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THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

Interiors

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p. 46 NEWS 10 Thanksgiving traditions

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In North Shore cities and villages, touch football and other family traditions rule during Thanksgiving.

11 Higher taxes

President Obama has pledged to raise taxes on those who make $250,000 or more — which is thousands of people on the North Shore.

12 Taking a swing

Golf commissions on North Shore stay busy all year long.

24 North Shore Offerings

Take a look at intriguing houses in our towns.

26 Open House

A large list — complete with map — of where to find your next home on the North Shore this weekend.

LIFESTYLE & ARTS

15 Keys to success

What are the keys to creating a successful benefit on the North Shore?

OPINION 30 Facing off

Two columnists on either side of the political spectrum offer their opinions.

16 Social whirl

Take a look at some of the top parties attended by North Shore residents recently.

17 Love & Marriage

What is the best way to divvy up chores between a husband and a wife?

The most durable finish on the market.

BUSINESS 31 Book it

With Borders shutting down in Wilmette and elsewhere, how are the independent book stores on the North Shore doing?

20 Sunday Breakfast

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Monica Pedersen talks about design and home decoration as Thanksgiving approaches.

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34 Main Street

Bob Gariano looks at a Lake Forest resident, who worked at McDonald’s for years, who runs another food operation: the Northern Illinois Food Bank.

22 Your Weekend Agenda

Find out about the top events coming up this weekend on the North Shore.

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SPORTS 44 One-woman show

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46 The Perfect Weekend

Restaurateurs Debbie and Carlos Nieto talks about their ideal weekend together..


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index | 7

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

Refine your nesting instincts.

A game that has the touch

on Thanksgiving

O

ur column Love & Marriage, written by Joanna Brown, unites two topics that — as the song says — go together like a horse and carriage. But Thanksgiving & Pro Football?

turkey is finished. In this issue Bill McLean takes a look at the Thanksgiving tradition of touch football — which can generate more aches and pains than the name suggests — and more on the North Shore.

At first glance, the association seems incongruous. The former is a national holiday based on a peaceful meal shared in the New World by pilgrims and Indians and the thanks given to God for their bounty. The latter is a game marked by savage hits, penalties for bad behavior and mind-numbing strategies. Yes, the Native-Americans of the 17th century are the ancestors of the Washington Redskins logo — and the Dallas Cowboys supposedly still have a hole at the top of the stadium so God can watch — but any other link between Thanksgiving & Pro Football seems to be pure chance.

Speaking of sports, though only hardy golfers are still playing these days, we take a look at why Glencoe — out of all the North Shore suburbs — is the only one that elects officials to a golf advisory commission. Lest you think it’s a quiet body of duffers, a few years back the chairman was ousted. Joanna Brown has the story.

Still, the game of football is tied indelibly with the holiday. And it’s not just the three pro games shown – college football boasts a Thanksgiving tradition, as does high school. But best of all to the football wannabes who always wanted to lead the final game-winning drive but whose teenage talent fell short, touch football always appears once the

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And as mentioned above, Joanna is the author of our Love & Marriage column. This week she looks at the10.12 BSM NS weekend Nesting.indd divvying up of chores between a husband and a wife. That may be one to refer to on Thanksgiving, when the fine china is piled up, the gravy is on the dining room floor — and one spouse will likely be asleep in front of a 60-inch screen playing a third NFL game of the day. Enjoy the weekend.

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8 | news

I’mNOTwide awake Sleep deprivation among students a big problem on North Shore — especially with rise of social media

■ by

bill mclean

It’s a pose struck by teenagers in high school classrooms across the North Shore, usually during first period: Sleepy-eyed, hair-disheveled student rests head atop right hand, turning into fidgety version of Rodin’s “The Thinker.” The student is sitting either in a corner or behind an enormous football player, blinkblink-blinking and hoping the teacher won’t notice the one who got maybe two hours of sleep. A bout of snoring sometimes ruins that plan. “Sleep deprivation among students is a big concern,” said Pat Cannon, chair of the counseling department at Highland Park High School. “It’s also a part of a bigger picture involving student anxiety and depression. “Students,” she added, “are constantly trying to meet expectations from parents, teachers, coaches, peers, themselves. Too often they’re overextended.” According to the National Sleep Foundation, American teens require a little more than nine hours of sleep a night. But only eight percent of them are getting it. There are three shifts in a teen’s packed day: school hours; after-school hours devoted to sports and/or other extracurricular activities; hours after dinner at home. It’s the post-dinner shift, more than the other two blocks of time, that’s turning teens into book-toting zombies the next day. “It does start at home,” said John Maher, Lake Forest High School’s dean of social work. “If a student is struggling academically or emotionally, one of the first questions we ask is, ‘Are you getting enough sleep?’ I asked the question earlier today

(Nov. 9). Kids are anxious at night, worried about the next day for what could be a number of reasons. “When they’re anxious,” he added, “they can’t sleep. When they can’t sleep, they’re watching TV, texting, using a computer, calling friends, Facebook-ing. Half the night for some is spent engaging in social media.” Most first-period classes begin well before businesses open. After the start time at a high school in Edina, Minn., was changed from 7:25 a.m. to 8:30 a.m., verbal SAT scores for the top 10 percent of the students improved by several hundred points. “An adolescent’s brain thrives with later wake-up times,” noted documentarian Vicki Abeles and Vassar associate professor of psychology Abigail A. Baird, in a piece posted by Valerie Strauss of The Answer Sheet. “The increase (in SAT scores) could not be attributed to any variable other than later start times.” First period at Highland Park High School starts at 8 a.m. “It’s been 8 a.m. for decades,” Cannon said. “Starting later than that would be hard to do because of all of our students’ activities and responsibilities after school.” Three years ago administrators at North Shore Country Day School in Winnetka opted to start first period at 8:15 a.m., or 15 minutes later than in years past. Fifteen minutes … exactly 1.042 percent of a day. No big deal, right? Wrong. “Those 15 minutes felt like 45 minutes to many,” said NSCDS principal David Potter. “The pacing of the morning was better. People were able to get settled more easily, and people weren’t as harried. “Our school has been examining the

overall health of our student body, and getting enough sleep at night is an issue of absolute importance. There is a correlation between good health and students performing at their best.” Students who don’t achieve REM (rapid eye movement) sleep night are likely overloading themselves – at school and at home: Advance Placement and honors courses and sports/extracurricular commitments during the day, followed by hours and hours with all kinds of electronic devices throughout the night. “A parent has to ask some questions,” said Lake Forest’s Maher. “Is it wise for a student to have a TV in the bedroom? A computer in the bedroom? A cell phone in the bedroom? Some families make their children turn off their cell phones at night and place them in a dish on a counter in the kitchen. That won’t cure a kid’s insomnia — some kids just don’t sleep well, no matter what —but it’s not a bad idea.” New Trier High School senior Riley Hayward swims for the Trevians, meaning she’s often training in the school’s pool hours before the start of first period. But Hayward doesn’t hold the record for most yawns executed in the first period. “I look around, and I see exhausted people, people nodding off,” she said. “People do fall asleep in class. I try to get at least eight hours of sleep each night. I’ve never had trouble falling asleep, probably because of swimming’s demands. “Our team,” she added, “knows how important sleep is. We sometimes brag about how early we go to bed. I remember saying, ‘Hey, I went to bed at 8:30 last night!’ ” ■


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THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

BOWLED OVER ■ by

bill mclean

It’s typically dubbed “The Turkey Bowl.” It’s that traditional pickup football game played by oodles of families and friends all over the country, staged in parks and spacious back yards every Thanksgiving Day. “We play our game in the morning, around 8:30 or 9,” Highland Park native Scott Goldstein said. “We do that so we can make it back in time to watch the first college football on TV.” Players of all shapes and sizes and ages compete in the battles. Some combatants — middle-aged weekend warrior types, thinking they’re still as agile and tough as they were in their high school days — insist on tackling; most play by two-hand touch rules. “Everybody gets hurt, basically,” Goldstein said. “Sprained ankles, muscle pulls, some bloody noses. But it’s still fun. “When we get home we’re all sore, and we hear, over and over from those who didn’t play, ‘I told you so.’ ” On Happy Bird Days every late November, most Americans embrace the traditions of playing football, watching football (college and pro) on TV, eating way more than they should at grandma’s and — about an hour after swallowing that last piece of pumpkin pie — bowing to the powers of tryptophan after finding the nearest couch. “Everybody, at some point on Thanksgiving Day, is in a food coma,” said Lake Forest High School senior Christine Andersen. The Reilly family of Lake Forest holds its Turkey Bowl every three years. But its version has absolutely noting to do with football. Players in the Reilly backyards pick teams and bowl … turkeys. Actual turkeys, the frozen kind you find in grocery stores. Butterballs as bowling balls. Myra Reilly came up with the idea. One of her daughters, Lisa Schlenker, took care of most of the event’s logistics in its inaugural year. “Lisa,” Myra said, “is very creative. She likes to take my ideas and run with them. “We work very well together.” A lengthy sheet of plastic has been used to serve as the bowling lane. The bowling pins? Real bowling pins, purchased by Lisa at a bowling alley in Chicago. “Sometimes the turkey doesn’t make it anywhere near the pins,” said a giggling Laura Brinckerhoff, Lisa’s sister. “I remember one time it stopped about halfway down. Completely stopped. It was such a hilarious moment, especially when you take into consideration our family dynamics.

Thanksgiving traditions on North Shore are focused on sports — and jumping into a lake

“We love it when there’s so much nonsense going on.” A “turkey,” by the way, happens to be the term for throwing three consecutive strikes in game. “That’s never happened in our back yard,” Reilly said. “We had some who have rolled one strike. We give out awards for strikes.” Among the Reillys’ other nontraditional Thanksgiving traditions is a must-see pina-feather-on-the-turkey. Myra Reilly paints a six-foot image of a turkey for the contest. “With a huge backside,” she said. “I give everybody a cardboard feather, about 15 inches long, and they have to decorate it or design it to reflect their personality or interests.” Every Thanksgiving Wally Hayward of Kenilworth and his family (wife Jen and daughters Riley and Hope) are interested in

‘Everybody gets hurt,

Trying to roll a “turkey” with a turkey is one way to enjoy Thanksgiving on the North Shore.

photography by reilly family

basically. Sprained ankles, muscle pulls, some bloody noses. But it’s still fun.’ — Scott Goldstein gobbling up … seafood. In Key Largo, Fla. “The Sunday before Thanksgiving we head to O’Hare for an early flight,” said Hayward. “Wheels up, at around 6 a.m. We stay down there for a week, paddle-boarding and snorkeling and eating sushi. “We love spending our Thanksgivings in Florida.” New Trier High School senior Devin Boehm ate his traditional Thanksgiving feast at the little kids’ table two years ago. Boehm stands 6-foot and weighs 180 pounds. He was Gulliver at the table that day. “I enjoyed that, didn’t mind sitting there at all,” said the New Trier football player. “I probably do what a lot of people do on Thanksgiving. I play football with friends at the school. It gets intense; we get after it. But I love the day because of the food.” One Thanksgiving Day, years ago, Boehm was invited to witness another family’s tradition, which was about as traditional as the Reillys’. “A kid I know jumped into Lake Michigan, with his family. Seven of them, all at once, going into Lake Michigan. What a sight that was. I laughed.” ■

11/17-11/18/12

Kristen Tallon and Lauren Tallon have the pins set up for an annual Turkey Bowl event in Lake Forest.

photography by reilly family


11/17-11/18/12

news | 11

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

TAX MAN ■ by

angelika labno

The federal tax decisions to be made before Christmas are likely to bring no holiday cheer for North Shore incomes — and they could be the equivalent of a lump of coal. Newly reelected President Barack Obama has made it clear that he wants any couple making more than $250,000 a year in income to fork over more of their money to the federal government starting in 2013. On Nov. 9, the president announced he was willing to compromise with Republicans on preventing certain tax hikes by the year’s end — but increasing taxes on the wealthiest Americans is not negotiable. The repercussions of a federal income tax increase would be felt all throughout the North Shore, a hub for affluent professionals and small businesses. The top two income tax rates are set to increase from 33 percent to 36 percent and 35 percent to 39.6 percent. The new ObamaCare plan adds a 3.8 percent investment tax on the wealthy as well. Factor in that the state of Illinois raised the income tax 67 percent in 2011, and the North Shore is facing a tax burden it hasn’t experienced in decades.

Potential higher rates would have large impact on North Shore

“No one likes to pay more of their hard-earned money to the government without any idea of where it’s going,” said State Sen. Susan Garrett of Lake Forest, a Democrat

‘No one likes to pay more of their hard-earned money to the government without any idea of where it’s going.’

