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SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017

Glenview | Northbrook

SUNDAY BREAKFAST Namesake’s alive! John Evans ‘returns’ to Evanston. P23

SPORTS

Junior guard Lizzy Shaw continues to step her game for Glenbrook South. P20

CAMP PRIMER

Get a jump-start on summer with these ideas for your kids. P11 FOLLOW US:

NO. 87 | A JWC MEDIA PUBLICATION

Corporate Venture

NEWS

Test ready: Glenbrook South students ready to pitch ideas

GBN students team up for business incubator course

BY STEVE SADIN DAILYNORTHSHORE.COM

I

deas for new business ventures are bubbling up at Glenbrook South High School and some of them are ready for test marketing. These businesses are developing in the business incubator course in entrepreneurship at Glenbrook South High School as part of a new yearlong course where students hope to lure investors toward their venture at a Shark Tank-style sort of final exam. Students, primarily sophomores and juniors, work in teams developing a business model they will test and possibly get funding to launch, according to Michael Macfadden, who teaches the course. There are some seniors. “There is a lot of team building and leadership skills developed,” said Macfadden. “They learn how to take advantage of each other’s strengths and cover weaknesses with another’s strength. It’s unlike their other Continued on PG 8

BY STEVE SADIN DAILYNORTHSHORE.COM

D

From left, Kyle Kadish, senior, Miles Kadish, sophomore, and Ryan Cotler, junior, work on their start-up business Friday afternoon at Glenbrook North High School. PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEVE HANDWERKER

iscount incentive programs to motivate shoppers have been around for years, but five Glenbrook North High School students have created a new program that supports local businesses. Corporate Catalyst is approaching merchants and restaurants to assemble a package of discounts it can offer to businesses in Northbrook to distribute to their employees, according to Liam Poczatek, a senior and one of the entrepreneurs behind the effort. “We have a lot of small businesses in Northbrook and local corporations with a lot of employees,” said Poczatek. Though Poczatek and his partners—Arie Sztainberg, Patrick Continued on PG 8

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| SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017

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| SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

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SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017 |

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| SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

INDEX

IN THIS ISSUE [ NEWS ] 8

corporate venture Glenbrook North students team up for business incubator course

8

textbook ready Glenbrook South students ready to pitch ideas.

[LIFESTYLE & ARTS ] 9  north shore foodie

Lake Forest pizzeria provides more than pie.

10 love & marriage

Message from ‘The Bottle’: Mix it up on Valentine’s Day.

[ REAL ESTATE ] 16 open houses

Find out — complete with map — what houses you can walk through for possible purchase on the North Shore this weekend.

17 h  ouses of the week

Intriguing houses for sale in our towns are profiled.

[ SPORTS ] 21

blood, sweat — no tears Weingardt’s turnaround season continues at the Central Suburban League Tourney.

[ LAST BUT NOT LEAST ] 23 s unday breakfast

Namesake’s alive! John Evans ‘returns’ to Evanston. Check out the digital version of The North Shore Weekend at dailynorthshore.com!

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THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017 |

7

NEWS

STANDOUT STUDENT

From Northbrook to Nicaragua BY JAKE JARVI

I

t seems like a lot of us would be completely lost without our smartphones. It seems like that would especially resonate with anyone under 20, who likely never met dictionary.com’s hardcover predecessor. But Glenbrook North High School junior Lucia Bosacoma gave up her smartphone—and practically every other modern convenience—for six weeks the summer after her sophomore year when she joined a volunteer organization called Amigos de las Américas and traveled to El Mango, a rural town in Nicaragua. Amigos de las Américas is a full immersion program recruiting high school and college aged volunteers to travel to communities in Central and South America, stay with a local host family, and develop leadership skills and cultural awareness. “ We were prepared to culturally assimilate,” Bosacoma says. “Obviously, there’s a large culture shock when you get there.

Lucia Bosacoma and several of the kids from the daily Amigos de las Américas camp sessions

Rural Nicaragua is very different than the North Shore of Chicago.” Before embarking, Bosacoma gathered locally with other Chicagoland volunteers for 30 hours

of pre-departure training. Once in Madagalpa, Nicaragua, she and the other volunteers designated to Nicaragua went through four additional days of training specific to the area they would be

staying. She and her two partners were responsible for organizing and leading weekly camps for local youth ages 5 to 15 focusing on the environment, hygiene, and

conflict resolution. They also devised one large community project using Amigos de las Américas funds to encourage more high yield, profit producing farming practices with profits later earmarked for building a well at the local school. “The town is sort of spread out, but the school is one of the only places where they unite,” Bosacoma says. “Also, when the kids go to school, they have to bring water from their houses because the school doesn’t have water. Once they drink that, they don’t have any water left, so they can’t wash their hands or anything.” Other than that, she spent her time as the locals did. Her host family had only two electronics in the house: an old tube television with an antenna and a smartphone that had access to Wi-Fi for one hour once a week. “A lot of time there is spent doing daily things that we would think are really easy, like washing the dishes,” Bosacoma says. “Cooking the food takes a long time because you’ve got to get

the fire started, but since it rains every day during the wet season it’s hard to come by wood to make the fire. And you wash your clothes in a river on a rock.” It also took a little while to get used to the daily menu, which consisted mostly of rice and beans. Though the limiting of food choices and electronic devices sounds like hardship to our contemporary American sensibilities, Bosacoma admits it wasn’t as hard to adjust to as it may sound. “Anyone can do it,” she says. “You just have to be open to new experiences. A lot of people here don’t realize that they can live without all the appliances and luxuries they’re surrounded by, but while I was there, it didn’t seem like a big deal because that’s just how everyone lives.” Do you know a teen doing outstanding work in the fields of charity, science, arts, business, or education? Send your suggestion for Standout Student to jake@jwcmedia.com.

Our Lady of Perpetual Help School A Premier Private Education in the Finest Catholic Tradition

John Conatser founder & publisher Kelly McGuire cfo & v.p. of strategy & operations [ EDITORIAL ] Adrienne Fawcett executive news & digital editor Bill McLean senior writer/associate editor Kevin Reiterman sports editor Katie Ford editorial assistant Kemmie Orquiz social editor [ DESIGN ] Linda Lewis production manager Kiara Smith advertising coordinator/graphic designer Doug Adcock graphic designer Kevin Leavy graphic designer Bill Werch senior graphic designer [ CONTRIBUTING WRITERS ] Joanna Brown  Scott Holleran Jake Jarvi Mike Lubow  Julie Kemp Pick Steve Sadin Gregg Shapiro Jill Soderberg Emily Spectre [ PHOTOGRAPHY AND ART ] Joel Lerner chief photographer Larry Miller contributing photographer Robin Subar contributing photographer Barry Blitt illustrator [ SALES ] Gretchen Barnard, M.J. Cadden, Courtney Pitt, Jill Rojas All advertising inquiry info should be directed to 847-926-0957 & info@jwcmedia.com Find us online: DailyNorthShore.com Like us on Facebook! © 2017 The North Shore Weekend/A publication of JWC Media 445 Sheridan Rd., Highwood, IL 60040

Celebrate Catholic Schools Week Preschool-8th Grade OPEN HOUSE Sunday, January 29 following the 9:30 & 11:00 am Masses

1123 Church St., Glenview • 847.724.6990 • olph-il.org


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| SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

NEWS

the same course for the third straight year. It was developed by INCubatoredu, an educational services company. The six GBS student-developed businesses include enterprises that work with vintage clothing, event planning, golf instruction, road rallies, clothing art and sports equipment rental,

according to Macfadden. One Stop Sports, the sports equipment rental business, is ready to operate once the lacrosse season starts in March, according to Drew Gonzalez, one of the three students bringing the business to life. “We rent out sports equipment so parents can see if their children

have an interest in a sport,” said Gonzalez, a Glenbrook South junior. “It can cost a lot of money to buy the equipment and the kid may not stick with the sport.” Gonzalez, along with Dylan Garvey, a junior, and Sean Morrison, a senior, said they chose to focus on lacrosse because one of the coaches at the school put

them in touch with Glenview Park District personnel who had used equipment they were able to rent. Lacrosse is a spring sport that fits into the course timing, said Morrison. They will offer their rental services to participants in the park district’s middle school youth lacrosse program. Morrison

said equipment purchase can cost between $500 and $600. Another group of five students—Melanie Macwan, John Hartigan, Andrew Richards, Michael Wyciszkiewicz and Chad Tormoen—have created Shibes. They are engaged in a two-prong approach as they get ready to sell T-shirts with a design created by an artist. They find the artists as well as a manufacturer. “It’s cool to be doing this and it’s our very own business,” said Macwan. Macwan said their idea gives young people the chance to get a unique piece of clothing and artists a venue for their creativity. Hartigan said they are reaching out to art schools and classes to find talent. “We are giving them a chance to display their art,” said Hartigan. After they get their first run of shirts, they said they plan to set up a table at school to sell them. Macfadden said the other student-run businesses are Vintage Threads, which curates vintage clothing for men; Swing N’Learn, developing a platform to connect novice golfers with experienced coaches; Northside Planners, creating weekend activities for youngsters, and Chicago Engine Club, which plans, hosts and runs car meetups and road rallies for “gearheads” of all ages.

and error to determine a viable product or service to market, according to Mindy Ingersoll, who teaches the course. “Everyone adds value to the class and they are showing a real passion for what they’re doing,” said Ingersoll. “All the things they are doing are in real world scenarios. They are developing a passion for their business.” Students like Kyle Kadish, a senior, share Ingersoll’s enthusiasm. He is working with four other students to create Colledge, a website to ease the college search for students while helping schools find students who will be a fit at the university. “This is an amazing experience,” said Kadish. “It’s an opportunity to learn with each other and develop a business.” Ingersoll is not the only person teaching the students. She said a strong emphasis is put on teaching each other. “They pull out each other’s strengths and help others through their weaknesses,” said Ingersoll. “This is an invaluable skill they will be using the rest of their lives.

