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FIND US ONLINE: DailyNorthShore.com

SATURDAY JANUARY 5 | SUNDAY JANUARY 6 2018

SUNDAY BREAKFAST

SPORTS

Thanks for the memorable lines in 2018. P14

SOCIAL SCENE

Time to recall delightful and insightful words by athletes and coaches in 2018. P13

Carolyn and Carl Rutstein host dinner discussion. P11 FOLLOW US:

NO. 326 | A JWC MEDIA PUBLICATION

NEWS

Opening Doors Lake Forest Country Day School kicks off 2019 with an open house THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

Anyone who has ever wondered what it’s like on campus at Lake Forest Country Day School (LFCDS) will get an opportunity to see it for themselves on January 10. The 9 a.m. open house offers an opportunity to tour the campus, speak with teachers and students, observe classes in session and meet families f rom the LFCDS community. Located on more than 30 acres, LFCDS delivers a diverse educational experience grounded in rigorous academics, arts, athletics and social-emotional learning to students f rom age two through eighth grade. Students f rom more than 36 communities thrive in a state-of-the-art, hands-on learning environment that prepares them to be critical thinkers, innovative problem solvers and effective communicators. Across all grade levels, students have access to learning spaces that include e x p a n s i ve o u t d o o r c l a s s ro om s , a 2,800-square-foot Innovation Center, a

Mentalist ‘minds’ your business Christopher Carter is set to stun audience at WCH BY LIBBY ELLIOTT THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

Christopher Carter is coming to Winnetka — and he’s ready to BLOW. YOUR. MIND. The well-known Chicago-based illusionist, mind reader and mentalist will appear at the Winnetka Community House (WCH) on January 26 as the featured entertainment at WCH’s annual Board of Governors fundraiser. Using techniques he perfected in a career spanning 28 years (and counting), Carter will engage with audience members throughout the one-hour performance, inexplicably predicting their actions, manipulating their thoughts and reading their minds. But make no mistake. Carter is not a psychic, clairvoyant or fortune-teller. He does not use ropes or strings or moving floors in his unique brand of magic “I read people,” Carter says in a phone interview. “Their eyes, their clothes, their mannerisms. I am a skilled observer of human nature.” Although Carter becomes hesitant when the subject turns to his techniques, he says he always opens his show by interacting with the audience for at least 15 to 20 minutes, using that time to mentally log their observable data. “It really begins when the show begins,” Carter says. “I put the leg work in early.” Continued on PG 6

Christopher Carter PHOTOGRAPHY BY LORRAINE RYAN

Continued on PG 6

“ I teach at LFCDS because authenticity and academic rigor are honored and encouraged in the teachers, in the curriculum we develop, and in our students. This combination of individualism and high expectations provides the foundation for an incredible education.”   – Rhonda Venard-Darin, Lower School & Upper School Visual Art Teacher

Open Houses: Thursday, January 10 • Thursday, February 7 • 9 am 145 South Green Bay Road, Lake Forest, IL 60045 • RSVP at lfcds.org/visit or call 847.615.6151

PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 991 HIGHLAND PK, IL


January Clearance Sale

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| SATURDAY JANUARY 5 | SUNDAY JANUARY 6 2019

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND


M c E l r o y ’ s J a n u a ry F u r s a l E s av E u p to 70% o F F o r i g i n a l p r i c E s

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966 n o rt h s h o r E d r i v E l a k E b l u F F i l 847-295-4600 w w w . M c E l r o y F u r s . c o M THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

SATURDAY JANUARY 5 | SUNDAY JANUARY 6 2019 |

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INDEX

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NEWS 9 area gets a new code

Codeverse unveils kids studio in Wilmette.

9 standout student

Meet Zach Demet, a fun-loving Lake Forest High School senior with a serious passion for theater.

LIFESTYLE & ARTS 10 north shore foodie

Kick start your mornings at Glencoe’s latest coffee spot.

11 social scene

University of Chicago Cancer Research Foundation Auxiliary Board members join two world-renowned doctors for an engaging discussion.

REAL ESTATE 12 houses of the week

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We profile intriguing houses for sale on the North Shore.

SPORTS 13 total recall

Athletes and coaches said it in 2018. We learned and laughed.

LAST BUT NOT LEAST 14 sunday breakfast

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Our favorite spoken morsels from last year’s “Sunday Breakfast” subjects still resonate.

13 THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND


O U R NEW YEAR’ S R ESOLUT ION IS A COMM ON ONE.

Reduce. Reduce. Reduce.

We’ve selected special merchandise and reduced it all 40%. It’s this month only thru Jan. 26th, while stock lasts, so hurry in. Because our loss is your gain.