— State Sen. Susan Garrett

who voted against the rise in state income taxes last year. “If a tax increase is implemented as expected, we deserve to see a comprehensive plan with details on spending, debt reduction and resolution of entitlement programs.” Kenilworth is considered by Forbes.com to be the second most affluent community in the United States. According to 2009 city data, the median income for the village is $240,750, which means almost half of its residents would be affected by Obama’s plan. Entering the

36 percent bracket would mean a couple in Kenilworth making $250,000 would theoretically pay another $7,500 a year in federal income tax, though deductions would likely lessen the blow. Wilmette resident and lawyer Kevin Mudd adds that the expected 33 percent rise in the capital gains tax — now at 15 percent but likely to jump to 20 percent — affects small businesses, home owners, and those who sell investments, to name a few. With the end of the year approaching and no solution by Congress in sight, many are forced to evaluate whether to sell simply to lock in the lower rate. “Selling stock is easier,” Mudd said. “Selling houses can take months.” Further, the tax-free exemption for the federal estate tax is likely to drop to $1 million on Jan. 1, 2013 from more than $5 million this year. A slew of other taxes — such as the 2% cut in workers’ Social Security taxes — could change. Sighs Lake Bluff resident and tax lawyer Mike Rhoades, “The failure to provide clear and predictable tax laws disadvantages all citizens. The only certainties are death and taxes.” ■


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//

STAYING ON COURSE

ALL YEAR LONG Golf commissions on North Shore hear players’ concerns, review hole handicaps

//

Mike Driscoll sends a putt toward the hole as John Bradley looks on during the Senior Fall Classic hosted by the Glencoe Golf Advisory Committee at Glencoe Golf Club.

photography by j. geil

The golf season may be winding down, but in Glencoe the work is far from over. The conference room at Village Hall is aglow long after the sun has set on a Monday, and committee members are involved in a scientific review of the handicaps on each hole of the public Glencoe Golf Club. The projection screen is covered in long, convoluted equations involving sigma and other mathematical symbols more common in a graduate school statistics class. The 20-year-old committee is the liaison between the Village and the course’s most frequent users. Its six members are Glencoe residents and Golf Club members, and as appointments of the Village Board they take quite seriously their charge to advise the board on all matters of the course. “The staff is capable, but it’s our job to help compose the golf program,” said Village trustee Joe Keefe, who chairs the Golf Advisory Committee and acts as a liaison to the Village Board. Not only in Glencoe but in towns up and down the North Shore, municipal course managers balance the wants of course members with the demands of the taxpayers they answer to – who aren’t always the same people. In Glencoe, for example, only 10,000 of the 30,000 rounds played annually are played by residents. “We have monthly meetings to discuss and brainstorm, and they’re open to the public,” Keefe said. “The (committee) members are sharp business people who bring practical business IQs to the committee, and through that we’ve had expertise in customer service, marketing, and other areas.” A year ago, Lake Forest created a special advisory committee appointed by the city manager to oversee the cityowned Deerpath Golf Course. Kemper Sports was called in to help operate the course more efficiently, as Deerpath — constructed in 1927 — for the first time received $20,000

from the Recreation Fund to cover costs in 2011. The advisory committee was conceived during the hiring process. “Before we hired Kemper Sports we did all kinds of public meetings about the course and what people wanted to see there, and what came through was that the users really wanted to have a voice,” said Jeff Wait, superintendent of special facilities. “We don’t have all the answers but we’re always seeking public input, and we formed this special advisory committee to the city manager. “They’re like a sentinel for the membership, and they have their fingers on the members’ pulse. I think we get frank conversation from them because they’re not associated with the staff, and we get buy-in from them because they’re residents and members.” When operations change at Deerpath – such as an anticipated review of the handicaps this winter, like in Glencoe – discussions begin with the nine members of the Special Advisory Committee. Recommendations are forwarded to a golf course subcommittee of the Parks Board, the full Parks Board, and then the City Council for final action. Wait says the system allows staff to work out all the kinks before the City Council reviews any proposal, and also enables Advisory Committee members to carry accurate information into the community. “This is a small town and neighbors talk. When they’re grocery shopping and someone asks about the course, they have the knowledge to say, ‘This is what we’re doing, and this is why,’” Wait said. In Wilmette, three of the Park District commissioners form a subcommittee focused on the Wilmette Golf Club - as is that case with each of Wilmette’s recreational facilities. The golf subcommittee meets monthly at the course, and meetings are open to the public. There is also an annual users’ meeting to solicit feedback, scheduled this year for Dec. 8.

But there are also independent men’s and women’s clubs at the Wilmette Golf Club, which facilities superintendent Jeff Bowen said are eager to interact with Park District staff. “We hear from them continuously on all sorts of issues, from operational things to facilities issues, like if there is a bad spot on the fairway or a problem with a tee box, or if they don’t like the chicken salad. We take it all in for consideration, within the boundaries of our budget,” Bowen said. ■

Amy Hwang /the new yorker collection/www.cartoonbank.com


11/17-11/18/12

news | 13

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

ALL-WORLD PLAYER LFCDS grad Flynn has led a rich life working on human rights

■ by

bill mclean

When Edward J. (EJ) Flynn attended Lake Forest Country Day School in the 1970s, football coach Frank Ward also emceed current events contests between two teams of four LFCDS students. Players who thought they knew the answer to a question posed by Ward would hit a button, illuminating a blue light bulb. “Those quizzes,” Flynn recalled, “motivated me to keep up with current events.” Flynn (Class of ’74) also hit hard and often outside the walls of the school — as a defensive end. “I loved slamming shoulder pads with my buddies,” said the 53-year-old. “We wore oldfashioned cleats then, ones with ankle supports. Old clunkers. I was by no means a star player.” But he’s an all-world figure at the United Nations in New York these days, as the Senior Human Rights Officer at the CounterTerrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED). The CTED office supports the Security Council’s Counter-Terrorism Committee, established in September 2001. He’s held the post since 2005.

“I’ve been very lucky making a living in a position that’s quite interesting and enjoyable,” said Flynn, who attended Deerfield Academy in Massachusetts after his LFCDS days and graduated from Duke University, before earning his law degree at Hasting College of Law, University of CaliforniaSan Francisco. “Everybody,” he added, “has a responsibility to contribute to the greater good of the world, and people can do that in many different ways.” The Vietnam War was the first major current event to grab a young Flynn’s undivided attention. The issues of the war kept their talons in Flynn for years. “I was quite fascinated by the way in which people in this country expressed their points of view of the war so freely, for and against,” Flynn said. “I was also tracking what was going on in Washington, D.C., and our leaders’ efforts to end the war.” At Duke, Flynn was active as a protestor against South Africa’s apartheid government. Organized campaigns on campuses all over the U.S. led several prominent universities to divest completely from South Africa and companies with ties to the government. Flynn then spent a couple of years in

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Lake Forest native EJ Flynn traveled to Yemen in 2010 in his role with the United Nations.

California after graduating from Duke, looking for work, any kind of work. One of his jobs: selling ad space for a local newspaper. “It took me a while to find my path after Duke,” he said. The field of law was Flynn’s guide. Following law school he spent six years representing Central American refugees along the U.S.-Mexico border in southern Texas. Flynn offered free legal service to refugees in detention centers. From there, Flynn served the UN as a human rights monitor in Haiti in ’93. His mission was evacuated in the republic after three months because of instability in the region. From 1994-95 Flynn was a UN human rights officer during the wars in Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina, before hopscotching Europe, Central Asia and North America from 1998-2003 as a UN coordinator for human rights programs.

Flynn’s rumpled passport could competently serve as a political science professor at accredited universities. Flynn blames — and praises — the good folks at LFCDS for that. “The teachers at Lake Forest Country Day opened my mind to the world beyond the North Shore,” Flynn said. “I was very lucky to live and study (for 10 years) in such a beautiful community like Lake Forest. “I loved my time there.” Bob Bullard taught Flynn in the seventh and ninth grades at LFCDS. He loves seeing students blossom. “EJ is a phenomenal human being,” Bullard said. “His humanness is exceptional. His humility is exceptional.” So is Flynn’s resilience. Hurricane Sandy knocked out his power in New York for five days in late October and early November. He was unruffled. “No big deal,” he said. ■

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THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

11/17-11/18/12

NEWS DIGEST REVIEW

PREVIEW

Glencoe ■ Nearly three-quarters of voters in Glencoe approved the Capital Improvement Bond Referendum on Election Day, which is earmarking about $8.6 million to fund storm sewer upgrades, street resurfacing, sanitary sewer work and sidewalk repairs. The lion’s share of the referendum — about $5.5 million — will be spent on storm sewer upgrades. Neighborhoods in the vicinity of Elm Place and Valley Street, Greenwood Avenue and Oakdale Avenue and Harbor Street and Linden Avenue will be the focus of the improvements. During the next six years, the average cost to pay the new debt will be $33 for each $10,000 of total taxes for Glencoe residents. The amount will rise for the nine years thereafter. Kenilworth ■ The Village of Kenilworth rejected a home rule referendum, voting roughly 62 percent against the measure. Though nearly every town on the North Shore — save for Glencoe — has passed home rule, Kenilworth residents strongly voted against the measure on Nov. 6. Almost 70 percent of residents cast votes, and the final tally was 854 against, 528 in favor. North Shore ■ Democrats scored sweeping victories across the North Shore on Nov. 6. In the rejiggered 10th District, Democrat Brad Schneider of Deerfield toppled oneterm incumbent, Republican Bob Dold of Kenilworth, by 52 percent to 48 percent. Schneider will be the first Democrat to represent Lake Forest in Congress in decades. Longtime Democrat incumbent Jan Schakowsky topped Republican challenger Tim Wolfe, 59 percent to 41 percent, in the remapped 9th District. On the state level, both the 29th District Senate seat and 58th District House seat remained in Democratic hands.

North Shore ■ Village offices across the North Shore will be closed Thursday, Nov. 22 for Thanksgiving. Some — including Wilmette — will also be closed on Friday, Nov. 23. Please check your local village Web site for more information. Wilmette ■ The Village Center Merchants will host the Annual Tree Lighting Ceremony on Friday, Nov. 16 at 7 p.m. on the lawn at Wilmette Village Hall. Music by local school groups will be performed. On Saturday, Nov. 17, marching bands, bagpipers, clowns, mini-cars and Santa Claus will join the annual Holiday Parade at the Wilmette Chamber of Commerce. The parade begins at the CTA parking lot on Fourth Street at 10:30 a.m. and proceeds west on Central Avenue to the Village Center at Wilmette Avenue. Winnetka ■ The village’s annual curbside leaf collection program will run until Monday, Nov. 26. Residents may rake their leaves to the parkway just inside the edge of the curb for collection by the village. Leaves raked onto the streets will not be collected. Leaves must be placed on the parkway no later than 7 a.m. on Nov. 26. Leaves placed out after this time must be placed in Winnetka yard waste bags or in plain paper yard waste bags with a village yard waste sticker affixed. Winnetka bags and stickers are available at Grand or Lakeside Foods at $2 each.

Share what you think about the weekend with David! david@northshoreweekend.com

Liza Donnelly /the new yorker collection/www.cartoonbank.com

STANDOUT STUDENT

HE’S GOT THE TOUCH Lake Forest Academy’s Fu excels quickly in painting, running and more ■ by

angelika labno

After a long day of school, music and athletic training, boarding student Tony Fu escapes to his nightly stakeout – Lake Forest Academy’s studio space. Taking out his oil paint, Fu’s mind races with what landscape image to execute as he thirsts to tackle a new challenge. Everything that he touches turns to gold…well, almost. At the 2012 Scholastic Art and Writing regional competition, he walked away with a Gold Key and two Silver Keys. Next year, he is aiming for national distinction, and December’s deadline is fast approaching. His donated painting of the school’s former garden was auctioned off for $250 at the LFA’s Caxy Life Auction in October. Moreover, Fu plans to enter a contest to be featured in the Deer Path Art League Gallery. But Fu is no seasoned painter; he just started exploring with oils last year. The quick success of a new hobby is nothing new. For having played just three years, he is first clarinet in the school orchestra. Another new focus is running. He joined the crosscountry team in the fall. He was able to bring down his 5K time from 29 to 22 minutes. With that over, Fu now focuses on swimming. He is also on the Dragon Team at the Soaring Eagle Kung Fu School, where he has taken kung fu for over a year. “I never anticipated so much sport, but it’s helped me, especially with perseverance,” says Fu. “It makes you stronger and healthier in terms of the mind, too.” And Fu shows ambidextrous qualities of the mind by excelling in science and math classes. He is only one of two ninth graders in AP calculus B.C. and takes AP chemistry. AP chemistry teacher, Dr. Cedergren, remembers Fu coming to her before the school year started, asking to skip physics and chemistry and go straight into AP chemistry. After reviewing his test scores and recommendations, she knew she would make an exception for Fu. “I remember thinking, ‘What are you, crazy?’” says Dr. Cedergren, laughing as she recalls her first encounter with Fu. “I gave him a little oral quiz to see if this was a good fit for him, and he passed it with flying colors.” Piano, however, is what Fu spends most of his time on, practicing up to two hours daily. In April 2012, he received the Illinois State Music Teachers Association Level XI Achievement in Music award for the highest

Tony Fu

examination score. He then took first place in the senior division at the North Shore Music Teachers Association piano competition. He is currently preparing for his piano feature in the Young Steinway Concert Series at Skokie Public Library in spring 2013. “Music is an indispensable part of my life,” says Fu. Despite the various academic and artistic achievements, his greatest asset, says Fu, is having two first languages, Chinese and English. Frequent trips and a couple moves to China, including one from second to fifth grade, account for Fu’s native speaker proficiency. He is most proud of having no accent and the ability to think in both languages. To round out his language skills, Fu is taking Latin at LFA this year. “It’s what affects my identity the most,” says Fu of language. “I am very fortunate to have this opportunity and gift.” Being a new boarding student, Fu is already active in LFA’s campus life. He is a member of the robotics, tennis, badminton and ping pong clubs. Also an aquarium enthusiast who enjoys caring for and observing his tropical fish from the Amazon and Africa, Fu plans on initiating a wildlife discovery club, collaborating with Lake Forest’s Wildlife Discovery Center. “He’s really enthusiastic, and one of those kids that just wants to learn for the sake of learning,” says Dr. Cedergren.


