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What’s Inside

Sweets for Santa Logan Abbitt

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VOLUME 17 - NUMBER 4 - HOMECOMING 2011 P r i n t ed i n t h e U S A www.mymurraylife.com Publisher Robert Valentine

Cruise Survival Tips Dee Mason

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Managing Editor Logan Abbitt Art Director Justin B. Kimbro, K-Squared Designs, LLC

Where Are They Now? 34

Carrie Szwed

Assistant Art Director Amanda G. Newman Assistant Artists Kyle Smith | Chelsea Hartmann

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Robert A. Valentine Notes N’ Neighbors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Murray Life Staff Pet Paws . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Kathy Hodge Kappa Tour of Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Murray Life Staff Day Trips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Erin Carrico Count On It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Murray Life Staff A Pitch for the Angels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Logan Abbitt Laughing Matter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Murray Life Staff Uncommon Mystery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Michael Cohen Home and Garden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Rupert Sebastian Dining Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 From Fast to Fabulous Money Pages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Ron Arant New Year’s Around the World. . . . . . . . . . . 48 Robert Valentine Calendar of Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 What’s Happening & Where Commonwealth Cuisine Quiz . . . . . . . . . . . 52 What’s Happening Next Last Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Robert Valentine 2

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Sales & Marketing Andrew Dundee | VJ Stevens Editorial Staff Logan Abbitt Internet Consultant Justin B. Kimbro, K-Squared Designs, LLC Staff Photography Wm. Gross Magee | Justin B. Kimbro Contributing Writers Ron Arant | Erin Carrico Michael Cohen | Jamie Helton | Logan Abbitt Dee Mason | Adrianna Payne | Rupert Sebastian Carrie Szwed | Kathy Hodge Printing Image Graphics, Paducah, Kentucky

Murray Life is published five times annually for the Murray area. All contents copyright 2011 by Murray Life Productions. Reproduction or use of the contents without written permission is prohibited. Comments written in this magazine are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the ownership or management of Murray Life. Subscription rate is $15.00 per year, two years $25.00. Subscription inquiries and all remittances should be made to Murray Life: 105 N. 6th Street, Murray, KY 42071. Subscriptions may also be made through the Web site, www.murraylifemagazine.com. All advertising inquiries should be directed to the Managing Editor at: Murray Life, or by calling 270-753-5225. E-mail us at: murraylife@aol.com This magazine accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, photography or artwork. All submissions may be edited for length, clarity and style.


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Editorial

Old Friends “Should auld acquaintance be forgot?” – Robert Burns ld friends, we may answer with confidence, should not be forgotten, as Mr. Burns knew quite well. We will all raise our voices, linked arm-in-arm on December 31 as the old year fades and a new twelve-month period of unrealized potential dawns, chilly and innocent, on January 1.

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We salute the season of holidays – from Thanksgiving to Valentine’s Day – with this issue of Murray Life. Christmas will take a big bite of our attention, but we’ll acquaint you with New Year’s celebrations from around the world. For some insight into international practices, our thanks to Murray restaurateur Tom Karvounis, MSU student Pedro Monedero-Izquierda, and Rex Valentine, a thirty-year resident of Japan, who recently retired from a life of honest work despite being younger than your humble editor. You’re invited to tour some beautiful homes in Murray as the Kappas of the Murray Women’s Club seek to share community with charity again this year. Kathy Hodge speaks out for all our furry friends with a word of caution about holiday hustle and the wellbeing of pets. Our “Notes ‘n’ Neighbors pages will bring you updates on honors and athletics, with help from the ever present camera of Terry Little. We’ll go holiday cruising – in safety – thanks to British travel writer Dee Mason, and explore the tasty variety of the sugar cookie with advice from Murray’s favorite foodie, Logan Abbitt. Erin Carrico, Murray’s chief of all things tourist, will take us to nearby Columbus Belmont Park for a look into history, and LBL naturalist Carrie Szwed will reveal the seasonal secrets of animals who survive the season with “a long winter’s nap.” Events abound, so keep your schedule up to date, your dining plans on target, and your mind challenged with our helpful calendars, dining guide and puzzle and humor pages. Read closely and you’ll find out more about Christmas trees than you thought possible. As we prepare for press the clocks are turned back and the evening seems to come too early. It’s all the more reason to tuck up under a blanket with a good lamp and a copy of Murray Life. After all, it’s not the end of the year so much as it is the beginning of something new and wonderful. From our eclectic little group of artists and scribblers to you and yours, may the season be warmed by your heart and the darkness be dispelled by the smiles of those you love. We’ll see you in 2012, lest auld acquaintance . . . well, you know. v

Robert A. Valentine, Publisher

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Notes ‘n Neighbors

Murray’s K-Squared Designs Takes KTIA Awards Galore

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hree west Kentucky organizations shared honors at the Kentucky Travel Industry Association’s annual conference in Lexington this October. The news should make Murray pretty proud.

The Murray Convention and Visitors Bureau (MCVB) recently received six Traverse Awards at the KTIA meeting. Lakes area tourism group, KWW, received another three awards, making a total of nine recognitions for tourism marketing designs involving Murray’s K-Squared Designs. Traverse awards are given by the association each year to recognize excellence in marketing by those in the tourism industry. K-Squared’s contribution to the west Kentucky honors included work on websites, ad campaigns, newsletters, print materials, brochures, and social media campaigns. K-Squared took home a total of nine awards for their designs. "We are honored to have received these awards from KTIA recognizing our marketing efforts," said Erin Carrico, executive director of the CVB. "Being such a small CVB, it is always exciting to be recognized at the state level." According to KTIA, the Traverse Awards honor travel professionals for their talent, creativity and effectiveness in marketing. “It’s great for us to see our work recognized next to the efforts of older, larger firms with bigger budgets,” said KSquared’s Justin Kimbro. “We always enjoy showing the rest of the world why they should visit our part of Kentucky. Justin paid tribute to staff members Amanda Newman, Assistant Art Director and Kyle Smith, Production Assistant, for their efforts in the award-winning campaigns. Congratulations! We’re not surprised that “K2DS” made the rest of west Kentucky look good: they’ve been doing it for Murray Life Magazine for quite a while. v

Drop us a Line

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urray Life Magazine wants to hear from you! Tell us what you think about our magazine and our community by writing to us at PO Box 894, Murray, KY 42071. You can also send email to murraylife@aol.com or you can visit our Facebook page www.facebook.com/Murraylife. v

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Notes ‘n Neighbors

They Came, They Threw a Tree, They’ll Be Back f you missed the annual Murray Highland Festival and Games, you missed a great deal of fun. Parades, bagpipes, musicians, men in kilts, sheep herding dogs, and the Scottish athletic competitions took over Murray’s Central Park on October 22 and promised to return on the third weekend of October in 2012. Plenty of people are waiting with happy expectation.

Terry Little

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Terry Little

“It is the perfect fall day,” said Mayor Bill Wells in his welcoming remarks during opening ceremonies, and he was right. A crisp morning gave ‘way to a warm afternoon as the music group Highland Reign and the Birdsong Harpists filled the air with Scottish tunes and athletes from nationally-ranked professional Mark Wrinkle (an MSU alum) and local amateur J. T. Lee astonished the onlookers with feats of strength and agility. Northcutt Farms provided dogs, sheep and other beasts of the highlands, and some estimates put the total crowd near 1,000 for the day. If you missed it, John McConnichie and “a few of the lads” have preserved the memories on YouTube. Just crank up the steam in yer auld computer and go to www.MurrayHighlandGames.com. v

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Pet Paws

Keeping Your Pets Safe During the Holidays By: Kathy Hodge n the midst of all the holiday activities, our focus on family and friends is even greater that ever. In this busy season, don't forget the furry family members that are just as much a part of the family as Uncle Harry and Aunt Mable.

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Whether you own a careless canine or a fearless feline, keep their wellbeing in mind as we enter this holiday season. Be aware of the things that may cause your pets to have a not-so-happy holiday season. First of all, everyone will be enjoying special holiday meals and treats. It is only natural to want to share the family feast with pets as an offering of thanks and love. While a taste of the turkey may seem to be a loving gesture, the truth is, it’s more caring not to share your holiday meals with your pet. Their bodies are not like ours and cannot handle some of the foods that we humans adore. Chocolate, alcohol and fatty foods can be deadly. Never give your pets leftover bones from the holiday meals. Cooked bones splinter and can be fatal to pets so be sure to discard all leftovers out of your pets’ reach. While it seems that a little bit of turkey skin here and little stuffing there wouldn’t hurt, we also know how quickly the pounds can add up over the season. The same rules that apply to us apply to our pets. We know that pets will not refuse "people food." So, to keep your pets lean, healthy, playing machines, keep the table scraps to a minimum – if you give them at all. Pets want to experience the glitter and glamour of the holidays.