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John Conatser FOUNDER & PUBLISHER Mindy Kovco ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER

EDITORIAL Bill McLean MANAGING EDITOR Sherry Thomas EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Kemmie Ryan SOCIAL EDITOR Elaine Doremus SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR

DESIGN Linda Lewis PRODUCTION MANAGER Amanda Alvarado ADVERTISING COORDINATOR/GRAPHIC DESIGNER Doug Adcock GRAPHIC DESIGNER Bill Werch GRAPHIC DESIGNER

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Libby Elliott, Karina Kavanagh, Gregg Shapiro, Jen Shea

PHOTOGRAPHY AND ART Joel Lerner CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER Robin Subar CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Barry Blitt ILLUSTRATOR

SALES Julie Yovits, Gretchen Barnard, M.J. Cadden, Brett Everett ALL ADVERTISING INQUIRY INFO SHOULD BE DIRECTED TO 847-926-0957 & INFO@JWCMEDIA.COM FIND US ONLINE: DAILYNORTHSHORE.COM LIKE US ON FACEBOOK! © 2019 THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND/A PUBLICATION OF JWC MEDIA 445 SHERIDAN RD., HIGHWOOD, IL 60040

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

A D V E RT I S I N G

I N Q U I R I E S

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NEWS MENTALIST Cont. from PG 1 For his grand finale — with a thick blindfold and heavy duct tape covering his eyes — Carter reads the thoughts of random people in the crowd. And in a time where music, television and movies are increasingly polarized by age, Carter’s “Mentalist” act has widespread, multigenerational appeal. A popular performer on college campuses and a sought-after speaker at corporate events, Carter has demonstrated his skills on a variety of daytime talk shows for years. “There are certain universal languages, and one of them is mystery,” Carter says. “People are fascinated by the temporarily unexplainable.” Carter began honing his act as a kid magician but quickly learned to interpret body language while observing his Uncle Bud — a retired Army colonel — play poker. “His shoulders would always tighten when he was bluffing,” Carter recalls. Years later, while working towards a Ph.D. in theater at the University of Michigan, Carter discovered he could combine his love for performing with his keen intuition and powers of perception. Instead of becoming a theater professor, he began working steadily as a mentalist, drawing inspiration from his 19th century predecessors. “This was a lost art form when I first started,”

Christopher Carter PHOTOGRAPHY BY LORRAINE RYAN

Tickets to Carter’s WCH appearance on January 26 are selling briskly, with adult general seating priced at $100 and discounted tickets (ages 12-21) at $50. Preferred front-row tickets are set at $125 for audience members eager to be part of the show. “Proximity helps,” Carter says. “It’s much easier to interact with people when they’re close to the stage.” The ticket price also includes pre-show cocktails plus light and heavy hors-d’oeuvres in the WCH Garden Room at 6:30 p.m., followed by a postshow dessert and silent auction until 10 p.m. Carter takes the Matz Hall stage at 8 p.m. All proceeds from the event benefit the program and services of the Winnetka Community House, a non-tax supported, nonprofit founded in 1911 to provide North Shore residents with educational, cultural, social and recreational opportunities. “This annual event provides direct operating support that helps us keep the lights on, service our constituency and fulfill our mission,” WCH Board of Governors Chair Murray Ancell says. “But it’s also about bringing the community together to laugh.”

Carter says. “I had no mentors. Now, a number — relies heavily on audience participation. “Because what I do is entirely interactive, each of young performers are starting to pick it up again.” show is unique,” Carter explains. ‘There’s a strong To purchase tickets to Christopher Carter “MentalAnd while the core routines of his performance element of improvisation when I perform, so each ist,” visit winnetkacommunityhouse.org or call 847446-0537 are set in advance, Carter — like most mentalists audience effectively creates its own show.”

ing an exciting transformation. An integral part of the LFCDS experience is a strong public speaking strand embedded newly renovated gymnasium and a Perform- in the school’s curriculum. During their time ing Arts Center which is currently undergo- at LFCDS, students develop their ability to LFCDS Cont. from PG 1

express themselves, take risks in a nurturing and achieve at their highest level. environment and cultivate the self-confidence to present to large audiences. For more information or to register for the These opportunities empower students to event, please visit lfcds.org  or call 847-615dream, try new things, take academic risks 6151.

INVISIBLE WORDS

Gallery with a conscience hosts exhibit to spotlight homelessness BY GREGG SHAPIRO THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

When Highland Park resident James Lynch took over the reins at The Art Center Highland Park (TAC HP) last year, one of his first priorities was to address some inconsistencies in the gallery process. “We were a full-time gallery with a contract curator,” Lynch says. “Caren Helene Rudman had a long history with TAC HP, including creating and curating the important “Voices and Visions/Women of Courage” exhibits, but we had no real commitment to her long-term. One of my first decisions was to find a way to include Caren on a more permanent basis as part of our team and to honor her finely tuned artistic vision for all of our events, not just use her here and there.” Lynch asked Rudman to make sure all of the center’s planned exhibits in 2018-19 had a conscience. “We agreed right away, because it was my intention all along,” says Rudman. “It’s my community, and the team at TAC HP right now is the best it’s ever been.” Starting with the exhibit “Musicality and Food, Glorious Food,” the new team added an entry fee for the opening night event for the first time ever. It asked people to bring non-perishable food items that were then distributed to the Moraine Township Food Pantry, where TAC HP also donated art from the annual Recycled Art event. Rudman saw to it that the center fulfilled part of its commitment to