LIFESTYLE & ARTS | 15

Party on ■ by

bill mclean

It is Day One of the planning for a benefit, and Katie Ford finds herself surrounded by people at The Church of the Holy Spirit in Lake Forest. Or in a spacious conference room at Lake Forest Hospital. She looks to her left, to her right and straight ahead, and the Lake Forest resident and mother of four sees eager, organized, ambitious, attentive folks. “I love meeting people, working with people,” she said. “Always have. I’ve also always felt blessed when I get to be around people.” People power is half the equation to putting together a successful benefit on the North Shore. The other half: making sure those wide-eyed people know exactly what they want to accomplish. Together. And from Day One of planning to Benefit Day. “You have to come up with a mission, a purpose, and make sure everybody involved knows what it is right away,” said Lisa Lauren, a member of the board of directors at The Kenilworth Club, a classic venue for a benefit. Lauren has served as a co-chair of galas held for Evanston Dance Ensemble (EDE). So has Leslie Warner. “It can be a daunting task, even when you know you’re six months away from the benefit,”

THROWING A SUCCESSFUL BENEFIT ON THE NORTH SHORE INVOLVES PLANNING, PASSION — AND PEOPLE

Warner said. “It’s a challenge, but that challenge can be met as long as your goals are clarified early. Getting silent auction items is a challenge. To get those items you have to get people to make a lot of personal contacts. “You have to be energetic, persistent.” When the task of staging a benefit graduates from “daunting” to “too daunting,” a party planner is often called in. One of the best-known on the North Shore was Lake Forest’s Bruce Southworth, who passed away in September. From Key West to New Orleans and beyond, his parties were top-notch and creative. Southworth once transformed the Onwentsia Club dining room into the cabin of a yacht, “A party should progress seamlessly,” Southworth once told a sister publication for JWC Media. “We know every minute of the event. But you don’t see that from the outside.” Party planner Steven Valenti worked with Southworth for 18 years, and he now runs Lake Forest-based All Things Party. Valenti’s vocation (with some assistance from airplanes) has landed him in 25 countries. At the top of his “To Remember” list, for any kind of event (social, corporate, non-profit), is empathy — from the first minute of the first planning meeting to the last minute before the doors open. “It’s really important that the planners of the

event view the event through the eyes of the guests,” Valenti said. Guests at “Toast to Ragdale: Roaring Revival” in Lake Forest saw lots of boas and bootlegger togs in early May. The event benefited the Ragdale Foundation, a non-profit artist residency, following a $3.2 million renovation to restore the structure to its 1920s heyday. Valenti was brought in to elevate the event, which for years had been a cocktail fundraiser. The 2012 version was a sold-out black-tie dinner-dance affair, and it raised twice as much money as expected. “Some of the best parties I’ve worked on were those on the North Shore,” he said. “In Chicago and along the North Shore of Chicago, people know how to entertain. “It’s that simple.” Ford chaired The Church of the Holy Spirit Spring Fair in 2009. In the same year she cochaired a Lake Forest Hospital benefit. “I was around people who were passionate and willing to do anything it took to make sure those were successful benefits,” Ford said. “When you have that going for you, it’s easy.” For years Lauren’s passion has been dance. Her daughter, Jenna Pollack (Evanston Township High School, ’07), is one of only 12 girls in the dance program at The Julliard School in New York.

Years ago one of the missions of an Evanston Dance Ensemble benefit was to expand its donor base. A church — the setting of EDE benefits, for years — is a quaint, warm venue. But a benefit at such a place usually attracts only relatives of the dancers. “A benefit’s mission,” Lauren said, “will determine the budget of the mission. One year our mission was to raise money for a scholarship program, for example. Ensembles sometimes also want to hire a guest choreographer or pay for a guest dancer. We took a leap. “We went for bigger venues.” One benefit, held at The Kenilworth Club, was called “Fancy Dance.” Another was staged at North Shore Center for the Performing Arts in Skokie. “We called that one, ‘Fancy Schmancy Gala,’ ” said Lauren, giggling. “It was held in a lobby area. The Joffrey Ballet and Hubbard Street Dance host many of their benefits in lobbies.” But All Things Party’s Valenti cautions organizers who try too hard to come up with a new theme for a non-profit benefit each year. “Non-profit events are challenging,” he said. “Trying to come up with a creative theme is a great way to keep things interesting. But you never want to lose sight of what worked in the past.” ■


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THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

11/17-11/18/12

Lyric Opera Gala photography by larry miller Last month, the Lyric Opera of Chicago’s Opening Night Gala Benefit and Opera Ball raised net proceeds of more than a million dollars; 3,400 guests attended the Opening Night Gala Benefit performance of Richard Strauss’ Elektra, and 640 guests attended the Opera Ball at the Radison Blu Aqua Hotel. ■

JOANNE BROOKS & DR. WOLF PEDDINGHAUS

BECKY & LESTER KNIGHT

BILL & CAROL VANCE

ALEXANDRA & JOHN NICHOLS

KAREN GRAY, KIM WHITE, JAMES & MAXINE FARRELL

Cradle Ball photography by Jennifer Kathryn Photography More than 300 guests took part in September’s 18th annual Cradle Ball at the Ritz-Carlton Chicago. The evening, which was in support of the The Cradle’s programs and services for children, expectant women, adoptive parents and adopted persons, included the 2012 Silver Cradle Awards, which recognizes Chicago-area companies that provide adoption benefits to their employees. ■

JOE GRIGSBY & KRISTI VEITCH

FREDERICK WADDELL, JULIE TYE, JAMIE LEE CURTIS

CRISS HENDERSON, KIM COHEN, RICK BOYNTON

JANET MCDONALD, JAMIE LEE CURTIS, THERESE FAUERBACH,

FREDERICK WADDELL, KATHY HART, ERIN DICKES, JOHN LUCE


11/17-11/18/12

lifestyle & arts | 17

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

IT CAN BE A CHORE TO DIVVY UP DUTIES BETWEEN

HUSBAND AND WIFE On a recent Sunday morning, my house was like a scene from Ozzie and Harriet. The washing machine was chugging, the oven radiated heat, the kitchen smelled like pumpkin pie and homemade soup, and at least one bathroom sparkled after a total wipedown with an all-natural peppermint disinfectant. Outside, men worked in the yard. They mowed (real blades for the adult, while our son trailed behind with his bubble mower), raked, dismantled the hammock, and covered patio furniture with the most attractive snow shield I could find. By noon, we were all exhausted — but the stale cereal and raisins still hadn’t been vacuumed up from the rugs. So who was going to vacuum in my halcyon world? The research suggests we should just forget it — live in filth, so to speak — in order to maintain a happy marriage. A 2008 study by the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor revealed that husbands create seven extra hours of housework per week for their wives. In exchange, wives save their husbands an hour of housework each week. The National Science Foundation has funded this study of economic, health and social behavior of nearly 8,000 families since 1968. The study found that women do 10 hours of housework weekly before marriage, and 17 hours after marriage. Wives with more than three kids averaged more like 28 hours of housework per week. Men, in contrast, do eight hours of housework weekly before marriage, and seven hours after marriage. Even with three kids, they’re only doing 10 hours of housework weekly. Point: ME. He has plenty of time to vacuum. In Norway, a 2012 study showed that couples who share the housework run a 50 percent higher risk of divorce than couples who leave most of the housework to the wife. Researchers found no cause-and-effect, but rather a correlation of modern attitudes. Women increasingly are well-educated and well-compensated for jobs outside the home, and men are more likely to take on more housework; in the same households, women are less dependent on their husbands, and thus more apt to divorce. In Norway, it’s worth noting, women do the lion’s share of the housework. Point: HIM. For the sake of the marriage, I should vacuum. A 2011 study of stress hormones and housework comes out in favor of filth. Researchers from the University of Southern California, UCLA, and Connecticut College found that for both husbands and wives, doing housework kept stress hormones higher at the end of the day. Wives’ stress hormones dropped when if their husbands spent more time doing housework. Husband’s stress hormones dropped when they were able to engage in leisure while their wives kept working on household chores. The stress hormone they

measured in 30 Los Angeles couples, cortisol, supportive of gender equality, or if women are affects sleep, weight gain, burnout, and the more assertive in their dissatisfaction with immune system. lazy partners, the University reported, but Point: DRAW. Let’s buy a dog to eat the the result is the same. cereal. Point: ME. And he gets to be happy! Cambridge University published another I won’t tell you how we resolved our vacstudy earlier this year that suggests men are uum standoff – or if we ever did. Rather, happiest when they share the housework – tell me how you and your spouse divvy up and 30,000 people in 34 countries don’t lie. the household chores, and I’ll share the best Arguments decline and happiness increases responses in a future column. Send your comwhen men take an active role in housekeeping. ments to Joanna@northshoreweekend.com RM-11-1291C_Layout 1 11/2/12 1:18 PMmore Page 1 It is unclear whether men are becoming

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lifestyle & arts

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation photography by blair holmes production, inc.

The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation’s Breathe Benefit 2012: Community Inspiring a Cure was held in The Drake Hotel’s Grand Ballroom last month; over 240 individuals attended. More than $150,000 was raised to help find a cure for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis a rare disease that kills approximately 40,000 people a year in the United Stated alone.. ■

DAWN GARD & JENNIFER LAWLESS

TOM & MARY ANN AHERN

RALPH HOWARD & JULIE HALSTON

MICHAEL & DAWN GARD

KATY PETRAK & CHUCK LAWLESS

Museum of Science & Industry photography by jb spector & bob carl Nearly 900 guests celebrated at the Museum of Science and Industry’s 32nd annual Columbian Ball, named for the Columbian Exposition of 1933, when the MSI first opened its doors. This year’s auction raised $242,000, and guests also enjoyed dinner, dancing and cocktails. The funds raised at this event will go towards continuing MSI’s educational programming, teacher development and museum exhibits. ■

REBECCA & ARNIE KLEIN

JIM & MAXINE FARRELL

JEFFREY & LISA ARONIN

BILL & LINDA GANTZ

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11/17-11/18/12


11/17-11/18/12

lifestyle & arts | 19

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

Heat oven to 425 degrees. Combine 1/2 cup flour, pecorino cheese and 1 teaspoon smoked paprika in a large bowl.

Smoked paprika -- or pimenton, as it’s known in Spain -- adds flavor to both the crispy chicken skin and the sauce it’s cooked in. This tender, sort-of braised chicken needs to be served with warm white rice to soak up that rich sauce. Garnish with chopped cilantro for freshness in taste and color.

Heat olive oil over medium-high heat in a Dutch oven or large, heavy pot. Dry the chicken with paper towels as this will help the skin brown nicely. Season chicken generously with salt and pepper on all sides. Dredge the chicken in the flour mixture and place a couple pieces of chicken in the pot. Cook until golden brown and crispy, 3 to 5 minutes per side. Cook the chicken in batches to avoid overcrowding the pot. Use tongs to flip the chicken pieces, and set the crispy chicken on a plate to wait. Juice three lemons (over a strainer) into a large bowl and add zest. Add the onion,

SPANISH CHICKEN

fennel, garlic, olives, 2 teaspoons of smoked paprika, cinnamon and sherry. Pour the mixture into the pot that was used for the chicken and cook on medium-high heat,

WITH LEMON, OLIVES AND ONIONS

stirring occasionally, until softened -- about 10 minutes. Stir in the remaining tablespoon of flour. Cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes or until mixture is thickened. Stir in the tomatoes and wine. Bring to a boil, and let it cook for 2 minutes. Tuck the chicken back into the pot, skin side up. Try to arrange the pieces so they are completely surrounded by the sauce, leaving the tops out so the skin stays crispy. Place the uncovered pot into the oven and bake until the chicken is cooked through, 30 minutes.

skin tightening wrinkle reduction sun damage reversal skin texture rejuvenation 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon flour, divided 1/4 cup grated pecorino cheese

12 whole garlic cloves, peeled and halved

3 teaspoons paprika (pimenton), divided

3/4 cup pitted green olives, halved if big

1/4 cup olive oil

1 pinch ground cinnamon

1 whole 4-pound chicken, cut into parts

2 tablespoons dry sherry

Salt and black pepper

1 cup whole peeled tomatoes, crushed

3 medium lemons, zested and halved

1 cup white wine

2 large yellow onions, thinly sliced

1 bunch cilantro, roughly chopped

1 large fennel bulb, halved, thinly sliced and

Warm white rice

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THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

11/17-11/18/12

Sunday Breakfast

Designing woman TV host and author Monica Pedersen talks turkey and more ■ by

david sweet

Monica Pedersen always wanted to get involved in design. “My aspiration was to work for a designer or to work for the Merchandise Mart,” said Pedersen, a Highland Park resident and Chicago-area native. “I didn’t grow up in an area affluent enough to get people to help them with interior design. We did it on our own.” Today, Pedersen is a well-known design authority. Since 2006, she has hosted a number of live shows on HGTV, including “Designed to Sell” and “Bang for Your Buck” and is now co-host of HGTV Dream Home Giveaway and HGTV Green Home Giveaway. “There are a ton of amazing designers in Chicago, but you have to be comfortable when that red light comes on,” she says of her television work. “You’re in a lot of crazy situations. There’s no coaching, no teleprompters.” This year, her first book — “Make It Beautiful: Designs and Ideas for Entertaining at Home” — was published. She writes about baby showers, graduation parties — and even gingerbread house decorating parties, one of her favorites. With Thanksgiving arriving on Thursday, Pedersen shared a few tips for those entertaining at home. “Don’t be afraid to mix that fine china with store-bought accent plates and accessories,” she says. “Your home and what you have in it are meant to be enjoyed during the holidays. “Start saving the holiday catalogs and present them to the children if they are having downtime. Tell them to start tearing out pictures of what would be on their wish list for Christmas. My Aunt Pat did this for us when we were kids, and it kept us well behaved. “Also, bring your sense of humor to the entertaining process. Every host has a good horror story. A few years back I was spending way too much time on my flower arrangements and ended up with a very pretty table and a very raw turkey.” After attending Columbia College in Chicago, where she majored in journalism, she started modeling and getting booked for tool commercials. Says Pedersen, who for her 18th birthday received a cordless drill from her father, “Those auditions were easy. ‘Bring

photography by peter rosenbaum your tool bucket.’ No problem at all.” Once HGTV called, her focus became how to design while on a budget. “Most of the entertaining budgets can be really high-end — a $100,000 flower budget at Trump Plaza,” Pedersen says. “But you can make design beautiful on any budget. Be creative.” This year, Pedersen has taken 40 trips for work. She and her husband Erik, a Lake Forest Country Day School graduate, count up all the cities on a chalkboard. She’s enjoyed giving away homes to awe-struck winners. “I literally surprise them at the door