They are learning the methodology.” They also have coaches who come in as guest speakers to offer perspective on areas of expertise like finance or marketing. Each individual group of entrepreneurs has a mentor from the business community who volunteers his or her time to assist the students on a regular basis either in person, on the phone or with a video conference. Working with Kadish on Colledge are his brother, Miles Kadish, Ryan Cotler, Jacob Ginzburg and Corey Wessel. They are working out the details of their website. Kyle Kadish said students who go to the website will complete a questionnaire. When they complete it, they will get a list of colleges appropriate for them based on criteria like size of institution, geography and a variety of other factors. “It saves the school money,” said Cotler. “They won’t be sending letters to students who have no interest going there.” Corporate Catalyst, Colledge

and the other businesses in the class are applying the scientific method to business, according to Ingersoll.

“They make assumptions, test their assumptions and do it again so they can add value to their idea,” said Ingersoll. “It is

the scientific method to a degree but there is still an art to it because they have to sell their idea.”

GBS Continued from PG 1 classes.” Teamwork is also important because Macfadden said a large part of the grade will be joint effort. Macfadden is not the only one doing the teaching. There are coaches from area businesses who talk to the students about areas of specialization like finance or marketing. Each team also has a mentor from the local business community who acts as an advisor, according to Dawn Hall, the instructional supervisor who heads the business department. She said there is regular contact with the mentor in person, on the phone or through video conferencing. “This is an authentic experience,” said Hall. “When they walk through the door (of the classroom) they feel they are going to work.” At the end of the year there will be a pitch night where the student teams will present their ideas to a panel of potential investors. Hall said hopefully one of the teams will get funding to develop its business in an advanced class next year. “If the panel believes in them they can move forward,” said Hall. “They have to show they’re viable. Just the experience of presenting it is invaluable.” Two teams were funded at Lake Forest High School last year, according to a DailyNorthShore.com. That school is teaching GBN Continued from PG 1 Dahlke, Bianca Osinski and Miles Lazar—did not have specific numbers, they sense with mammoth corporations like All State Insurance Company and UL (Underwriters Laboratories) in town, there is a potential market. A village of 33,170 as of the 2010 census, Northbrook has over 3,000 businesses within its corporate limits with more than 45,000 people working there. This more than doubles the population during the day, according to the village website. Corporate Catalyst is one of five businesses created and being nurtured in the Glenbrook North business incubator class. The students hope to impress a panel of judges enough at the end of the year that they will get funding to develop their ventures in an advanced class next year. Rather than craft a 30-page business plan, the students work in teams to collaborate with each other, drawing on the strengths of each of them with some trial

From left, Chad Tormoen and John Hartigan, both sophomores, work on their business incubator team’s final exam presentation for a custom-designed T-shirt business, at Glenbrook South High School. PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEVE HANDWERKER


THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017 |

9

LIFESTYLE & ARTS

NORTH SHORE FOODIE

It’s not just what’s in the Sauce … Lake Forest pizzeria provides more than pie BY STEVE SADIN DAILYNORTHSHORE.COM

A

fter a career where he climbed near the top of the food service industry’s corporate ladder, Craig Grimes of Lake Forest spent a year as a serious student of pizza. Once his education was complete, Grimes opened Sauced Pizza in October offering home delivery and carry-out orders of pizza and more in Lake Forest. Customers get a variety of choices when it comes to crust, sauce and ingredients. Before an order is complete, the customer selects from a pair of crusts, five sauces, a minimum of 22 toppings ranging from a basic pepperoni to pineapple or jalapenos and four sizes, according to Grimes. Raised in the St. Louis area, Grimes had an early exposure to the food service industry. Owning his own business was always a dream. He got a lot of on-theground as well as formal education on the way to opening Sauced Pizza. “Restaurants are a way of life in St. Louis,” said Grimes. “I started cooking at a very young age and grew up working in restaurants. I bused tables, waited

tables, bartended and managed.” More than 20 years ago, Grimes joined the Levy organization and moved to the Chicago area. He landed in Lake Forest 10 years ago and was a regional vice president in charge of the restaurant division. When he joined the company it grossed $30 million annually. When he left its sales were $1.5 billion. While working for Levy, Grimes was asked to join the board of directors of Nature Foods, a vegan restaurant chain. When the company was in need of strong leadership, he was asked to become its CEO. He took the job. Grimes Opens Own Business After a few years with Nature Foods, Grimes decided it was time to open his own business. He had to decide what kind and make sure he knew everything there was to know about it before taking the plunge. Pizza was a natural choice. “Pizza is always what comes up when it’s family meal time,” said Grimes. It was time for his pizza schooling. Returning to his St. Louis restaurant roots, Grimes got in touch with a friend who owns Imos Pizza there, spending much of his time working most of the jobs that need to be done in a pizzeria. It has 92 locations mostly in Missouri. Many of them are franchises. After immersing himself in Imos’ way of doing things, he

the cheese mix for the pizzas, he said he conducted focus groups to refine the decision. Sauced Pizza uses a five-cheese mix of Romano, Parmesan, Asiago, Mozzarella and Provolone. He said it is a blend of aged and fresh. Menu choices are not limited to pizza. Customers can also order pasta, wings, salads, desserts and beverages. For employees of Sauced Pizza, Grimes said he offers another opportunity. Once a An Abundance of Choices Once customers choose person becomes a general between the crispy thin crust or manager, Grimes puts $6,250 a the traditional hand-tossed year away for them for four years. variety, they pick one of five That will be the money the person sauces—traditional red tomato, needs to buy a franchise. white Alfredo, pesto, smoky bar“They get the chance to beque or olive oil. Then they get become the CEO of their own into toppings. He said popular business,” said Grimes. “They will demand will govern the expan- be the one to connect with the sion of what people want on their community. We’re small now but pizza. in a few years they will be reBefore Grimes came up with warded.” — from the guy who takes everything to the dumpster to the person who makes the dough,” said Grimes. “It takes a team not an individual.” Sauced Pizza’s customers get a lot of choices when selecting a pizza, which include the standard menu to the artesian pizzas that are offered as specials each month, such as Chicken Florentine or barbeque bacon chicken.

Owner Craig Grimes flies some wings at Sauced in Lake Forest. PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOEL LERNER.

contacted another friend who operates 142 Pizza Huts in Texas and learned as much as he could there as well. He said it was vital

to opening Sauced Pizza. “It’s critical to have an appreciation of what everyone contributes to the success of a restaurant

North Shorts Takes by the Lake by Bill McLean “Numb and number”

thought you had before learning the news — those unreturned ou scan the news on your phone calls at work, that phone early one morning. mysterious back pain, that It had been delivered via worrisome noise your car makes — all seem minor now, petty to email from a colleague. the nth degree. You blink. You read it again. Numbness settles in and You try to process it, but lingers. profound sadness interrupts the You attempt to get through the process. rest of the day. A voice from your All of the problems you car radio asks an on-air expert

Y

about what to do about a leaky faucet. You punch in another station, and another voice is concerned about what the Chicago Bears will do with the third pick in the NFL Draft in April. You turn down the volume because whatever you’ll hear for the rest of the day will sound trivial. You think about the sad news

again. You still find yourself in some sort of trance, wondering if you’re ever going to blink again. Minutes later, a barista gives you a smile after giving you a cup of coffee. You needed both; you’re thankful for both. It’s a moment — a precious one — you had taken for granted for too many years before today. “Precious” was the word you saved to describe a newborn.

It’s now a good word to use to describe every minute of every day. A week later, you attend a funeral that feels nothing like a funeral. Yes, you hear sniffles to your left and to your right, and your eyes well up a couple of times. But the service turns into a true celebration of a remarkable life. You mingle with others after the service. A man is in awe of what he learned about a woman

who had treated each day as a golden opportunity to love others. ‘I want to approach life the way she did,” the man says to you. You are no longer numb. From a death, you and hundreds of others in the church had gained a healthy perspective on life. You exit the church. You can’t wait to live life anew.


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THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

LIFESTYLE & ARTS

LOVE & MARRIAGE

Message from ‘The Bottle’: Mix it up on Valentine’s Day And though it’s still January, I’ve invested about $50 in our family’s Love-fest. Valentine’s Day is traditionally a celebration of courtly love, but on Feb. 14 our children, niece and most special friends will all be reminded of how much my family loves them. My outlay should surprise no one. The National Retail Federation reported in 2016 that more than half of consumers celebrate Valentine’s Day, spending an average of $146.84 on flowers, jewelry, candy, apparel and more. Total spending topped $19 billion. The same survey found that 91 percent of consumers buy something for their significant other or spouse, at an average cost of $90. But that’s not a figure that fits every budget. If you’d prefer to save your pennies for an extrahad swapped out the snowmen spectacular Spring Break getand reindeer for roses and love- away, Wilmette business owner birds. Amy Lafontant assured me that Valentine’s Day started Dec. 26. you can still have a special

Joanna Brown

B

efore I vacuumed up the last of the loose pine needles from our Christmas tree, my local stores

The National Retail Federation reported in 2016 that more than half of consumers celebrate Valentine’s Day, spending an average of $146.84 on flowers, jewelry, candy, apparel and more.