6

Wendy Abrams and Caren Helene Rudman

an outreach program, inviting the Boys and Girls Clubs of Lake County in for a tour, discussion and art class. In the ensuing months, gallery attendance increased and art sales improved, but the most recent gallery event was where the concept really took hold. Enter Wendy Abrams — Highland Park resident,

placards from homeless individuals around the world. She had stopped to engage with them and find out more about them. “What struck me about some of their signs,” says Abrams, “was the amount of care, design and thought that went into some of them. Not only that, these were people in the direst of circumstances in most cases, and yet their messages were so hopeful and positive.” This gallery exhibit celebrates the spirit of humanity and hopes to also make those who live on the street less invisible to those more fortunate. To complement “Invisible Words,” Rudman also invited artists to submit works on the theme of “The Art of Giving Back.” Kelly Mathews, whose “Project Resist Fear” piece calls attention to common fears we all have as human beings, was asked to be the guest juror. TAC HP also invited artists from Keshet, a Jewish support program for individuals with special needs. “We’re hoping to do more with Wendy in the future,” says Rudman, “and the season we’ve planned for the next 12 months can be one of the strongest efforts we’ve ever had here. There has been interest in adding panel discussions and events. The comenvironmentalist and arts activist. When Wendy munity needs to know that the gallery is open six shared a project that she’d been working on with days a week — soon to be seven — and groups can Rudman, it was clear that this could be the best request tours and docent-led discussions in advance.” example of the kind of work TAC HP was looking to showcase. The result is the current show, “InvisFor more information about The Art Center Highland ible Words,” on display now through January 7. Park, visit theartcenterhp.org. To create “Invisible Words,” Abrams collected

| SATURDAY JANUARY 5 | SUNDAY JANUARY 6 2019

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND


NEWS

NEW YEAR, NEW YOU Flotstone is contributing a gift to the festival’s free raffle. Other donors include Bluffington’s Cafe, Hansa Coffee Roasters, Inovasi, Pasquesi’s Home and Garden, Otherdoor and Lake Forest Book Store. Other things to look for next weekend include: * Heinen’s will have a table with samples of organic snacks and f resh produce including apples and oranges.

A recent cycle class at Lake Bluff Health and Fitness.

Bluff Recreation Center from 8:30 a.m. to noon with f ree samples, special deals and a f ree raffle of health and fitness gifts from local shops. Lake Bluff Park District Fitness Center Supervisor Cati Christensen says the goal is to increase awareness of how easy it is to get out and walk and to make better food choices. The idea for the free community event grew out of the park district’s participation in GO Lake County, a community walking initiative that encourages residents to embrace a habit of walking in local neighborhoods for 30 minutes a day. Booths at the festival will include representatives f rom Be Market, Heinen’s grocery store, Lake Bluff Nordic Ski Club, Lake Bluff Hub & Cycle and Lake Bluff Health and Fitness. “The people that we have involved in this event are all Lake Bluff residents or businesses,” explains Christensen. Vade Sankar, owner of Be Market, says THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

things for me, so it’s an opportunity to share that with the community.” There will also be sample yoga, spin and total fitness classes throughout the morning. Lake Bluff Health and Fitness will have a membership special waiving the $75 registration fee for people who join that day. Cheryl Brown is teaching a fitness class at the festival for Lake Bluff Health and Fitness, where she works. “It’s a good time of year to do it, to kind of jumpstart your year,” Brown says. “If you’re looking for an alternative to some of the bigger gyms, Lake Bluff is a nice, comfortable place. It’s very down-to-earth.” Also participating is Flotstone, a floatation therapy center. Flotstone founder Patrick McMurray says they’re a natural complement to athletic activity. “Fitness people in general really do well when incorporating float therapy,” he says. “With fitness, it does play a huge role.”

* Lake Bluff Nordic Ski Club will have tips and information on Lake Bluff Golf Club’s cross-country ski trails and, if there’s snow, maybe even a test run. * Lake Bluff Hub & Cycle will be showcasing products f rom their shop and providing information about upcoming events. * Reike Specialist Daphne Johnson will be offering information on Reiki— the incredible discipline that helps cleanse your body and further your spiritual under- standing of yourself and the world around you. Guests can also learn more about one of the fastest growing sports around — Pickleball — and watch the exclusive video, A Day in the Life of Lake Bluff Fitness Center that showcases the many ways to a healthier lifestyle.

HE

ST

UDEN

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his shop will share samples of various smoothies, a green detox juice drink, a turmeric sweet potato spinach soup and a chai tea latte. Sankar will also offer We are now five days into 2019. How information on a three-day cleanse that are those New Year’s resolutions coming? he says he’s found very helpful. If you need a little help sticking to those “We will be sharing health information goals, the Lake Bluff Park District is about a plant-based diet and nutrition. hosting its first annual GO Fitness Fes- My focus is organic foods — healthy tival on January 12. superfoods, pre- and post-athletic Fitness festivities kick off at Lake natural options,” he says. “It did amazing BY JEN SHEA

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

T

Lake Bluff to host its first annual GO Fitness Festival on January 12

ZACH DEMET LAKE FOREST HIGH SCHOOL

A star in Lake Forest High School’s upcoming winter play, 1984, deserves to take a bow in 2019. LFHS senior Zach Demet — who will portray O’Brien in a production based on the novel by George Orwell — has quite a range as an actor at the school, from playing a lawyer in Radium Girls as a sophomore to performing the baker role in Beauty and the Beast last year to taking the stage as a German boxer in The Patsy earlier this year. Demet, a tenor, also entertains audiences as a member of the LFHS Madrigal Singers.