— Publishers Clearinghouse-type stuff,” she says. “They don’t know what to say, and I say ‘Keep talking! Keep talking!’ Three seconds of that in television is dead air.” When she gets a moment’s rest, she enjoys breakfast at the Eggshell Café in Deerfield, where they have “great egg white omelets,” Pedersen says. And no matter where she goes, her eye is always focused on her favorite topic. “When I’m at a party, I love looking at the design and décor,” she says. “I remember it more than the food.” ■

Monica Pedersen of the North Shore has published her first book


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lifestyle & arts | 21

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

Lachowicz’s advice: Start at the bottom

Michael Lachowicz

By Katie Rose McEneely What’s your best advice for a young cook? You really have to start at the bottom, as a dishwasher, as a prep cook. If you come out of culinary school as a sous-chef, you’re doomed to fail. You need a foundation. Everyone wants to come out of school famous; it’s silly and unrealistic, and it drives a lot of people out of the industry. What’s your: Favorite dish on the menu? Favorite food to make? I’m a big fan of preparing game, so I love squab and venison and quail, but we sell a lot of fish, and that takes a more delicate touch and more attention to detail. I love lobster. I think it needs help; in and of itself, it’s a little innocuous,

it needs care and attention to elevate. I enjoy it because it’s challenging; there’s a lot of technique that goes into cooking a lobster properly. You have to really appreciate the composition. What do you like to eat at home? I eat very healthy; I eat whole grains, lots of fresh vegetables, lot of protein, I’m very conscious of what goes into my body now. And when I go out to eat, I indulge! Favorite tool? My hands. I can accomplish more with them than I can with any tool. What’s your favorite cookbook, or the cookbook that has influenced you the most? The book that’s influenced me most—and

I have a lot of chefs I respect, but generally I don’t read cookbooks—is “On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen,” by Harold McGee. It’s kind of the precursor to all this molecular gastronomy. McGee wrote this book about the science of cooking 25 years ago and it has all the details and accounts of what’s going on in the pot, on the stove. It gives you a lot of perspective on the product. Any young cook should read that book. Most memorable kitchen incident? I had a restaurant in Glen Ellyn, Les Deux Gros. We had just remodeled, we had [just won an award], and [we got the news that a very famous chef from France] had killed himself

because Michelin took away one of his stars. It was a very poignant moment; chefs build our lives and our persona around what we do. Perception becomes reality very quickly for us. Michael is located at 64 Green Bay Rd., Winnetka. For more information or to make a reservation, visit www.restaurantmichael.com or call 847-441-3100. ■

Interior Design Fine Furnishings, Accessories, & Gifts Bespoke Furnishings Unique Seasonal Décor 266 East Deerpath Rd. Lake Forest, IL 60045 Hours: Tue. - Sat. 10 - 5 p847.714.9970

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lifestyle & arts

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

Your What to do on the North Shore, Nov. 16-18

friday, november 16TH “A rt is for … Gifting” Opening R eception Deer Path Art League

400 E. Illinois Rd., Lake Forest 5-8 p.m. Free, www.deerpathartleague.org or 847-234-3743 You are invited to the Deer Path Art League’s Holiday Exhibit. Celebrate the season with gifts that are artfully created, varied in price and truly one of a kind! Featuring Artists: Amy Butts (Jewelry), Angelo Fico (Glass), Jason Fricke (Drawing), Lucy Gundling (Collage), Denise Houck (Jewelry), Ira Burhans (Ceramics), Ray Lapsys (Glass), David Roth (Photography), and Korina Shklair (Oil Painting). Exhibit runs until Jan. 4. ■

“The Anastylosis Project” The ArtCenter – Highland Park 1957 Sheridan Rd., Highland Park 6:30 p.m. – 9 p.m. Free www.theartcenterhp.org or 847-432-1888 Artist Mary Griep creates large-scale, intricately detailed drawings based on 12th century buildings from around the world, specifically spaces with culturally sacred value. “Anastylosis” is defined as “a method of restoring a monument distinguished often by dismantling and, in theory, rebuilding the structure using the original methods and materials.” This opening reception includes drinks and other refreshments; exhibition runs through Dec. 30. ■ “Sacred Spaces” The ArtCenter – Highland Park 1957 Sheridan Rd., Highland Park 6:30 p.m. – 9 p.m. Free www.theartcenterhp.org or 847-432-1888 The Art Center – Highland Park presents Sacred Spaces, a juried exhibition of work inspired by places with sacred significance, traditional, personal or alternative. Juried and curated by Jennifer Greenburg and Riv Lynch, the exhibit will feature paintings, drawings, photography and mixed media by local and regional artists. Opening reception Nov. 16; exhibition runs through Dec. 30. ■ “Harold and the Purple Crayon” Chicago Children’s Theatre North Shore Center for the Performing Arts 9501 Skokie Blvd., Skokie Through Nov. 16 & 18, various show times Tickets $16.50 – $42.50 The Chicago Children’s Theatre brings this musical adaptation of a classic children’s story to the North Shore. Harold, a curious four year old boy who, armed with his

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trusty purple crayon, has the power to create a world of his own simply by drawing it. Appropriate and imaginative for audiences of all ages. ■ “Stand Up for Youth – A Night of Comedy ” Park Center, The Lakeview Room

2400 Chestnut Ave., Glenview 7 a.m. Tickets &75 www.realfitgym.com or 847-780-4932 Burn fat with metabolic workouts, the new solution for high calorie burn in this complimentary trial at RealFit Gym. The primary goal of these 45-minute classes is to raise the heart rate for short periods of time, followed by periods of rest. ■

saturday, november 17TH ‘M ake the Connection Senior R esource Fair” North Shore Village

North Shore Retirement Hotel 1611 Chicago Ave., Evanston 10 a.m. Free www.northshore-village.com or 847-721-1413 North Shore Village (NSV), an organization that supports older adults in their desire to “age in place” in their own homes, is hosting “Make The Connection,” a resource fair for older adults and their families. “Make The Connection” will showcase local businesses and resources that have been recommended by many of North Shore Village’s 250-plus members.■

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lifestyle & arts | 23

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

“The Little Mermaid” Children’s Theater of Winnetka

“West Side Story ” Regina Dominican High School, O’Shaughnessy Theatre

620 Lincoln Ave., Winnetka Nov. 16-18, show times vary Tickets $10 www.childrenstheatrewinnetka.com or 847-446-2108 Join in the Under the Sea fun of Disney’s The Little Mermaid. An incredible cast of 83 New Trier Township students, wonderful costumes and sets bring this production of a Disney and fairytale classic to life. ■

701 Locust Rd., Wilmette Tickets $10 adults, $5 students. Children under 9 attend free. 7:30 p.m. Purchase tickets at the door. Regina Dominican High School’s fall musical, “West Side Story” is the famous 1957 Broadway adaptation of Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.” Don’t miss this touching story of teenage lust, racism and gang violence.■

Night Sky Viewing Heller Nature Center

sunday, november 18TH

2821 Ridge Rd., Highland Park 6:30-7:30 Free www.pdhp.org See the moon, Jupiter, and seasonal constellations through the telescopes at Heller Nature Center. All are welcome, but content is appropriate for ages six to adult. The program will be cancelled if weather is poor.■

“Oper a in Cinema presents: T he M arriage of Figaro” Wilmette Theatre

1122 Central Ave., Wilmette 2:30 p.m. Tickets $20 www.wilmetteteatre.com or 847-251-7424 Conducted by Antonio Pappano, directed by David McVicar, choreographed by Leah Hausman and starring Erwin Schrott, Miah Persson, Jonathan Veria and Gerald Finley, this 2006 anniversary production from London’s Royal Opera House reveals with truth and no little wit all the tensions between master and servants.■

“From the Heart ” Heartwood Foundation and lululemon athletica in Evanston

Heartwood Center 1818 Dempster St., Evanston, IL 60202 Tickets $50 www.heartwoodwomenandcancer.org or call 847-491-1122 ext. 19 The Heartwood Center’s Fall benefit, “From the Heart” will host the premier screening of a short documentary film that highlights the foundation’s program for women with cancer. There will be food from Curt’s Café, music by the Side One Jazz Trio, and a silent auction to benefit the foundation.■

“Bar at College: A L egacy, a Spirit and a Name .” Sponsored by the Lake Forest-Lake Bluff Historical Society Woodlands Academy

760 E. Westleigh Rd., Lake Forest 
 3 p.m. $20 for members, $30 for nonmembers www.lflbhistory.org or 847-234-5253 Come to a lecture and book signing with Sister Martha Curry of the Sacred Heart; Curry will discuss the historical and religious context of Barat College. Ticket price includes a copy of the book, which is valued at $28.■

NORTHSHORE DERMATOLOGY CENTER, S.C. Allumera Photofacial Ultherapy - Lunchtime Face Lift Coolsculpting by Zeltiq Cutera Pearl Laser Resurfacing and Rejuvenation Laser Hair Removal Botox® & Dysport Fillers TM

(Restylane , Perlane, Juvederm, Sculptra) TM

Facial Chemical Peels Microdermabrasion New Laser for Stretch Marks Laser Scalp Hair Enhancement for Men and Women

Leg Spider Vein Treatment Sun & Age Spots Skin Surgery - Moles & Skin Cancer General Dermatology for All Ages LAKE FOREST 800 N. Westmoreland Rd. Suite 100C 847.234.1177

WILMETTE 3612 W. Lake Ave. 2nd Floor 847.853.7900

TINA C. VENETOS, M.D. BOARD CERTIFIED DERMATOLOGIST On Staff at Evanston, Glenbrook, and Lake Forest Hospitals

“B’K ol Echad – In One Voice ,” A Musical Journey of Sound and S oul Beth Hillel Congregation Bnai Emunah

3220 Big Tree Ln., Wilmette, IL 
 4 p.m. Tickets $30 in advance, $36 at the door www.bhcbe.org or 847-256-1213 Featuring the performances of cantor Pavel Roytman, Chicago A Capella, cellist Nazar Dzuhryn, the Campanella Children’s Choir and members of the Tum Balalaika Band, all are welcome at this cantorial concert put on by Beth Hillel Congregation Bnai Emunah.■ North Suburban Symphony “German M asters” Concert Beth Hillel Congregation Bnai Emunah

400 E. Illinois Rd., Lake Forest 4 p.m. Tickets available at door; $18 adults, $10 seniors and students, children under 12 free with an adult ticket. Experience beautiful selections from Bach, Handel, and Brahms that form our concept of “classical” music. From dance traditions to nationalism, the music of this concert evokes images and cultures of a bygone era. Join the NSS in the Gorton Community Center Auditorium for a lovely afternoon of music and friendship.■ “Post Election Wr ap-Up” Congregation Solel and Adlai E. Stevenson High School

1301 Clavey Rd., Highland Park 2 p.m. Free www.solel.org or 847-433-3555 The post-election wrap-up will feature Norman Ornstein, who frequently appears on the PBS News Hour and is a fellow of the American Enterprise Institute. Ornstein’s newest book, “It’s Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided With the New Politics of Extremism” will be available for sale.■


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real estate

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

11/17-11/18/12

HOUSES OF THE WEEK

81 INDIAN HILL ROAD, WINNETKA, IL, 60093

$2,800,000 EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY: JEAN WRIGHT REAL ESTATE (888) 827-8714

Flowering trees , lush gardens along with spectacular views of Indian Hill Golf Course surround this impeccably maintained home on an acre in Winnetka. First floor features sundrenched rooms that look out to a blue stone terrace and expansive back yard. Graciously appointed formal living room and dining room are perfect for entertaining large or more intimate gatherings. Or better yet, relaxing alone with a good book. _is home features an exceptional family room and first floor master-suite with private sitting room. A timeless COOKS’ kitchen has a large granite island as well as a separate breakfast room. Four generous sized family bedrooms are on the 2nd floor. _is is a wonderful home with the charm, room flow and amenities for today’s families. Wilmette schools. Finished basement , elevator and two plus garage just add to this very special offering. Harper School, 5+bedrooms, 4 1/2 bathrooms. $2,800,000 Presented by JEAN WRIGHT REAL ESTATE.

260 CARY AVENUE HIGHLAND PARK, IL 60035

$2,990,000 EXCLUSIVELY PRESENTED BY: BETH WEXLER & JOEY GAULT 312.446.6666

Total gut renovation with 6,500 square feet of living space featuring finishes only seen in the finest of homes! Rocco Fiori architectural landscaped property with wooden bridges enhancing estate setting. Grand scale rooms with voluminous ceilings. Custom Nuhaus kitchen with rare stone counters & top-of-the line appliances. First floor master suite with 2 walk-in closets, stunning master bath and workout room. Luxurious indoor pool.  Must See! Presented by @PROPERTIES.


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THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

Elegant Lake Forest Estate A significant example of the enduring quality of David Adler’s work, this elegant home boasts a deceptive simplicity which is immediately apparent in the treatment of the windows and doors on the façade and the rear of the home. Featuring grandly-sized formal rooms, the stunning finishes reinforce the elegance and importance of the design. Maintained and updated throughout the years, the home has approximately 11,075 square feet on three levels and features a kitchen and bathrooms renovated with excellent quality materials. The 2.08 acre property features a swimming pool, tennis court, formal gardens and lush lawns.

