIP DESIGN CONCEPTION

DESIGN-OUTPUT

51

DESIGN PROPOSAL

PROGNOSIS

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Architectural Thesis l

Kaavya Shakunthala


B A S I C

S T E R E O T Y P E S

Saree, Lehenga

YOGA DANCE namaste

JALEBI

CRICKET

SPICY FOOD BOLLYWOOD

fafda

jigisha PATELS VEGETARIAN

GARBA & DANCE

POOR PEOPLE

HINDUS

VERY RICH MISER

INDIAN

GUJJUZ

SNAKE CHARMERS

SPICY FOOD JOINT FAMILY MASALA HOT CLIMATE IT PEOPLE HINDI LANGUAGE

jignesh

FOODIES

FAT PEOPLE

BUSINESS NO DRINKS

SWEET TOOTH

RELIGIOUS HINDUS

RELIGIOUS

POOR ENGLISH SPEAKERS

I am Delhi university student & I treat girls with respect. Me and my friends help for NGOs and many other causes.

UNSAFE

Kenny Sebastian, a successful Malyali stand-up comedian who loves playing guitar.

RAJINIKANTH IDLI DOSA SILK SAREE VERBALLY ABUSIVE

IT PEOPLE

INGADU VANGADU

PARTY ANIMALS

MATERIALISTIC

ALL SOUTH INDIANS CALLED

delhilite

MADRASI

MURDERER HIGH SPENDING RAPE HIGH FASHION

Vaibhav belongs to rich Telegu speaking nuclear business family who loves football. Married his girlfriend from other caste.

IRRESPONSIBLE PERVERT

CORRUPT SPOILT

TAMIL SPEAKERS RICE

Mukesh Ambani helps many NGOs & various causes, who can fluently speak English.

COFFEE DARK SKINNED

CLASSICAL MUSIC COCONUT LUNGI


Breaking

AMAZING MOMO

stereotypes

DOG/SNAKE EATERS

CARE-FREE JAPANI BHAI

FRIENDLY TRIBAL WAR DANCE

INDIA & ITS STATES

ASSAMESE CHINKIES

HUMAN SKULL

SMALL/ TINY TINY EYES

RAW FOOD-STYLE TEA PLANTERS TIMID

Lets our I, Savitha saha, work hard in an MNC and love shopping, eating chicken a lot.

LAZY WORKERS

KALI MATAA BINDI OBSESSION

MATERIALISTIC

Bengali FISH LOVERS

BONGS

ROSHOGOLLA

Rimpi Das, an Assamese actress is well talents, tall and has no characteristic Mongolian facial resemblance.

DURGA POOJA CHEAP LIFE-STYLE

know culture

India is a culturally diverse country, i.e. Indians cannot be framed as following one single culture throughout the region. The culture variations are not slight and hence cannot be ignored. Infact each Indian state have their own culture to boast about. But due to cultural ignorance, many Indians, as well as foreigners do not know the deeper meaning of each culture and hence assume various stereotypes that exist even nowadays. Hence there is a dire need to educate the people and the visitors, exactly about various rich Indian cultures & simultaneously encourage the cultural development, giving importance to the lifestyle of the artisans, craftsmen,etc. Architecture can act as an important catalyst to bring about all of this. Architectural Thesis l

Kaavya Shakunthala


INTRODUCTION

• THE NEED •VISION •DESIGN GOAL •LIMITATION

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NEED

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VISION

Noida is a well planned growing city lying in the South-West region of Delhi. Though it is a self sustaining city with residential, commercial, office, open spaces, it lacks behind culturally. This thesis proposes to build a Cultural Hub -a place for all INDIAN cultures. The best location to propose this is in fact, in the capital, as this needs to be globally recognized and promoted. Moreover, the availability of ample space, culturally neutral population and developing area which can accommodate new facilities, brings down the options to Noida. This Cultural Hub will have multi-character but act as a joint single entity in encouraging Indian Culture. The architectural language will vary for each cultural pavilion but unite them as a whole through various methodologies. The built form should integrate with the existing city fabric as well as stand out, acting as global recognition for India.

There has been complete cultural negligence in India in the past few decades, with the growth of Modern Technology. With the influx of new modern equipments and the craze with the Western Culture adoption, Indians are in the verge of losing their own culture. The idea of adopting to the Western Culture is considered prestigious and trendy among this generation as is advertised and promoted by global icons. The lack in promoting and encouraging may not only lead to cultural extinction but also affect cultural tourism to a greater extent. First and foremost, the prevailing misconceptions about Indians and about other state cultures need to be broken . Interest to learn, follow & adopt our culture will boost our cultural value worldwide. Hence there is an immediate need to educate about culture to us and our neighbors. Sector11,Dwarka, New Delhi

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Introduction

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Basics

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Design Guides

l Design Output Architectural Thesis l

l Prognosis l Kaavya Shakunthala


G

O

A

L

The design proposal aims to create holistic architectural experience showcasing culture in all aspects. The arts and culture should be systematized into one coherent body of knowledge from inside ,as well as, outside the building, Beginning from the core exhibit areas, to the exterior environment, everything should reflect culture in its own way, to create vibrant and dynamic experience for visitors. The three important aspects looked upon for designing a holistic experience for the visitors: Culturally sound Interior Core exhibit areas, reflecting direct cultural knowledge. Culturally sound Exterior, manifests indirect cultural aspects. Ease of Transition space, which fuses both smoothly.

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LIMITATION

India is a culturally rich country. It cannot be defined as following one single culture, as there are more than 200 variations from region to region. Only those cultures, that prevail predominately in the Indian subcontinent, are taken into consideration for designing buildings. Other cultures are showcased in temporary exhibits and shall not have dedicated space for them. The spaces designed will only adhere to Indian cultural aspects and not to any foreign cultures. The proposal aspires to solve various programmatic and socialistic issues that arise, while designing the Cultural Hub.

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Introduction

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Basics

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Design Guides

l Design Output Architectural Thesis l

l Prognosis l Kaavya Shakunthala


BASICS

•Methodology •WHAT ? What is culture (Data)

•HOW? How many cultural variations?

•PROGRAMM Programm formulation through Standards

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METHODOLOGY

DESIGN GUIDES

CASE STUDY

GOAL THE NEED

SITE STUDY

PROGRAMM FORMULATION As stated by Christopher Jones in Design Methods: Seeds of Human Futures (1970), the design process is cyclic and divisioning, so as to have, varying inputs in various stages for a better, practical design solution. Various options are generated, analyzed and finalized for, further creation of more options. And such the process continues, till the final design product is developed.