For his sensational efforts, Demet will receive a special gift from

For more information about this free festival, call 847-234-4150. SATURDAY JANUARY 5 | SUNDAY JANUARY 6 2019 |

7


NEWS

LOVE WHERE YOU LIVE! It’s all about teamwork with Team Mangel of @properties

Kathryn Mangel, Kelly Mangel PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBIN SUBAR

BY KARINA KAVANAGH THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

It didn’t take long for Kathryn and Kelly Mangel to realize they shared a competitive drive. Both North Shore natives, the two met playing sports together in middle school and they have been teammates ever since. Today, Kathryn and Kelly are Team Mangel—the top-producing real estate team within @properties’ Winnetka office—in somewhat of a step up from matching jerseys in middle school. We recently sat down with the real estate gurus to learn more about their careers and get their insider advice for today’s buyers and sellers. Why do you call yourselves the hometown real estate team? We both loved growing up on the North Shore, were schooled locally, and couldn’t wait to move back to raise our children here. We have known each other since we were in middle school (sixth and

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fourth grades, respectively) and grew up playing sports together, which is when we both developed our winning attitude. Why do people choose to work with Team Mangel? We don’t like to speak for ourselves, since everything is all about our clients and their opinions matter most. Our LinkedIn and Zillow reviews speak for themselves. We focus on finding our buyers, sellers or renters the perfect real estate solutions for their family. As a client testimonial says, we “take the time to understand your needs and help you get to your end game.” What advice do you give to sellers? You have only one shot to make a first impression in the market. It is a price war and a beauty contest, and you must win both! In terms of home improvements, we always recommend cleaning, decluttering, and painting. Updating kitchens and baths will also be helpful.

What advice do you give to your buyers? Be smart and do your homework about the neighborhoods, schools, properties, and communities. You need to “love where you live” so it is important to do as much research as possible. What are your favorite North Shore memories? We’ve always felt that the North Shore is the best place to grow up. We grew up in the era of Risky Business, Home Alone, and The Breakfast Club—need we say more? There is nothing like riding your bike to school, town, Homer’s and the many beaches including Tower, Elder, Kenilworth, and Gillson. What are your favorite places on the North Shore? The Chicago Botanic Garden in Glencoe is one of our absolute favorites. We

| SATURDAY JANUARY 5 | SUNDAY JANUARY 6 2019

also love the beaches and the restaurants; Guildhall, Torino, Happ Inn, Lou Malnati’s, and of course, Homer’s are just a few of the places you might find us when we’re out on the town. What is the most important thing in your purse? Our cell phones and portable chargers so we can always stay in touch with our clients. What are the best new home inventions? Quartz and Quartzite countertops are great because they can survive just about anything. Smartphone thermostats, alarm systems, and security camera doorbells are also on the cutting edge. Photographed at Dayton Street Development’s 338 Melrose in Kenilworth. Wearing clothes, jewelry, and handbags from What Fitz Designs from Gaillee Fitzpatrick. THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND


NEWS

S TA N D O U T S T U D E N T

DRAMA KING Demet resembles a lineman but delivers lines on stages instead BY BILL MCLEAN THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

Zach Demet hears it all the time. A stranger sees his 6-foot-2, 260-pound frame, makes an immediate assumption and blurts, “You play football, right?” The gregarious-to-the-bone Demet usually smiles and replies with a polite “No.” The Lake Forest High School senior does have a sports background — in wrestling, track and field, swimming and water polo. Demet no longer competes in any of them. Football? Never, in an organized setting. But if you’re a play director and you’re looking for a teen to portray a gridder with any kind of attitude, Zach Demet is your teen. He’d nail the role. Demet’s primary “varsity” activity since his sophomore year has been theater. Some of his credits: Donald in You Can’t Take It with You; the baker in Beauty and the Beast”; the German boxer in the French farce The Patsy; the fireman in The Amish Project; a lawyer in Radium Girls; and juror No. 3 in 12 Angry Jurors. “Being involved in theater has done so much for me,” says Demet, who landed the role of O’Brien

for the school’s winter play, 1984 ( January 31-February 2). “I’m more confident in many aspects of life because of it. My presentation skills have improved, thanks to theater. I love being a part of a group that tells a story. I enjoy, in general, the environment of theater — in that realm you get the chance to be creative, to be a different person on a stage. “So much of art is storytelling,” adds the A/B student. “Telling a story, through performing, is exciting.” Acting in a drama class skit as a fifth-grader at Deer Path Middle School helped Demet solve his working memory problem. True story. Demet likes to tell it. “I was able to recall my lines in the skit because I was moving around during the skit,” Demet recalls. “I thought, ‘This is great.’ It was more fun than I thought it would be. Something clicked. I got hooked on drama. After that, if I ever got frustrated while doing my homework, I’d stand up and walk around in my bedroom. Things would then sink in and stay in, and I’d no longer be frustrated.” In sixth grade he portrayed Stanley Yelnats (“Stanley” spelled backward) in Holes. A year later he was King Triton in The Little Mermaid. Demet earned a part in a musical, too. The non-football player tackled role after role and gained rounds of applause from audience

members. “Theater,” Demet says, “probably has been the biggest part of my life. My theater teacher at school [ Joe Pulio, also a business teacher and the theater department lead at LFHS] has been a great mentor. He’s tough, but I don’t mind that because he cares and has a lot of passion about theater, about education. He reminds me of my father [Steven]. I love when Mr. Pulio challenges me; I love when he tells me either in theater class or during a play rehearsal, ‘Stop! I don’t believe you!’ His intensity helps me develop as a performer.” Demet sees himself at a liberal arts college but probably not as a theater major. Film intrigues him. Producer Zach Demet? Maybe. “I don’t want to be restricted in college, but I will stay invested in the arts,” says Demet, who was a choir member at Deer Path Middle School and warbles with Lake Forest High School’s Madrigal Singers at senior centers and country clubs. “I want to explore different things, take advantage of the opportunities available at a good college. I don’t mind the challenges that come with trying something new.” It appears a credo that a 10-year-old Zach Demet heard from his father at the dinner table continues to influence him. “I’ll never forget what he said that night,” Demet says. “He said, ‘I would rather make mistakes than

live with regrets.’ ” Lake Forest High School senior Zach Demet

Do you know a teen doing outstanding work in the field of charity, science, arts, business or education? Please send your suggestion for Standout Student to bill@northshoreweekend.com.