Valentine’s Day. She’s got a million ideas to share with her customers at The Bottle Shop. “Being at home can be very romantic, but for each couple that means something different and the Valentine’s Day stereotypes don’t work,” said Lafontant, who has helped customers find their favorite wines and beers for 11 years. “Mix it up. Don’t do ‘typical’. Do it different. “I’m a big fan of playing games so that (on a date night) you continue to interact while you’re playing backgammon or cards. That’s why for a long time I had a putting green and ping pong table in the store. Other people like to make dinner together or just set the table together beautifully. Maybe you want to watch a movie that you saw together when you had just started dating, and I know people who like to read aloud to each other.” For many couples, a great night at home includes a great meal and drink. (With a very few

exceptions, “Most every culture in every country in the world is drinking some kind of fermented beverage,” Lafontant assured me.) Lafontant can recommend a wine to match your menu, or food to pair with the beverages you like. “The first question is, ‘How much do you want to spend?’ ” she said. “My bottles start at $10 and go up, so we can start the conversation wherever you are comfortable. I really like my $10 selections. “If for Valentine’s Day you want to do a bottle of sparkling wine for $10, I can add two flutes for $1 each. And then for a really amazing treat, we’ve got some handmade candy from a local resident for another $10. That’s a special night for under $25. “If you’re beer drinkers, let’s put together a 12-pack and you can go home and do a flight together of all the beers by one company or all different IPAs or stouts. I think that is so much fun to do.”

SOCIALS HAVANA NIGHTS SCHOOL OF ST. MARY Photography by Nan Stein

Co-chairs Katie Donovan and Jenny McKinney, gathered a crowd for a Cuban-themed affair, Havana Nights, featuring cocktails, Cuban food and a live Cuban band for School of St. Mary’s annual fundraiser. A cigar roller, domino duels, and other fun Cubanthemed activities rounded out the night, as funds were raised for the school’s Annual Fund.

KATIE DONOVAN , JENNIFER MCKINNEY

LORENZO & ANNALISA DIVITO

RODD SPECKETER

ALEJANDRO ORTIZ

VENETTE BIANCALANA, MICHELE MEUCCI

KATHY BURDEN, CHRISTINE FARRELL

schoolofstmary.org


THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017

G r e at E s c a pe s

Benefits aplenty buoy summer campers physically active and learning life skills at the same time.” Founded in 1935 and located emoving technology from an adolescent these days only two and a half hours from does not require major Chicago, the camps in Southwest surgery, but the day can’t Michigan are set up to invigorate be far away. the mind and body of each Kids are tethered to devices, camper. Water ski one hour, jam cell phones in particular, and it’s in the music and recording studio for that reason Dayna Hardin during the next. Mount a horse — a Glencoe resident and owner/ in the morning and learn about director of two summer camps in web design in the afternoon. Michigan — insists campers and Closer to home, the North their parents attend a pre-camp Shore boasts a wide range of meeting in this Age of Distrac- summer camps for kids of all ages, tions. from traditional offerings at park “We want to make sure the districts to specific options at kids know they’ll be de-plugged others. Teaching professionals during the entire camp experi- help local Nike Tennis Camp ence [for two, four or eight attendees hone their tennis weeks], so they won’t be shocked games; at the Language Stars on the first day,” said Hardin, who Wilmette Center (335 Ridge owns and runs Lake of the Road), award-winning foreignWoods Camp for Girls and language classes are offered for Greenwoods Camp for Boys in kids from the age of 1 to the age Decatur, Michigan, a popular of 12; and there’s even a summer destination for North Shore camp — staged at Piccolo Theatre residents after the final day of in Evanston — geared for budding stand-up comics and school. “One of the skills we focus on comedy writers. is communication, authentic “Too many kids are on set communication,” she added. schedules during the school year, “Texting is not real communica- with too many of the committion. Nobody hides behind tech- ments held indoors,” Hardin said. nology at our camps.” “There’s freedom at summer Sometimes the benefits of camps, less pressure than when summer camps can’t be deter- the kids are connected to technolmined until a camper reaches ogy. adulthood, and sometimes they’re “Research shows that kids with apparent as soon as the camper ADHD (Attention Deficit Hybecomes a member of a sports peractivity Disorder),” she added, team in the fall. “have fewer symptoms when they Or an art club. participate in activities outdoors.” Or a dance troupe. What also heartens Hardin is “Summer camps are really the staying power of a summergood at teaching skills that aren’t camp perk that was the same always taught in schools,” said yummy lure for this generation’s Hardin, who was a Lake of the parents and grandparents. Woods camper for four years, “Kid’s still enjoy eating s’mores later served as a camp counselor around a weekly campfire,” and then bought the camps in Hardin said. “I don’t see that 1997. “Employers continue to changing, ever. Do you? I think seek employees who are leaders that’s the neatest thing, seeing with collaborative and creative them make s’mores and singing skills. Technology won’t help you camp songs. You know what else develop skills like those. hasn’t changed? Parents still want “Camps,” she added, “teach the best opportunities for growth kids to be resilient. When our for their kids.” campers play games, they make Recent Highland Park High up the rules and referee them- School graduates Rebecca Breitselves, and that enables them to stein and Joseph Spellberg — colearn how to compromise and valedictorians in 2016 — worked negotiate. They ’re being as camp counselors in different BY BILL MCLEAN

R

The outdoors provide a unique opportunity to “explore your true nature,” as campers find for themselves at Lake Forest Open Lands’ ecologically themed Eco-Camps for kids ages 4-13. For more information, visit www.LFOLA.org. PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF LAKE FOREST OPEN LANDS ASSOCIATION

Cub Creek Science Camp includes a hands-on zoo. PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF CUB CREEK

states last summer. Breitstein inspired first-graders at the Jewish Community Center “Z” Frank Apachi Day Camp in Northbrook, while Spellberg guided campers in Georgia. Spellberg was a happy camper at the same nine-week camp for several years. “It’s a great camp, so much fun,” Spellberg said in June. “You get to boat there, play sports, and there’s a religious aspect to it. I found my Jewish identity there.” Spellberg discovered something else at the camp in The Peach State: friends for life. Can you think of a camp benefit with more value than that? “Kids who attend summer camps have two sets of best friends: their best friends at school and their best friends at summer camp,” Hardin told The North Shore Weekend in 2015. “If things get tough during the

school year, they know they’ll always have their summer-camp best friends.” Removed from the fear of failing in familiar surroundings at school, a youngster often finds the courage to enter an uncomfortable zone at a summer camp — while gripping a climbing station’s rope, for example, or while tacking a sailboat for the first time — and returns home with more confidence. “Our camps are designed to encourage campers to try new things, to take safe risks,” Hardin said. “If the campers don’t succeed, there’s a support system of counselors and other campers for them. “What I’ve noticed in the past 10 years, and what I find exciting, is how often kids are realizing they can have the time of their lives when they’re nowhere near their cell phones.”


SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

2017 SUMMER CAMP PRIMER

CUB CREEK SCIENCE CAMP Type of camp: Animal and Science Camp Location: Rolla, MO Overnight, day, or both: Overnight Age range of campers: 7-17 Contact person for inquires: Dawn Cox Contact info: (573) 458-2125, Office@BearRiverRanch.com, MoScienceCamp.com Over 300 animals make up Cub Creek Science Camp’s hands-on zoo, which includes lemurs, alpaca, parrots, porcupines, foxes, lizards, snakes, and wallabies among many more. Beyond our animals, Cub Creek Camp has a six-element ropes course including zip-lining, climbing, and rappelling, and an unbelievable variety of activities from pottery and archery to culinary and chemistry. Our campers

make lasting friendships and BIGGER KID CAMPS memories under the guidance and AT GORTON encouragement of 90 well-trained, caring staff members. Cub Creek COMMUNITY provides spacious, air-conditioned CENTER cabins and delicious, buffet-style meals. Type of camp: Day camp

LITTLE KID CAMPS AT GORTON COMMUNITY CENTER Type of camp: Day camp

Location: Gorton Community Center, Drop In Learning Center, Lake Forest Overnight, day, or both: Day Only Age range of campers: Varies age 2-5 yrs Contact person for inquires: Marketing@gortoncenter.org Contact info: Kristy Richardson Drop In Learning Center Camps: 847-234-6060 x4115

Location: Gorton Community Center, Lake Forest Overnight, day, or both: Day Only Age range of campers: Varies age 7 & Up Contact person for inquires: Marketing@gortoncenter.org

performing arts camps under the guidance of Tom Beck, are annual favorites. Come join Gorton this summer for Aladdin and Beauty and The Beast! Interested in more fun? Safety Town is back the week of June 6th! Amazing Minds and Sylvan will also join Gorton for camps this summer for ages 5 and up. Look on the Gorton calendar for more camps serving kids of all ages throughout our community by logging on here: www.gortoncenter.org/calendar!

LANGUAGE STARS SUMMER CAMPS AND SUMMER CLASSES

Overnight, day, or both: Day camps Age range of campers: Camps and classes are segmented by age groups for kids between the ages 1-12. Contact person for inquires: Jeff DiGiannantonio Contact info: Please submit inquiries to info@languagestars. com, call 773.935.7827, ext. 1000 or visit LanguageStars.com

Language Stars offers fun, world language summer camps and Contact info: Catherine Yehle, classes for children ages 1-12 in Gorton Center Camps Spanish, Mandarin, French, 847-234-6060 x4109 German, Italian and Arabic. Music, art projects, and games will be Gorton Community Center is blended with fun summer activities thrilled to offer amazing camps to provide an enriching and educational summer experience. this summer in Lake Forest. Locations: This year’s summer programCamps range from age 2+, and Language Stars has 11 conveGorton is constantly adding camp niently located centers throughout ming includes fun themes such programs that are of great interest Chicagoland, including: as Summer Carnival and Pirate’s to the community. Look for the Treasure. Every Language Stars pre-registration on March 15th Lincoln Park (Chicago), summer camp is taught by caring, and sign up! PASTA, the Hyde Park (Chicago), Deerfield native-speaking teachers who are Type of camp: Language Stars offers a variety of fun summer opportunities including: week-long, full-day camps, week-long, half-day camps and summer classes that meet weekly.

committed to educating the next generation of bilingual kids.