CONCEPT DESIGN EVOLUTION

FINAL IMPACT STUDY

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Basics

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Design Guides

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WHAT

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HISTORY LITERATURE

CUSTOM

FOODTECHNIQUE MUSIC ENVIRONMENT LIFE RELIGION MUSIC CUSTOM DANCE LITERATURE LITERATURE ARCHITECTURE DRESS FOLKLORE ART MUSIC LANGUAGE HISTORY CASTE CUSTOM LITERATURE FASHION CUSTOM FOOD

LIFESTYLE

ETHNIC

ARCHITECTURE

DRESS

DANCE FASHION LIFE COMMUNITY SKILL LIFESTYLE MUSIC HISTORY ARCHITECTURE CASTE CIVILIZATION CUSTOM ARTLIFE RELIGION LANGUAGE ART DRESS LITERATURE TECHNIQUE FOLKLORE CUSTOM FOLKLORE WELLNESS FOOD PEOPLE MUSIC RELIGION IDEAS FOOD ENVIRONMENT DRESS FASHION ETHNIC FOOD

LANGUAGE

CULTURE

RELIGION

LANGUAGE

FASHION

ART

RELIGION DANCE

ARCHITECTURE TECHNIQUE

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ARCHITECTURE

DANCE, MUSIC,DRAMA

RELIGION

Dravidian Architecture, Temple architecture, Maratha architecture, Indo-islamic Architecture, European colonial architecture, Rajasthani architecture, Indian vernacular architecture, Badami cave temples

ART & CRAFT

Madhubani painting, Bandhiniart, south Indian carving, various regional art n craft styles persisting even now from pottery, crafting, hand-looming, painting, etc

LANGUAGE LITERATURE

Bharatnatyam, Kathakalli, Garba, Sathriya,Kuchipudi,Kathak,Odissi,Manipuri, Mohiniyattam,folk and tribal dance Classical music, Hindustani music, folk music, Tabla, Sitar, Mridangam, Flute,etc

CUSTOM

FOOD

From greeting everybody with namaste, getting elders blessing by touching their feet, Diwali oil bath ritual, Kaali worship through garba, Raavanharan, Jain week long fasting, one month Muslim fasting, etc l

FASHION & DRESS

South Indian Thali, North Indian thali, Maratha food, Indian snacks , Goan delicacies, Bihari food, Bengali food, South eastern food ,Meat,Punjabi parathas,sarson ka saag,Falooda, Vada, Sambar, Variety rice,Fafda, Jalebi, Dhokla, Introduction

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Basics

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Design Guides

Various varieties of draping Saree’s, South Indian Saree, lehenga, ghagra, Salwar kameez, dhoti, lungi, bandhgala, pheta, Gandhi cap, mekheda sador (assamese) , sherwani, etc l Design Output Architectural Thesis l

l Prognosis l Kaavya Shakunthala


North East Cultural zone

HOW

?

Prominent Cultural Variations East Cultural Zone

India is one of the world’s oldest civilization. Indian culture is often labeled as amalgamation of various cultures, spanning across the Indian subcontinent and has been influenced and shaped by history, which is several thousand years old. Indian Culture is broadly divided as Seven overlapping cultural zones by Ministry of Culture. They are South Culture Zone, South Central Culture Zone, North Culture Zone, North Central Culture Zone, East Culture Zone, North East Culture Zone, and West Culture Zone namely. They are classified so based on region, Architectural style, religion, literature, art, painting styles, dance, music, drama, performing arts, crafts, fashion, dress, language, custom, food, etc. Detailed study of all these overlapping factors, gives the clear overall picture of Indian Culture.

North Culture Zone

West Cultural Zone

North Central Zone

SouthCentral Cultural Zone

South Cultural Zone

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ARCHITECTURE

Indian Architecture, which has evolved over centuries, is rooted to history, culture, religion and geographical conditions. Though the Indus Valley sites of Harappa, Mohenjo-daro, and Lothal provide substantial evidence of extensive ancient town planning, the beginnings of Indian architecture are dated to the advent of Buddhism in India, in the reign of Ashoka during when they constructed various Buddhist monasteries and stupas. Buddhist architecture predominated till late 7th century, when Hindu School Of architecture took over. The most notable achievements were the rock-cut temples like Ajanta, Ellora, Temples of Mahabalipuram, Kanchipuram temple, Brihadeeswara Temple, Sun Temple (Konark), AngkorWat, etc. The Hindu architecture, in-itself had various different typologies based on the regional style. The story of Somnath Temple in West India is famous as it was rebuilt many times after being attacked by various enemies. In central India, the Chandellas built a

exercises typified by the Victoria Memorial in Calcutta. There are some notable specimens of church architecture, such as St. James’s Church in Delhi, but the principal regal contribution of the British appears to be the construction of a new capital in Delhi. Indigenous styles of architecture did not entirely suffer a demise, and step-wells continued to be built in Gujarat throughout the nineteenth century. In Rajasthan rich merchants constructed large havelis or residences in which the window work defies description. The most striking of these havelis are to be found in Jaisalmer Contemporary architecture has also developed over the years due to various renowned architects like Charles Correa, Balkrishna Doshi, Laurie Baker, Le Corbusier, Satish Gujaral and many others to list like. Mumbai’s Nariman Point is famous for its Art Deco buildings. Creations like Lotus Temple,and various urban developments of India like Bhubaneswar and Chandigarh, are notable.

Magnificent complex of temples at their capital, Khajuraho, between 950-1030 A.D. In the northwest, the Solanki kings built the Surya or Sun temple in Modhera, which stills provides striking testimony to their achievements. More stupendous is the Surya temple at Konarak, one of many other masterpieces of Orissan architecture. The Mughal emperors were interested in heavily investing in monumental architecture and spent lavishly on the construction of mosques, mausoleums, forts, palaces, and other buildings . Mughal architecture is predominant in Delhi, Lahore, Agra, and Fatehpur Sikri. Jama Masjid, Taj Mahal, Qutub Complex, Humayum’s Tomb are few of the marvelous creations. Unlike the Mughals, the British contributed little to India’s architectural history. Their rule is associated mainly with monumental civic buildings, such as the Victoria Terminus in Bombay, or commemorative

Buddhist Architecture l Hindu Architecture l Indo-Sarsanic Architecture l Mughal Architecture l Dravidian Architecture l Rock-cut architecture

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RELIGION

Nanak,who preached simple monotheistic faith .Amritsar, is considered as the holy city for Sikhs, where sits the magnificent Golden Temple. Sikh community have strengthened them through various oppositions from other religions to subdue them and have risen up , with many followers in the world. Christianity, came in during the British rule, during when many people where preached and pulled into, the religion.