RAPTURE AND ‘VERSE’ Codeverse enterprise to take off in North Shore, thrill youngsters BY JEN SHEA THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

A spaceship-themed coding studio for kids is set to launch in Wilmette this weekend. “Everything in the studio is completely interactive,” Codeverse Studio Manager Tia Piraino says ahead of the venture’s January 5 opening. “It looks very futuristic. “I’m excited about being able to have people finally see the space.” Codeverse opened its first location in Lincoln Park in 2017, before expanding to Naperville. Codeverse is the world’s first fully interactive coding studio for kids aged 6-13. At the studio they learn a special coding language — KidScript, based on JavaScript — and use it to program hardware like concert hall lights, speakers and robotic arms, or to design their own apps and games. After-school, evening and weekend classes are available for $225 per month. The week-long spring camp costs $500. Codeverse Co-founder and Chief Marketing Officer Katy Lynch says the studio and Wilmette should be an ideal match. “Wilmette is a very family-centric town, so we believe that we’re a great fit for the area,” she says. “Seeing the kids’ reactions when they program something for the first time, it’s fascinating,” Lynch says. “It’s cool,” she adds, “to see kids have that ‘aha’ moment.” THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

And parents can take part in those breakthrough instances, too. “[The kids] can share anything that they design and develop in the studio with their families,” Lynch explains, adding Codeverse students will likely send their creations — games, for example — to their parents’ cellphones. Lynch started the company with her husband, Craig Ulliott, in 2016. She worked at Techweek, a website that tracks tech companies outside of Silicon Valley, and he was at Belly, a customer loyalty app for merchants. “We got the idea while both of us were running completely separate businesses,” Lynch says. Lynch saw a documentary about the lack of women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics), triggering a chat with Craig. They did extensive research, which revealed two realities: an absence of coding language designed for kids and a dearth of interactive studio space. It took them about a year to develop KidScript. The Lincoln Park studio opened its doors in July 2017. Less than two years later, as they prepare to open the Wilmette studio, Lynch says she and Ulliott are drawing on lessons learned from the Lincoln Park and Naperville sites. “We primarily designed the studio based on everything we had learned at the Lincoln Park studio,” she says. “The elements that we’re including in the Wilmette space do mimic the Lincoln Park space.”

Codeverse opens this weekend in Wilmette.

Some of Codeverse-Wilmette’s classes are nearly full, Piraino, the studio manger, reports. She adds that the unique workspace on Green Bay Road will have “a ton” of things going on during opening week, a ribbon-cutting ceremony ( January 7) among them, as well as several open houses. It won’t be the last studio Codeverse opens.

Lynch says Codeverse has obtained more than $10 million in funding to open franchises beyond the Chicago area. “We plan to have them across the U.S.,” she says. Visit codeverse.com for more information. Its Wilmette location is 517 Green Bay Road.

SATURDAY JANUARY 5 | SUNDAY JANUARY 6 2019 |

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LIFESTYLE & ARTS

NORTH SHORE FOODIE

CAFÉ CUISINE Glencoe’s new Hometown Coffee and Juice is already a local favorite

Far Left: Garden Caprese, Rubin’s Rueben and Bagel, Egg and Cheese Left: Cappuccino and Mocha Latte Above: Baked goods PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOEL LERNER

BY LIBBY ELLIOTT THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

When a well-run, locally owned business opens on the North Shore, news travels fast. It’s been just two months since Glencoe’s Hometown Coffee and Juice launched in its corner location at the intersection of Vernon and Park Avenues (formerly occupied by Glencoe Roast Coffee) but already it’s the neighborhood hotspot. On a weekday morning in late December, the café was buzzing with a mix of college kids home for the holidays, professionals on laptops, stay-athome moms, and retirees — all happily communing over Hometown’s full menu of coffees, juices, smoothies and specialty toasts. And who better to own and operate a cafe called “Hometown” than Julie and Lou Rubin. The Rubins have made Glencoe their home for nearly 20 years, living, working and raising their two children in the community. “When we moved here, we fell in love with the village’s small town, Mayberry aspect,” says Lou. “It’s where we live and what we’re proud of.”