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However, they need supervision around holiday decorations much like young children. Only allow furry friends around the tree when they can be watched. Otherwise, they can get nosy and may even tip over the tree. You can anchor your Christmas tree to the ceiling with a string or wire. To discourage your pet from playing with the tree, place sticky mats, crunchy aluminum foil or bubble wrap on or around the tree. Try putting some pennies in an empty plastic drink bottle and balance the bottles on the bottom braches


Pet Paws

“Poinsettias are another major cause of pet problems. They are 100% deadly to dogs. If your dog ingests the flower, he or she will die without treatment. ” of the tree or plant so they will noisily tip over if a cat or other pet jumps at or on the tree. Don't forget that pets are notorious for chewing. The extra cords and plugs for holiday lights and other fixtures can look like chew toys. This is perhaps the greatest danger for pets. They can be seriously injured or even killed if they get their pearly whites through the electric cord. Tape down or cover cords and unplug lights when you are not at home. Poinsettias are another major cause of pet problems. They are 100% deadly to dogs. If your dog ingests the flower, he or she will die without treatment. Much like the live wires, keep them as far out of reach as possible. Accidents and illness may require an emergency visit to your vet. Of course, during the holidays, many animal clinics may be closed – another very valid reason to not be so sharing with your pet and to keep a close eye on it. Just in case, make sure you have an emergency after hours number for your vet. Holiday guests and other activity can be very stressful and even frightening to pets. It can trigger illness and intestinal upset. Make sure pets have a safe place to retreat in your house and make sure they are wearing current ID and have been micro-chipped in case they escape out a door as guests come and go. Reduce stress by keeping feeding and exercise on a regular schedule and always make time for your pets. It will help both you and your pets have a more relaxing, safe and holiday season. v

MORE INFORMATION For more information about any of the Society’s programs, contact the Humane Society of Calloway County at 270759-1884, humanesociety@murray-ky.net, visit our website at www.forthepets.org, find us on Facebook or stop by our office at 607 Poplar Street Suite A-1, Murray.

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Town & Gown

Kappa Tour of Homes By: Murray Life Staff

“Legacy of Giving” will be celebrated on Sunday, December 11, 2011, when the Kappa Department of the Murray Woman’s Club hosts the annual Holiday Tour of Homes. Kappas have been honored to donate to many worthwhile community organizations over the past thirty years. This has been made possible by the generosity of many local homeowners and the loyal support of the public. This year Need Line will be the recipient of the fundraising effort. Tickets may be purchased in advance for $7 from any Kappa member or at the homes for $8 the day of the tour.

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The three featured homes range from the historic to the newly completed. All three homes reflect the excitement of the holiday season and the wish to share it with others. As Kappas begin their fourth decade of tours and celebrate the past thirty years of giving, they are very pleased to open the tour with the home of Connie and Larry Evans who will also be celebrating a 30 year milestone. After being away from Murray for the past thirty years, Larry and Connie Evans have returned to Murray for retirement and have very graciously opened their spectacular home to the public for this much-anticipated event.

................................................................................................................ The stately white house sitting majestically at 1321 Main Street has been home to several families since its completion in 1951. In 2009 Karen and Mark Welch became the present owners of this 4,200 square foot beauty built with turn of the 20th century architecture. Outside, mature boxwoods, ivy lined walkways, and topiary trellises add to the illusion of entering an old English garden. The addition of twinkling Christmas lights amidst the greenery adds to the total ambiance of this impressive entrance. The tall Greek Revival columns supporting the porch call attention to the soaring grandeur of the home’s façade.

Karen & Mark Welch 1321 Main Street

Once inside, the visitor is immediately impressed with the warmth and comfort of dark painted walls, wide white molding enhanced with colors of eggplant, gold, bronze, and dark cranberry, as well as the use of wallpapers throughout.

The eclectic furnishings add to the interest and comfort of this home. Karen and Mark will be sharing multiple “themed” Christmas trees throughout the interior including a vintage post card tree. The kitchen features elegant cabinets with natural wood finish. A pantry located next to the kitchen would be the envy of any homemaker. A screened porch with a tiled floor looks out over the pool and courtyard and is the perfect place for the family to relax and enjoy the beauty and privacy of the fenced backyard. During the summer months the scene is completed with a variety of holly, dogwoods, hostas and hydrangea. An exercise area, recreation room and a handyman’s workshop make up the basement area while plans for more renovation are in store for upstairs space. A friendly family sharing a beautiful home is a true holiday gift to our community. 10

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Town & Gown

At the corner of 8th and Main Streets sits an elegant historical green home built in 1909. The inviting and spacious wrap-around porch hosts the long-standing “Porch Party” during Murray State University’s Homecoming Parade. Shirley and Lowell Latto are members of a large and blended family. Their children and grandchildren love to visit in this wonderful home. The twelve foot ceilings, warm hardwood floors, natural wood trim and stained glass make an interesting and inviting home on all three levels. Between the first and second levels is a beautiful stained glass window from the original building of the First United Methodist Church in Murray.

Shirley and Lowell Latto 713 Main Street

Enhancing the historical structure, the Lattos have recently renovated a back porch into a combination kitchen/sunroom. This addition is light, bright, and airy and continues onto the new deck and charming gazebo enhanced with beautiful landscaping. The family begins their Christmas decorating as soon as the Thanksgiving dinner is cleared away. Much care and creativity go into the holiday décor. An abundance of hospitality is extended to all who visit this home during the holiday season, and it is a “must see” on Main Street each Christmas.

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Larry and Connie Evans 201 Bridlewood Drive

Since leaving Murray in 1981, Larry and Connie Evans dreamed of the day they would return. In planning for their retirement in Murray, one thing they both agreed upon was they wanted their house to feel as though it had a history, making it the perfect home for their children, Mallory and Garrison, to return to for the holidays. They planned and designed a Georgian-style home based around a large center hallway. Larry and Connie wanted their dream to look as if the core of the home had always existed with additions adding to the “history” of this new construction. Many of the choices in the house relate to someone or some place in their past, resulting in a home full of memories. They trusted Charles Robinson of Charles Robinson Construction to complete this dream home for them. Chris Maley of Maley Landscapes, Inc. added the perfect landscaping design for the historically based home. Both paid attention to even the smallest detail and exceeded the Evans’ expectations making their dream home a reality.

Larry always made sure that his family was “home” in Murray for Christmas every year. Pulling out of their driveway in the Northeast for the long drive to Murray in December meant the holidays had begun for the Evans family. This year their drive will be much shorter, and the celebration will begin much earlier. The decorations for their home will be centered on a historical dressing in the front rooms, moving into a more traditional holiday style in the central part of the home, and ending in the back of the home with a bit of Christmas whimsy in the kitchen. Be sure to check out the outdoor living space at the back of the home as the holiday spirit will continue in this family -inspired space. v

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Day Trips

Step Into History By: Erin Carrico

he smell of gunpowder hangs in the air. A smoky film of cannon fire covers the hills. High-society ladies in extravagant hats and gloves, escorted by soldiers clad in Confederate uniforms, walk to the general store. Wash ladies scrub laundry in metal tubs, using wire from tree-to-tree to hang garments. Small boys carrying drums practice their battle cadence on the way to the field. It was like stepping into a time machine‌back to 1861, at the Battle of Belmont in Columbus, Ky.

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The second weekend of October marks the celebration of Civil War Days at ColumbusBelmont State Park with this year commemorating the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Belmont. Each year, a full weekend of re-enactment activities are planned throughout the state park. The authenticity of costumes, dialogues, food and camps is surreal; history comes alive in the most fascinating way. The highlight of the experience was having an in-depth conversation with General Ulysses S. Grant. His personality was most enchanting and humorous. The General’s accent and mannerisms were so accurate he seemed like a ghost. He took great pleasure in jousting the South, but was quick to mention the beauty and sophistication in our Southern belles. He immediately asked where my

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escort was, seeing as I am young. In those days, it was improper for an unmarried, young lady to be in public without an escort. General Grant offered up one of his many soldiers to be my escort for the day until, of course, battle time. Before battle, the wives of Generals Grant and Polk held a high tea for the ladies of the camp. Punch and cookies were served, while ladies of all classes mingled with one another. Generals Grant and Polk gave small speeches talking of their backgrounds and beginnings in the military. Ironically, both men came from West Point to begin their careers. Walking through the encampment, various sundries and goods were available for purchase. The public is welcome to purchase dresses, goods, and furniture, but re-enactors are encouraged to trade for goods, just like the old days. Watching a man actually barter with the manager of the general store in trading a knife for new boots was captivating. The re-enactors truly behave as though it is 1861. The event of the day is the re-enactment of the Battle of Belmont. Everyone gathers around the hilly fields as the soldiers from each side march in with drummer


Day Trips

Several other events take place during the course of the weekend, including a Ghost Walk through the trenches and trails of the park depicting stories of the Civil War. boys. Once the first shot is fired, rounds of cannons and explosions fill the air. The shots of the cannons were so powerful the ground moved. Soldiers fall to the ground as the Army doctor and his nurses take the field – performing medical procedures in the middle of chaos. The battle happened quickly and accurately, according to historic records. Several other events take place during the course of the weekend, including a Ghost Walk through the trenches and trails of the park depicting stories of the Civil War. All of these activities are free for the public to enjoy. No admission fee is necessary. The re-enactors encourage and enjoy the public speaking with them and participating in activities. The Civil War Days is an excellent family outing providing a unique history lesson. However, if small children are attending, bring along earplugs for loud gun noises. Make your plans now; history will repeat itself at Columbus in 2012, and this time you won’t want to miss it. v

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This is medium level puzzle #18...Good Luck!