Hinduism has spread to all parts of the world today, taken there by Indian migrants. This reli-

gion produced a vast corpus of texts: preeminent among them have been the Rig Veda, the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Ramayana, and the Bhagvata Purana, which are popular even now. Various temples, Dharmasalas were built to guide people to have a better valued lifestyle. Buddhism originated and flourished in India before 6th century, and it is in Bodh Gaya that Buddha gained enlightenment. Today, it is more prevalent in countries like Tibet, China, Bhutan, Myanmar, Thailand, etc. Jainism, another religion followed by many Indians was found by one of Buddha’s contemporary, Mahavira, also uniquely Indian. Both of them questioned Vedas and stressed importance of ahimsa or non-violence and abolition of caste systems. Today Jains are among India’s most distinguished trading and business communities; and the legacy of Jain art and culture is just as profound. Sikhism, another Indian faith,originated with Guru

Though the institutionalized religions are associated with great architectural monuments, such as the Hindu temple cities of South India (Kanchipuram, Rameswaram, Chidambaram, and many others), the Mughal splendors of Delhi, Agra, and Fatehpur Sikri, or the Golden Temple at Amritsar, Churches (Velankani Church, Basilica of Jesus,Goa)the roadside monuments and shrines are even more indicative of the manner in which these faiths interweave with the lives of their adherents.

Buddhism

Islamism

Jainism

Indian is considered world-wide as a land of religion. Many people flood in for spiritual release from the weariness of the material life. India is the birthplace of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism, collectively known as Indian religions Today, Hinduism and Buddhism are the world’s third and fourth-largest religions respectively. India is one of the most religiously diverse nations in the world, with some of the most deeply religious societies and cultures. Religion plays a central and definitive role in the life of many of its people. Hinduism. Islam, Christianity, Sikhism, Buddhism and Jainism are the major religions followed by the people of India. Jainism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and the Bahá’íFaith are also influential but their numbers are smaller.

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Hinduism

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Christianity

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Sikhism

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Baha’i


DANCE MUSIC DRAMA

Dance and music first emerged as part of festivals and religious worship and of dramatic arts in India. Both dance and music, collectively known as sangit, became connected with drama. The earliest written work dealing with all aspects of music and dance was the Natyashastra (Handbook on Dramatic Arts). India has had a long romance with the art of dance. Natyashastra and Abhinaya Darpana (Mirror of Gesture) are two surviving Sanskrit documents,both estimated to be between 1700 and 2200 years old. Indian dance includes eight classical dance forms, many in narrative forms with mythological elements. The eight classical forms stated by National Academy of Music,Dance and drama are: Bharatanatyam of the state of Tamil Nadu, Kathak of Uttar Pradesh, kathakali and Mohiniattam of Kerala, Kuchipudi of

2,000-year-old Kutiyattam of Kerala, which strictly follows the Natya Shastra. With the Islamic conquests that began in the 10th and 11th centuries, theatre was discouraged or forbidden entirely. Drama played a major role in reviving patriotism among people, for Independencce against the British Rule. Natyacharya Mani MadhavaChakyar is credited for bringing the age old drama tradition from extinction. Modern Indian theatrical scenes, changed in India after Independence. Over the years, Dance, Music and Drama have evolved into a more modern phase, seeing more Western fusion.

AndhraPradesh, Yakshagana of Karnataka, Manipuri of Manipur, Odissi(orissi)of Odisha and the Sattriya of Assam. Various regional dances like Bhagra, Bihu, Chhau, Mahai, Ghoomar, Dandiya, Garba are also popular. Music has been an integral part of Indian Culture. Ancient Indian systems classifies musical instruments into four groups based on primary sources of vibration: strings, membranes, cymbals, and air. The Samaveda, and other Hindu texts, heavily influenced India’s classical music tradition, which is known today in two distinct styles: Carnatic and Hindustani music. Indian drama and theatre has a long history along side its music and dance. Kalidasa’s plays like Shakuntala and Meghadoota are some of the older dramas, following those of Bhasa. One of the oldest surviving theatre traditions of the world is the

Bharatnatyam l Kathak l Mohiniyattam l Manipuri l Kuchipudi l Yakshagana l Sattriya l Hindustani Music l CarnaticMusic l KalidasaDramas

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LITERATURE AND LANGUAGE

The Indian literature dates back to many thousand years. The earliest works were orally transmitted. Sanskrit literature begins with the oral literature of the Rig Veda, a collection of sacred hymns dating to the period 1500–1200 BCE. Later came Tamil Sangam Literature , followed by literature in Kannada, Telugu, Marathi, Bengali, Hindi, Parsi ,etc.

The Vedas are the earliest known literature in India. The Vedas were written in Sanskrit. The word ‘Veda’ literally means knowledge. In Hindu culture, Vedas are considered as eternal and divine revelations. They treat the whole world as one human family Vasudev Kutumbakam. There are four Vedas, namely, the- Rig Veda, Yajur Veda, Sama Veda and Atharva Veda. Each Veda consists of the Brahmanas, the Upanishads and the Aranyakas.

The Ramayana and the Mahabharata are the oldest preserved and well-known epics of India. These epics played an important role in their eras, to instill certain values. Ramayana tries to emphasis the role of dhárma as a principal ideal guiding force for Hindu way of life, with moral code of conducts. Whereas, in Mahabharata, the strength of Dharma is devised along with Karma. Sustaining Dharma, with few diversions from the straight loyal path is considered correct. In addition to these two great Indian epics, there epics such as Megdoot, Mricchakatika, Ratnavali, Arthashastra and other in classical Tamil language — Silappatikaram, Manimekalai, Civaka-cintamani and Valayapathi-kundalakesi are also famous. The Puranas occupy a unique position in the sacred literature of the Hindus. They are regarded next in importance only to the Ve-

das and the Epics. There are said to be eighteen Puranas and about the same number of Upapuranas. Some of the well known Puranas are Brahma, Bhagvat, Padma, Vishnu, Vayu, Agni, Matsya and Garuda. It is found that India has 122 first languages, in use out of which, 22 are official – 15 of which are Indo-European. Sanskrit is the mother of many Indian languages. The Vedas, Upanishads, Puranas and Dharmasutras are all written in Sanskrit. The language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more abundant than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either. Hindi, Gujarati, Bengali, Marathi, Punjabi and many other languages, emerged from Sanskrit. All of these languages have roots and structure similar to Sanskrit, to each other and to other Indo European languages.