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For years, Lou — a mortgage broker — would grab his morning coffee at Glencoe Roast before heading upstairs to his office, housed in the same building. When Glencoe Roast came up for sale last July, he bought it, emboldened by his belief that the village needed more retail and food options. He was also intrigued by the idea of branching out into a new line of work. “I helped my son, Adam, start his own shaved ice business called Mr. Freeze last summer,” he says. “The response we got from the community felt incredible. I realized that’s how I want to feel in my everyday life.” Indeed, the Rubins have channeled their love for Glencoe into every aspect of Hometown — from the décor, to the food, to the staff. The café’s bright, white interior is softened with woven chandeliers and comfortable furnishings. In the summer, Hometown’s front windows open accordion-style onto plentiful sidewalk seating. Orders are placed at the café’s counter and delivered to seated customers with small, table-sized street signs bearing familiar Glencoe names like Grove and Greenwood. Serving La Colombe coffee and pastries pre-

while maintaining just the right balance of smoothies to coffee. “We built our menu as an authentic coffee house, and then added other food items to round it out,” says Lou. Hometown’s friendly, capable baristas are nearly all holdovers from the old Glencoe Roast. The Rubins were keen to maintain continuity —even paying employees during the café’s remodel. In addition to coffee bar classics such as the Flat White, Cortado, Machiatto and latte, Hometown’s menu features a French Press. Steeped in an elegant, glass carafe, this coffee offering is large enough to share with a friend — served with two ceramic mugs. Always mindful of the details, Hometown offers a full range of plant-based alternative milks, including oat, almond, soy and coconut. And while Hometown Coffee and Juice is clearly a new venture for Lou Rubin, he’s applied the same fundamentals that served him well in his 27-year career in the mortgage business. “You can’t just open,” said Lou. “You have to provide a good product. It has to be about the look, the people and the food. All those cylinders need to be working.”

pared by hyperlocal bakeries, Hometown’s menu of open-faced sandwiches (known as toasts), salads and smoothie bowls span breakfast, lunch and late-afternoon snack time. “We wanted to make it so there’s something here to eat at all times of the day,” says Lou. Hometown’s specialty toasts include The Classic, which layers avocado, olive oil and Roma tomatoes topped with a sprinkling of red pepper flakes and sea salt. The Garden Caprese adds mozzarella, basil, pesto and balsamic glaze to the mix. Hometown’s bagel melts are prepared fresh to order on steamed bagels, delivered to the café fresh each day. They are then piled high with fixings to create such tasty combinations as the Bacon, Egg and Cheese, Rubin’s Reuben and Park Avenue Melt. On the weekends, Hometown sells Do-Rite Donuts, sourced fresh from the city, while supplies last. “We sell out of everything … early,” says Lou. “Even the gluten-free variety.” Offering seven cold-pressed juices and nine Hometown Coffee and Juice is located at 700 Vernon smoothie blends, Hometown’s owners have been Avenue in Glencoe, 847-242-0220, hometownglencareful to provide options for the health-minded, coe.com

| SATURDAY JANUARY 5 | SUNDAY JANUARY 6 2019

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND


LIFESTYLE & ARTS

Socials UCCRFAB Dinner Discussion — Your Microbiome Photography by Robin Subar

Carl and Carolyn Rutstein hosted members of the University of Chicago Cancer Research Foundation Auxiliary Board (UCCRFAB) for an intimate discussion with two world-renowned doctors that are a part of the University of Chicago Medicine team. Guests enjoyed cocktails, delicious cuisine, and the discussion entitled “Your Microbiome— The Collection of Invisible Organisms that Live On and In You.” Guests learned how microbiomes affect cancer risk, as well as response to treatment, and how lifestyle habits, including diet and sleep, can alter them. UCCRFAB is hosting its annual gala, “The Time is Now,” on March 9 at the Halim Time & Glass Museum. cancer.uchicago.edu/foundation/auxiliary-board DR. WALTER & LISA STADLER, CAROLYN & CARL RUTSTEIN

ELIZABETH JENKINS, SHERIDAN TURNER, JACK BALL

JANE SHEKMAN, CAROLYN RUTSTEIN, JACKIE MISHORY

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

ASHLEY SAMZ, KATY SOLOMON

HEIDI & THOMAS O’TOOLE

EMILY MATZ, VANESSA LEONE, PH.D.

SATURDAY JANUARY 5 | SUNDAY JANUARY 6 2019 |

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R E A L E S TAT E

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Amazing opportunity in sought after Northmoor neighborhood in East Lake Forest. Updated and beautifully maintained charming brick ranch has large private fenced in backyard and 2 1/2 car garage. Updated kitchen with newer cabinets and appliances. 2 fireplaces. Beautiful hardwood floors. Recreational room, ½ bath and storage rooms in lower level. Plentiful closets. Enjoy lake breezes in the screened porch which opens up to a patio with fire pit. Close to town, running and bike trails, beach and parks.

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| SATURDAY JANUARY 5 | SUNDAY JANUARY 6 2019

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND


FIND MORE SPORTS AT DAILYNORTHSHORE.COM

SPORTS

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: @tnswsports

Quoteworthy BY BILL MCLEAN THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