Instructions: Place the numbers 1 through 9 in each blank field. Each column (down), row (across) and 3x3 region must contain each of the numerals only one time.

Again, good luck! Where is the Solution? Not sure of your answers? Visit our Web site to check your solution. Go to www.murraylifemagazine.com and click the “Puzzle Solution” symbol. We’ll see you next issue with another great puzzle!

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Count On It

Tree Trivia

Compiled by: Murray Life Staff

$36.12: 27 million:

Real Christmas trees purchased

8.2 million: $64.61:

24%:

15,000:

350,000:

7 years:

6.5 feet: 4.2 million:

260: 40 million:

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Community

A Pitch for the Angels By: Logan Abbitt

Angels are real, and they live in Murray, Kentucky. I know; I've seen them. he simple fact is that having a job doesn't guarantee that you'll have health insurance or be able to afford it on your own. That's why we have organizations like The Angels Community Clinic and Angels Attic Thrift Store. The clinic provides free basic medical and dental care to the working, uninsured citizens of Calloway County. The number of citizens that qualify is pretty big, too.

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The Angels Community Clinic opened to patients on February 8, 2000. The Angel's Attic Thrift Shop opened in July 2002, adding some much-needed financial stability, and dental services were added in February 2003. The clinic now logs more than 2,000 patient visits a year. Eleven years later, it continues its mission of helping Calloway County residents that need a little extra help. With the economic crunch going on right now, their services are needed more than ever. “There's a tremendous need for obtainable healthcare for our local neighbors and friends who work very hard and have no insurance," said Sherry Crittendon, Nurse Practitioner and Executive Director of the Angles Clinic. Given the level of community involvement in the Angels clinic, it might be more accurate to say that it's really the people of Calloway County who 16

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collectively providing these services to their neighbors. Doctors, dentists, nurses, pharmacists, and most of the staff members volunteer their time. The Murray-Calloway County Hospital provides assistance with basic x-ray and lab services based on income guidelines. On Tuesdays, church groups, previous patients, and other volunteers even cook dinner for the staff.

The Angels Attic Thrift Store is also run by volunteers and all proceeds go to the clinic. In fact, 90% of the clinic's funding comes from Angels Attic. The thrift store is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Donations can be made to the store from Monday through Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Angels Attic is located at 972 Chestnut St. Their phone number is 762-0505. Private donations make up the other 25% of the clinics funding. There are several ways to make direct donations. See their website at www.angels communityclinic.com for more information or visit the clinic in person at 1005 Poplar St. They are open Monday through Thursday from 8:30 am to 4:00 pm. If you have questions, you can all them at 759-2223. v


v During this season of charity, please consider helping your neighbors and your community.

You, too, can be an angel this holiday season.

Community

Angel’s Attic Thrift Store is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Donations can be made to the store from Monday through Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Angels Attic is located at 972 Chestnut St. Their phone number is 762-0505.

Image GFX to drop in their ad

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A Laughing Matter

New Year’s Resolutions Compiled by: Murray Life Staff

A New Year's resolution is something that goes in one year and out the other. -Anonymous ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° Dubious New Year's Resolution #1: Learn what the heck "resolution" means. ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° I do think New Year's resolutions can't technically be expected to begin on New Year's Day, don't you? Since, because it's an extension of New Year's Eve, smokers are already on a smoking roll and cannot be expected to stop abruptly on the stroke of midnight with so much nicotine in the system. Also dieting on New Year's Day isn't a good idea as you can't eat rationally but really need to be free to consume whatever is necessary, moment by moment, in order to ease your hangover. I think it would be much more sensible if resolutions began generally on January the second. -Helen Fielding, Bridget Jones's Diary ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° Dubious New Year's Resolution #16: Start buying lottery tickets at a luckier store. ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° Many people look forward to the New Year for a new start on old habits. -Anonymous ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° Dubious New Year's Resolution #38: I will try to drive closer to the speed limit. ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° Good resolutions are simply checks that men draw on a bank where they have no account. -Oscar Wilde ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° Dubious New Year's Resolution #42: I will give up chocolates totally. 100%. Completely. Honest! ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° New Year's Day… now is the accepted time to make your regular annual good resolutions. Next week you can begin paving Hell with them as usual. -Mark Twain ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° Dubious New Year's Resolution #75: I will balance my checkbook…on my nose. ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° ° I will not chase that stick unless I actually see it leave his hand! -The dog 20

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Sweets for

Santa

Building the Perfect Sugar Cookie By: Logan Abbitt

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ccording to legend, the medieval German custom of the Paradise Tree was decorated with apples, wafers and cookies. The tradition was adopted by Christianity, along with the edible embellishment, creating the Christmas tree. As Saint Nick visited each house to leave his presents, he would often snack on a decoration from the tree—to keep up his strength. Children noticed the decorations that had been snacked on and so began leaving them out on plates by the fire. This was done to keep them close to Santa's entrance. Homes that did not use wafers or cookies thought it would be nice to leave out something for Santa to munch on, too, after hearing stories from other families about how much he enjoyed their cookies. Eventually, fewer and fewer people decorated the tree with food but wanted to keep up the tradition of leaving something for Santa Claus. Americans leave milk and cookies for Santa, but in England, sherry and mince pie are more traditional. Today, some believe that Santa’s diet consists entirely of milk and cookies all year round. Judging by his broad face and a little round belly that shakes when he laughs like a bowlful of jelly, that just might be true. The Christmas season is a prime time for aspiring pastry chefs to try out a plethora of cookie recipes for friends and family, as well as for Kris Kringle. Traditional Christmas cookies include biscotti, gingerbread men, shortbread, rugelach, thumbprints, snickerdoodles, rum balls, meringues, and many more delicious treats, but the king of them all is the sugar cookie. (As one comedian observed, though, isn’t every cookie a sugar cookie?)

The Best Sugar Cookie Ingredients •1 ½ cups butter, softened •2 ½ cups white sugar •4 eggs •2 teaspoons vanilla extract •5 cups all-purpose flour •2 teaspoons baking powder •1 teaspoon salt •Pinch of lemon zest

Directions •In a large bowl, cream together butter and sugar until smooth. •Beat in eggs and vanilla. •Stir in the flour, baking powder, lemon zest and salt. •Cover, and chill dough for at least two hours, or overnight. •Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Roll out dough on dusted* surface 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick. •Cut into shapes with any cookie cutter. Place cookies 1 inch apart on ungreased cookie sheets. •Bake 5 to 8 minutes in preheated oven. They should turn slightly brown around the edges. Watch them closely: they can burn easily. •Cool completely before decorating. *Dust your working surface with powdered sugar rather than flour for best results. The dough may be sticky; simply keep dusting it with powdered sugar and you can continue to work with it even as you add additional flavor.

The sugar cookie stands out for two reasons: First, they are the most fun to play with. Sugar cookies can be cut into an infinite variety of shapes; they can be painted, frosted, sprinkled, stacked, dazzled and dipped in chocolate. Second, they are very difficult to get right. If you can master the sugar cookie from scratch, then you’re ready for just about any culinary challenge. This may take some practice, but even the mistakes are usually pretty tasty. The recipe below is made especially for rolling out and cutting into shapes.

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The best part about making sugar cookies is personalizing them. While there are many classic shapes for the season such as trees, stars, and candy canes. I would encourage you to look for something more exotic. My favorite cookie cutter shape is puzzle pieces. You can use them to create entire puzzles of cookies encouraging the recipient to truly play with their food. You can find cutters in all of the letters of the alphabet; why not spell out a message? There are cookie cutters in the shape of nearly every animal, cartoon character, or mythical beast. I happen to know that ponies are very popular right now. Or how about Mount Rushmore? There’s really no limit. Some companies can even make custom cutters based on your drawings. When you’re ready to decorate your shaped cookies, the options are equally endless. Icing comes in almost every color, but it’s simple to make your own. This is the basic recipe.