Sanskrit l Hindi l Tamil l Gujarati l Punjabi l Bengali l Orriya l Ramayana l Mahabharata l Guru Grant l Bhagavat Gita

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ART AND CRAFTS

Indian crafts are highly acclaimed throughout the world for their aesthetic appeal and magnificence. The diverse cultural traditions of India have enabled the accomplishment of producing various kinds of crafts. The crafts are composed of different materials, themes and proficiencies. Works on woodwork, pottery, hand looms, terracotta, paintings, bead work, jewelery and embroidery etc have survived through centuries with fewer changes. Clay Craft of India The origin of clay crafts in the country dates back to as early as the Indus Valley Civilization. The Indian states of Himachal Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat, West Bengal and Rajasthan are renowned for their diverse form of clay crafts. Wood Craft of India Indian woodcrafts have existed in the nation ever

riors, modelled on classical prototypes, continue to be made in every nook and corner of India. Havellis of Jaipur are very intricately carved by expert craftsmen, which still stands with great majestic aura. Ancient stone carving can be explicitly seen in Ajanta Ellora Caves. These shrines were all cut out of rock, by hand, and rank amongst some of the most outstanding specimens of ancient Indian architectural heritage. The finest specimens of cave - temple architecture, they house elaborate facades and exquisitely adorned interiors. These structures representing the three faiths of Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism, were carved during the 350 AD to 700 AD.

since ancient periods. The craft of manufacturing products with the help of wood was practised even prior to the stone sculptural age. Manipuri region of Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat, Karnataka, Kerala and Jammu and Kashmir are some of the Indian states which are famous for their woodcrafts. Ivory Craft of India Crafts involving ivory crafting is popular in the states like Kerala, Punjab, Delhi, Gujarat, Rajasthan and West Bengal. The ivory carvers of Jaipur , Bengal and Delhi are known for their engraved models of ‘ambari hathi’ or processional elephant, bullock carts, sandals , caskets, book covers, and palanquins. Craftsmen of Gujarat carve exquisite human figures as also images of deities.

Glass Craft of India It is evident from the archaeological findings at Basti in Uttar Pradesh that glassware in India is about 2000 years old. Glass processing, although have changed widely from past.

Stone Craft of India The art of sculpture is the poetic expression of stone craft. Sculptures of deities, decorative for house inte-

Madhubani Painting l Bandhini Fabric l Conch Shell Bangles l Pembarti Metal Craft l Stone Carving l Zardosi Craft work l Banarasi Saree

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CUSTOM AND FOOD

Kolams / rangolis are auspicious patterns created using rice flour or white sandstone powder. Rangolis (rang - colour) are further decorated using colour powders, flowers and materials. It is an art as well as a traditional symbol. Festivals India being a land of diverse cultures & religions, countless festivals are celebrated throughout the year. People of the same religion follow different customs, based on the region in which they live. The celebrations include prayers to the Gods, rituals, meeting with friends, sharing of sweets & gifts. It is a Hindu belief that vrtams followed with sincerity, as stipulated, will condition and discipline the body as well as the mind. Another aspect of the Hindu religious festivals are the utsavams, which involve a gathering, pomp and joyous activities.

The namaste is one of the most popular Indian customs. The Namaste, or ‘namaskar’, or ‘namaskaara’ is one of the five forms of traditional greetings mentioned in the ancient Hindu scriptures, the Vedas. Also, in India, there exists the concept of a joint family, wherein the entire family (parents, wife, children and in some cases relatives) all live together. This is mostly because of the cohesive nature of the Indian society, and also reportedly helps in handling pressure and stress. Most temples are located along magnetic wave lines of the earth, which help in maximizing the available positive energy. The copper plate (called Garbhagriha or Moolasthan) buried under the main idol absorbs and resonates this energy to its surroundings. Going to the temple often, helps in having a positive mind and garnering positive energies, which in turn lead to healthier functioning.

Indian cuisine varies from region to region and is also influence by many neighbouring nations. Wheat, Basmati rice and pulses with chana (Bengal gram) are important staples of the Indian diet. The food is rich with curries and spices, including ginger, coriander, cardamom, turmeric, dried hot peppers, and cinnamon, among others. Spices and flavourings like whole or powdered chilli pepper (mirch), black mustard seed (sarso), cardamom (elaichi), cumin (jeera), turmeric (haldi), asafoetida (hing), ginger (adrak), coriander (dhania), and garlic (lasoon) are frequently used. One popular spice mix is garam masala, a powder that typically includes five or more dried spices in different proportions. Each culinary region has a distinctive garam masala blend based on their lavour and cuisine. With dishes varying from region to region, Indian cuisine has an enormous rich range of food, that people can gorge on.

Sambar l Sarson ka saag l Fafda Jalebi l Roti l Parantha l Puttu l Vada Idly l Kheer l Kachori l Undhyu l Dal Makhni l

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FASHION

Clothing in India varies depending on the different ethnicity, geography, climate and cultural traditions of the people of each region of India. Historically, male and female clothing has evolved from simple Langotas, and loincloths to cover the body to elaborate costumes not only used in daily wear but also on festive occasions as well as rituals and dance performances. India’s recorded history of clothing goes back to the 5th millennium BC in the Indus Valley civilization where cotton was spun, woven and dyed. Indian cotton clothing was well adapted to the dry, hot summers of the subcontinent. A variety of weaving techniques were employed in ancient India, many of which survive to the present day. Silk and cotton were woven into various designs and motifs, each region developing its distinct style and technique. Famous among these

called a lehenga or pavada worn with choli and a dupatta scarf to create an ensemble called a gagra choli; or salwar kameez suits, while many south Indian women traditionally wear sari and children wear pavada.

weaving styles were the Jamdani, Kasika vastra of Varanasi, butidar and the Ilkal saree. Brocades of silk were woven with gold and silver threads and were deeply influenced by Persian designs. The Mughals played a vital role in the enhancement of the art, and the paisley and Latifa Buti.

Region to region, the draping style of saree, type of saree and its style varies widely. For men, traditional clothes are the Achkan/Sherwani, Bandhgala, Lungi, Kurta, Angarkha, Jama and Dhoti or Pajama. VArious other accessories and add ons like headgear, dastar, pheta, gandhi cap, mysore peta, rajasthani safa, jama are worn by men, during different occasions and purposes.

Dyeing of clothes in ancient India was practised as an art form. Five primary colours (Suddha-varnas) were identified and complex colours (Misra – varnas) were categorised by their many hues. Sensitivity was shown to the most subtlest of shades; the ancient treatise, Vishnudharmottara states five tones of white, namely Ivory, Jasmine, August moon, August clouds after the rain and the conch shell. Indians ad mastered art of weaving, dyeing, embroidery, art works, crafting in fabric as well.

Recently pants and shirts have been accepted as traditional Indian dress by the Government of India. Women started wearing more comfortable clothing and exposure to international fashion led to a fusion of western and Indian styles of clothing.