NIKE TENNIS CAMPS Type of camp: Sports Camp Location: All over the country Overnight, day, or both: Both Age range of campers: 6 to 18 Contact for inquires: 1-800-NIKE-CAMP, www. ussportscamps.com/tennis/ Come join the fun and get better this summer at Nike Tennis Camps! With junior overnight and day camps for boys & girls ages 5-17, as well as adult weekend clinics, there is a camp option for everyone!  Nike Tennis Camps provide young players the opportunity to improve their tennis skills, work hard, make new friends and have a lot of fun.  Our dedicated camp directors have a passion for teaching and a gift for helping you take your game to the next level. 

PASTA Plays and Performances

for Ages

Specialty Camps and Dates

Wilmette, Park Ridge, Arlington Heights, Barrington, Hinsdale, Naperville, St. Charles, Glen Ellyn

2-5

June 12-16 Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs June 19-23 Beauty and the Beast June 26-30 Peter Pan July 10-14 Sleeping Beauty July 17-21 The Princess and the Pea July 24-28 Little Red Riding Hood July 31-August 4 Pinocchio Times are 9 to 12 with a lunch bunch option from 12-1 (we provide lunch for $3). Camp Gorton for infants/toddlers will continue to have a Drop-In schedule from 9:00-1:00 daily, $10 per hour, with a $55 enrollment fee. Official sign up begins March 15th, email Dicdirector@gortoncenter.org to pre-register to secure your spot. Receipt of payment confirms your spot. Space is limited. Please visit us for more information online via www.gortoncenter.or/calendar

CAMPS

_____________________

Pre-Registration begins March 15th!

Join Us for Safety Town Camp June 6th! Look for Safety Town Jr. in August! For Information Please Visit Us at

www.GortonCenter.org

Gorton Community Center 400 East Illinois Road Lake Forest, IL 60045 (847) 234-6060 FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK

Aladdin: Ages 7 and up. Sign Up Now! Beauty and the Beast: Ages 12 and up. Sign Up Now! Facets Film Camp: Spend a week together to make films! Make Age group is 9-14. Sewing Camp: Teens spend a week learning to sew! Age group teenagers. Amazing Minds Camp: Kids spend a week learning about their world! Ages 5-9. Sylvan Camp For Robotics your child and a buddy work together to plan and build a new robot using LEGO® bricks. Ages 7 +

Sign Up at www.gortoncenter.org/programs or visit our calendar at www.gortoncenter.org/calendar


THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

2017 SUMMER CAMP PRIMER

SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017

Give your young learner the world this summer! Play-based, FunImmersion® world language classes for kids ages 1-12! Summer camps and classes are available at our 11 convenient locations in the North Shore and Chicago. To learn more, visit Languagestars.com or call 866.55.STARS. Save 15% off summer classes and camps! Enroll online or by phone with promo code: SU1715percent


SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017

2017 SUMMER CAMP PRIMER

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

AFTER CAMP LAUNDRY SERVICE

• Duffel pickup from your house or the camp’s drop off point • We take the whole bag, wash/dry/fold all the laundry, and clean other camp necessities – WE WASH THE BAG, TOO! • Hypoallergenic cleaning with all natural softeners and whiteners

THE LAST, BEST PART OF CAMP Actual emails from customers: “Beyond thrilled with your service! Can I sign up now for next year?” “Everything smells and looks great! Thanks so much for the follow up, and yes for eight weeks!” “You guys are awesome! I couldn’t believe how fast you were able to get my stuff back.” “My laundry room was a mess, and sand is clogging my washing machine. I am using Camp Laundry next year for sure!”

• Duffel delivery back to your house clean, fresh, and organized Regular Service (8 days or less): $1.50/lb, and $25 delivery charge Express Service (4 days or less): $1.75/lb, and $50 delivery charge A portion of our proceeds go to camp-related charities!

Reserve your pickup day at:

www.Camp-Laundry.com SEND YOUR CHILDREN TO CAMP, BUT DON’T LET THEM BRING CAMP INTO YOUR HOME! *We are not affiliated with any camps*

NIKE TENNIS CAMPS SERIOUS. FUN.

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

BUTLER UNIVERSITY

Junior Overnight and Day Camps

Junior Overnight and Day Camps

Boys & Girls | Ages 9-18 | All Skills Tournament Training | High School

Boys & Girls | Ages 13-18 | All Skills | High School High Performance

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

ROD SCHROEDER NATIONAL TENNIS CAMP

Boys & Girls | Ages 9-18 | All Skills Tournament Training | High School

Junior Overnight and Day Camps

Junior Overnight and Day Camps

Carthage College – Kenosha, WI

Boys & Girls | Ages 9-18 | All Skills | Tournament Training | High School

USSportsCamps.com 1-800-NIKE CAMP (1-800-645-3226) All Rights reserved. Nike and the Swoosh design are registered trademarks of Nike, Inc. and its affiliates, and are used under license.Nike is the title sponsor of the camps and has no control over the operation of the camps or the acts or omissions of US Sports Camps.


THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017 |

THIS IS WHERE AWESOMENESS HAPPENS

930 Kings Lane, Glenview Anne DuBray

$1,695,000 847-724-5800

25 Aberdeen Court, Bannockburn $1,600,000 Judy Sklare 847-433-5400

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

1765 Robinwood Lane, Riverwoods $999,000 Marsha Noble 847-234-8000

1585 Samanthas Way, Deerfield $949,000 Alan Berlow 847-945-7100

3620 Maple Avenue, Northbrook $1,497,000 Nancy Gibson 847-272-9880

2058 Beechnut Road, Northbrook $1,170,000 Robin Blumenthal 847-272-9880

1044 Greentree Avenue, Deerfield $1,149,000 Marcia Biordi Brown 847-945-7100

620 Bent Creek Ridge, Deerfield $1,099,000 Edward Bohrer 847-541-5000

1110 Fairoaks Avenue, Deerfield $799,500 Alan Berlow 847-945-7100

2329 Mohawk Lane, Glenview $779,000 Marla Schneider 847-724-5800

2 Leeds Court, Lincolnshire Naomi Campbell

3140 Glenway Drive, Northbrook $749,000 Marla Schneider 847-724-5800

$765,000 847-362-7300

NEW LISTING

OPEN SUN 1- 3

702 Glenwood Lane, Glenview $729,000 Anne DuBray 847-724-5800

1218 Carriage Lane, Northbrook $649,000 Linda Lipman 847-272-9880

808 Woodbine Lane, Northbrook $619,900 Nancy Gibson 847-272-9880

2300 Congressional Lane, Riverwoods $605,900

265 Lee Road, Northbrook Ronna Wisbrod

$599,000 847-272-9880

2600 Crestwood Lane, Riverwoods $599,000 Linda Jacobson 847-835-6000

538 Milford Road 538, Deerfield $550,000 Merle Kirsner-Styer 847-433-5400

1741 Dewes Street, Glenview Marla Schneider

319 Basswood Drive, Northbrook $534,900 Marla Schneider 847-724-5800

1200 Vernon Drive, Glenview Paul Gorney

$514,900 312-943-1959

3009 Peachgate Lane, Glenview $489,000 Anya Wilkomer 847-724-5800

921 Echo Lane, Glenview Anne DuBray

$399,000 847-724-5800

1617 Sunset Ridge Road, Glenview $389,000 Nancy Claussen 312-266-7000

1220 Rudolph 5M, Northbrook $295,000 Karen Arenson 847-256-7400

813 Suffield Square, Lincolnshire $249,900 Julianne Spilotro 847-541-5000

Michele Vold

847-945-7100

NEW LISTING

1740 Mission Hills Road 202, Northbrook $579,000

Debra Baker

847-541-5000

OPEN SUN 1- 3

NEW LISTING

3758 Russett Lane, Northbrook $479,000 Anne DuBray 847-724-5800 NEW LISTING

14 Ashford Court, Lincolnshire Melanie E Thillens

$544,900 847-724-5800

700 Pine Street, Deerfield Nirali Dalia

$449,000 847-234-8000

3709 Maple Leaf Drive, Glenview $425,000 Marsha Schwartz 847-272-9880

39 Julie Drive, Glenview Marla Schneider

2640 Summit Drive 110, Glenview $335,000 Maureen Mohling 847-446-4000

205 Donald Terrace, Glenview $321,900 Patricia Furman 847-724-5800

1621 Mission Hills Road 506, Northbrook $299,000

$415,000 847-724-5800

OPEN SUN 12- 2

$365,000 847-541-5000

Barbara Rogalla

847-945-7100

ColdwellBankerHomes.com ©2017 Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker Logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage.