Icing for Cookies Ingredients •3 cups of sifted confectioner's sugar •¼ cup milk* •½ teaspoon vanilla •Dash of salt •Food coloring

Directions •Combine sugar, milk, vanilla and salt; mix well. •Add food coloring. *Adjust the amount of milk to get the desired thickness. Thinner icings can be brushed on like paint, while thicker icings can be applied with a butter knife or the back of a spoon. In addition to icing, you can use various candies and nuts. Look in the baking section at your favorite supermarket and you’ll find a wide variety of items to decorate with, from gels to sprinkles to colored sugar. Popular items include miniature chocolate chips, peppermint candy pieces, M&Ms, and “red hot” candies. If you’re not using icing, you will want to apply certain items (like the red hots, or whole nuts) before the cookies have cooled completely and hardened. Another amusing idea is to insert a stick into the cookie before baking and you have a cookie lollipop. Decorating is a great way to get the kids involved. They will have a lot of fun being creative, and they can take extra pride in knowing that Santa is enjoying a treat made just for him by their own hands. When it comes down to it, the perfect sugar cookie is the one you made and personalized yourself. Santa will appreciate the extra effort. And, Santa, remember to leave one bite of cookie left along with a thank you note. Knowing you enjoyed it is one of the best gifts a child can receive on Christmas morning. 24

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SURVIVAL TIPS for an Unforgettable Cruise Holiday:

A Concise Guide 28

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By: Dee Mason s the weather turns towards typical autumn, cruise season is almost here again. Traditionally in our part of the USA, cruise travel to hotter climates becomes popular around this time with the Caribbean being the main destination.

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A typical weeklong Caribbean cruise holiday stops at about four to five ports allowing passengers to explore the local culture and history. These days, cruise liners can be described as floating palaces as the hospitality offered rivals that of a four- or five-star hotel, depending on the type of package you have. If you are deciding to take a cruise this year, it is advisable to start planning early as it is likely you won’t be the only one wanting to escape for a bit of sun during the wet miserable months of autumn and winter. Once the decision is made to go on a cruise, the first step is to shop around for a travel package from a travel agent. Thanks to the Internet, comparing cruise packages from different travel agents couldn’t be easier. This is the best way to get the best price possible not to mention the facilities that you want. It is important to book your cruise holiday as soon as you find the best package deal for you because if booking is left to the very last minute, you might find that package prices have changed or the deals are sold out. Delay could also mean that the dates you have set aside for your travel is no longer available which is why research and booking your holidays at the earliest possible time is essential. After you have booked your cruise, there are certain items you cannot go without. These are the “little things” that can make all the difference. Such items will ensure your cruise holiday is an enjoyable one so here is a list of must have items for every cruise vacation.

Mobile Phone: this gives you a way of communicating with people back home when you are on the high seas. Having your own mobile saves you the money you’d have to spend calling home from every port. Your research prior to the vacation must include getting extra mobile phone batteries and also finding out if electrical circuits on the ship are compatible with your mobile phone.

Snorkel Gear: most cruises stop at several local ports meaning passengers can explore. If you are a fan of snorkelling, it would be advisable to bring your own gear from home instead of using equipment that is shared by all tourists or to save you having to buy new gear. Camera: unless you plan to go on a cruise holiday every year, your vacation might be the only one for years. This means you need to have a camera with you to document all the places you visit and the activities you engage in. When picking a camera to take with you on a cruise holiday, it is advisable to pick an inexpensive one so you are not out of pocket in case you lose it. It also keeps you from being a target for local thieves. Chances are you will not be able to tell the difference in photo quality. w w w. m u r r ay l if e m a g a z ine . c o m

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Nausea Medication: unless you are absolutely sure you are not prone to seasickness, it is advisable to have nausea medication with you, as excessive vomiting will surely ruin your vacation. Also remember to bring other medication for ailments such as headaches and stomach bugs as food on ships are kept for weeks at a time. It’s better to be safe than sorry. Protective Gear: one of the best things about cruise vacations is that when you dock in a local port, you can explore the town to your heart's content. That’s why it is important to have comfortable shoes for walking around, as well as a hat and sunblock to protect your skin from a level of UV most people are unfamiliar with.

Portable Bag: most cruise package holidays come with a tour guide moving services that take passengers from one local destination to the other so it is important to have a plastic bag in which you can store your valuables such as passport and money to prevent damage. The bag with your valuables can then go into your portable bag such a back pack you can keep with you at all times when moving around. So there you have it: your survival guide for having an enjoyable cruise holiday. Following the tips given will save you money and give you peace of mind so you can enjoy your holiday experience to the fullest. v

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2623 Wayne Sullivan Drive Paducah, KY 42003 Phone: 270-442-9726 Fax: 270-442-5058 www.computer-source.com

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W he re A re T Have you ever w o n d e re d where some of our favorite wild creatures go in the wintertime? We know many birds migrate south, but what about the animals that don’t have the luxury of wings to take them to a more hospitable place? The answer to this question lies just beneath the surface – literally! Many native animals survive Kentucky winters by hibernating underground or, sometimes, even underwater. Take the groundhog, for instance. This famous hibernator, named after its affinity for living under ground, will disappear for three to four months in the winter. How does a groundhog survive this long stretch underground without food or water? That’s where the amazing phenomenon of hibernation comes into play. The groundhog is considered a true hibernator because its body temperature drops significantly and its brain, heart, and metabolic activity slow down, too. In its deepest sleep, a groundhog’s temperature drops to a mere 40°F while its heart rate slows to five beats per minute! Slowing down all these processes reduces the amount of energy needed to survive. Since energy comes from food, less energy required means less eating required, so the groundhog can fast throughout the winter. Prior to hibernation, in the fall, the groundhog pigs out on food to gain some extra fat reserves. Maybe that’s where the “hog” part of its name comes from.


he yWildlife N oinwWinter? By: Carrie Szwed, Naturalist

While other mammals such as skunks and opossums may become a bit sleepier in the winter, they are not true hibernators like groundhogs because their body processes do not change much. Even bears, which are often considered the quintessential hibernators, do not fit the definition of a true hibernator. Their body temperature does not drop significantly, and they will sometimes even give birth in their dens, which most moms would agree is the opposite of not using energy! Other animals, which join groundhogs in the category of true hibernators, include the snakes. Have you ever thought about where those slithery snakes we encounter on our summer hikes and fishing trips go in the winter? That’s right: they hibernate. Scientists actually use the word brumation to describe when an ectothermic, or coldblooded, animal goes into hibernation. Because snakes rely on their external environment to heat them up and keep them active, the winter weather does not serve them well. Therefore, each snake must find a warm, cozy cavity and slip into a deep slumber for the winter. Ideal refuges can be under rocks, among the roots of fallen trees, or simply under loose soil. Contrary to popular belief, snakes cannot dig their own holes, so most snakes take up winter residence in a pre-existing cavity. Because there are not enough cavities out there to give each snake his own winter abode, several snakes often hibernate

together. When a cavity hosts a group of snakes, it is called a hibernaculum. One of these hibernacula was once found with 10,000 garter snakes in it! If the idea of thousands of snakes tangled up in an underground cavity makes you feel a little squirmy, let’s move on to another cold-blooded creature that actually has legs, and a shell to boot! What happened to all those turtles we saw lazily basking on logs this summer? Well, they got even lazier and went to sleep for four months, but you won’t find them underground. They actually spend their winters under water! How can an animal stay under water for several months without taking even one breath of fresh air? Well, as chemistry class taught us, oxygen can be found in water, too. By circulating water over the soft tissues in their mouths and cloacas (the orifice used to lay eggs and excrete waste), turtles can get the little amount of oxygen they need to remain alive while in a state of hibernation. Amphibians like frogs and salamanders can also hibernate underwater by absorbing the oxygen in water right through their skin. Hibernation, in all of its phenomenal forms, is a great way for terrestrial wildlife to survive cold, harsh weather. If you ever find yourself missing your favorite wildlife in the dead of winter, just remember that many of them are still there; they’re just in a “land v down under.”

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Uncommon Mystery

Happy Birthday, Turk! by: Jakob Arjouni (1985) By: Michael Cohen he detective is always an outsider, negotiating between two worlds, whether he is the classic, Sherlock Holmes type or he, sometimes, she, is the hard-boiled detective, the loner fiercely guarding her independence. The detective’s alienation is worse when his race differs from all those around him, and that is the case in the books written by the German-born Turk Jakob Arjouni.