$4,900,000 www.275Sussex.info Ned Skae

aNd

SuzaNNe MyerS

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage - Lake Forest Ned (847) 234-8000 Suzanne (847) 421-4635 Ned.Skae@cbexchange.com Suzanne.Myers@cbexchange.com

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real estate

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

LAKE BLUFF

1 $825,000 Sunday 1-4 Rina Du Toit 8 47-814-8648

55 GREENWICH CT. Prudential Rubloff

LAKE FOREST

2 $3,200,000 1510 N. GREEN BAY RD. Sunday 1-4 Jean Anderson 8 47-460-5412 Prudential Rubloff 3. $699,000 320 N. MEADOW LAKE LN. Sunday 1-4 Julie Morse 8 47-830-4356 Prudential Rubloff 4. $5,999,999 700 N. MAYFLOWER RD. Sunday 1-4 Vera Purcell 847-234-8000 Coldwell Banker 5. $459,000 992 ARMOUR CIR. Sunday 1-3 MaryPat Lundgren 847-234-8000 Coldwell Banker 6. $569,000 656 GRANDVIEW LN. Sunday 1-3 A dele Curtis 847-295-0700 @properties

2

NORTHFIELD

7. $169,000 308 W. FRONTAGE RD. Sunday 1-3 847-446-1855 Baird & Warner 8. $429,000 342 LATROBE Sunday 2-4 The Skirving Team 847-924-4119 Coldwell Banker

4

HIGHWOOD

9. $350,000 Sunday 1-3 Albiani/Ackerman 847-432-0700 10. $225,000 Sunday 1-3 A lbiani/Ackerman 847-432-0700

1 3

HIGHLAND PARK

5

11. $899,000 Sunday 12-3 Deanne Nissen 847-881-0200

6

809 EUCLID @properties 341 JOCELYN @properties 2521 HYBERNIA @properties

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WINNETKA

12. $2,695,000 231 WOODLAWN AVE. Sunday 1-2:30 Moran/McEneely 847-881-0200 @properties

WILMETTE

13. $1,575,000 310 CENTRAL Sunday 12-2 Lori Neuschel 847-881-0200 @properties 14. $1,340,000 1106 GREENWOOD Sunday 1-3 847-446-1855 Baird & Warner 15. $1,050,000 1132 ASHLAND AVE. Sunday 12-2 Joseph Nash 847-881-8000 Prudential Rubloff 16. $574,000 2033 THORNWOOD Sunday 1:30-3:30 The Skirving Team 847-924-4119 Coldwell Banker 17. $995,000 622 LAKE Sunday 2:30-4:30 Lori Neuschel 847-881-0200 @properties Sunday 1-3 Leslie Maguire 847-881-0200 @properties 18. $1,945,000 1140 SHERIDAN RD. Sunday 1-3 Rinaldi/Veech 847-881-0200 @properties

EVANSTON 19. $575,000 Sunday 11-1 847-446-1855 20. $616,000 Sunday 2-4 847-446-1855

2515 PRARIE AVE Baird & Warner 1037 MONROE Baird & Warner

21. $999,000 Sunday 12-2 847-446-9166 22. $875,000

507 OAKDALE Jean Wright Real Estate 376 WOODLAWN

GLENCOE

9 11

10

21

12 22

7

8 15

16 14

18

Please email your open house information, include the info listed above, 1 week prior to: openhouse@northshoreweekend.com

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THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

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featured home: 23410 N. Elm Road, lincolnshire Exclusivley Represented By:

Joanna Koperski 847.668.0096 jkoperski@atproperties.com

23410nelm.info

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THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

Lake Forest Frame & Design Open Tuesday–Friday 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.–2 p.m., or by appointment 204 East Westminster, Lake Forest | 847.234.0755 | framedesigns@ameritech.net

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THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

TAKE THE WRIGHT PATH TO THE NORTH SHORE

JEAN WRIGHT REAL ESTATE

559 CHESNUT STREET • WINNETKA • 847-446-9166 • jeanwrightrealestate.com

GLENCOE

$869,000

www.350Washington.com

WINNETKA $3,525,000 www.40IndianHill.com

WINNETKA $2,700,000 www.72locustWinnetka.com

WINNETKA $2,175,000 www.1065Westmoor.com

WINNETKA $2,050,000 www.854Prospect.com

NORTHFIELD $1,925,000 www.435SunsetRidge.com

WINNETKA $1,675,000 www.96Church.com

NORTHFIELD $1,300,000 www.151Wagner.com

GLENCOE $1,200,000 www.392Jackson.com

OPEN SUNDAY 12-2

GLENCOE $1,150,000 www.234Dennis.com

GLENCOE $999,000 www.507Oakdale.com

LAKE FOREST $899,000 Build Your Dream Home!

WILMETTE $675,000 www.1420Sheridan6C.com

WINNETKA Two Units Available www.555HillTerrace.com www.559HillTerrace.com

WINNETKA $225,000 www.953Westmoor.com

WILMETTE $199,900 www.1616Sheridan5H.com

NORTHFIELD $169,000 www.6040Arborlane202.com

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opinion

■ by

deroy murdock

R

FA CI N

onald Reagan called the 1964 election “a time for choosing.” The election Nov. 6 yielded a time for bewilderment. Given his record, it is astonishing that President Barack Obama won re-election. He should have lost, big time. Despite an $833 billion stimulus and $5.6 trillion in fresh national debt, the economy crawls forward with 2 percent growth. Shovel-ready projects were not shovel ready. The Department of Energy has generated some 60,000 “green” jobs -- at $578,333 each. When Obama arrived, the unemployment rate was 7.8 percent. It’s now 7.9 percent. Nonetheless, Obama is the first president to get re-elected with joblessness above 7.2 percent since FDR in 1936. Reputed uber-genius Karl Rove reconfirmed that he is the most overrated living participant in American public life. As “the architect” of profligate “compassionate conservatism,” Rove helped smash the GOP’s reputation for fiscal discipline. This still hurts Republicans. As Reuters’ Tim Reid wrote: “Early national exit polls revealed that about 50 percent of U.S. voters still blamed former Republican President George W. Bush for the country’s economic problems rather than Obama.” The allegedly brilliant Rove foresaw 279

electoral votes for Romney. Oops! By beating these odds, Obama demonstrated that a majority of the U.S. electorate supports democratic socialism. Three bumper stickers on a California automobile recently illustrated this sad truth. They said, “Obama” “Tax the Rich,” and “Live Better -- Work Union.” Rather than being rejected as un-American, class warfare proved to be a winning formula. Look for Obama and the left to sow further seeds of discord. Romney’s general-election campaign had its flaws, but it was energetic, issue-based and optimistic. Nonetheless, he was excoriated for remarking that 47 percent of Americans essentially were beyond his reach because they “believe that they are victims” and “that government has a responsibility to care for them.” Actually, Romney tried to sell limited government to the 49.5 percent of Americans who pay no income tax. Obama offered them health care, school loans and other free “investments” financed by the 51.5 percent of Americans who pay income taxes. Republican Sen.-elect Jeff Flake of Arizona is one of Capitol Hill’s most stalwart soldiers for small government, tight budgets and terminating pork-barrel excess. He will serve Arizona and America splendidly. Republican Ted Cruz also is Senate-bound. Texas’ former solicitor general is scary smart, well-spoken to a fault and Hispanic. Perhaps he and Sen. Marco Rubio,

R-Fla., can remind the GOP how to appeal to this large and growing demographic group. Colorado and Washington legalized marijuana. These states soon may collide with Obama, who is a battering-ram-wielding drug warrior, despite belonging to the Choom Gang, his high school posse of Hawaiian potheads. A majority of Americans voted for big government. Now, we all must share the bed that they made. Unfortunately, as Reagan once said, “If you get in bed with the government, you’ll get more than a good night’s sleep.” ~ Scripps Howard News Service

FF

Obama’s triumph makes little sense

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

in teaching science, technolog y, engineering and math, the fields where the fastestgrowing and best-paying jobs will be. Kids, have you considered a career as a psephologist? (That’s an election scientist.) - Equality. This generation’s civil rights movement scored over ultraconservative Neanderthals. Wisconsin’s Tammy Baldwin became the first openly gay senator. Ballot initiatives to allow samesex marriage were approved in Maine and Maryland.

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Many victors during Obama’s win

■ by

T

wendi c. thomas

hey weren’t on the ballot and they weren’t backed by a super PAC, but the list of the other winners on Nov. 6 could fill

binders. President Barack Obama captured the Electoral College and, albeit barely, the popular vote. But geeks, gals and others had reasons to cheer. Here are five victors worth noting. - Statistician Nate Silver. The 34-year-old economics major and author of the wildly popular blog FiveThirtyEight.com correctly predicted, state by state, how the Electoral College votes would go and proved that nerds rule. The United States lags behind 51 other countries

- Elections. Hurricane Sandy scattered voters, demolished polling places and forced the East Coast to think outside the ballot box; in New Jersey, voters could e-mail or fax their ballots. The process was a huge mess and hundreds of votes probably didn’t get counted, but we’ve got until the next Congressional elections to fix it. By 2032, we’ll be able to scrunch our eyes shut, visualize our pick for president, and the big scanners in the cloud will record our thoughts as a vote. - Women. The Senate will have 20 female members, more than ever before. Parity is still a dream, but the Nov. 6 gains added five more sets of lady bits to the testiculardominated dialogue on reproductive rights. Bonus: Richard Mou rdo c k of Indiana (rape + pregnancy = God’s

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will), M i s sou r i Rep. Todd Akin (legitimate rape) and Illinois’ Rep. Joe Walsh (abortion never saves a woman’s life), all Republicans, lost. - Ultimately, Republicans. The GOP has no choice but to toss its Betamax tapes and switch to a post-Blu-Ray format that can attract women, blacks, Latinos, Asians, other ethnic minorities and voters under 40, constituencies who picked Obama. Mitt Romney ruled with older voters, white voters and, not surprisingly, old white voters. We deserve options, but we have none when third-party candidates are perpetually dissed and when one party has moved so far right, it’s about to turn the bend and come in from the left. Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, the chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, conceded as much, saying Republicans “have a period of reflection and recalibration ahead ...” The voters’ choice is a refudiation of the GOP canard that America must be taken back (from whom, they won’t say). More than 47 percent of voters, it seems, care about climate change, energy independence, immigration reform and other issues that Republicans ignored or denied, but Obama promises to tackle in his second term. Gloating and jokes aside, our nation can’t afford another four years of partisan bickering. America must be “greater than the sum of our individual ambitions,” as Obama said in his acceptance speech. If America has any chance to “keep the promise of our Founders,” Republicans must help build that. ~ Scripps Howard News Service

Robert Mankoff /the new yorker collection/www.cartoonbank.com


business | 31 ‘WE HAVE TO WORK TWICE AS HARD’ North Shore’s independent book stores deal with challenges in age of Amazon ■ by

bill mclean

The quaint book store on Elm Street in Winnetka can count on its patrons to perform a concert each business day — even though they have no idea they’re making sweet music. The customers’ instrument at The Book Stall at Chestnut Court: the floor. Their walking feet, while browsing, make it creak. And, in a way, it announces ever so gently, “Welcome to an independent book store.” Roberta Rubin has owned The Book Stall — think The Little Shop Around the Corner in the movie “You’ve Got Mail” — for 30 years. “It is an antiquated business, yes,” admitted Rubin, sitting in her cozy office on a busy Friday afternoon. “But it’s also a wonderful business, with wonderful people. “It’s not an easy business,” she added, “and all stores like this are flying by the seat of their pants.” When Borders liquidated all of its stores last year and closed the books on 10,700 jobs, Rubin was worried. It’s never a good thing when brick-and-mortar stores disappear. Even the big ones. Publishers need major chains to stay healthy. Online “shops” like Amazon.com do not. “I wasn’t happy when I heard the news about Borders,” recalled Lake Forest Book Store owner Sue Boucher. “If Barnes & Noble closes stores, that would really put publishers in a bind. Brick-and-mortar stores — we’re essentially showrooms for books.” The familiar sound associated with Amazon.com isn’t a creak; it’s a click. “Amazon is dictating everything,” added Boucher, alluding to Amazon.com’s taxfree selling advantage in 45 states. “I have to collect sales tax. Add to that the advent of e-books … Our society is so enamored with technology. We’re dealing with challenges like those. “It’s a lot of hard work, what we do in this industry. We have to work twice as hard.” The Lake Forest Book Store has partnered with several local libraries to stay relevant in Lake County. Psychic medium and author John Edwards spoke at a community center in Round Lake this fall. The event’s admission: buying his book. On a recent Friday afternoon at The Book Stall, an animated employee sat in a corner and read a kids’ book before an ample audience of kids and their parents. Rapt kids, perched on laps, laughed. The employee turned pages. Parents smiled. “I do know we won’t be able to rely on walk-in traffic,” said Rubin, whose Book Stall was named 2012 Book Store of the year by

Katherine Connolly, 10, of Winnetka reads a book at The Book Stall at Chestnut Court in Winnetka. The Book Stall recently was named “2012 Book Store of the Year” by Publishers Weekly.

photography by j.geil Publishers Weekly in June. “I also know this store will still be here in fives years. Books will thrive then; e-books won’t eradicate us. “But we have to change our ways in order to survive. Maybe not carry as many books as we do. The critical question is this: How do independent book stores make operations more efficient so we don’t have cashflow problems? Right now I don’t have an answer for that.” Highland Park High School senior Emilie Greenberg has one foot stuck in the past and one in the now. “When Borders closed I was devastated,” said Greenberg, who was appointed by Highland Park mayor Nancy Rotering to serve on the Highland Park Public Library board to provide a youth perspective. “I really liked the way Borders stores were arranged. I love feeling books, flipping the pages of books. “But books aren’t always easy to pack, and I like to read on vacations. So I’ve used digital devices (Kindle, iPad) to read books.” Mike Leonard has used both of his feet to traipse inside The Book Stall for years. The Winnetka resident and “Today” show correspondent was scheduled to appear at his favorite haunt on Elm Street Nov. 13 for the launch of “My Bookstore: Writers Celebrate Their Favorite Places to Browse, Read and Shop.” “Your bookstore is the heartbeat of our community — a gathering of great thinkers, a mindful meeting place,” Leonard wrote. “I stop in at least once a week, often just to wander the aisles or share a few words with your fine and funny staff. And I always leave with something. A new book. A shot of inspiration. A good feeling.” ■