Prep athletes and coaches say the darndest things each year. And insightful things. And smart things. And funny things. Here are our favorite sports quotes from last year: “I ought to give Pierson [Ohr] a key to the pool. Then again, that might give our athletic director [Augie Fontanetta] a reason to fire me.” — New Trier High School boys swimming coach Josh Runkle, on Ohr, a senior who often arrived at practice before anybody else did. “Ziv [Tal] went up to Noah [Shutan, a teammate] and told him, ‘You need to shoot.’ Ziv was thinking about the team, thinking about what was best for the team. Ziv had confidence in Noah, and his teammates saw that and appreciated that. Teammates responded well to Ziv’s challenges.” — Highland Park High School boys basketball coach Paul Harris, on Tal, the Giants’ leading scorer in his senior season (2017-18). “Not sure what Mrs. McDermed meant by that. Maybe I’ll have to see it (the movie Gangs of New York) one of these days.” — New Trier senior wresLoyola Academy middie Najee Taylor. tler Patrick Ryan, referring to a comment made by a teammate’s mother, Cheri McDermed, who had noted Ryan (whose face was cut up and splotchy game. LA had lost 9-6 to NT in the previous season’s after a meet) resembled a pirate or a character from state championship game. Gangs of New York. “James [Snyder] has sheer size. Big kid, with “We’re lifting weights as a team one day, and very long arms. Tenacious. He flew to where he Everet [Andrew, a sophomore] decides we’re going needed to be on the court, and his mentality at all to have a spelling bee. He challenged us to spell times was, ‘I will do whatever it takes to make a ‘Knights of Columbus’ on that day. Pretty funny. It block.’ ” — Deerfield-based Chicago Bounce club helps us mostly, his fun personality. He keeps things volleyball coach Blake Orlov, on the New Trier light.” — Loyola Academy sophomore swimmer senior middle blocker, an integral member of the Trevians, who finished in fourth place at the state Luke Mauer. tournament. “I only hesitated before naming Audrey [Kaus] “Shocked … I was shocked, shocked at my time a captain in her sophomore year because of her age. But, looking back, it couldn’t have been a better [2:19.99, in the 200-meter butterfly at a long course choice. Audrey learned right away how to motivate meet last summer]. I got out of the pool, sat on the others. Her words helped us. Her actions helped us. deck and hugged my legs. I didn’t know what to do She’ll leave a massive void.” — Lake Forest High with myself. Why I didn’t use one of the chairs School girls basketball coach Kyle Wilhelm, on nearby, I couldn't tell you.” — Highland Park High Kaus (Class of ’18), a forward and a valuable leader. School senior swimmer Abby Smith.

pound defensive lineman, a junior and Division I recruit. “Jamie [Fargo] and I are incredibly proud parents. I’m glad Charlie found the sport [rowing]. He’s made friends, instant friends, through rowing. The competitive son I see in boats is nothing like the Highland Park High School guard Ziv Tal. son I see when he’s not rowing. He is so mellow, low-key, down-to-earth, easygoing. Charlie likes to laugh and joke around. We crack each other up.” — Stephanie Fargo, on son Charlie Fargo, who helped Team USA’s U19 eight crew take the silver at last summer’s World Rowing Junior Championships in Racice, Czech Republic.

“Good luck guarding him [New Trier senior center-back Andrew Kuhn]. His technical abilities fly under the radar too often. Andrew is a weapon on offense for us, a huge one. I go to bed at night [on the eve of NT soccer matches] and sleep better, knowing Andrew will be there for us on set pieces. “Carolyn [Grevers] is passionate about coaching, He’s nails. He’s tough.” — New Trier boys soccer “That was her way of telling me, ‘Hey, we’ve got this; we’re good.’ ” — Loyola Academy girl water passionate about swimming. You know what, coach Matt Ravenscraft. polo coach Kim Przekota, on receiving a wink from though? She’s probably more passionate about “Kiley [Rabjohns] makes slices look like easy Ramblers senior Lauren Voss, who helped LA place helping her swimmers develop their lives outside of swimming. Carolyn has always been highly in- shots; they’re not. And she’s as mentally strong as fourth at the state tournament. terested in a swimmer’s next phase in life.” — Lake she is physically commanding. The slices, her slices “We played tonight for those freshmen in college Forest High School assistant girls swimming coach … they’re defensive shots, but she uses them to [and former Loyola Academy boys lacrosse players]. Cindy Dell, on Grevers, the program’s head coach. neutralize her opponents and then she flips the point in her favor — with Kiley, all of sudden, beWe knew they were up there in the stands. We saw “[Rylie] Mills is strikingly graceful for such a coming the offensive player.” — Lake Forest High them.” — Loyola Academy junior middie Najee Taylor, after helping the Ramblers defeat New giant human being.” — Lake Forest High School School girls tennis coach Denise Murphy, after Lake Forest High School girls swimming coach Trier’s Trevians 7-2 in the inaugural Illinois High sophomore cross country runner/sports videogra- Rabjohns (32-0) won the singles championship at Carolyn Grevers. PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOEL LERNER School Association (IHSA) boys lacrosse state title pher Peter Elliott, on the Scouts’ 6-foot-5, 270- the Class 2A state tournament. THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

SATURDAY JANUARY 5 | SUNDAY JANUARY 6 2019 |

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S U N D AY B R E A K FA S T

‘Sunday’ Best BY BILL MCLEAN ILLUSTRATIONS BY BARRY BLITT

We ate and talked. We laughed and listened and cried. And I — one grateful journalist — learned all about fascinating people with ties to the North Shore. Here are my favorite quotes that appeared on our “Sunday Breakfast” pages in 2018: “Before we got married [in 1990] I made Mark [Green] take a premarital swim test in my grandparents’ pool in Palm Beach. I made him swim all of the strokes of swimming [freestyle, backstroke, butterfly and breaststroke]. He passed.” — Swim instructor and Winnetkan Marcia Cleveland, who swam across the North Channel (21 miles, between Ireland and Scotland) in July.

be slightly changed by the experience.” — Musician Stephanie Rogers, founder of Story Jam. She hires well-known storytellers and writes songs for each story, and her 10-piece band performs the music at Story Jam shows. “My mom [Frankie Lowe] loves life, loves everything about it. If I ever reach the point of having 1/16th of the energy my mom has, I’d be thrilled.” — Gabrielle Cummings, president of NorthShore University HealthSystem’s Highland Park Hospital. “You should see what goes on in a room with an engaged youngster

resident who was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease at the age of 43 in 2012.

players during the 2016-17 season for a five-part newspaper series.