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Arjouni’s Frankfurt detective is Kemal Kayankaya, a Turkish-born German who experiences daily prejudice and seems to make a specialty of it in his cases. When Arjouni describes Frankfurt from the point of view of his detective, racial friction comes through even the most casual and mundane encounters. Arjouni is not well-known in America, but he has a huge following in Germany, where his books are now routinely filmed and he is considered one of the best crime novelists in the world. Arjouni was only twenty-one when he published his first detective novel in 1985. Titled Happy, Birthday, Turk!, it introduces Kayankaya, whose name and birthplace are Turkish, but who doesn’t speak the language, having been raised by German foster-parents. His appearance is non-Aryan enough to arouse vicious prejudice in the seedy Frankfurt underworld where he spends most of his time. ''They are 'international' down to their Parisian underwear," Kayankaya says of his fellow Germans, “but they're not able to recognize a Turk unless he's carrying a garbage can.'' On his twenty-sixth birthday, Kayankaya is hired by the widow of a Turkish immigrant who has been stabbed to death in Frankfurt’s red-light district. The investigation dumps Kayankaya deep into places where German intolerance for the Turks is not even thinly disguised. In a complicated plot he uncovers police corruption and encounters as much violence as any American hard-boiled detective. What is interesting to me about Arjouni is the combination of his subject matter, his method, and his reception by the Germans. His subject matter in the Kayankaya novels, of which there are now four, is always the tension and resulting violence between cultures. Throughout these books, as Kayankaya uncovers nationalism and racism or feels it in his own person, there is anger but no preaching. For Kayankaya, prejudice is just one part of the whole resistant milieu in which he works, and preaching about it would be, in a sense, as silly as Dashiell Hammett’s Sam Spade preaching against violence. The effect of these books is a stark picture of German xenophobia and the many problems of that country, where reunification, the European Union, and borders newly opened to former Soviet-bloc nations all happened with a speed no one could have predicted. But German readers and moviegoers, far from being resentful at the mirror Arjouni holds up to them, have made him a phenomenon: Germany’s most popular mystery writer. v Michael Cohen has been doing a feature commentary, “Uncommon Mysteries,” on WKMS for several years. These short mystery reviews focus on the unusual or uncommon stories which may be a deviation from conventions of the mystery genre, an odd viewpoint or historical first, or a new twist on an old plot device, such as the locked room murder or the unwilling amateur detective. This is an excerpt from Cohen's forthcoming collection of reviews.

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Home & Garden

Building the Perfect Campfire By: Rupert Sebastian

all is here and winter is looming. This is the time when we start to think about campfires. Even if you're not actually camping, sitting around a nice fire with friends and family is one of the best ways to spend a chilly evening. The smell, the warmth, the dancing flames, the songs, the stories, the crackle of the fire and, of course, the s'mores.

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There is an art to building a campfire, as well as safety concerns that must be addressed. Follow these tips and you'll be sure to enjoy your next campfire. Prepare the pit. You can't place a fire just anywhere. For safety and efficiency, you will need to create what is referred to as a fire pit. Don't worry; there is no digging involved. First, clear the area of all debris. Avoid areas with low or overhanging branches, too. Next, construct ring by surrounding the pit area with rocks. Pavers from the local home supply store work just as well. Be sure to account for wind when selecting the area, too. Those trees over there may be closer than you realize if the wind blows in that direction. Gather the wood. You will want to collect the wood for the fire and keep it stacked in piles away from the pit stacked according to size. Do not use green or freshly cut wood. There are three different kinds of wood needed for a successful campfire: • Tinder – small twigs, wood shavings, dry leaves, paper, bark or dryer lint. • Kindling – small sticks, one inch or less in diameter • Fuel – larger wood that keeps the fire going

Build the fire. You've prepared the site and collected your tinder, kindling, and fuel wood. Now you just need to put it all together. The way you assemble your wood before lighting it is called the fire lay and there are several classic methods to use. The purpose of the fire will usually determine your fire lay selection. Whichever type of fire you decide to make, keep these things in mind:

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@ Plan where you will light it - leave an opening to reach the tinder. • Light the upwind side so the wind blows the flame into the fuel. • Leave air space between pieces of wood. • Build UP, not OUT. Create a higher pile of wood rather than a flatter pile.

Home & Garden

Teepee Fire The teepee fire lay is the most useful and easiest to light. The key is to stick a few sticks into the ground to supply support for the rest of the kindling. Follow these steps to create a teepee lay:

1. Place your tinder bundle on the ground or on a small piece of bark. 2. Stick three or four kindling twigs in the ground to form a teepee above the tinder. 3. Lean small kindling twigs against the downwind side of the tinder. 4. Leave an opening on the upwind side where you can light the fire. 5. Continue to lean twigs around the teepee structure. 6. Work your way up to pencil-sized sticks, leaving plenty of air space between sticks. 7. Poke three or four pencil-sized sticks into the ground forming a larger teepee structure. 8. Lean some smaller fuel pieces against this support structure. This style produces a fast flame and quickly falls into itself in a pile of coals. The heat is directed up to a single point and is useful for boiling water in a single pot above the teepee. Once the teepee collapses, fuel can be laid around it easily to keep it going.

Log Cabin Fire The log cabin fire lay is the most popular style for beginners to build. Follow these steps to create a log cabin lay:

1. Lay a small teepee fire. 2. Lay two larger pieces of fuel parallel on opposite sides of the teepee. 3. Lay two slightly smaller pieces of fuel parallel on the other two opposite sides. 4. Leave a space under the upwind piece through which you can reach the tinder to light it. You might need to fashion a mini-torch and stick it in to light. 5. Continue to lay smaller and shorter pieces to form a cabin or pyramid shape. 6. Have extra kindling ready to drop into the top or through the spaces on the sides to feed the internal fire until the outer walls catch fire. This kind of fire makes good coals and is a classic campfire look. Getting it lit is the challenge.

Council Fire This is the big daddy of large group campfires, and it is not recommended for beginners. A council fire burns hot, bright, and for a long time without adding more wood. It does take bigger logs and is meant for entertaining big crowds. If you're ready to try, and have the occasion, here's how to do it. 1. Lay 4 logs, each about 5 or 6 inches across and 3 to 3.5 feet long, with about 4 inches of air space between logs. 2. Across these, lay a platform of about 6 logs, each about 5 inches across and 3 feet long. 3. Across this, lay a layer of 4 inch logs, 2.5 feet long. 4. Then, two layers of 3 inch logs, 2 feet long, in perpendicular layers. 5. Then, 2 layers of 2 inch logs, 2 feet long. 6. Then, 2 layers of 1 inch split wood, 18 inches long. 7. Make a lot of split kindling sticks and stick them into any open air space in the log layers. 8. Create a teepee structure on top of the last layer of split wood. 9. Leaving a space to light the teepee, continue placing more split pieces around the teepee to make a few more layers. 10. The teepee is lit and the fire burns its way down through the layers. This fire maintains good flame for a long time as burning fuel drops down into the larger pieces of wood and ignites them. There is no large structural collapse as you might get with a log cabin.

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Home & Garden

@ Hunter's Fire The hunter's fire lay is good for cooking and has good wind protection. It is not useful for entertaining or warming, however. Follow these steps to create a hunter's fire lay:

1. Retrieve two short logs 6 to 8 inches in diameter and place them nearly parallel to each other about 6 inches apart at one end and 3 inches at the other. 2. Create small teepee fire between the logs and feed it fuel until there are good coals. 3. Use the two logs as a platform on which you set your pots to cook. 4. Spread or pile the coals to create hotter and cooler cooking areas.

Light it up! Finally, it is time to light the fire! A very important tip to keep in mind is that heat rises, so when lighting a fire, make sure you light under the fuel so the fire burns up into the larger wood. Tips for lighting your campfire:

Light under the tinder. Make sure kindling is above the tinder so the heat rises and burns. • Light upwind; the wind will blow the fire into the fuel. You should have checked the general wind direction before laying your fire, anyway. • Position yourself between the prevailing wind and your fire lay. Too much wind will extinguish your match or tinder so use your body as a windbreak. • Hold your match in place; don't toss it on the tinder or you'll use up a lot of matches. •

Lean-To Fire The lean-to fire lay keeps air space open due to the support stick and a steady, light wind really helps it get started. Follow these steps to create a lean-to lay:

1. Stick a long, large piece of kindling in the ground at a flat angle. It should point into the wind. 2. Place your tinder bundle under the stick. 3. Lean very tiny pieces of kindling on the tinder bundle. 4. Lean more small kindling against the support stick. 5. Lean larger kindling against the first layer. 6. You could create a second lean-to of larger sticks over the first lean-to. This is fun to light, but the most common challenge is burning up all the tinder without catching the kindling because too much air space is left open. Once it gets going, it's fun to anticipate the main support stick burning through and falling.

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The Physics of Fire The average campfire can get as hot as 500° degrees Fahrenheit after burning for only three hours. To have fire, you need to have Three Key Elements. • Fuel: material that will burn • Air: to provide oxygen to burning process • Heat: enough heat to bring fuel to ignition When one of these three is removed, the fire stops burning.


@ Put it out!

Home & Garden

Safety First!