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DR. GODUCO KNOWS THE DRILL ■ by

‘What did I learn from that experience? It taught me how tough it was not to have a good education.’ Dr. Philip Goduco said.

photography by jim prisching

bill mclean

About a year after “Top Gun” hit the movie theaters in 1986, Philip Goduco started his residency in the U.S. Army Dental Corps in Fort Jackson, South Carolina. Now a Lake Forest resident and Vernon Hills-based super general practitioner, he was one of seven dental residents on the base, among the best of the best, a “Maverick” – in a white coat, rather than a G-suit. During a training session in a classroom one day, a Col. Noone asked the elite contingent a question. It had something to do with periodontology. None of the residents attempted to answer it. Col. Noone was stunned. “He looked at us,” Goduco recalled, “and said, ‘Nobody knows? Come on, all of you should know. You’re Top … Gum.’ ” Goduco, 55, loves to laugh almost as much as he loves to make others laugh. But that’s only part of the appealing chairside manner he’s had for all kinds of patients for 25 years, including 20 at his office in Vernon Hills. The 1987 Loyola University School of Dentistry graduate (with honors) is brighter than Hollywood smiles and owns abscess – no, excess – compassion. “I’ve always been focused on doing what’s right for my patients and being ethical at all times,” said Goduco, who was born in the Philippines and, at the age of 10, emigrated with his family to the U.S. “I’m an optimistic person, a happy person. ” After graduating from Glenbard North High School in Carol Stream in ’75, Goduco was offered many academic scholarships from four-year schools. But his father, Orlando, insisted that Philip get a part-time job and attend the College of DuPage. The future dentist worked as a pressman/assistant

supervisor at a Kwik Copy for a few years. “What did I learn from that experience?” he said. “It taught me how tough it was not to have a good education. My dad wanted me to experience that time in my life so that I’d value money. He was right; he was always right.” Five years later he started to pursue a career in dentistry, after a brief flirtation with becoming an automotive engineer. “My dad,” Goduco said, “couldn’t see me as a grease monkey. I then looked into getting into either the medical or dental field.” Goduco met his future wife, Jini, when both were undergrad students at Loyola University Lake Shore campus. The setting was a party. Their first dance at that bash was a slow one: “Always and Forever,” by Heatwave. Following his stint at Fort Jackson, Dr. Goduco examined and treated patients during an unaccompanied tour in South Korea for 18 months. He opened his practice in Vernon Hills in ’92. “I consider my office a one-stop dentist’s office,” said Goduco, who, in one morning, could complete a simple examination of patient, treat another patient’s temporomandibular joint disorder, diagnose obstructive sleep apnea in a third patient and cap the stretch by securing a crown for a fourth. “I heard about (an NBA) player who had to have a lot of work done in one day,” said Goduco, father of four (Christina, 27, Trisha, 25, Isabel, 15, and Asher, 8). “Five specialists – five – worked on him that day, one after another. “That would never be necessary at our office.” ■

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Main Street

Lake Forest resident’s commitment to food bank is crucial ■ by

The first step in a successful holiday season is planning a proper Thanksgiving Day feast. All along the North Shore families are already laying these plans, putting together an appropriate shopping list for the ingredients to feed friends and family who visit on that fourth Thursday in November. But there are many families on the North Shore who must rely upon the generosity of others to help them through the holidays. The Northern Illinois Food Bank is one of those remarkable organizations that works quietly behind the scenes to make sure that those less fortunate families do not go hungry during the holidays or any other time during the year. The food bank has a hidden asset: the organization’s president and CEO, Pete Schaefer. He is a long-time resident of Lake Forest. He learned his supply chain and food service management skills at McDonald’s Corporation, which serves tens of millions of customers each year. During his 16 years at the restaurant company, Schaefer ran the corporation’s supply chain accountability efforts, the global security and product safety work, and earlier was managing counsel for the company. “Northern Illinois Food Bank distributes 40 million pounds of food each year through 700 pantries, soup kitchens, and other feeding programs. And we are working to create the capacity to help even more,” he said. “Every dollar we raise has enormous impact. A $100 contribution can provide a family of four people three meals a day for nearly two full months.” Across 13 counties, food manufacturers, local groceries, corporations, foundations, and individuals come together to donate food and funds, as well as countless volunteer hours to evaluate and repack food for distribution to network partners – the food pantries, soup kitchens, shelters and youth and senior feeding programs that serve more than 60,000 neighbors in need each week. The organization’s vision is for no one to be hungry in northern Illinois. The scale of their operations is imposing. Their mission is to lead the northern Illinois community in solving hunger by providing nutritious meals to

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bob gariano those in need through a variety of innovative programs and partnerships. The food bank’s mission is all the more compelling when one considers that 48% of the people the food bank serves are children. Northern Illinois Food Bank began as a dream of Sister Rosemarie Burian who had an idea in 1982 to open a center for the poor in DuPage County. From that nascent concept, Bethlehem Center was born. Sister Rosemary distributed the first food in May 1983. In its first full year of operation, 64,000 pounds of food were distributed through 80 food

Every dollar we raise has enormous impact. A $100 contribution can provide a family of four people three meals a day for nearly two full months.’ Pete Schaefer, president and CEO of the Northern Illinois Food Bank pantries, soup kitchens, and shelters. From these modest beginnings, Northern Illinois Food Bank has grown to distribute 40 million pounds of food – the equivalent of more than 33 million meals in fiscal year 2012. Over the last 29 years, the food bank’s name has changed, its address has changed, and staff has changed; but the one thing that has remained consistent is their commitment to feeding our hungry neighbors. We are fortunate that capable and experienced executives like Pete Schaefer have stepped forward to lead organizations like the Northern Illinois Food Bank, to help those neighbors of ours who are less fortunate. ■ Main Street columnist Bob Gariano can be reached at bob@northshoreweekend.com

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v

Representing The LARGEST Pool of Home-Buyers PREVIOUSLY

140 ROCKGATE GLENCOE, ILLINOIS

LISTED BY R.J. GOLO

REAL ESTATE

PREVIOUSLY

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484

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DAYS ON MARKET WEXLER

LISTED BY COLDWELL BANKER

10 MAPLE HILL ROAD GLENCOE, ILLINOIS

145 RAVINE GLADE ST GLENCOE, ILLINOIS

LISTED BY COLDWELL BANKER

1385 DAYS ON

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897

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MARKET

1618 WILMETTE WILMETTE, ILLINOIS

LISTED BY COLDWELL BANKER

LISTED BY COLDWELL BANKER

2494 SHOAL CREEK CT RIVERSWOOD, ILLINOIS

128 DAYS ON

182 DAYS ON MARKET

366 DAYS ON MARKET

LISTED BY 4 SALE REALTY

163

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NATASHA

MILLER

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707 GREENLEAF WILMETTE, ILLINOIS

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From THE CITY to THE NORTH SHORE PREVIOUSLY

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125

28 DAYS ON

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FAWCETT PREVIOUSLY

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1096 ASH WINNETKA, ILLINOIS

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316

200 DAYS ON

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1297 BURR OAK LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS

240

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VORIS/ CHILDS LISTED BY KOENIG STREY

168 DAYS ON MARKET

493 ILLINIOS LAKE FOREST, ILLINOIS

HEIDI

GRUMLEY PREVIOUSLY

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826 LINCOLN EVANSTON, ILLINOIS

366 DAYS ON MARKET

MARKET

MEGAN

JORDAN Source: Broker Metrics, LLC; MRED, LLC, 01/01/11 – 12/31/11

atproperties.com

SOLD

177 DAYS ON MARKET

MIKE

THOMAS

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36 | SPORTS

New Trier’s Sarah Shafiq celebrates a block during the Class 4A state volleyball tournament at Redbird Arena.

photography by madison roberts

‘WE NEVER GAVE UP’ Tashima, Steinberg stand out as Trevians take second at state tourney

■ by

kevin reiterman

The winning formula was in play. Just feed the ball to Brittani Steinberg. “(In that first set), I just kept getting the ball to Brittani,” said New Trier High School junior Taylor Tashima. “It was working. It was the best thing ever.” Steinberg was dominate at the net. “I had some nice swings,” said Steinberg, who finished the match with a team-high 17 kills. “Taylor was giving me what I wanted.” The Tashima/Steinberg connection carried the Trevians to an impressive 25-21 victory in the first set of Saturday night’s Class 4A state title game at Normal’s Redbird Arena. Sets two and three were a different story. Say hello to Cara Mattaliano. The Benet Academy senior star found a way to snatch the momentum away from New Trier. The 6-foot-1 Mattaliano began to put her stamp on this match early in the second set. “She was a difference maker,” said New Trier junior libero Emmy Friedler, who finished with seven digs. “She played

amazingly. She kept hitting her spots.” Mattaliano wound up with a match-high 21 kills (.326) as the No. 1 seeded Redwings (40-2) defended their state crown, winning set two 25-22 and set three 25-17. “I really thought that we would be the team which would take Benet down,” said New Trier head coach Hannah Hsieh, who led the Trevians to a lofty 39-2 final record. “We pushed them. We never gave up,” said Tashima, a Northwestern recruit, who recorded four kills, three digs and 32 assists in the title match. “This was great volleyball. This match had some great hitting, some great defense.” Still, Tashima was not pleased with the way the momentum slipped away in the second set. “I learned a good lesson tonight,” the 6-foot left-hander added. “When we were up, we needed to take it (to them). We needed to find a way to win.” “You can’t give away points,” said Hsieh, who watched her team fall behind 7-1 early in the third set. “When they got the lead, they got into a rhythm.”

Tashima, who has developed into one of the state’s most versatile players with her stellar setting, serving and hitting skills, and Steinberg were in lockstep in the opening set. Steinberg, who will be taking her game to Yale University next year, smacked eight kills in the first set. Seven of those blasts came off perfect sets by Tashima. New Trier’s offense also featured junior Haley Fauntleroy (seven kills), junior Abbey Boyd (five kills), senior Maggie Carragher (four kills) and sophomore Sarah Shafiq (four kills). State semifinal: The Trevians, who last won a state title in 1974, advanced to the championship after knocking off perennial power Mother McAuley (13 state titles) in the semifinal round 16-25, 25-22, 25-16. Steinberg paced the attack with 15 kills. Tashima, Fauntleroy, Carragher and Shafiq finished with four kills each. The defense was led by Friedler (nine digs), Steinberg (eight digs), Tashima (seven digs) and senior Savannah Hubly (six digs). ■


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VOCAL LEADER Highland Park grad Bartelstein accepts captain’s role at Michigan

■ by

kevin reiterman

You know what they say. “Leaders are made, not born.” You would get no argument from former Highland Park High School basketball standout Josh Bartelstein. “I was far from being a leader in high school,” he admitted. How things have changed. Earlier this month, the 6-foot-3 Bartelstein was named as the lone captain of the University of Michigan men’s basketball team. Not bad for a walk-on. “It’s really cool. A really great honor,” said the senior guard, “especially at a place like Michigan.” For Wolverines head coach John Beilein and his staff, selecting Bartelstein was a slam dunk. On the Michigan website, Beilein said “there is one thing that is certain … (Bartelstein) is the most selfless, team guy that I have ever coached. As a result, the decision was (a) natural.” Bartelstein plans to embrace the captain’s role.

“I’ve become a vocal leader (for this team) and I’m not changing that,” he said. “I’ll find out what motivates my teammates. “Being a leader here is an extension of the coach,” added Bartelstein. “I’ll try to bring the best out in our players. If I do that, then I’m doing my job.” Bartelstein, who writes a basketball blog (J-Bart Blog) on Michigan’s athletic website, will be playing on another talent-laden squad this winter. The defending co-Big Ten champs, which feature Tim Hardaway Jr., Trey Burke and Jon Horford, are ranked No. 5 by the Associated Press. Senior Matt Vogrich, a Lake Forest High School graduate who received the team’s Sixth Man Award last season, will be a four-year varsity letter winner for the Wolverines. “I’d like to contribute more on the court,” said Bartelstein, who has battled a rash of injuries (ankle and knee) during his four seasons in Ann Arbor. “But there’s a ton of talent here. A lot of future pros.” Bartelstein has been impressive in the BARTELSTEIN >> PAGE 45

Highland Park High School graduate Josh Bartelstein, a senior walk-on, was named team captain at the University of Michigan.

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HIGH FIVE

Williams’ sack attack sparks Scouts in state quarterfinal win over Notre Dame Lake Forest’s Trent Williams (No. 7) chases Notre Dame’s quarterback Dan Nagode in the Class 6A state quarterfinal game. Williams finished with five quarterback sacks.

photography by david banks

■ by

kevin reiterman

Lake Forest’s football team came up with a little trickery in its Class 6A state quarterfinal win over Notre Dame. That gimmick play at the end of the third quarter was masterful. And the encore performance of Trent Williams? Now that was genuine article. Williams was nothing short of “ridiculous” in his team’s historic 30-19 victory over the host Dons on Nov. 9. The Scouts will be moving on to the state semifinals for the first time since 1978, when it hosts Cary-Grove on Nov. 17 (4 p.m.). On this night, the Williams Sack Exchange was open for business. The junior outside linebacker, who simply has been awesome during LF’s postseason run, finished with six tackles for loss, including five quarterback sacks. “Is that all he had?” said Lake Forest head coach Chuck Spagnoli, with a slight smile. “He plays hard every down, and he was fortunate to beat some blocks. “With him, it’s genetics, not coaching,” Spagnoli added. And the humility?