“The mom acted out a scene at the center, with her daughter watching alongside others. I remember the daughter saying, ‘I was forced to come.’ But she also told me, ‘I’m glad I’m here. It gave me the opportunity to see another side of my mom.’ ” — The Art Center (TAC)-Highland Park Executive Director James Lynch, recalling a moment at TAC when it was known as the Suburban Fine Arts Center.

“I remember vividly taking a tour of my friend’s house [in La Grange Park] and being mesmerized with the design in each room and thinking, ‘Wow!’ I was just a child, maybe 8 years old. I also remember in high school, flipping through copies of Architectural Digest in our family room and devouring the pages. The magazine’s pictures and words enthralled me.” — Lee Thinnes, founder and owner of Lee’s Antiques in Winnetka.

“The second I heard that track in the car, maybe four notes in, bang … my big bang. I became enamored with that kind of music, instantly.” — Saxophonist and Bravo Wa u k e g a n music teacher Joey Rosin, on hearing ‘Giant Steps’ on the CD The Very Best of John Coltrane when he was a fourth-grader. “A guest told me recently, ‘As soon as I enter the Deer Path Inn, I feel warmth, and I feel like I’m receiving a hug.” — Deer Path Inn Innkeeper Matt Barba.

“My father [The Rev. George Back, former dean at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Oklahoma City] picked up the pieces, helped people heal [after the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in downtown Oklahoma City]. I watched him. I admired his work. He did a wonderful job, overseeing the restoration and enhancement of a beautiful cathedral, and he did it all through love. That was a pivotal time in my life, and it impacted me significantly, essentially leading me to a vocation I truly love.” — The Rev. Luke Back, rector at The Church of the Holy Spirit (Episcopal) in Lake Forest. “Writing comforted me at an early age. I wrote in notebooks in my youth, constantly wrote, filling the pages with my impressions of people and describing how I’d like to resolve a situation I was facing or at least handle it, deal with it. Writing was my companion. It still is.” — Rochelle Distelheim, a Highland Park resident since 1956 and author of the novel Sadie in Love. (2018, Aubade Publishing).

“I met a man who had exactly what I had [obses“A month before he died, Benny looked at me in his sive-compulsive disorder hospital room and said, ‘It’s with intrusive thoughts]. time for me to go home.’ He had made it, survived He knew … just knew. His it, and he was willing to Joey Rosin last day, after he had lost the talk about it with me. That ability to speak, you should was such a relief, hearing him. have seen the streams of It was a huge moment for me. It was a turning point. I cried. visitors that stopped by to see him in our living room. He gave me his card; we The last group left at around emailed each other. His wonLee Thinnes 10 p.m.” — Kings & Convicts reading to an “The vioderful message to me that day Brewing Co-founder and CEO attentive dog. Magic. Magic happens.” lence is pernicious down was, ‘You are not alone.’ ” — Lake Forest resident and florist Brendan Watters, on his son Benny, who died from — Carole Yuster, founder and executive director of K-9 there [Chicago’s West Side]. Gabrielle Cummings Katie Ford. Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) at the age of Reading Buddies of the North Shore. Those kids, those athletes, live in a 5. The Benny’s World foundation is a founding member war zone. Daily. It’s deeply ironic and of the DIPG Collaborative. “I survived the Ironman [Triathlon]. I wanted tragic, not being able to play on playgrounds because “They walk in, notice the atmosphere, and it my children to think, ‘Hey, Daddy has this thing, they’re no longer safe. They should call them ‘gun- evokes memories, fond ones, from their childhood. “I see connections at shows; we’re all the same. I this disease, but he’s dealing with it, staying active, grounds.’ ” — Author and Chicago Sun-Times sports I’ve seen customers get wistful and teary-eyed.” — want people to feel inspired, energized, during our being proactive.’ ” — Pampered Chef Vice President columnist Rick Telander, on what he discovered while Liz Bearwald, co-owner (with husband Michael shows. I want them to feel something, to think, to of Product Development Bill Bucklew, a Wilmette chronicling the lives of Orr High School boys basketball Bearwald) of Bent Fork Bakery in Highwood.

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| SATURDAY JANUARY 5 | SUNDAY JANUARY 6 2019

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND


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SATURDAY JANUARY 5 | SUNDAY JANUARY 6 2019 |

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| SATURDAY JANUARY 5 | SUNDAY JANUARY 6 2019

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND

The North Shore Weekend East, Issue 326  

The North Shore Weekend East is published every week and features the news and personalities of Wilmette, Kenilworth, Winnetka, Northfield,...

The North Shore Weekend East, Issue 326  

The North Shore Weekend East is published every week and features the news and personalities of Wilmette, Kenilworth, Winnetka, Northfield,...