Traditional Indian clothing for women in the north and east are saris worn with choli tops; a long skirt

BanarasiSaree l Kancheepuram Silk Saree(TN) l MundumNeriyathum (Kerala) l Salwaar Kameez l Dhoti l Lungi l Sherwani l Bandhgala l Peta l

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PROGRAMM Standards & Guidelines for Programm formulation

The building programm is primarily developed from various Cultural standards, Complex design standards and Case analysis. Estimations are done wherever necessary , with consideration of various factors as crowd flow throughout with varying graphs of occasional visitors, low flow weekdays and peak weekends, important festivals and occasions. This programm developed, defines requisite space for all activities without any space crunch or space wastage.

Space

TICKET COUNTER Queing Checking entrance

Manager Room Assistance Office space File Room Storage room Meeting room Server room Pantry Space Restroom Ladies Gents Gents Circulation

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10+2

Total Area required

Comments

50 200 200 100

2 dedicated for ladies and handicapped people

ADMINISTRATIVE SPACES

Lobby /Reception Waiting area

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No.of units to be Area required for provided one unit

TOTAL

15

1.7

5 5 10

10 5 10

10

4+1 7+1 7+1

30 25.5 50 25 100 20 30 60 20 5 10 15 15 40 430.5


CULTURAL SPACES

Reception Hall Exhibition Spaces Gallery Comm. Outlet & FoodCorn cCirculation Restroom Landscaping Craft works Workshop

50 1000 100 60 80 50 300 300 200

Total

7140

COMMON SPACES AMPHITHEATER Stage Seating Green room Restroom Control room Rehersal hall Mutlipurpose rooms Retail shops Circulation

2000

1.66

TOTAL

350 3320 200 100 100 100 100 200 1000 5470

Recreation Cultural Spaces Games and activties various rides Spa relaxation

5000 5000 3000

TOTAL

13000

Casual exhibit spaces Common Restrooms

300 200

Means of TRANSPORTATION Two wheelers Auto-rickshaws Taxi Cab Private car Private Bus Public Bus Metro

0.2 0.12 0.03 0.13 0.07 0.15 0.3

% 20 12 3 13 7 15 30

People 20000 12000 3000 13000 7000 15000 30000

1

100

100000

6000 2500 15

3.75 12 40

22500 30000 600

PARKING Two wheelers Private car Private Bus TOTAL

AUDITORIUM Entrance Ticket counter Stage Seating Projection/Controlroom

1000

1.66

50 30 150 1660 30

Storage Green room Restroom Ladies Gents Circulation

50 100

TOTAL

3400

25 30 200

53100

SERVICE DG room Transformer HVAC Solide waste management Fire cctv safety control room

100 150 60 50 50 30

RO Plant Rain water harvesting

60 60

TOTAL

620

BUILT UP AREA

without parking with parking

46600 46600 99700 99700

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Architectural Portfolio l

Kaavya Shakunthala


DESIGN

GUIDES

•CASE STUDY ANALYSIS •SITE STUDY & ANALYSIS •FUNCTIONAL RELATIONSHIP •DESIGN CONCEPTION

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CASE

STUDY

ANALYSIS

Standards & Guidelines fro Programm formulation

Case studies necessarily needs to provide an insight of the functioning mechanisms as well as cultural activeness. Similar kind of studies, will provide only one way of looking at a problem. Studies varying on different grounds shall provide multi-angles and hence a better practical design solution. Study factors majorly include Cultural aspects, Cultural exhibits, Environment reflection, culture as complete entity, Crowd pattern, Crowd movement, Crowd Control, Public responses, etc. IHC(Singapore), INA(Delhi) & Pragati Maidan(Delhi) are taken to study the stated factors.

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CASE

STUDIES

For understanding various cultural showcase aspects, cultural reaction of visitors and site management, crowd management, crowd movement ,etc three case studies were taken.

IHC (Indian Heritage Center) was taken to study the changing display aspects of Indian culture to many foreigners in a more interactive understandable way.

Delhi Haat-INA is designed as a platform to showcase the local crafts from various regions. Its changing exhibitions, multi-cuisine food & cultural shows pulls people

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Pragati Maidan was chosen for its best crowd control aspect and cultural showcase with many state pavilions, These pavilions showcase their state culture.

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Indian Heritage center is conceptualized from spider web, and reflects modern contemporary architecture. Exhibit spaces are interactively designed and change once a while. Various cultural programs also happen frequently on various occasions.

INDIAN

All three floors are dedicated to showcase culture. Great continuity is achieved with mixed exhibit types: audio, video, literal works, displays, technology, handson exercise. It is successful in showcasing culture effectively, though not in great depth.

HERITAGE

•Beautiful narrative that is self explanatory and attracts attention and leads to next space slowly •Highlighting spaces and adding interactive features, which enables better understanding of Indian culture for foreigners, who are new.

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SUCCESS ISSUES

DILLI

CENTER •Various modes for exhibiting the culture gives a complete experience for any visitor.

•Cultural Interactive display attracts all kinds of people. Hands on crafts and collectible souvenirs are add on features.

Dilli Haat is very culturally active hub due to the reason, that people, customise their spaces and the spaces are very flexible.These dynamic spaces tend to comfort and increase relatability for the user

•As the displays change only on monthly basis, it is little bit static and doesn’t attract local people but only foreigners. •Various cultural activities and events happen regularly, without affecting the exhibit spaces.

•Location in core central area (Delhi) is a great advantage due to ease of access. •Spaces that adheres to all types of people Adults, Teens, Children, Elderly, Handicapped. •Contrasting Villagistic feel giving new different experience to metro crowd. •Well connected transportation link to access the area. This enables various types of commuters to easily access

SUCCESS


The shops are aligned along central linear axis, but are grouped and placed organically with varying levels, which creates a staggered village bazaar-like look. This inturn creates smaller dynamic functional spaces.

Conceptualized as huge space frame structure, the building, by itself, acts as sun breaker, which serves to obstruct direct harsh sun rays and let in air circulation. The same theme of triangular structures and motifs are found throughout the entire complex.

The space inside the exhibit buildings are designed as column free structure. Hence its extensively flexible and can accommodate various different types of exhibitions. The entire area is well lit and has good air circulation, although it is air-conditioned on many occasions.

PRAGATI MAIDAN

HAAT

S ISSUES

•Central linear main axis, connects visually and gives the sense of place •Expansion constraint, due to which many open spaces converted to exhibit spaces •Parking issues during weekends and festive days •Changing exhibit spaces, first hand hand-made, quality crafts and products, cultural performance nights attracts many local crowd.

•Massive huge exhibition blocks act as iconic structure

•Sense of place is missed due to hugeness of complex

•Various stages of construction, led to an organic pattern of the complex.

•Due to many gates, every visitor experience is different but not led through a narrative in all

SUCCESS ISSUES

•10 Access Gates enables hassle-free movement for everybody •Various crowd gathering , crash-out spaces, food corners provided that cater to the major needs of the public.