That’s all Williams. “I have to credit my cornerbacks and safeties,” he said. “They’re the ones that gave me time. Making the tackle (sack) was the easy part.” The five sacks? “I’m not counting,” said Williams, who has pulled down the opposing QB seven times in the past two playoff games. “I’m just trying to do what I can to help us win.” Lake Forest’s Gino Quaid, who also turned in an outstanding effort, dug everything Williams did. “He’s relentless out there,” said the junior safety, who wound up with 13 tackles and two interceptions. “What a teammate. He never gives up, never stops. He’s a playmaker.” Williams’ YouTube play came on the fourth series of the game, when his amazing speed and strength produced a defensive trifecta and led to the game’s first score (one-yard TD run by running back Hub Cirame). Don’t try this at home, but on one single, solitary play Williams managed to sack ND quarterback Dan Nagode, force a fumble and recover the loose ball 16 yards behind the line of scrimmage. “What he did was ridiculous,” said LF

He’s relentless out there. What a teammate. He never gives up, never stops. He’s a playmaker.” — Trent Williams safety Regis Durbin, who finished with seven tackles, including one for a loss. “He helps this team so much. He’s great. He’s a game-changer.” Durbin also finds ways to help the Scouts (9-3). The junior, who is listed as one of LF’s backup quarterbacks, played a major role on that trick play — a double pass — which caught Notre Dame by complete surprise. After catching a backward toss from Andrew Clifford in the right flat, Durbin lofted a 38-yard spiral to Jack Troller (four catches, 59 yards) on a fly pattern. It almost went for six. But the wide-open Troller was downed at the Notre Dame 10-yard line after hauling in

a slightly off-target pass from Durbin. “The offensive coaches worked on it this week,” said Spagnoli. “We joked about using it. But it was well designed. Well drawn-up.” “I just wish I would have thrown the ball a little better,’’ said Durbin. Lake Forest kicker Baylor Broughton made sure that the play didn’t go for naught. The senior connected on a 27-yard field goal — his 10th of the season — to give the Scouts a 24-13 advantage with 11:17 left in the third quarter. Lake Forest’s other super play on offense came early in the second frame, when senior wide-out Nicholas Giordano beat coverage WILLIAMS >> PAGE 43


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Loyola Academy’s John Rushin (right), seen here in earlier action this fall, turned in another stellar effort in Saturday’s state quarterfinal.

ROCKIN’ AND ROLLIN’ Rushin, Sullivan star as 11-1 Ramblers shut down high-powered Palatine in state quarterfinal

■ by

t.j. brown

John Rushin — his name says it all — loves to go after the quarterback. The Loyola Academy defensive lineman, who has made a verbal commitment to Yale University, was at it again in Saturday’s Class 8A state quarterfinal game. The 6-foot-6, 265-pound senior, who averages nearly five tackles per game, recorded his eighth quarterback sack of the year in Loyola’s 19-7 win over visiting Palatine. With the win, the Ramblers improved to 11-1 and now will host Glenbard North in a state semifinal game on Saturday at 1 p.m. Glenbard North advanced after upsetting Maine South 29-23. The pressure Rushin and the 6-foot, 225-pound Darby Goodwin applied all afternoon certainly was a big reason Palatine (10-2) couldn’t manage an offensive touchdown. Palatine’s rushing attack was limited to just 22 yards, and star quarterback Ethan Olles was 16-of-40 for 168 yards and four interceptions. Rushin faced a double-team during most of Saturday’s game, yet still managed to be effective. “At times, we play three down linemen sets, and he’s

double- or triple-teamed,” Loyola coach John Holecek said. “But it’s expected. He knows he’s got to fight through that.” Shutting down Palatine was not an easy task. After all, this was a Pirates squad which entered play averaging 44 points. They had scored 51, 69 and 42 points in their previous three games. So when Olles opened up a fourth-quarter drive with a 22-yard connection to Cam Kuska, any anxiety Ramblers’ fans felt was understandable. But Rushin calmed the Loyola faithful. He broke past a double team and closed on Olles’ blind side, driving the quarterback into the turf for an eight-yard loss. On the next play, a third-and-18, Cody Sullivan completed his hat trick by picking off his third pass, effectively ending any hopes a Pirates’ comeback. Sullivan was all over the field in this contest. His first INT came on a first-and 10 from the Loyola 26, when Olles’s throw over the middle went right into Sullivan’s hands. The second pick came midway through the second quarter on the first play after Palatine got the ball back in Loyola territory. “We saw on film that the quarterback has two options,” Sullivan said. “Luckily for me, he threw it my way.” But Sullivan, who also had six tackles in the winning effort, gives much credit to the defensive line, anchored by Goodwin

photography by j.geil and Rushin. In addition to the sack, Rushin added five tackles. Goodwin had two tackles, but also applied pressure on an incomplete pass almost intercepted by Sullivan. “They put so much pressure on the quarterback,” said Sullivan. “And those rushed throws lead to interceptions.” Rushin’s focus right now is tightening up the Ramblers’ defense. It sounds a little outlandish, given Loyola hasn’t lost a game since Aug. 31, and its defense has only given up more than 20 points four times. The most recent was Oct. 6, when the Ramblers allowed 28 points to Fenwick. “That was a little bit of a wake-up call for us as a defensive unit,” Rushin said. Since then, the defense has given up a grand total of 14 points. The seven points Palatine scored came on a 47-yard Kuska punt return. Notable: Quarterback Pete Pujals, running back Julius Holley and wide receivers Luke Ford and Richie Wehman led the Ramblers’ offense on Saturday. Holley finished with 76 yards on 21 carries. He scored a two-yard touchdown just before halftime. Pujals completed 13-of-26 passes for 155 yards and a TD. His big strike was a 21-yard pass to Ford on a sideline pattern in the third quarter. Ford finished with three catches for 29 yards, while Wehman led Loyola with five catches for 67 yards. Tight end Joe Dixon also added three catches for 36 yards. Daniel Rafferty came up with Loyola’s other interception. His sixth pick of the season came on the first play from scrimmage and it led to a quick field goal by Mike Kurzydlowski from 26 yards out. Kurzydlowski also connected on a 24-yard field goal early in the fourth quarter. ■


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Lake Forest’s Margaret Carney drives to a second-place finish in the 100 butterfly in Saturday’s sectional at Lake Forest.

photography by kevin tanaka

DOING THEIR THING — AGAIN McArdle, Lanigan lead the way as Scouts claim sectional championship ■ by

bill mclean

Annie McArdle didn’t panic during the 200-yard individual medley race at a swimming and diving sectional Saturday afternoon. But the Lake Forest High School senior certainly could have, after “hitting a wall wrong” in the home water. The Scout thought, “Oh, shoot,” after the brief mishap, righted herself and wound up finishing third in a state-qualifying time of 2:08.92. It was smooth sailing for McArdle in her other event nearly two hours later. McArdle clocked a personal-best 1:05.93 to win the 100 breaststroke. McArdle’s time in the breaststroke ranks 10th among all state qualifiers in the event. Pain kicked in near the end of her effort in the breaststroke. Nothing unusual there. “The breaststroke … It’s my thing,” said McArdle, 14th in her thing at last fall’s state meet. “I knew I had to go fast in the first 50. After that it was all about getting my

head down, finishing well. “The pain,” she added, “usually goes away soon after I get out of the pool.” LF’s Scouts got off to super start on Saturday, receiving strong showings from divers Christine Andersen (fourth place, state-qualifying 396.95 points) and Mary Rose Donahue (fifth, state-qualifying 391.1) in the meet’s morning session. “My last home meet; I wanted to have fun at it,” said Andersen, who competed as a club diver (Glenbrook Aquatics) in the offseason for the first time and plunged against elite divers at AAU nationals. “I had fun. What also helped, at this meet and all season, was the club experience. This year I wanted to improve my consistency, and club diving helped me to do that.” Coach Carolyn Grevers’ North Suburban Conference champion Scouts captured the sectional title with 303 MCARDLE >> PAGE 43


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THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

New Trier’s Nicole Retondo races to a second-place finish in the 200 IM in Saturday’s sectional at Glenbrook South.

photography by david banks

New Trier swimmers in line for another state title — a three-peat — after dominating sectional

■ by

bill mclean

A few days after New Trier High School senior Riley Hayward committed to swim at USC, she received a text message from a good friend at Loyola Academy. Evan Swenson thumb-thumbed, “We’re going to be teammates in college.” Hayward climbed a start block for the 100-yard breaststroke at Saturday’s Glenbrook South sectional in Glenview. To her immediate right was none other than Swenson, crouched and ready to race as the event’s top seed. Two good friends. Two start-block neighbors. Two future Trojans. “We don’t even talk about swimming when we get together,” Hayward said. But the pair gave plenty of people something to talk — and cheer — about after the 100 breast. Swenson, an Evanston resident, touched first in a rapid 1:03.82, ahead of Hayward’s brisk runner-up time of 1:04.81. Swenson ranks first among all state qualifiers in the event;

We’re such a family, our team. I don’t know how else to describe it. We share things, support each other … always.” — Riley Hayward

Hayward is third, behind Fenwick’s Haley Wickham (1:03.93) and ahead of reigning state champion Paulina Kaminski (1:05.32), also from Fenwick. “I’m so excited Riley and I will swim for the same team in college,” Swenson said. “It’ll be awesome.” New Trier’s team performance Saturday, in four syllables: awe-inspiring. Trevians coach Mac Guy’s gals amassed 21 state berths — the maximum. The two-time reigning state champions easily captured Saturday’s sectional title with 283.5 points. Glenbrook South’s Titans (254) and Loyola’s Ramblers (204) went 2-3. New Trier junior Christine Ryan was on Hayward’s mind late Saturday afternoon. Ryan finished first in the 500 freestyle at the previous weekend’s Central Suburban League South meet. The same Christine Ryan did not even compete in the event at the sectional. That’s how deep NT’s 2012 crew is. “I feel for her; we all do,” said Hayward, who swam at the U.S. Olympic Trials in Nebraska this past summer. “Her (tapered) time (5:00.9) at our conference meet was faster than the winning time at this sectional.” NT seniors Stephanie Marchuk (5:01.65) and Campbell Costley (5:01.81) finished 1-2 in the event Saturday. Reigning CSL South diving champ Juliette Corboy of New Trier was magnificent again last weekend, topping the field with 482.85 points. Senior teammate Olivia Loucks finished runner-up (state-qualifying 438.7 points). Corboy will enter this weekend’s state meet as the topranked diver by a country mile. Or two. Prospect sophomore Dana Liva ranks second, after scoring a 468.6 at last weekend’s Stevenson sectional.

I’m so excited Riley and I will swim for the same team in college. It’ll be awesome.” — Evan Swenson Marchuk also triumphed in the 200 free (1:52.34), anchored the runner-up 400 free relay (3:31.16, Costley, Jessica Sutherland and Nicole Retondo) and swam on the state-qualifying 200 free relay (third place, 1:37.31, Amelia Girgenti, Grace Ford and Taylor Patterson). The Trevs’ quartet of Hayward, Sutherland, Girgenti and Kara Lucenti edged a Loyola foursome 1:46.23-1:46.27 for first place in the 200 medley relay. NT’s other state-qualifying efforts were Costley (fourth place, 200 free, 1:53.22); Retondo (second, 200 IM, 2:08.31; seventh, 100 free, 53.12); Lucenti (fourth, 200 IM, 2:10.08; third, 100 breast, 1:05.97); Patterson (fifth, 50 free, 24.37); Ford (eighth, 50 free, 24.58); Sutherland (third, 100 butterfly, 58.32; sixth, 100 backstroke, 58.81); Anna Peterson (fifth, 100 fly, 58.65); Girgenti (fifth, 100 free, 52.78); and senior Sharon Wu (eighth, 100 back, 59.41). “We’re such a family, our team,” said Hayward, who’s interested in majoring in business at USC. “I don’t know how else to describe it. We share things, support each other … always. “I’m so glad I’m a part of it.” The state preliminaries start Friday morning (diving) at Evanston HS. ■


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FINE NINE

Loyola’s Madeleine Jardeleza competes in the 200 medley relay during Saturday’s sectional at Glenbrook South.

photography by david banks

Swenson leads the way as Loyola sends swift contingent to state swim meet ■ by

bill mclean

The easiest way to get an instant smile from Loyola Academy senior swimmer Evan Swenson is to mention one name: Maria Kyle. “She’s the funniest girl,” Swenson said of her freshman teammate after Saturday’s Glenbrook South sectional in Glenview. “She’s so chill. We’ve told her, ‘You need to go fast.’ All she usually says is, ‘OK.’ ” Kyle was significantly better than OK in the 100-yard butterfly on Saturday, motoring to a first-place 57.25 from an outside lane (2). Her seed time was 59.38. Kyle ranks 11th among all state qualifiers in the event. “What Maria did in that race is a testament to how hard she works,” Ramblers coach Mike Hengelmann said. “She shows up every day, trains hard, never complains. “I couldn’t be happier for her.” The USC-bound Swenson saw nothing but smiles from her teammates and coaches after winning the 100 breaststroke in an electric 1:03.82 — a time faster than last year’s

winning time (1:03.96, Fenwick’s Paulina Kaminski) at the state meet. Swenson, an Evanston resident, also sped to runner-up honors in the 50 freestyle (statequalifying 23.43) and swam on a pair of statequalifying relays (200 medley, second place, 1:46.23; 200 free, second, 1:37.14). “Evan is right where we need her to be in the 50 free,” said Hengelmann, a Loyola graduate. “Our girls, all nine of them … They’re executing well in races.” Loyola’s fine nine secured a combined 12 state berths on Saturday and amassed 204 points (third place, behind Glenbrook South’s 254 and champ New Trier’s 283.5). Loyola’s other state-qualifying efforts: Kyle (fifth place, 200 free, 1:53.56); senior Maddie Jardeleza (fourth, 100 backstroke, 58.24; sixth, 200 free, 1:54.6); sophomore Maria “Libby” Jardeleza (second, 100 fly, 57.87; fifth, 200 IM, 2:10.35); and sophomore Grace Tierney (third, 100 free, 52.54); Kyle, Maria Jardeleza, Tierney and Maddie Jardeleza placed fourth in the 400 free relay (state-qualifying 3:34.52); the Jardelezas and