The final step in enjoying your campfire is knowing that it is extinguished when you are through. Everyone will sleep better knowing that this has been taken care of properly. Over nine million acres of forest have been lost to fires this year, so don't take any chances. Smokey the Bear offers these guidelines:

1. Allow the wood to burn completely to ash, if possible 2. Pour lots of water on the fire, drown ALL embers, not just the red ones 3. Pour until hissing sound stops 4. Stir the campfire ashes and embers with a shovel 5. Scrape the sticks and logs to remove any embers 6. Stir and make sure everything is wet and they are cold to the touch 7. If you do not have water, use dirt. Mix enough dirt or sand with the embers. Continue adding and stirring until all material is cool. 8. Do not bury the fire as the fire will continue to smolder and could catch roots on fire that will eventually get to the surface and start a wildfire. 9. REMEMBER: If it's too hot to touch, it's too hot to leave! Campfires provide a connection with nature as well as a time of reflection and a feeling of peace. Follow these guidelines and you're sure to enjoy a fantastic fire. v

When it comes to fire, there is no such thing as too safe. Remember these tips before you even begin. • It is best to have a bucket of water, a shovel and a fire extinguisher nearby and ready to put out a fire just in case something goes wrong. • Never build a fire near tents or other flammable items. • Never use flammable fluids to start a fire. • Never leave fire unattended. • Never burn aerosol cans or pressurized containers. They may explode. • Never put glass in the fire pit. Glass does not melt away, it only heats up and shatters. • Build a fire only as big as you need. • Make sure to completely extinguish fire before you leave.

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Seen Around Town

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Murray Dining Guide ith each issue we are including a comprehensive list of the wonderful places where you can eat in Calloway County and the surrounding area. We’re hoping this will serve as a reminder to our residents that you don’t have to go far for a great meal, and will offer some help to visitors and newcomers.

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We think you’ll find pleasure in the wide variety of styles and locations available to you. Our listing is organized by categories of style so you can easily choose the dining that suits your taste. If your favorite restaurant isn’t listed, please let us know. We’ll do our best to keep up. Enjoy! Los Portales

Cypress Springs Resort

506 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . ...(270) 767-0315

Applebee’s Neighborhood Bar & Grill 816 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 759-5551

Asian Buffet 638 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-3788

August Moon 1550 Lowe’s Dr. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 759-4653

Baldy’s Grill 901 Coldwater Rd. . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 762-0441

Big Apple Café 1005 Arcadia Circle . . . . . . . . .(270) 759-8866

El Mariachi Loco 406 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 759-9000

El Tequila 716 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 767-0026

Gloria’s World Village Food

2740 Cypress Trail . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 436-5496 New Concord, KY

Quarters 200 N. 15th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-3406

Eagle Nest Marina & Dockside Bar and Grill 500 Eagle Nest Rd. . . . . . . . . . .(731) 642-6192 Buchanan, TN

Olive Pit 905 Mineral Wells Ave. . . . . . .(731) 642-5030 Paris, TN

Kentucky Dam Village 166 Upper Village Dr. . . . . . . . .(270) 362-4271 Gilbertsville, KY

Ruby Renee’s Restaurant 1196 State Route 121 North . .(270) 761-7829

Largo Bar & Grill Shogun

4645 Hwy. 119 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(731) 232-8323 Buchanan, TN

706 N 12th St., Suite 9 . . . . . . .(270) 761-7486

The Keg

Willow Pond Catfish Restaurant

1051 N 16th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 762-0040

16814 Hwy. 68 E. . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 474-2202 Aurora, KY

Tom’s Grille 501 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-4521

Tumbleweed Southwest Grill 807 Walmart Dr. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 873-2300

Ann’s Country Kitchen 318 Main St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 492-8195 Hazel, KY

124 N. 15th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 759-3233

HRH Dumplin’s 305B S. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-0000

Jasmine Restaurant - Thai & Asian Cuisine 506 N. 12th St. Suite E . . . . . . .(270) 761-8424

Magnolia Tea Room 306 Gilbert St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 492-6284 Hazel, KY

La Cocina Mexicana 501 S. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 767-1627 Murray

La Cocina Mexicana 314 Main St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (270) 492-6392 Hazel, KY

Aurora Landing Restaurant 542 Kenlake Rd. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 474-2211 Aurora, KY

Bad Bob’s Bar-B-Que 806 Chestnut St. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 767-0054

Coldwater Bar-B-Que & Catering 8284 Hwy. 121 N. . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 489-2199

Belew’s Dairy Bar US Highway 62 East . . . . . . . . .(270) 354-8549 Aurora, KY

Brass Lantern 16593 Hwy. 68 E. . . . . . . . . . . . . 270-474-2773. Aurora, KY

Cindy’s on the Barge 888 Kenlake Marina Ln. . . . . . .(270) 474-2245 Hardin, KY

Cracker Barrel 650 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 762-0081

Crossland Diner 3034 Stateline Rd. W. . . . . . . . .(270) 492-6424 Hazel, KY

Domino’s Pizza

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117 S. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-3030

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Murray Dining Guide Happiness Restaurant 412 Main Street . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 293-4952

Spanky’s

Holmes Family Restaurant 1901 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 767-0662

Quizno’s Subs

9505 Hwy. 641 N. . . . . . . . . . .(731) 247-5527 Puryear, TN

1203 Chestnut St. . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-8880

Pitstop BBQ T & J’s Diner

2393 State Route 121. . . . . . . .(270) 759-7001

2667 St. Rt. 94 E.. . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-4826

Hungry Bear 1310 Main St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-7641

Sammon’s Bakery Tom’s Pizza

974 Chestnut St. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-5434

506-A N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-9411

Laird’s Bar-B-Que

Sonic Drive-In

77 W. Main St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(731) 247-3060 Puryear, TN

217 S. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 759-9885

Subway Lynn Grove Country Corner 7010 Hwy. 94 W. . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 435-4500

Backyard Burgers

622 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-7827

801 Paramount Dr. . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 759-2480

Taco Bell Martha’s Restaurant 1407 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 759-1648

Mary’s Kitchen 11205 Stadium View Dr.. . . . . .(270) 759-2036

Matt B’s Main Street Pizza 1411 Main St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 759-1234

Mr. Gatti’s Pizza 804 Chestnut St. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-6656

Mugsy’s Hideout 410 Main St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 767-0020

Nick’s Family Sports Pub 614 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 762-0012

Pagliai’s Pizza 970 Chestnut St. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-2975

Papa John’s Pizza 656 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-6666

Pizza Hut 1113 Chestnut St. . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 759-4646

Pizza Pro 605-C S. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 767-1199

Renfro’s Hih Burger Inn 413 S. 4th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-1155

Rudy’s, “On the Square” 104 S. 5th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-1632

Ryan’s Steakhouse 801 Walmart Dr. . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 759-3809

Sirloin Stockade 922 S. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-0440

Snappy Tomato Pizza 1550 Lowes Dr. . . . . . . . . .(270) 761-7627

402 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-8758

Boulders 317 Chestnut St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 761-9727

Taco John’s 604 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-9697

Brother’s Barbeque 401 Sycamore St. . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 761-7675

Victor’s Sandwiches 1301 W. Main St. . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-7715

Burger King 814 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 759-8266

Vietnamese Cuisine 1407 Main St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 761-7655

Burrito Shack 214 North 15th St. . . . . . . . . . .(270) 761-4444

Wendy’s Old Fashioned Hamburgers 1111 Chestnut St. . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 759-4695

Captain D’s 700 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-9383

Zaxby’s N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 792-2375

Culver’s 818 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 761-2858

Dairy Queen 1303 Main St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-4925

Dinh’s Vietnamese Eggrolls 715 S. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 761-7655

Doughnut Hole, The 404 S. 12th Street . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-4900

Fidalgo Bay Coffee Shop 1201 Payne St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 761-4800

Hardee’s 505 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-3246

KFC 205 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-7101

Vitello’s Deli 216 N. 15th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 759-3663

McDonald’s 107 N. 12th St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(270) 753-5548

Murray Donuts 506 B North 12th St. . . . . . . . . . .(270) 761-1818

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The Money Pages

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Investment Insight: Three Keys to Surviving Market Turbulence By: Ron Arant, a Financial Consultant for Hilliard & Lyons

ost stock market investors are looking for the same result: strong and steady gains of their investments. Dealing with a period of sustained falling stock prices is not easy. All too often, investors react to a sharp drop in prices by panic selling or digging in their heels despite deteriorating fundamentals. But more thoughtful investors see a correction or downturn as an opportunity to review the risks in their portfolios and make adjustments where necessary.

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When confronted with any adverse market event – whether it is a one-day blip, a more lengthy market correction (a decline of between 10% to 20%), or a prolonged bear market (a decline of more than 20%)—take time to review your portfolio. Dealing with volatility can be difficult. Here are three suggestions to help you and your portfolio survive market turbulence.