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| SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

REAL ESTATE

OPEN HOUSES

wy Skokie H

1. 234 W. Washington Ave LAKE BLUFF Sunday 1-4 $799,000 Rina DuToit, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.814.8648 2. 354 E. Scranton Ave LAKE BLUFF Sunday 11:30-1:30 $759,000 Daria Andrews, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.477.3794

1-6

Buckley Rd

Lake Bluff

3. 634 Rockland Avenue LAKE BLUFF Sunday 1-3 $585,000 Dede Banks, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.542.0700

E Park Ave

N Green Bay Rd

4. 142 E. Sheridan Rd. LAKE BLUFF Sunday 12-2 $875,000 Michele Wilson, Coldwell Banker 847-234-8000

7-36

E Townline Rd

lley

ie Va

Skok Rd

37

52

53

8. 1051 Cedar Lane LAKE FOREST Sunday 12-2 $669,000 Deb Fischer, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.309.9119

16. 747 Highview Lake Forest Sunday 2-4 $799,000 Stacey Marquis, Coldwell Banker 847-234-8000 17. 455 Rockefeller LAKE FOREST Sunday 2-4pm $1,057,000 Patricia Carter, Coldwell Banker 847-234-8000

9. 897 Longwood Drive LAKE FOREST Sunday 1-3 $995,000 Tracy Wurster Team, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.997.0730

18. 1130 Harlan LAKE FOREST Sunday 11:30am-1:30pm $689,000 Heather Wright, Coldwell Banker 847-234-8000 19. 863 Gloucester Crossing LAKE FOREST Sunday 2:15-4:15 $693,500 Michele Wilson, Coldwell Banker 847-234-8000   20. 360 E. Westminster LAKE FOREST Sunday 2-4 $1,999,000 Suzanne Myers, Coldwell Banker 847-234-8000   21. 1835 Amberley LAKE FOREST Sunday 1-3 $999,000 Michele Wilson, Coldwell Banker 847-234-8000   22. 2025 Amberley LAKE FOREST Sunday 1-3 $949,000 Michele Wilson, Coldwell Banker 847-234-8000   23. 2035 Amberley LAKE FOREST Sunday 1-3 $949,000 Michele Wilson, Coldwell Banker 847-234-8000   24. 1665 Oak Knoll LAKE FOREST Sunday 1-3 $799,000 Vera Purcell, Coldwell Banker 847-234-8000

13. 117 North Avenue LAKE FOREST SUNDAY 1-4 $779,000 Becky Dolin, @properties 847.295.0700

Highland Park

Deerfield

15. 656 S Buckingham Ct LAKE FOREST SUNDAY 2-4 $659,000 Jeff Matheson, @properties 847.367.0500

12. 275 S South Shore Lane LAKE FOREST SUNDAY 12-2 $1,000,000 Megan Jordan, @properties 847.295.0700

3851 5457

7. 1100 Olmsted LAKE FOREST Sunday 2-4 $1,895,000 Patricia Carter, Coldwell Banker 847-234-8000

11. 865 S. Ridge Road LAKE FOREST Sunday 1-3 $1,250,000 Jonathan Dick/ Corky Peterson, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.528.8400

Everett Rd

Half Day Rd

14. 660 S Buckingham Ct LAKE FOREST SUNDAY 2-4 $750,000 Carolan/Pickus, @properties 847.295.0700

10. 670 Rockefeller Road LAKE FOREST Sunday 2-4 $849,000 Mona Hellinga, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.814.1855

5. 90 Brierfield Ct LAKE BLUFF 1-3pm $749,000 Jennifer Moreland & Cathy McKechney, Griffith, Grant & Lackie Realtors® 847.234.0816

Lake Forest

6. 310 Belle Foret Dr. LAKE BLUFF Sunday, 12-1:30 $849,000 Joan Culkin Conlisk, Coldwell Banker Winnetka 847-446-4000

gan uke

a N. W Rd

62 5861

Dundee Rd

Glencoe

Northbrook 6365

Tower Rd6678

Winnetka

Rd

8393

Bay

94

en

Glenview

Gre

8182

d nR

Lake Ave

ida

Kenilworth

her

7980

N. S

Sunset Ridge Rd

Shermer Rd

Willow Rd

Northfield

Wilmette

95

25. 26211 Farwell LAKE FOREST Sunday 1-4 $2,649,000 Bree MacKenzie, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.421.9928 26. 1227 Cascade Court LAKE FOREST Sunday 1-3 $815,000 Mary Ann Kollar, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.421.1188 27. 443 W Deerpath LAKE FOREST 1-3pm $1,499,000 Jack Comerford, Griffith, Grant & Lackie Realtors® 847.234.0485 28. 1910 W Southmeadow Ln LAKE FOREST 1-3pm $1,199,000 Lisa Trace, Griffith, Grant & Lackie Realtors® 847.234.0485 29. 146 W Westminster Rd LAKE FOREST 12-2pm $1,699,900 Lisa Trace, Griffith, Grant & Lackie Realtors® 847.234.0485 30. 630 Academy Wood Dr LAKE FOREST 2:15-4pm $799,900 Lisa Trace, Griffith, Grant & Lackie Realtors® 847 234-0485 31. 1260 N Western Ave #305 LAKE FOREST 1-3pm $349,000 Cathy McKechney & Jennifer Moreland, Griffith, Grant & Lackie Realtors® 847.234.0816 32. 1700 Millburne LAKE FOREST 1-3pm $1,390,000 Elizabeth Wieneke, Griffith, Grant & Lackie Realtors® 847.234.0485 33. 945 Pinecroft Lane LAKE FOREST $ 998,000 Sunday 1-3 pm Brunhild Baass Baird & Warner 847.804.0092 34. 1361 W Estate Lane LAKE FOREST $ 625,000 Sunday 12-3 Brunhild Baass Baird & Warner 847.804.0092 35. 991 Ashley LAKE FOREST $1,395,000 Sunday 1-4pm Eileen Campbell, Jameson Sotheby’s International Realty 847-757-5181   36. 1101 Griffith LAKE FOREST $1,099,000 Saturday 1-3pm Eileen Campbell, Jameson Sotheby’s International Realty 847-757-5181

37. 242 Leonard Wood South Unit 211 FORT SHERIDAN Sunday 1-3 $359,000 Suzie Hempstead, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.910.8465 38. 481 Broadview Avenue HIGHLAND PARK Sunday 1-3 $427,500 Debbie Hymen, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.609.5339 39. 248 Ivy Lane HIGHLAND PARK SUNDAY 12-2 $1,049,000 Susan Maman, @properties 847.881.0200 40. 2587 Roslyn HIGHLAND PARK Sunday 11:30am-1:30pm $999,999 Kim Shortsle, Coldwell Banker 847-234-8000 41. 316 Roger Williams HIGHLAND PARK Sunday 1 - 3 $789,900 Marshall Atlas, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.975.7431 42. 891 Half Day HIGHLAND PARK Sunday  1:00pm-4:00pm $325,000 Carol Santi   847-668-8449 Brendan Santi   847-208-4509 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage   43. 3086 Summit HIGHLAND PARK Sunday 1:00pm-3:00pm $349,000 Carol Santi   847-668-8449 Brendan Santi   847-208-4509 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage   44. 265 Whistler HIGHLAND PARK Sunday 1:00pm-3:00pm $389,000 Valerie Frossard  224-223-2330 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage   45. 1978 Holly HIGHLAND PARK Sunday 1:00pm-4:00pm $550,000 Carol Santi  847-668-8449  Brendan Santi  847-208-4509 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 46. 1810 Cloverdale HIGHLAND PARK Sunday 2:00pm-4:00pm $664,000 Carly Jones  312-391-3170  Maxine Goldberg  847-922-4815 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage   47. 160 Linden HIGHLAND PARK Sunday 1:00pm-3:00pm $899,000 Janet Borden  847-833-3171 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

48. 25 Hemlock HIGHLAND PARK Sunday 1:00pm-3:00pm $849,000 Janet Borden  847-833-3171 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 49. 2102 St John’s Ave HIGHLAND PARK Sunday 1-3 $544,900 Karen Skurie, Baird and Warner 847-361-4687 50. 812 Marion Ave. HIGHLAND PARK  Sunday 12-2 $1,299,000 Martha Glass,   Baird and Warner  847.845.6616 51. 1985 Hidden Ridge Lane  HIGHLAND PARK  Sunday 2-5 $1,149,000 Martha Glass, Baird and Warner  847.845.6616 52. 4 Court of Mohawk Valley LINCOLNSHIRE Sunday, 12-2 $365,000 Hilde Wheeler Carter, Coldwell Banker Winnetka 847-446-4000 53. 1800 Telegraph Road BANNOCKBURN SUNDAY 12-2 $799,000 Duffey/Falls, @properties 847.295.0700 54. 700 Pine DEERFIELD Sunday 1-3 $449,000 Nirali Dalia, Coldwell Banker 847-234-8000 55. 629 Byron Court DEERFIELD Saturday 12pm-2pm $899,900 Karen Skurie, Baird and Warner 847-361-4687 56. 1157 Linden Ave DEERFIELD Sunday 1-3 $1,149,000 Karen Skurie, Baird and Warner 847-361-4687 57. 629 Byron Court DEERFIELD Sunday 1-3 $899,900 Karen Skurie, Baird and Warner 847-361-4687 58. 1123 Morgan Street NORTHBROOK  Sunday 1-3 $619,000 KZF Development, Lisa Novelli or Steven Monz 847-559-9800 59. 810 Timbers Edge Lane NORTHBROOK Sunday 12-3 $825,000 KZF Development, Lisa Novelli or Steven Monz 847-559-0500 60. 1326 Southwind Lane NORTHBROOK Sunday 1-3 $569,900 Rosemary Duffy, Berkshire Hathaway Koenig Rubloff 847-903-3786


THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017 |

17

REAL ESTATE

OPEN HOUSES 61. 835 Turnberry Lane NORTHBROOK Sunday 1:00pm-3:00pm $869,900 Janet Borden 847-833-3171 Colwell Banker Residential Brokerage 62. 205 Franklin GLENCOE Sunday 1 - 3 $2,400,000 Chris Downey, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.340.8499 63. 628 Happ Road NORTHFIELD SUNDAY 11-12:30 $499,000 Darragh Landry, @properties 847.998.0200   64. 471 Edens Lane NORTHFIELD SUNDAY 12-2 $449,000 Chris Veech, @properties 847.881.0200 65. 32 Regent Wood NORTHFIELD Sunday 11-1 $995,000 Joe Nash, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.846.0100 66. 678 Sheridan Road  WINNETKA 1:00-3:00 $1,199,990 Diana Peterson,  AuctionWorks 312.218.6102 67. 985 Oak WINNETKA Sunday 1-3 $749,000 Kevin Rutherford, Baird & Warner 847.446.1855 68. 1423 Edgewood WINNETKA Sunday 1-3 $1,099,000 Meg Sudekum, Baird & Warner 847.446.1855 69. 1091 Cherry WINNETKA Sunday 1-3 $775,000 Carrie Healy, The Hudson Company 847.507.7666 70. 889 Private WINNETKA Sunday 1-3 $1,475,000 Carrie Healy, The Hudson Company 847.507.7666 71. 1405 Scott WINNETKA Sunday 2-4 $1,199,000 Laura McCain, The Hudson Company 847.347.4630 72. 640 Blackthorn WINNETKA Sunday 12-2 $1,699,000 Laura McCain, The Hudson Company 847.347.4630 73. 669 Walden WINNETKA Sunday 1-3 $1,595,000 Julie Bradbury Miller, The Hudson Company 847.751.2619

74. 1182 Asbury WINNETKA Sunday 1 - 3 $1,785,000 Sherry Molitor, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.204.6282 75. 910 Willow Rd, WINNETKA Sunday, 12-1:30 $1,399,000 Maureen Spriggs, Coldwell Banker Winnetka 847-446-4000   76. 79 Indian Hill Rd. WINNETKA Sunday, 12-2 $1,885,000 Maureen Mohling, Coldwell Banker Winnetka 847-446-4000   77. 663 Garland Ave. WINNETKA Sunday, 12-2 $1,475,000 Sarah Dwyer, Coldwell Banker Winnetka 847-446-4000   78. 855 Gordon Terr. WINNETKA Sunday, 1-3 $2,949,000 Annie Flanagan, Coldwell Banker Winnetka 847-446-4000 79. 78 Robsart Road KENILWORTH SUNDAY 12-2 $1,599,000 Rinaldi/Turner, @properties 847.881.0200   80. 518 Kenilworth Avenue KENILWORTH SATURDAY 1-3 $1,199,000 Cummins/McDonald, @properties 847.881.0200 81. 1411 Hawthorne Lane GLENVIEW SUNDAY 11:30-1:30 $840,000 Carlson/Siebert, @properties 773.472.0200 82. 2640 Summit Dr. #110 GLENVIEW Sunday, 12-2 $335,000 Maureen Mohling, Coldwell Banker Winnetka 847-446-4000 83. 901 Locust WILMETTE Sunday 1-3 $995,000 Kevin Rutherford, Baird & Warner 847.446.1855

87. 2215 Birchwood WILMETTE Sunday 1-4 $660,000 Mary Ann Kollar, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.421.1188

HOUSES OF THE WEEK

88. 619 Greenleaf WILMETTE Sunday 1:30 -4 $949,000 Joe Nash, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices KoenigRubloff 847.846.0100 89. 1261 21st. St. WILMETTE Sunday, 2-4 $989,000 Anne West, Coldwell Banker Winnetka 847-446-4000   90. 914 Greenwood Ave. Wilmette Sunday, 12-2 $1,195,000 SFC Team, Coldwell Banker Winnetka 847-446-4000   91. 1241 Maple Ave. WILMETTE Sunday, 1-3 $1,225,000 Team Van Horn, Coldwell Banker Winnetka 847-446-4000   92. 1504 Highland Ave. WILMETTE Sunday, 2-4 $1,525,000 Maureen Spriggs, Coldwell Banker Winnetka 847-446-4000 93. 734 9th St. WILMETTE Sunday, 12-2 $1,099,000 SFC Team, Coldwell Banker Winnetka 847-446-4000

$889,000

2114 Inverness Lane, Glenview 5 Bedrooms, 5.1 Bathrooms Exclusively Presented by: Renee Dickman @properties 847.998.0200 rdickman@atproperties.com Casual elegance in desirable Glenlake Estates! Grand Sussex model features 3 car garage and fenced yard. Gorgeous cooks kitchen boasts island with separate sink, high end fridge, loads of counter space and breakfast bar. Entertain a crowd in the formal dining room and relax in the large living room flowing off gracious two story foyer. Work out at home in your own exercise/dance studio. Full bath and study/guest room complete this fantastic home. So much home to love!

94. 4009 N Proctor Circle ARLINGTON HEIGHTS Sunday 12:00pm-2:00pm $564,900 David Weil 847-989-8910 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage 95. 4229 Lee Street SKOKIE $775,000 Sunday 2-4pm Aaron Masliansky, Jameson Sotheby’s International Realty 847-780-6220

84. 1008 Greenleaf WILMETTE Sunday 1-4 $1,895,000 Kevin Rutherford, Baird & Warner 847.446.1855 85. 2015 Hollywood Court WILMETTE SUNDAY 1-3 $779,000 David Simon, @properties 847.881.0200 86. 3011 Wilmette Avenue WILMETTE SUNDAY 1-3 $599,000 Laura Cross Collyer, @properties 847.881.0200

$819,000

1331 Somerset, Glenview 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms Exclusively Presented by: Cheryl O’Rourke Cheryl.orourke@cbexchange.com Relaxed elegance abounds in this light filled mid-century ranch located on the 5th hole of North Shore Country Club golf course. Greet the sun over your morning coffee and enjoy the incredible panoramic view.


| SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

GLENVIEW

6bed/4.1ba

$1,450,000

NE W !

NORT H S HOR E

NE W !

18

GLENVIEW 5bed/5.1ba

$1,439,000

1378BENNINGTON.INFO 215CRABTREE.INFO Vittoria Logli 847.998.0200 Jeannie Kurtzhalts

GLENVIEW 5bed/3.1ba

$939,900

1582FIELDING.INFO Vittoria Logli

GLENVIEW

5bed/3ba

710GLENDALE.INFO Jeannie Kurtzhalts

GLENVIEW 2bed/1.1ba

1655WINNETKAROAD.INFO Pedro Castaneda

GLENVIEW 5bed/4.1ba

GLENVIEW 4bed/3.1ba

NORTHBROOK 4bed/2.2ba

GLENVIEW

5bed/4.1ba

$1,299,000

3122THORNWOODAVE.INFO 1368BENNINGTON.INFO 847.998.0200 Randy Nasatir 773.472.0200 Connie Dornan

$929,000

1115SHERMER.INFO 847.998.0200 Jeannie Kurtzhalts

$629,000

$1,299,000

$625,000

NORTHBROOK

4bed/2.1ba

847.998.0200

GLENVIEW 3bed/2.1ba

$879,000

1736FIELDING.INFO 847.998.0200 Vittoria Logli

$524,500

NORTHBROOK

3bed/2ba

$484,900

847.998.0200

GLENVIEW 4bed/2ba

$449,000

175FAIRVIEWLN.INFO 4205TERRILYNLANE.INFO 2001BRENTWOOD.INFO 942QUEENS.INFO 847.998.0200 Susan Teper 847.509.0200 Ryanne Bumps 847.509.0200 Kimberly Meixner 847.509.0200 Dina Silver 847.998.0200

$305,000

NORTHBROOK 2bed/2ba

3050PHEASANTCREEK303.INFO 312.491.0200 Leslie Silverman

$274,900

GLENVIEW

2bed/1ba

1751HENLEY1N.INFO 847.367.0500 Kathy Menighan Wilson

$235,000

773.472.0200


THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017 |

PROUD LUXURY LEADER NORTH SHORE*

GLENVIEW 5bed/3.1ba

$1,065,000

NORTHBROOK 5bed/4.1ba

$995,000

1958CENTRALRD.INFO 955BERMUDADUNES.INFO Connie Dornan 847.998.0200 Anthony Mehrabian 847.881.0200

GLENVIEW

4bed/4ba

GLENVIEW 4115LAKE.INFO CARA FELD

$699,900

1248CEDARWOOD.INFO Hepburn/Cascia

NE W !

847.998.0200

$2,275,000 5BED/4.1BA 847.509.0200

GLENVIEW 2bed/2.1ba

$449,000

105CORNELL.INFO Cara Feld

TWIN LAKES, WI 4bed/4ba

GLENVIEW 3bed/2ba

$434,900

GLENVIEW 4bed/2.1ba

$400,000

GLENVIEW 4bed/3.1ba

2313ROBINCREST.INFO 2911JERRIE.INFO 2912HARRISON.INFO 847.509.0200 Connie Dornan 847.998.0200 Pam Gottfred MacPherson 847.998.0200 Lena Bondar

$2,100,000

DUNE ACRES, IN 2bed/2.1ba

$995,000

NEW BUFFALO, MI 5bed/4.2ba

$1,450,000

UNION PIER, MI 6bed/4.1ba

$1,375,000

2003ELAKESHOREDR.INFO 23CRESTDR.INFO 10950BASSWOODDR.INFO 10400SMITHRD.INFO Mary Brennan 630.660.7631 Mark Hull 219.406.8090 Liz Roch 312.636.8751 Gail Lowrie 312.925.2121

$399,900

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• 188 HARBOR | GLENCOE 5BED/5.3BATH $2,485,000 • 753 VALLEY | GLENCOE 5BED/5.1BATH $2,495,000 • 830 LOCUST | WINNETKA 6BED/5.1BATH $2,395,000 • 826 LOCUST | WINNETKA 6BED/5.1BATH $2,875,000 120 HARBOR | GLENCOE • 560 OAK | WINNETKA 5BED/5.3BATH $3,075,000 6BED/5.1BATH $3,475,000 • 1035 SHERIDAN | WINNETKA www.heritageluxury.com 8BED/10.2BATH $13,750,000