Tierney joined Swenson on that runner-up 200 medley relay; Swenson’s leg mates on the runner-up 200 free relay were Kyle, Tierney and junior Marta Considine. “Our team is so close, so supportive,” said Swenson, who’s thinking of majoring in journalism or communications at USC. “And we all push each other in practice.” Between races late at Saturday’s sectional, Hengelmann was asked about his days as a swimmer at St. Louis University. “I wasn’t very good at any stroke,” he admitted. “I was a relay guy.” His Ramblers are really fast girls. Fun, too. “They all get along real well,” he said. “It’s a great atmosphere when you’re around them.” The state meet preliminaries start Friday at Evanston HS. HIGHLAND PARK The bulk of the Giants’ swimmers tapered fully for the Central Suburban League North meet at Maine East earlier this month. That meant the contingent faced a fairly daunting task afterward: Hold each taper

until Saturday’s Glenbrook South sectional. “We went for broke at (the league meet),” Highland Park High School coach AJ Block said on Saturday. They went for state berths in the state’s most competitive sectional. “This meet … It’s fast, so fast,” Block said. “And many of the best swimmers, from New Trier and Loyola and Glenbrook South, aren’t even fully tapered, aren’t even shaved.” HP placed ninth (48.5 points). None of the Giants’ entrants advanced to state. Giants senior Talia Fishbein touched sixth in the 100 breaststroke (1:08.59), missing a state berth by a scant 0.37. Sophomore teammate Erin Cullather placed sixth in diving (338.7 points). HP senior Samii Asher tied for 11th place in the 100 backstroke (1:00.89); she’d entered the meet with a seed time of 1:01.91). HP’s best relay effort at the sectional occurred early. The quartet of Asher, Fishbein and freshmen Sophia Livney and Natalie Gelberg clocked an eighth-place 1:54.53 in the meet’s first swimming event (200 medley relay). ■


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MCARDLE >> FROM 40

points, well ahead of runner-up Mundelein (237). LF freshman Reilly Lanigan raced like a seasoned vet, topping the 200 IM field in 2:06.2, winning the 100 butterfly in 56.96 and swimming on a pair of state-qualifying relays (200 medley, second place, 1:49.42; 400 freestyle, second, 3:31.83). Only Neuqua Valley senior Gia Dalesandro (2:03.75) and Naperville Central senior Julia Roller (2:04.41) swam faster in the event than Lanigan did in sectional action last weekend. “She’s one of my favorite teammates,” said McArdle. “Reilly works hard. “The whole team,” she added, “works hard.” Lanigan’s sister, junior Caitlin Lanigan, touched second in the 100 backstroke (58.64) and joined freshman Haley Nelson, junior Margaret Carney and sophomore Eleanor Meeks to finish runner-up in the 200 free relay (1:38.24). The Lanigans collaborated with Nelson and sophomore Clare Wieland for runner-up points in the 400 free relay. Meeks, Hillary Rancap and Amanda Gottschalk were the Scouts’ other three medley-relay legs. Nelson silvered and qualified for state in each of the 200 free (1:54.2) and 100 free (52.88) events; Carney zipped to runner-up honors in the 50 with a state-qualifying 24.4, before securing a state berth in the 100 fly (second place, 57.25). Freshman Elise Vondra (500 free, second, 5:10.07) and Rancap (100 back, third, 59.44) earned LF’s other state berths. A sweet total of 16 LF entrants made it to state, only five short of the maximum berths for one team. “Being a part of a team is the most important thing to me in swimming,” said McArdle. “My teammates mean so much to me. When I practice I work hard because I know my teammates are going just as hard. “It’s easy to work hard,” she added, “when you know you’re a part of a team as motivated as ours is.”

Lake Forest senior Nina Nissly qualified for state in three events for students with disabilities on Saturday: 200 free (2:52.09), 50 free (36.78) and 100 free (1:22.19). She ranks first among all state qualifiers in each event. The state preliminaries start Friday morning (diving) at Evanston HS. ■

There’s

Jack Troller of the Scouts hauls in a diving catch against Notre Dame.

photography by david banks BARTELSTEIN >> FROM 37

WILLIAMS >> FROM 38

classroom. He’s been Academic All-Big Ten for the past two seasons. Playing for the Woverines has been special. “It’s a great feeling to run out of the tunnel to 15,000 yelling fans,” said Bartelstein. Big Ten basketball figures to be better than ever this winter. Indiana is the country’s No. 1 team. Ohio State is No. 4, while Michigan State is No. 14. Bartelstein, who played one season at Phillips Exeter Academy (2009), is not about to forget his roots. “When I was named captain, one of the first persons that I sent a text to was coach (Paul) Harris.” He said. “He’s helped me a ton.” Bartelstein averaged 13.5 points, 6.0 rebounds and 5.0 assists per game during his senior season for the Giants, who finished 23-5. Son of Mark Bartelstein, a highly respected NBA and NFL sports agent, he’s majoring in sports management. “I plan to go into business or real estate,” he said. “I want to pave my own way.” ■

down the right sideline and raced 61 yards for a score. Then, on the Scouts’ very next possession, Clifford (13-240, 165 yards) and Giordano (3-84) teamed up on a six-yard touchdown to make it a 21-6 game at halftime. Lake Forest, which never trailed in the contest, sealed the win with 1:36 left in regulation, when Cirame (15-94) scored on a 56-yard run. NOTABLE: Once again, the Scouts received stellar play from Kutschke brothers. Thomas Kutschke, a senior defensive end, finished with five tackles, including a sack and tackle for loss. He also batted down a pass. Jack Kutschke, a junior linebacker, finished with eight tackles. Strong defensive showings also were turned in by Charles Moss (eight tackles), Chris Wilson (six tackles), Jack Traynor (four tackles) and Matt Harmon (four tackles). David Glynn helped out on the offensive end with three catches for 35 yards. ■

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HAVING DAD AS COACH WORKS OUT WELL FOR WOODLANDS’ TEAM OF

Caroline Watts was the lone competitor on the Woodlands Academy cross country team this fall.

■ by

photography by j.geil

kevin reiterman

State meets can be intimidating. And exhilarating. Caroline Watts, who runs solo for Woodlands Academy, entered unknown territory when she competed in the IHSA Class 1A state cross country meet. She was tucked in with more than 200 runners — a colorful mass of humanity — on the Detweiller Park course in downstate Peoria on Nov. 3. Not knowing what to expect, the 5-foot-8 junior described the start of this championship race as “claustrophobic.” “It was chaos,” she said. “Not something I’m used to.” To her credit, the race didn’t smother her. “My main goal was to get my time down. And I was able to do that,” said Watts, who cut 25 seconds off her PR. She wound up putting together her best three-mile performance of the year, beating 159 runners to place 51st (18:55) in her first-ever state meet. “We’re pretty excited about what she did at state,” said her coach — and father — Bruce Watts. Running is a tie that binds. It’s that way for many families on the North Shore. And it’s certainly the case here. Lake Bluff’s Bruce Watts went the extra mile to form a life-long bond with his youngest daughter. “Back in middle school (at Lake Forest Country Day), you could tell that she was a good runner,” said Bruce. But, when Caroline enrolled at Woodlands in the fall of

2010, there was a roadblock. The school did not employ a coach for track and cross country. Despite having a full-time job — vice-president of facilities and public safety at the Illinois Institute of Technology (ITT) — Bruce did something rather unique. After getting the okay — and blessing — from Woodlands athletic director Rosemary Briesch, he got his coach’s certification and officially became Caroline’s high school coach. “I told Rosemary, ‘I can do this,’ ” Bruce said. With dad in the fold, daughter was cleared for takeoff. Caroline’s rise was quick. During her freshman track and field season, she claimed runner-up honors in the 800 meters at the conference meet. This fall — after saying so long to tennis — she ran cross country for the first time. And her results were impressive, placing fourth at conference, third at regional and sixth at sectional. “I’m okay in tennis. But I’m a better runner,” Caroline said. “Not playing tennis this fall was a hard decision because I really love my teammates.” She had thoughts of doing both sports. But the time commitment — and the fact that she still was recovering from a stress fracture on her right foot — was too great. “Sometimes, with the injury, we backed off the training,” said her coach. “We didn’t want to overdo it.” Caroline is not a miles maniac. But she does understand the importance of training.

“We’ll talk about what she needs to do (that day),” said Bruce, a former cross country runner in Maryland who took seventh in state during his senior season. “And then she’ll go out on her own and do it. “It can be tough for her. There’s no teammates pushing her. There’s no oversight from coaches,” the coach added. “But she likes that freedom.” Being a self-motivated kid has done wonders. “I love the independence,” Caroline said. “I love the challenge of training on my own. It’s helped me developed a stronger determination.” She also has learned a lot about race strategy. “It’s been neat to see her progress,” said Bruce. “Earlier in the season, she would go out fast and wind up slowing down in the second mile and third mile.” As the season went along, Caroline figured out how to pace herself. Her third mile was a key to her 22nd-place finish at the Libertyville Invitational, which featured a number of big schools including New Trier. “At the state meet, we focused on her second mile,” said Bruce. “We didn’t want her to have a letdown there.” It worked. Her splits at Detweiller were good: 5:57 after one mile, 12:26 after two miles and 18:55 after three miles. “I made sure that I saved some energy at the end,” she said. What’s next? “I’m in my recovery week,” she said. “Getting ready to focus on the track season.” ■


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Lily Bryant moves with the ball during 3v3 regional action this summer. The national tournament will be held in Orlando on Nov. 24-25.

photography by michael giangiorgi

Bryant, Advantage Academy head to National 3v3 Live Tournament ■ by

kevin reiterman

Janet Albert, who has been coaching soccer for 18 years, knows talent when she sees it. The veteran coach also knows what it takes to succeed at the national level in 3v3 soccer. “It’s all about chemistry,” said Albert, head coach of the Advantage Academy U10 girls squad. “You can have fantastic players but if there’s no chemistry, then you won’t win.” The coach will be sending five players, including Lake Forest’s Lily Bryant, to the National 3v3 Live Soccer Tour Tournament of Championships in Orlando on Nov. 24-25. A championship is in reach. “When it comes to 3v3 competition, Chicago usually is one of the top regions,” Albert said. Bryant helped Advantage Academy to a runner-up finish at the Midwest Regional, which was held at the Waukegan Sports Complex in early August. Advantage draws players from a number of area clubs. Being the director of coaching for the Hawthorn Woods Honor S.C. program (U6-U13), Albert has the opportunity

to check out talent. Albert believes Bryant, who plays for the Lake Forest Soccer Association, is a good fit. “She came to us late, but she’s picked it (3v3) up quickly,” said the coach, who founded Advantage Academy in 2003 and who has been an Olympic Development Coach (ODP) since 2004. “She’s very athletic. She adds a lot to the strength of this team.” Lincolnshire’s Isabella Michael, who also competes for the LF Soccer Association, also will be counted on in Florida. The other team members include Korbin Albert (Park City), Ashley Hutson (Lindenhurst) and Ella Richards (Chicago). Albert is a true advocate for 3v3 soccer. “It improves a player’s skills and tactical awareness,” she said. “The triangle of 3v3 is the nucleus of the bigger game. It takes a while for players to learn the 3v3 system. “And it’s a game in which you pay for your mistakes,” the coach added. “It can be pretty forgiving. But if you play it the right way, it can be a lot of fun.” ■


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The Perfect Weekend

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Long-time restaurateurs Debbie and Carlos Nieto run Nieto’s, the Freehling Room at Ravinia, Café Central and The Happ Inn along the North Shore.

For Debbie and Carlos, THE AMERICAN CLUB IS A TOP-NOTCH GETAWAY

I

f by chance we did have a weekend away from the restaurants, we would go to the American Club (in Kohler, Wisconsin). We took our son Adam when he was young. Three to four times a year we’d go up there. We would cross country ski, toboggan, sit by the fire and have wine. For dinner we’d go to the Immigrant Room. We’d go for a massage. We’d go to the Kohler showroom and look. There’s a place in the middle of the forest preserve. They have a roaring fire. They feed the deer in the back, so they’re always coming up close. We’d go to movies in Sheboygan. Stefano’s, an Italian restaurant, is our favorite for dinner there. For breakfast we’d go to Field to Fork, which is organic and run by the same person who runs Stefano’s. If we go in the summer, Carlos likes to play golf. We’ll play tennis. It is a beautiful spot all times of the year. We’ve gone so many times. We had all different kinds of rooms, from the carriage house to the new section. We just celebrated Carlos’ birthday. We’re thinking of going up there soon. When you are there, you are far away from everything. Debbie and Carlos Nieto, as told to David Sweet

“There’s a place in the middle of the forest preserve. They have a roaring fire. They feed the deer in the back, so they’re always coming up close.”


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THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

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THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND SATURDAY NOVEMBER 17 | SUNDAY NOVEMBER 18 2012

The North Shore Weekend EAST, Issue 6  

Featuring the news and personalities of Wilmette, Kenilworth, Winnetka, Northfield, Glencoe, Highland Park, & Lake Forest, Illinois

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