•Complex is static and inactive during non-exhibition days

•Parking area beside the complex, caters to most of the needs . l

Introduction

•Inappropriate management and static State Pavilions, do not attract much visitors.

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•It still lacks during peak time and the access to it, is not direct for first time l

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CASE

STUDY

INFERENCE

Various factors such as the spatial configuration, cultural reflection in complex, crowd attractions,the crowd movement pattern, successful outcomes, prevailing problems faced were analyzed in the case studies taken. Studying them in depth and analyzing, gives the basic core design strategies, which can ensure successful outcome. It concludes that the bigger, the complex, the more the crowd movement gets staggered and disoriented. Hence there needs to be a balance of spatial proximities between main exhibits, encouraging people to stroll around, as well as not get lost. The exterior environment plays a huge role for holistic cultural experience. Hence utmost care, with consideration of all factors needs to be taken as it has the capabilities to completely kill the feel or increase it manifold.

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ACCESS GATES

LOCATION Location in a core central area, ensures easy access for the public and would act as a better crash-out space. SAFETY Secluded spaces should be avoided in the public access areas. Secured feeling for all users, should be ensured.

CROWD MANAGEMENT Managing the crowd, without any congestion, traffic, overlap is necessary. Spaces for crash-out, refreshment, relaxation should be considered.

With more access gates, the crowd management is better. Avoiding overlapping traffic should be considered as well.

NARRATIVE The complex should be designed with a storyline, that leads the user to the climax, with increasing interest.

Low level environment connects the user with space, rather than iconic monolithic buildings.

TRANSPORT

MULTI-USER

Better transportation linkage to the HUB, increases the number of regular visitors and new tourists. Traffic conditions should be kept in mind while designing.

Space designed for all kinds of people- children, teens, adults, elderly, handicapped, etc would enhance the spatial usage INTERLINK-AGE Spatial linkage is necessary throughout the complex for an wholesome experience.

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CONNECTION

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MULTI ACTIVITIES Multiple activities / functions throughout the year ensures a very active bustling successful space.

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SITE

STUDY

&

ANALYSIS

Based on the case study analysis, various live sites in India were considered as an option , analyzed of its pros and cons. After thorough scrutinization, the final site was selected. The site study itself, provides many cues for concept evolution and design. Hence detailed study of the site shall ensure less site intervention and more successful better design.

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CHENNAI

MUMBAI

KOLKATA

NOIDA

PUNE Main metro cities in India, which are culturally neutral, were selected as options for the reason, to attract more crowd - local as well as foreigners. Reasons like, Future Impacts, Local acceptance, Proximity to the central core, Population flow, Expansion possibilities, eliminated various options, to finalize with the site at Noida, West Delhi.

BANGALORE

DELHI

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WHY

NOIDA

???

Location in Capital Global Iconic recognition

Culturally neutral people accepting various cultural aspects.

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Proximity to core Delhi, Gurgaon & Airport . Connection to these areas strengthens development

Developing AreaAvailable large chunk of land

Increasing need for new recreation areas with increased metro population.

More number of wealthier people Luxurious lifestyle.


The marked site in Sector 11, is the government-proposed cultural hub development site, having a small tributary of Najafgarh channel, running behind.

Dwarka, a fast growing neighborhood in South-West Delhi is well planned wit proper infrastructure. Moreover policies aim more recreational and cultural attractions along with a huge diplomatic enclave.

The site is located in Sector 11, Zone K2, Noida, West Delhi. This area is fast developing with great potential for mixed use. Mixed -use neighborhood creates a self sustaining society, where the daily inflow and outflow is not in high ratio. People working in the closer proximities, may ensure steady local visitors to the hub. Locating a cultural hub in such a place, will not only act as a recreation for all people but also encourage them to connect with their culture on a daily-basis that would enhance the quality of life and cultural promotion.

SECTOR 11

DWARKA

NEW DELHI

Dw

ark

DWARKA

aR

oa

d

AIR PORT ay

New Delhi, due to its unique location, in the heart of the country and bordering two states,has the most culturally neutral people having broader cultural exchanges from other states and from abroad.

India dates back to age old rich culture. With various religious origins, multitude of customs, different languages and ennumerous cultural aspects, it is best sought after for cultural tourism.

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Gu

n ao rg

sw es pr Ex ur

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GURGAON Proximity Map of site from Core New Delhi, Gurgaon (nearest big NCR city) & International Airport

NEW DELHI

The major issue in many tourist spots in Delhi, is its location in the city core and the heavy traffic to surpass to reach the destination,which consumes about half the time or more. These reasons hinder many foreign tourists to visit places that are far. Proximity , less road travel duration may have an advantage in luring many tourists. Proximity to the International & Domestic Airport ensures easier access for the International/ Inter-state Tourists. The site is approximately equidistant from Delhi and Gurgaon, two major metro cities, from where maximum local crowd can be expected. As the site is not in core Delhi, traffic congestions may not be a big issue to reach the destination. Moreover, its proximity to gurgaon ensures wider local crowd target.

INDIA

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SITE

CHARACTER

Sector 11

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Site

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Mall Road

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Sector 5

Sector 10

The site is planned as center core of Development for Urban Design of the linear District Center, In Sectors 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 in Dwarka ,as developed by the Delhi Urban Arts Commission. The declared green belt zone fuses into the site, along the drain, from the northern side, which has dense vegetation. Residential and Institutional buildings are located in Western and southern side of the site, whereas Eastern side of the site is abutted by Huge Sports Complex. There is a great potential in placing the Exhibition pavilions and buildings in the center, owing to its eqidistance from all sides and least affecting the green belt. The site acts as a mediator fusing contemporary buildings in northern-southern part, and also between the green open spaces and recreation areas situated on eastern-western side of the site. Hence the site acts as a junction, where northern-southern contemporary buildings unifies with the eastern-western dense urban green fabric. These constraints pushes towards more stronger contextual design.


01

The complication of the site, lies in green belt status ie: it should have more green spaces encouraging and presering dense trees. Least intervention from the northern part by zoning buildings in the southern central parts, would ensure this. The Hub is envisioned to have an international facility, which could attract millions of people from around the world to experience Indian Culture. Hence the design have to tend to all kinds of local as well as international needs. By doing so, the impact on the surrounding neighbourhood would be huge. Utmost care should be taken to solve other issues like, sound, crowd and trafffic in the area. Having the core exhibit area along site center, placed in closer proximity would ensure visual connection as well as better orientation. Zoning public parks, cultural schools and other spaces, having public intervention, along the outer edge of site, will assure active lively complex, througout the year.