1. TALK WITH A PROFESSIONAL. A financial professional can help you separate emotionally driven decisions from those based on your goals, time horizon, and risk tolerance. Researchers in the field of behavioral finance have found that emotions often lead investors to read too much into recent events even though those events may not reflect longterm realities. As your Financial Consultant, I can help

you sort through these distinctions, and you’ll likely find that if your investment strategy made sense before the crisis, it will still make sense afterward.

2. ORGANIZE AND REVIEW YOUR FINANCIAL RECORDS Crisis events highlight the importance of knowing where your assets are and maintaining organized financial records. Following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, markets closed for several days and many records in the heart of New York City’s financial district were destroyed. Yet the nation’s financial systems were up and running in a matter of days and your securities accounts were safe even when the stock exchanges were closed. While you cannot trade investments or access your assets during a market shutdown, securities firms maintain backup facilities and have contingency plans to help them service customers when trading resumes.

3. KEEP A LONG-TERM PERSPECTIVE The only certainty about the stock market is this: It will always experience ups and downs. That’s why it’s important to keep emotions in check and stay focused on your financial goals. A buy-and-hold strategy— making an investment and then holding on to it 46

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$ It’s important to remember that periods of falling prices are a natural part of investing in the stock market. despite short-term market moves—can help. The opposite of buy and-hold investing is market timing—buying and selling investments based on what you think the market will do next. Market timing, as most investment professionals will tell you, is risky. If your predictions are wrong, you could invest when the market is on its way down or sell when it’s on its way up. In other words, you risk locking in a loss or missing the market’s best days. It’s important to remember that periods of falling prices are a natural part of investing in the stock market. While some investors will use a variety of trading tools, including individual stock and stock index options, to hedge their portfolios against a sudden

The Money Pages

BUILDING COMPLEXITIES The complexities of building, preserving and passing along wealth have never been greater. Affluent investors are increasingly seeking guidance and comprehensive solutions that consider their unique circumstances and long-term goals. It’s my pleasure to work with such individuals to offer insight, advice and solutions in helping them reach their goals. drop in the market, perhaps the best move you can make is reevaluating and limiting your overall risk position. v Hilliard Lyons does not offer tax or legal advice. Please consult your tax advisor or attorney before making any decision that may affect your tax or legal situation. Securities offered through J.J.B. Hilliard W.L. Lyons, LLC. | Member NYSE, FINRA & SIPC. ©20072009 All rights reserved.

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Holiday Traditions

New Year’s Traditions Around the World By: Robert Valentine

veryone knows that New Year’s Day falls on January 1st. However, you may be surprised to learn that, although our New Year celebration is nearly as new as the United States itself, some of the traditions we practice may be thousands of years old.

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Observing the New Year is as old as organized society. Man, like nature, seems to have some internal drive to “start over.” Ancient New Year’s celebrations centered on natural phenomena like the changing of the seasons, but may have been focused on either the sun or the moon. Human life was still closely connected to weather because of a close dependence on the harvest and the hunt. We know that ancient societies in the Middle East celebrated the New Year around the vernal equinox (our March 23) and marked it as the beginning of a new year. That was when daylight equaled darkness, signaling for certain that the cycle of plant life would continue. When Julius Caesar “fixed” the Roman calendar January 1 was officially declared the Roman New Year, although many cultures celebrated either the vernal equinox or the winter solstice for many years. The early Christian Church disliked the connection between New Year’s Day and so many pagan religions and, in the 6th Century, officially moved the New Year to different religious occasions. Nearly one thousand years passed before Pope Gregory reformed the calendar and placed New Year’s Day firmly on January 1, again, although early American Protestants continued to observe March 1 for many years. So, New Year’s Day is January 1, but what to do to

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observe the event? The answers are as many and as varied as the cultures that sent immigrants to the new world.

The Fires Because the New Year arrives when the sun is still far away (noticeably smaller) and low on the southern horizon for most European and North American nations, light and warmth are scarce. It’s not surprising that fires and lights play a big part in the welcoming of the New Year. In the Netherlands, bonfires and fireworks signal the New Year as old Christmas trees are thrown onto the fire. In the “Cajun country” of Louisiana, huge elaborate bonfires are built along the levies of the Mississippi and set ablaze to signal the arrival of the New Year. Fireworks are a common element, perhaps dating back to a time when it was thought loud noises would frighten away evil spirits. The Chinese are famous for their use of fireworks during New Year’s celebration and why not? They invented gunpowder and fireworks as we know them today.

The Food Linked as it is to a “rebirth” of life and hope, it’s not surprising to find food used as both a symbol and a staple for many New Year’s observations. In Spain, it is good luck to eat twelve grapes at midnight on New Year’s Eve, for 12 months of luck and happiness. Likewise, in Greece, one eats a big piece of Vassilopitta (or, “St. Basil’s cake”). New Year’s Day is also the feast of St. Basil in the Orthodox Church, and a coin is baked into each Vassilopitta. The person who


l “Across the country, there are hundreds of local customs and traditions that signal the end to the old year and the beginning of the new” finds the coin in his or her piece of cake will be lucky throughout the year. In the American south, the custom of serving Hoppin’ John is as “old as the hills.” Black-eyed peas are cooked with hog jowl or other pork, and the tradition says that the dish brings good fortune. In parts of the south, the custom includes a hefty helping of “greens,” usually from turnips, and the saying is: “Peas for luck, greens for money.” Many traditional New Year’s foods commemorate hard times. In America, for instance, black-eyed peas suggest a less-than-wealthy diet. In Scotland, the New Year table might include haggis, a pudding or sausage traditionally made from the poorest cuts of meat, supplemented with oatmeal and spiced with whatever was available. In these times, however, the traditional foods are more of a ritual than the one-time necessary they used to be.

The Fun New Year’s Eve and the following day are usually great celebrations. In Scotland, where “Auld Lang Syne” originated, the Day is called “Hogmanay” and the celebration is varied. Edinburgh features an allnight festival (perhaps typical for a university town), but many people put off the carousing until January 1. Then, friends are expected to stop by to pay respects, share a bite and “a wee dram,” and wish each other

Holiday Traditions

well for the coming year. The “first footer” is the first person to cross the threshold in the New Year and tradition says that if it is a “dark-haired man” bearing a “source of warmth and a sign of friendship,” both the household and the visitor will have good luck. In Japan, the tradition is called “Oshogatsu” and it is regarded by many as the country’s most important holiday. Throughout December, you might be invited to one of many “Bonenkai” or “forgive the past” parties. The idea is to rid yourself of the ills and mistakes of the past to prepare for the new year. Forgiveness is dispensed and houses are cleaned to symbolize the new start. At midnight, gongs in the Buddhist temples ring 108 times to dispel the 108 kinds of human failing. On New Year’s Day children get gifts, often containing money, called “otoshidamas.” In America, you can’t start the New Year without singing “Auld Lang Syne.” The traditional Scottish poem about good friends and fond memories was re-written and set to music by the great poet Robert Burns in the 1790s, but it was probably made a part of the American celebration by Canadian bandleader Guy Lombardo. His popular New Year’s shows at New York’s Waldorf-Astoria were broadcast on radio, and then on television, and always included Burn’s “hymn to friendship.” Across the country, there are hundreds of local customs and traditions that signal the end to the old year and the beginning of the new. What’s yours? There are no rules, but there is an expectation that you will dispel from memory those unpleasant things from the old year, and “clear the decks” with hope and optimism for the New Year to come. v

Happy New Year!

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Calendar of Events

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he Murray Life Calendar of Events is graciously provided by the Murray Convention and Visitors Bureau. The CVB is your source for information on everything from dining, shopping, recreation and fun in the community to relocation. Learn more at www.tourmurray.com.

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the Rotary Club of Murray. The breakfast will be located at Pagliai’s from 6am-9am. Don't miss the Christmas Parade right after the breakfast. For more information, call 270.809.4771.

December 3 Pagliai’s

Rotary Christmas Parade Come out and watch the annual Christmas Parade, and enjoy the holiday spirit. The parade will begin at 10a.m. and is located in downtown Murray.

Christmas in the Park Enjoy the wonderful display of lights located at Central Park. Drive thru the park, and feel the holiday spirit. For more information, call 270.762.0325.

December 3

Reindeer Run 5K The Trigg Co Middle School in Cadiz, Kentucky is sponsoring the Reindeer Run 5K. The race beings at 4p.m. and is located at Trigg Co. Middle School. For more information, visit www.runsignup.com.

November 21December31

December 3

The Sound of Music Come out and watch The Sound of Music, it is Playhouse in the Park’s most requested show! The final collaboration between Rodgers & Hammerstein was destined to become the world’s most beloved musical. For more information, please call 270.759.1752.

December 2-18 Playhouse in the Park

MSU Fall Graduation Ceremonies Graduation for the Fall Class of 2011 begins at 10 a.m. in the CFSB Center north of Stewart Stadium on HWY 121N. Residential Colleges will close for the semester immediately following. For more information, visit www.murraystate.edu.