*MRED NORTH SHORE CLOSED VOLUME, $1M+: 1/1/16-12/31/16

19


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| SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017

SPORTS

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: @tnswsports

UNSHAKABLE SHAW Resolute guard serving as a steady presence for 18-4 Titans BY BILL MCLEAN , SPORTS@NORTHSHOREWEEKEND.COM

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izzy Shaw’s three-point shot wasn’t right at the beginning of the 2016-17 girls basketball season. The shortcoming bothered the Glenbrook South junior point guard, prompting her to come up with a plan to make it right. Shaw stuck around after each practice to take more shots from beyond the arc. At least 100. “A lot of shots,” said Titans assistant girls basketball coach Scott Nemecek, who, along with head coach Steve Weissenstein, serves as a rebounder for Shaw’s “overtime” sessions. Her improved marksmanship from long range — call it “Shaw’s sank redemption” — was glaring in a game at New Trier on Jan. 20. The 5-foot-7 floor general hit three of her first four trey tries and finished with a game-high 12 points (on four-of-six shooting from three-point terrain) in Glenbrook South’s 44-36 victory. “I picked up what helped my shot go in,” Shaw said of her aha moment during one of those post-practice minutes. “I grew as a player, and the confidence in my shot grew.” When returning all-Central Suburban League selection and University of Denver-bound Carie Weinman — a 5-9, doeverything guard — had to sit out eight games with a knee injury, beginning in late December, Shaw had to grow some more as a hoopster. And it showed, as the Titans (18-4, 6-1 in the CSL South) went 6-2 without Weinman, who returned to action against New Trier last weekend. “She’s such a huge part of our team,” Shaw said after Weinman scored nine points, including four on back-to-back driving layups, against a Trevians squad (13-9, 3-4) that had won six of its last seven games. “We missed her, of course, but those three weeks were really good for us considering we played as well as we did without Carie. Everybody had to play better when she was out. Everybody also

last weekend to attend a cousin’s wedding in Elgin. “That was something she earned, making the varsity as a freshman. She’s focused on basketball. “Good kid, funny kid,” added the member of the 2014-15 University Athletic Association cochampion women’s basketball team at the University of Chicago. “My little sister is smart, too.” Nemecek, the Titans’ assistant coach and one of Shaw’s personal rebounders, sees Shaw’s competitive side on the courts and Shaw’s friendly side in the school’s hallways. He admires both sides. “She’s receptive to coaching,” he said. “Lizzy is also so positive and delightful. Every time I see her during the school hours, she’s either smiling or going up to people and starting conversations with them.” Nemecek settles for an entirely different kind of sound after most practices at Glenbrook South: a basketball, launched by Shaw, falling through a net. Notable: Glenbrook South sophomore guard Libbie Vanderveen scored 10 points (second among teammates to Carie Weinman’s 15) in a 42-39 DRIVING MISS LIZZY: Junior guard Lizzy Shaw, seen here in Glenbrook South’s game at New Trier on Dec. 6, continues to step up her defeat of visiting Hersey on Jan. game. PHOTOGRAPHY BY TRACY ALLEN 21. Junior forward Liz LaPierre around the Detweiller Park entered Glenbrook South,” Weis- player for us,” said Weinman, who tallied eight, and sophomore gained confidence.” Shaw made Weissenstein’s course at the Class 3A state meet senstein said. “She’s underrated poured in a team-high 15 points guard Makayla Stadler chipped varsity in her freshman season, in Peoria: Shaw. as a defender, usually going up in South’s 42-39 defeat of visiting in with six points. South led but she was more than familiar No wonder she wasn’t tired against the other team’s No. 1 or and state-ranked Hersey (19-3) 28-16 at the half. … The Titans with the atmosphere surrounding after playing all 32 minutes — 2 [player], and she boxes out on Jan. 21. “She does the little produced an 8-0 run at the start Titans basketball. One of her and collecting three steals, to go really well for a guard.” things well — finds the open of the third quarter and a 9-0 older sisters, Ali (Class of 2011), with those clutch 12 points — in With about three minutes left teammate, attacks … she can do spurt in the fourth quarter in played varsity hoops for three the game at New Trier last in the first quarter and South it all. But we sometimes have to their 44-36 win at New Trier on seasons before continuing her weekend. trailing 8-5 at New Trier last tell her to shoot more. Jan. 20. Senior guard Callie hoops career at the University of Shaw no longer runs cross weekend, that guard received a “And she’s the sweetest Pekosh (eight points) scored the Chicago. country. Basketball is her steady sharp pass from Weinman person,” Weinman added. “Our final three points in the first se“I was at most of her Glen- in the world of the sports. Speak- moments after Weinman entered ‘Little Lizzy’ — that’s what we quence and five more in the latter, brook South games, watching and ing of steady, that’s a word that game action for the first time call her — is such a nice person.” as the visitors limited New Trier’s dribbling around,” said Lizzy accurately describes her game. since Dec. 22. Shaw nailed a School work and basketball are Trevians to two points in the Shaw, who averages about seven Shaw, while dribbling, is so good three-pointer — her second of Shaw’s top commitments in the game’s final 5:16. LaPierre (three points, three rebounds, three and in control with either hand, the frame — and then watched winter, though she finds time to points, four rebounds, three assists and two steals per game. you can’t tell what her dominant Weinman net those back-to-back watch TV and read books other steals) and Stadler (six points, Months before her first varsity hand is until she shoots right- layups in a 47-second span. than textbooks. Her aim in 2018 four rebounds) each came up with basketball game, Shaw ran handed. Suddenly it was Glenbrook and beyond is to pass and shoot a steal, 25 seconds apart, to thwart around — as a member of the And her passes are National South with a 12-8 advantage. and defend for a college women’s NT’s comeback bid in the fourth varsity cross country team. In the Honor Society smart. The potent backcourt band was basketball team. quarter. Weinman came down fall of 2014, only one member of “Lizzy has been a wiz with the back together. “Lizzy plays hard, plays her with a team-high seven rebounds “Lizzy has always been a key heart out,” said sister Ali, in town for the victors. the team qualified to hustle basketball since the day she


THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017 |

21

SPORTS

BLOOD, SWEAT — AND NO TEARS

Weingardt’s turnaround season continues at the Central Suburban League Tourney BY KEVIN REITERMAN, SPORTS@NORTHSHOREWEEKEND.COM

A

new phrase being kicked around these days is “Let’s be legendary.” lenbrook North’s Jacob Weingardt started his post-match interview by casually wiping a little blood off his forehead. Nothing serious. Just a dab of crimson running down his face. Just a little battle liquid when two heavyweights enter the circle and engage in combat. But this wasn’t just any skirmish for Weingardt. “Got a little revenge,” the GBN senior said. Weingardt came up with one of his best efforts of the season, when he claimed a 3-1 overtime win over top-seeded Peter Runac of Deerfield in the 285-pound third-place match at the Central Suburban League Tournament at Maine South on Jan. 21. It wasn’t predicted to go down like that. Weingardt went into the bout as the overwhelming underdog. In an earlier match this season against Runac, things didn’t go well for Weingardt. In that confrontation, Runac (25-14) needed less than a period to toss, turn and pin Weingardt. “I just tried to stay clear of getting tossed,” said Weingardt. “I’m sure he thought he could toss me again.” Weingardt is a different grappler these days. He’s competing with a quiet confidence and a fierce determination. Last year wasn’t exactly a memorable season for him. He didn’t get a lot done. “I don’t even remember what my record was last year. But it wasn’t good,” said Weingardt. This year has been a reversal of fortune. Weingardt carved out wins No. 28, No. 29 and No. 30 at the league tourney. His lone setback was a 4-2 overtime decision to Niles North’s Dylan Ramirez in the semifinals. (Ramirez went on to beat Glenbrook South’s Alex Balabanos in the championship). With his 30-10 ledger, Wein-

gardt will head to the Wheeling Regional on Feb. 4 as a contender. How did he get here? He started setting his alarm for 4:50 a.m. Four. Five. Zero. A. M. The “want” to get better has made a huge difference in Weingardt’s wrestling career. All season, he’s been rising and shining at that time in order to make it to GBN’s early morning workouts. Dedication has been key with the athletic Weingardt, who recorded 46 tackles, including six for losses, as the starting nose guard for the GBN’s 9-2 football team. GBN head wrestling coach Jason Erwinski has been thrilled with Weingardt’s turnaround. “He’s spent a lot of time in the weight room. He’s strong,” said Erwinski. “But I really think the change has been with his confidence. “When he steps out on the mat, he thinks he can win,” the coach added. “In fact, he expects to win. He asked me [today], ‘Why was I third? Why not first?’ ”

THAT’S A WRAP: Glenbrook North’s Jacob Weingardt takes on Deerfield’s Peter Runac in the third-place match at the CSL Tourney. PHOTOGRAPHY BY JUDY FIDKOWSKI

Notable: Erwinski and his staff appear have the Spartans headed in the right direction. After winning only one match in three years, GBN came up with six dual-meet wins this winter. And the team produced a respectable fifth-place showing at the CSL Tournament (132.5 points). The top four teams were Deerfield (310.5), New Trier (201.5), Evanston (178) and Maine South (159.5). Glenbrook South placed sixth (127.5). … GBN’s other top placers were freshman Kazden Orshoski (4th at 106), senior Gio Kollias (3rd at 132), senior Jake Fahey (4th at 138), sophomore Cam Casey (6th, at 182), sophomore Trent Williams (5th at 195) and senior Brandon Friedman at 220 (5th at 220). … Friedman is now 29-9 on the season. Fahey is 21-8. And Kollias is 26-10.