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Neighborhood

Context

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Site and its neighborhood - Building Height mapping


SIte Analsis based on various factors is necessary, for eecient better design. Landuse Pattern - Landuse Pattern analysis provides the typology of usage, which in turn gives insight about activity typologies, kind of people usage, crowd movement pattern and its indirect impact on the site. Building Height Mapping-Building Height mapping- provides information about height extent of buildings which instead determines various view angles, attraction feature height and complex height. Traffic conditions- Traffic Conditions - Information of the traffic pattern , throughout the day and throughout the year,impart design strategies to control traffic inflow and outflow, movement of vehicles and people, without hindering the neighbouhood. Transportation Nodes-Transportation node mapping is necessary to estimate the vehicular and pedestrian crowd movememnt pattern, which infact would impact the traffic pattern. Devising alternatie solutions for overlapping crowd accumulation zones, is necessary for peacefull crossover.

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Urban Green Fabric needs to be understood well, such that the intervention is made through the design. Infact, the design needs to encourage increase in greenurban fabric, wherever possible. More visual connection from the complex with the green fabric, may enhance and soothe the experience. Information about the Noise conditions in the neighborhood will ensure that the buildings are positioned, where noise interruptions are less. In the similar manner, noise from the complex, should not disturb the exterior environment. Contextual design of the space, with coherent functional living with the neighborhood.

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Site and its neighborhood - Noise level mapping


Based on the site analysis, various conclusions and site design cues are arrived at, as stated.

LAND-USE PATTERN

BUILDING HEIGHT MAPPING

Neighboring sectors in Dwarka are predominated by residential apartments, which will have huge impact due to Cultural Hub, on being built. As these sectors are being planned for linear central district, more denser residential zones can be predicted. Design, needs to adhere, to the future expansions as well to sustain as an active successful hub. An ancient Baoli (step-well) is situated in Sector 10, along the northern side of the site. The Hub can develop such heritage sites, which are in dilapidated conditions.

From the map, it is observable that the maximum height of buildings in neighborhood is 15m. Immediate neighbouring zones have less denser, medium heighted apartments, which slightly hinder long views. Northern, Eastern and South-Western neigbouring sites, are declared green belt area and urban open area, which will not see any buildings in future as well. Creating vistas along these sides, may be beneficial. For the iconic nature and identity, a attractive massive structure taller than all neighbouring buildings i.e.: more than 15m, should be built.

TRAFFIC CONDITIONS gives us an idea to channelize the vehicular and pedestrian traffic properly. The Mall Road has heavy traffic, most of the time, as it acts as main vertical connecting road in Dwarka, which also leads to core Delhi. Other roads like Road No:221, abutting the site in south side, sees moderate traffic flow. Hence the main entrance can be designed along tis road. Moreover the vertical metro road, with moderate traffic can be used for multiple exit, when thousands of people throng out simultaneously, thereby diluting the crowd flow. Service entries, when provided from wither Rd No:221 or Metro road, will ease the service vehicle movement and not hinder the traffic.

TRANSPORTATION NODES

GREEN COVER -

NOISE LEVEL MAPPING -

Many users are predicted to use public transport, as analyzed from various similar cultural hubs. Hence, expecting more footfall from metro stations and pedestrian movement from nearby bus depots and auto-stands, are understood to facilitate everybody. Direct special entry from the metro station, is preferable, as is in Pragati Maidan. 2 Subways near the site, beneath Road No 221 would facilitate pedestrian cross over from one side to another. As it is well planned area, there are many bus depots which can handle, huge crowd flow.

Green belt, is declared in the Western side of the site, which also melts into it, along the drain. Moreover, Green recreation open area (park) is envisioned to be built, in the eastern side of the site. There are various other smaller green spaces scattered in nearby sectors, that are not linked with site. Green spaces are close to nil, along the southern side from the site. Hence designing a public park, in the southern end of site, would act as recreation and green let out in the concrete jungle.

The site is surrounded majorly by residential apartments, which produce very less noise. Noise levels are slightly more, from the sports complex, in eastern end of site, on few occasions like sports meet. Metro train movement every five minutes, causes very less accountable noise. Hence there is no major issue of noise penetration, from the surrounding areas, into the neighborhood. As there is no frequent traffic congestions observed in the abutting roads, vehicular traffic noise does not pose an issue.

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TOPOGRAPHY

PROFILE

Building site

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Site and Topographic Sections

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25

50

75 100

Section

150

BB


For depicting the character of the site, topographic profile needs to understood. For this purpose, two sections have been made, along two different perpendicular axis, as shown. Measurable parameters, such as the height of the neighbouring buildings are collected. Non-measurable parameters such as the form, proportion and perspective aids us for the design.

Section

AA

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Rainwater Drain Pattern (predicted)

Site Contour Mapping

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Site Contours with 2m intervals are mapped throughout the site, along with its neigbourhood. It is observable from it, that there is only 6 variations inside the site for a vast expanse of acres. This concludes that the site is relatably flat, with very less undulations. The StormWater drain pattern, is predicted using the contour mapping. It shows that the northern tip of the site, beside the Najafgarh Channel, is the lowest. The water can be used for rain water harvesting and excess water be channelised into the channel.


S I T E

Based on the land use, public spaces are zoned accordingly, for maximum usage.

The entrance, exits are zoned based on road width and the traffic conditions, to avoid future traffic congestion.

Possible Good Visual points from the site, based on building heights and urban open spaces.

Pedestrian movement from exterior to the site from the metro station and nearest bus depots.

DESIGN

C U E S

The exhibit buildings are zoned in center to have less intervention of the existing green belt.

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Zoning dense green area, inside site, to avoid noise transmission and disturbance, although overall site will be greenscaped.

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CLIMATIC

CONDITIONS

Climatic conditions play an important role, in the usage of the entire complex. Contextual designing of the exterior and the interior, with consideration of the prevalent climatic conditions, is necessary, for an active utilization of the spaces designed. Climatic factors that need to be considered are wind velocity, wind direction, wind pattern, humidity, precipitation, water levels, sun path, seasonal variations, micro-climatic conditions, etc for the entire year, to arrive at a proper contextual design. Dwarka, Delhi overlap between monsoon-influenced humid subtropical (Kรถppen climate classification) and semi-arid (Kรถppen climate classification), with high variation between summer and winter temperatures and precipitation. It observes relatively dry short winters and has a prolonged spell of very hot weather, due to its semi-arid climate. Exterior and interior spaces should cater to both the winter and summer extreme needs.