December 10

Main Street Merriment and Dickens' Alley Get into the Christmas spirit by visiting Main Street Merriment Dickens’ Alley. This decorated ally will open at 5p.m. for everyone to walk through and enjoy. For more information contact Murray Main Street at 270.759.9474.

December 2

MSU Spring Semester 2012 Begins Residential Colleges open on Sunday, Jan. 15 for returning students. Classes begin on Tuesday, Jan. 17. For more information, visit www.murraystate.edu.

January 15-17

Journey Stories, a Smithsonian exhibit H. Thomas Rushing Ham Breakfast The Thomas Rushing Ham Breakfast is sponsored by 50

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Journey Stories is a compelling Smithsonian exhibition that shows how our evolving mobility changed a young nation and how transportation made us grow. The accounts of travelers themselves express the hopes and promises of fresh starts, the grim realities of forced


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migrations and difficult journeys, and the thrills of personal travel. The exhibit is located at Wrather Museum and is open to the public Monday thru Friday 8:30-4:30, and Saturday 10am-1pm.

Jan. 28-Mar. 10 Wrather Museum

Trivia Night This Murray Main Street fundraiser is entrainment and fun for the whole community. This year, Trivia Night will be held in the Murray Room. For additional information, please call 270.759.9474.

Calendar of Events

EVERY DAY IN MURRAY

THE WEST KENTUCKY/WRATHER MUSEUM Preserving the visual and emotional traditions of the Jackson Purchase Area. Located at North 16th Street and University Drive on the campus of Murray State University, the museum is open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Handicap access. For more info, call (270) 809-4771.

Feb. 4

THE CHERI THEATER

"Suddenly Last Summer" By Tennessee Williams This dark and gritty play introduces us to Catharine Holly, a young woman who seems to go insane after her cousin Sebastian dies on a trip to Europe under mysterious circumstances. The play is located at Actor’s Studio Theater in Wilson Hall 310, and will be performed at 7:30 each night. For more information, visit www.murraystate.edu or call 270-809-4421.

Murray’s seven-screen movie theater. For a list of current movies and times, please call (270) 753-3314 or visit www.moviesinmurray.com.

MURRAY STATE UNIVERSITY’S FINE ARTS Presenting a variety of performances from dance to plays, from symphonies to choir concerts. For current information, call (270) 809-ARTS.

Feb. 23-28 Actor’s Studio Theater, MSU

THE CLARA M. EAGLE GALLERY AT MURRAY STATE UNIVERSITY Offering a variety of exhibitions throughout the year, from student artwork to national tours. Art ranges from drawing to sculpture, from photography to multimedia. For more information, please call (270) 809-6734.

PLAYHOUSE IN THE PARK Calloway County’s 30-year-old community theatre. Playhouse presents a variety of plays throughout the year. For detailed information, please call (270) 759-1752.

"The Mousetrap" By Agatha Christie In this classic melodramatic theatre piece, the author comes forth with another hit about a group of strangers stranded in a boarding house during a snowstorm, one of whom is a murderer. Come check out this mysterious play at the Robert E. Johnson Theater in the Fine Arts building on campus. The performances are April 25-28 at 7:30pm, and April 29 at 2:30pm. For more information, visit www.murraystate.edu or call 270-8094421.

THE MURRAY ART GUILD A nonprofit organization that offers workshops and exhibitions for children and adults. Stop by and see some of the area artists at work. The Guild is located in downtown Murray at 500 N. 4th St. For additional information, please call (270) 753-4059.

April 25-29 Robert E. Johnson Theater

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?

Guess What?

A Commonwealth Cuisine Quiz By: Adrianna Payne

Food is a big part of any holiday celebration and Kentucky loves its food. Test your knowledge of food, famous eateries, and Bluegrass history with this taxing trivia test. (Answers are concealed somewhere in the magazine, and online at www.mymurraylife.com) 1. Pikeville annually leads the nation in per capita consumption of ____? a. Pepsi-Cola b. Fried chicken

c. Corn d. Boiled Okra

2. ____ were first served in 1934 at Kaolin's restaurant in Louisville? a. Deep fried apple pies b. Cheeseburgers

c. Fried pickles d. Pulled pork sandwiches

3. The Kentucky Hot Brown is a sandwich that was created in 1923 by Chef Fred Schmidt at the Brown Hotel in Louisville. The original recipe was on toast, with turkey, bacon, pimento, and_____? a. Brown gravy b. Cheddar cheese sauce

c. Vinegar d. Mornay Sauce

4. The “Tater Day Festival” held in Benton was originally devoted to what kind of potatoes in 1843? a. Yukon gold potatoes b. Russet potatoes

c. Sweet potatoes d. Red potatoes

5. Trigg County has been holding a “Country Ham” Festival every year since 1977. They hold many contests, but NOT A . . . a. Pig slaughtering contest b. Pig derby

c. Greased-pig catching contest d. Kiss the pig contest

6. The Parkette Drive-In, located in Lexington was featured on which Food Network show? a. “The Best Thing I Ever Ate” b. “Throwdown”

c. “Man vs. Food d. “Diners, Drive-Ins, & Dives”

7. Dippin’ Dots® ice cream is headquartered in which Kentucky city? a. Louisville b. Paducah

c. Murray d. Owensboro

8. Tobacco, soybeans, corn, and wheat are Kentucky’s leading field crops. The world’s largest Burley tobacco market is located in which Kentucky city? a. Benton b. Eddyville

c. Lexington d. Marion

9. Which Kentucky based fast food chain first translated its advertising slogan “finger lickin’ good” into Chinese only to see it come out as “eat your fingers off?” a. Kentucky Fried Chicken ® b. Taco Bell ®

c. Pizza Hut ® d. A & W ®

10. Bourbon Whiskey was named after which county in Kentucky? a. Christian County b. Jefferson County

c. Henry County d. Bourbon County

Answers on page 54 and online at www.mymurraylife.com

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Advertiser’s Directory Advertiser

Page #

Advertiser

( Page #

Advertiser

Page #

Animal Health & Wellness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

Kopperud Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Playhouse in the Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

BB&T Bank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

Lee Jewelry Artisans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

Primary Care Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

Briggs & Stratton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

Loft, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

Primary Care OBGYN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

Cagle and Bailey Adult Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

Marsha’s of Murray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Randy Thornton Heating & Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

Computer Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

Mattress Gallery, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Roof Brothers Wine & Spirits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Der Dutch Merchant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

MidSouth Vinyl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

Murray Animal Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

Froggyland Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Murray Bank, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47

Glisson Building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

Murray-Calloway Co. Chamber of Commerce 44

Gold Rush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

Murray-Calloway Co. Humane Society . . . . . . . .9

Grey's Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Murray-Calloway Co. Hospital . . . . . .Back Cover

Heritage Funeral Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Murray Electric System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

West Wood Wine & Liquor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

Hilliard-Lyons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Murray Insurance Agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42

Wild Raspberry, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

Houston Security Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36

Murray Life Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4, 19

WK&T Technology Store . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Image Graphics Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

Murray Medical Associates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

WKMS FM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Imes-Miller Funeral Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55

Murray Woman's Clinic . . . . . . .14 & Inside Front

WNBS-1340 AM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45

Jarvis Vision Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

NewWave Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55

K-Squared Designs, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

Northwood Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Kentucky Farm Bureau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

Paris Winery and Vineyards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

Seasons by Robert Valentine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 University Book and Bean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Urology Associates, H.S. Jackson, MD . . . . . . .53 Vintage Rose Emporium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Wall Appeals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 WENK/WTPR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Western Baptist Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Our next edition is a celebration of the hopeful joy of “New Beginnings” in 2012. Puzzle fans: expect more Sudoku, with answers tucked away in the magazine, . . . And that’s just the start! Count on Murray Life for humor, shopping tips, dining guides, Share the fun of Murray Life: A two-year gift subscription anywhere in the U.S. is only $25.00. Call 753-5225 or e-mail us at murraylife@aol.com and we’ll arrange to share Murray Life with your personalized gift card included. Get the latest at www.mymurraylife.com. The WebMag, archives, comments and columns – more than ever before.

Answers from Trivia Quiz on page 52 1. (a) We know: you were thinkin’ “moonshine,” weren’t you? 2. (b) Surprised? 3. (d) If you said “mac ‘n cheese,” you are a New Yorker. 4. (c) Welcome to the south, Sugah. 5. (a) No contest, but plenty of good pork, you can be sure. 6. (d) Our Editor guessed “Nova.” 7. (b) I scream, you scream . . . . 8. (c) There’s a basketball team there, too. 9. (a) But don’t be too proud. Everyone knows the Colonel and his fried chicken. 10. (d) Trick question: The Bourbon County in question was actually a county of Virginia, of which Kentucky was a part. It comprises the area now occupied by 18 Kentucky counties. 54

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Murray Life Magazine  

2011 Holiday Issue