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| SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

SPORTS

STEADY CLIMB Glenbrook South’s Bond reaches 30-win mark at CSL Tourney BY BILL MCLEAN , SPORTS@NORTHSHOREWEEKEND.COM

T

hrough his involvement with the Boys Scouts of America, Ethan Bond backpacked the Appalachian Trail not too long ago. It tested the Glenbrook South senior wrestler more than he thought it would. “Pretty hard, with lots of sweat,” Bond recalled at the Central Suburban League Meet at Maine South on Jan. 21. “But it was also exciting. “The mountains,” he added, “are a lot taller than I expected.” Bond’s too-tough-to-scale Mount Everest at the league meet in the 132-pound division? Deerfield High School junior Holden Heller. Heller and Bond met in a championship final, with Heller (35-3) claiming the top prize after an 11-0 victory. “He’s the best wrestler I’ve faced this season,” Bond said. “I knew I had to defend his legs in order to give me the best chance.” Bond (30-7) received a bye before grappling Maine East junior Julio Cabrales (14-9) in a quarterfinal. Bond survived 2-1, but he came away frustrated after topping the eventual fifth-place finisher. “A lot of bottom,” Bond said of the bout’s lack of flow. “It was a tough start for me, too close. But it woke me up, and I had a lot of time to prepare for my next match; a teammate helped me get ready for my semifinal.” Awaiting him in a semi was Glenbrook North senior Gio Kollias, who entered the tournament with a 23-9 mark and a higher seed than Bond’s. Bond was ready. The Titan took control at the outset and stayed in control, earning a finals berth with a 15-0 technical fall at 4:09. “I handled him defensively pretty well, after thinking it would be a pretty tough match,” Bond said. “On the shots he took against me, I scored. I worked on top and stayed aggressive.” The result did not surprise

state championship at 126 pounds in 2014). Bond wants to be either an engineer or a physicist in his postsinglet days. Another challenge, no doubt. Or another series of challenges. But Bond, conqueror of the Appalachian Trail, welcomes it. It’s how wrestlers roll.

THE MAN WITH THE SILVER MEDAL: Bond, Ethan Bond, of Glenbrook South’s battles Deerfield’s Holden Heller (right) in the 132-pound final at the CSL Tourney. PHOTOGRAPHY BY JUDY FIDKOWSKI

Titans senior Brian Lau, a 160pound wrestler and a friend of Bond for 11 years. Bond nudged Lau toward the sport of wrestling when the two were freshmen. “Ethan can dominate when he wrestles,” said Lau (13-16), who

placed fourth at 160 pounds in the league tournament last weekend. “Our coaches like to tell us, while we’re wrestling, ‘Dominate, make the gap bigger.’ “Ethan,” Lau added, “is probably the hardest working wrestler in our

room. He’s very serious and focused. He takes things seriously.” The two colleges Bond is seriously considering are the University of Illinois and the Colorado School of Mines, home of the fighting — wait for it … — Ore-

diggers. CSM’s men’s wrestling team is 3-6 in 2016-17, with one grappler (junior Caleb Micho) from Illinois on its roster. The 133-pound Micho, a Belvidere resident, graduated from Rockford Lutheran after winning a

Notable: Glenbrook South’s wrestlers placed sixth (127.5 points) at the CSL Tournament at Maine South on Jan. 21. Titans senior Alex Balabanos, like classmate Ethan Bond at 132 pounds, exited the gym in Park Ridge with a runner-up medal. Balabanos lost (fall, 1:45) to Niles North senior Dylan Ramirez in the final at 285 pounds. Balabanos (26-9) had downed Highland Park junior Sebastian Newman (via fall at 1:52) and Deerfield junior Peter Runac (via a 5-4 decision in a semifinal) in his first two bouts in the tourney. … Other top-six efforts by Titans at the league gathering: senior Daniel Pravich (32-7) —third place, 152 pounds; senior Branko Andelkovic (26-11) — fourth, 195 pounds; senior Ben Schonken (21-18) — fifth, 120 pounds; sophomore Sean Lynch (21-16) — fifth, 106 pounds; senior Mason Slan (19-16) — sixth, 170 pounds; and junior Noah Hill — sixth, 113 pounds. … Pravich’s only loss at the tourney was to eventual 152pound champion Steven Weathers. The Giants senior improved his overall mark to an eye-catching 28-1. … CSL North division champion Deerfield won the CSL Tournament with a 310.5-point total, followed by CSL South champion New Trier (201.5), Evanston (178), Maine South (159.5) and Glenbrook North (132.5). … Glenbrook South vies for Class 3A sectional berths at the Wheeling Regional on Feb. 3-4. Other schools in the field, including the host Wildcats: Glenbrook North, New Trier, Loyola Academy, Hersey, Buffalo Grove, Palatine and Fremd.


THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017 |

23

SUNDAY BREAKFAST

Spirit of John Evans lives on

Hospital) — is hungry. As we head for the door to begin our walk to The Lucky ohn Evans lives. Sort of. Platter, my gruff but inThe namesake of Evantriguing companion from ston and one of the founders the past notices of North Western University in items for sale on a 1851 — before it became known shelf in the cozy as Northwestern University — tasting room. He died at the age of 83 in 1897. But can’t take his eyes his spirit has returned to these off a whiskey parts in 2017, and it’s full of opinbottle, cut in ions and poised to share them half and powith the readers of Evanston sitioned Magazine, a JWC Media sister horizontalpublication of The North Shore ly. It’s actuWeekend. ally a cigar How robust is Evans’ spirit? ashtray. It’s visible to anybody who has I read his facial a tie to Evanston. expresThe 2nd Governor of the Territory of Colorado (from 1862sion: Maybe 1865) and friend of Abraham l a t e r some other Lincoln agrees to dine with me was a Jaguar day. at The Lucky Platter Restaurant repair shop in On our way to the restaurant, for breakfast, but only after we the 1960s. We sit on steel bar Evans strides purposely past more staring folks along a kick things off with a visit to stools in the tasting room, as a John Evans FEW Spirits, located one-tenth friendly distiller greets us and Chicago Avenue sidewalk. I try of a mile from the restaurant in encourages us to order a flight of Evans views the design of the FEW Spirits’ Breakfast Gin. to keep up with the native of Evanston, or … John Evans’ town. gins and whiskeys for $5. coin, specifically the depiction of “Good choice,” the distiller Waynesville, Ohio, and CincinI take a “fin” out of my wallet the man gracing the cent. “I’m curious, because this area says. “It’s got some Earl Grey tea nati College graduate (Class of 1838), but the only way to do so It’s Lincoln, again. was a dry community in the and show it to Evans, also the in it, with juniper and citrus. is by jogging. Evans samples it. 1800s,” says Evans, who, along founder of the Illinois Republican The distiller pours a little Now I’m receiving stares. “Lemony, isn’t it?” the distiller with other Methodist movers and Party. Wheat Whiskey in a glass and a His eyes widen, after noticing little Barrel Gin in another glass. asks. shakers, founded what would The host at The Lucky Platter become a Big Ten Conference an image of Lincoln — his old Evans downs the former, while I Evans nods at the distiller and welcomes Evans and his gasping university along the North Shore. friend and the 16th President of take a cautious sip of the gin. The stands up, my cue to leave a tip breakfast mate and asks, “Table We’re standing just outside the the United States — on the cur- distiller asks us to react. of bills featuring the face of or booth, gentlemen?” “Table,” Evans blurts. “I have entrance of FEW Spirits, de- rency. I take a coin out of my right “Superb, young man!” Evans George Washington. Evans — scribed on its website as “a dis- pants pocket and flip it three feet roars. also a physician, a railroad pro- no idea what a booth is.” tillery with an old-world, indus- into the air. Before I can voice my thought, moter and founder of hospitals, Evans scans the menu and trial-hip vibe, offering tours and It’s a penny. Evans eyes another gin bottle and including Lakeside Hospital in shakes his head. Never before had a tasting room.” I hope it lands heads, not tails. points to it. He wants to taste Chicago (later named Mercy he seen so many choices and so BY BILL MCLEAN ILLUSTRATION BY BARRY BLITT

J

Passersby stare at Evans’ thick, lengthy beard and Civil War-era togs. I fear a sneeze from Evans would free a trio of hidden birds from his facial hair. We enter the five-year-old establishm e n t , which I find out

many foreign entrees. But he likes the description of one and orders a Classic Benedict: poached eggs, with honey-baked ham and hollandaise and served on toasted cornbread. As we wait for our food, Evans looks at the other patrons. I look down at my notepad and begin to doodle. He clears his throat. “What are you doing?” he asks. Evans sounds exactly like what one of my high school teachers sounded like when I wasn’t paying attention in geometry class. I stop doodling. A softer side of John Evans emerges as he thinks out loud about the topics he’ll address in the pages of Evanston Magazine. “The construction boom going on around here … quite stunning,” he says. “I have always marveled at the beauty of Lake Michigan, and I am looking forward to traversing the paths along the shore and making observations. I understand there has been considerable talk lately about local preservation issues. Look for me to weigh in on those. “And is it true about the men’s basketball team at Northwestern?” he adds. “I learned from reading on the inner net — or is it the intra net? — that the Wildcats own a 16-4 record. Grand. That is absolutely grand.” The debut of “Being John Evans” will run in the February/March issue of Evanston Magazine.


SATURDAY JANUARY 28 | SUNDAY JANUARY 29 2017 | THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

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The North Shore Weekend West, Issue 87  

The West Zone of the North Shore Weekend is published every two weeks and features the news and personalities of Glenview, Northbrook, and D...