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Summers start in early April and peak in May, with average temperatures near 32 °C. The monsoon starts in late June and lasts until mid-September, with about 797.3 mm (31.5 inches) of rain. The average temperatures are around 29 °C. The monsoons recede in late September, and the post-monsoon season continues till late October, with average temperatures sliding from 29 °C. Winter starts in late November or early December and peaks in January, with average temperatures around 12–13 °C. Delhi’s proximity to the Himalayas results in cold waves leading to lower apparent temperature due to wind chill. Delhi is notorious for its heavy fogs during the winter season. Extreme temperatures have ranged from −2.2 °C to 48.4 °C. Providing more trees inside the complex, itself shades most of the areas, giving comfort for the users in extreme summer. But during extreme winter, comfort is open unshaded areas. Hence a proper balance needs to be sought after. Two most important wind patterns influencing Delhi’s climate are the Western Disturbance(summer) and the South-West Winds (monsoon). As the wind blowing in summer, is hot and dry, positioning a water body in the west would naturally cool the complex. Najafgarh Channel is located in the most appropriate direction. South West winds carry humidity and comforts the users. Hence these need to be harnessed by positioning the building in the perpendicular axis. It is observable from the Wind rose diagram, that wind movement during most of the year is along Western and North-Western direction. Water Table in the region, indicate that the region is not water scarce, even during extreme summer. Hence there is no high water pressure on the land, for its various requirements. Soil conditions are moderate having kankar soil till 4m depth and then mixture o kankar and silt. l

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FUNCTIONAL

RELATIONSHIP

For proper utilization of the designed spaces and intended functional usage, the functional relationship analysis in site-level and building-level are necessary. In consideration to older people, who would prefer less walking and in contrast for tourists, who would like to stroll and look around, spaces are such designed with flexibility for all, giving multi experience. The core exhibit spaces are grouped in closer proximity and other ancillary supporting spaces are scattered all around the complex .

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Desired Functional relationship Storage Back Stage

Kitchen

Bubble Diagram Park+ Cycle track

Dining& Restroom

Dressing Rooms

other facilities

Restroom

Food Court

Practice

Recreation

Meditation Hall

Amphitheater

Perform a n c e Arena

Cultural Games

Service Access

Craft Bazaar

Exhibition Pavilion

Open Display

Gathering Space Cultural School Ticketing Counter

Driver Resting

Two wheeler Parking

Parking Restroom

Entrance Lobby

Four wheeler Parking

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DESIGN

CONCEPTION

Design conceptualisation invloves ideas, notions, practical issue considerations in a primitive overlapping form , which then iterates to arrive at the best solution. Concept derivation and ideas evlove periodically, with varying factors. The main integral ideology behind this design is to create an active hub where people can enjoy, recreate and in the process, also learn and spread our culture. Relatability of the space is most important for the space to be dynamic and active, which is generally lost in huge complexes.

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CONCEPT

Factors like connection, inter-linkage, free flow, continuity ,flexibility, visual-connectedness, overlapping character, etc are considered for developing the concept.

DEVELOPMENT

Continuity and overlapping kingdoms will allow free low movement & complete culture tour.

Open endness with a central focus, will channelise free flow and avoid looping around,

The complex concept is mimicked inside each kingdom, with central dedicated stage.

Stage performances are visually not connected with other kingdoms.

For the visual connection inbetween te performance areas, stage is aligned outside the kingdom.

Performance areas visually connected as well as maintain privacy for the kingdoms

All kingdoms aligned with focus of the najafgarh cannel running beside.

All exhibit buildings together resemble abstractly, like humans holding hands.

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Recreation spaces Concert and Dance shows Vibrant Craft bazaar Dynamic exhibit spaces

children 18%

Locals

Gaming Mascots Interactive learning Multi cuisine food Concert and Plays

67%

ATTRACTIONS

Cultural street models Interactive knowledge transfer Wholesome cultural experience Indian Games & Rides Multi cuisine Indian food Concert and dance shows

52% adults

30% Aged people

Foreigners 33%

Conclusion Major revenue for Cultural Hubs, turns out from the localities, who frequent most throughout the year. Whereas foreigners flow rate will be high, only during vacations. Hence, the need to concentrate to attract local crowd is equally important as for the tourists, to create a full-year functioning active space.

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Beneficiaries : Artisans, Craftsmen, Dancers, Musicians, Guides, Administrates. Secondary beneficiaries : Tourists, Visitors.

Detailed interactive learning Whole day family entertainment space Multi cuisine food Games Concert and Plays

Easy accessible attractions Religious spaces More relaxing/ resting spaces Food Corner


PACKAGES

•Full Package - 1 day •Full Package - 3 day (2 kingdoms a day) •4 zones +cultural event •only cultural event •only rural village • High deck dining •Recreation Island

TIME PERIOD

9:00 am to 9:00 pm 12 hours

ACTIVE 6 hrs

PASSIVE 3 hrs

REFRESH 2 hrs

TIME

Entry

LAPSE

Waiting, Checking, Restroom,

Tour preface (movie screening+live)

Exhibits(interac-

0:00

10:00 - 30:00

20:00 - 30:00

30:00

Exit

Souvenier collection, shopping,food

Perform and Participate

Performance Exhibits

0:00

10:00 - 20:00

15:00

15:00

tive+live+literary)

2:00 - 2:30 hours taken in touring each kingdom. Touring is done in groups with an interval of 30 minutes. Each kingsoms correlate with each other to facilitate the visitors.

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DESIGN

OUTPUT

•DESIGN PROPOSAL

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DESIGN

Complex Design (site planning)

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PROPOSAL

Cultural Kingdom & Pavillion design

Amphitheater & Food Court design


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Complex design plays an important role in determining the efectivness of the design and activeness of the space. The better the design, better is its utilisation. Hence, spaces with various privacy levels are provided, to support interaction in few places and inhibit the same, in few other spaces.

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design

aspects

site level aspects analysed to determine the effectiveness of the space

Built up spaces in the complex

Entries and exits at site level

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Main horizontal and vertical axis in the site


Shuttle bus routes- Site

Tram route - Site

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ENTRANCE

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CENTRAL PLAZA

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PROGNOSIS

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Throughout the design process, the character of the cultural hub has evolved by not just confining inside the wall, but also flowing and connecting outside realm with the inner. This has been brought about, with various programs, spaces and different interaction intended zones. The subjective focus was on creating an interesting relationship and movement between the functions, in parallel to a site specific expression. Acting as central development node for the city and beyond, the design of the complex intends to encourage the growth of a better neighborhood.

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There is no ambition to postulate that something got solved but rather to acknowledge that the outcome is a direct product of our own priorities. Overall, one can conclude that the program for this project might be too big in scale for the plot that was chosen. Then again, with the limitation remained, it contributed to a more context orientated design path.

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Achitectural Thesis on Cultural hub  

Proposal for multi-cultural hub at Dwarka - Kaavya Shakunthala

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