The North Shore Weekend, January 21st, 2023

Page 1

& ARTS

SUNDAY BREAKFAST

Home is where everything is for
Skokie's
Old
mecca is
day
NO. 535 | A JWC MEDIA PUBLICATION SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 ECRWSS LOCAL POSTAL CUSTOMER PRSRT STD U.S.POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 991 HIGHLAND PK, IL
refuse to join any club that would have me
member.”
Lake Forest native Tim Hender pg26 NEWS
Westfield
Orchard shopping
making a
at the mall cool again pg12
“I
as a
As International Holocaust Remembrance Day approaches this month, we talk to local and national leaders about the recent rise in antisemitism and what we can do to educate future generations by sharing sobering lessons from the past. pg8 LIFESTYLE
Pantone's 2023 Color of the Year is brave and bold, ushering in a year of joy ... Viva Magenta! pg19 NEVER FORGET Well-known
writer and
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-Groucho Marx
English
journalist
Jonathan Freedland is the author of the recently published book, The Escape Artist, which tells the extraordinary story of Rudolph Vrba, a Slovakian Jew who was one of the first prisoners to escape Auschwitz.

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6 | SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND NEWS 12 retail resurgence Westfield Old Orchard mall in Skokie gets a 21st century makeover 13 carp control Great Lakes preservationists celebrate the new Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) NORTH SHORE MONEY 14 a spirited collaboration Winnetka’s Jennifer Solberg Katzman shares the story of her family business LIFESTYLE & ARTS 18 hashtag Glencoe resident Tracy Wolfe talks about what's trending in her life 19 viva magenta Introducing the Pantone Color Institute's vibrant Color of the Year 20 dog gone Rob Lowe stars in this heartwarming tale about a dog gone missing 21 a man called otto This new Tom Hanks film is ambitious, yet predictable 22 material pursuits From luxury travel to bespoke interiors, this week's picks for living your best life 24 morton's An iconic Northbrook steakhouse holds true to its legacy LAST BUT NOT LEAST 26 sunday breakfast Tim Hender finds his way back home, again, with Compass Financial Partners' move to Lake Forest INDEX John Conatser FOUNDER & PUBLISHER ADVERTISING @NSWEEKEND.COM Jennifer Sturgeon CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Dustin O'Regan, Kemmie Ryan, Sherry Thomas, Megan Weisberg FASHION EDITOR Theresa DeMaria CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Mitch Hurst, Monica Kass Rogers, Bill McLean, Peter Michael, Rex Reed DESIGN Linda Lewis PRODUCTION MANAGER/GRAPHIC DESIGNER Chris Geimer ADVERTISING COORDINATOR/GRAPHIC DESIGNER PHOTOGRAPHY AND ART Katrina Wittkamp PHOTOGRAPHY Tom Bachtell, Barry Blitt ILLUSTRATION Cheyanne Lencioni ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ALL EDITORIAL INQUIRIES SHOULD BE DIRECTED TO EDITORIAL@NSWEEKEND.COM FIND US ONLINE NSWEEKEND.COM © 2022 THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND A PUBLICATION OF JWC MEDIA 445 SHERIDAN RD., HIGHWOOD, IL 60040 847.926.0911 @ TheNSWeekend @ TheNSWeekend Who says you have to stay bored? There are plenty of reasons to retire later. • Paid on-the-job and ongoing training • Paid time off • Working close to home Feel those first-day feels again. Un-retire at PaceBus.com/Careers • Competitive starting pay • Health insurance • Retirement benefits Missing community? Un-retire today! pg14
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The past connects to the present. Today’s historians, like historians throughout the centuries, analyze and interpret past events in large part by how they impact our lives and our communities today.

The threads that connect past and present and connect the generations that span them are often reminders of the human ability to do the right thing. Those threads can also be reminders of humanity’s grotesque capacity to do just the opposite.

This reality came into full view late last year when the singer and rapper Kanye West— known colloquially as Ye—dusted off some choice antisemitic tropes and aired them within earshot of the listening public. West’s comments, together with similar statements made by Boston Celtics player Kyrie Irving, came on the heels of the emergence of politically active groups in the United States whose ideology is rooted in large part in hatred.

While the public may have been shocked by media reports of West’s comments and the comments of West’s defenders, those within the Jewish community nationally and globally who pay attention to such trends heard an all too familiar refrain. Antisemitism and hate crimes have been trending upward.

According to the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) there were 2,717 antisemitic incidents throughout the United States in 2021, a 34 percent increase from the 2,026 incidents reported in 2020 and the highest number on record since ADL began tracking antisemitic incidents in 1979.

“I think the data and what we've heard indicates that there has been a rise in antisemitism over the last few years. It's not uniform, but it's

munity. “If we look at reported incidences to the Anti-Defamation League, which is the collector of information, at reports of incidents on college campuses, and what's going on social media, it all points in one direction, which is that hate in general in our society, but antisemitism specifically, are increasing.”

Herbst background and experience as an academic provides him a unique perspective to observe and analyze trends related to race, ethnicity, and religion in the United States. He is a recognized leader in the Jewish and educational communities and, prior to serving as President of AJU, he was president and CEO of the Newseum Institute in Washington, DC. He was also President of Colgate University from 2010 to 2015.

“It's very complicated. There were haters and

ally in society. I think our society has become more polarized. Bias incidents of all types have increased, and antisemitism is usually a leading indicator of bias in society in general.”

Herbst says he does not think the current rise in antisemitism is primarily about mainstream politics, and that it's more about what's happening on the fringes, what's happening on social media, and what's happening on the streets.

“Jews in certain neighborhoods are definitely under attack and that makes it more difficult because if it was mainstream politics, primarily, you could say, ‘This is a losing strategy’,” he says. “It's on the left, and it's on the right. It’s a diffuse, amorphous phenomenon that feeds on itself. Then every once in a while, you have this media breakthrough with someone like Kanye, which I think to some extent normalizes what had previously been unacceptable speech, and so it all feeds into one another and it makes any kind of solution really complicated.”

For years now, university campuses have become flashpoints, and Herbst says that while college administrators have lately begun to address expressions of antisemitism and the conflation of opposition to the Israeli government with antisemitism, they still have more work to do.

“There are a lot of Jewish kids on college campuses now who are afraid of signaling their identity, afraid of identifying with Israel, and they have to overcome those fears because I think the only way to change the trajectory of all this is to be defined, and that's hard sometimes,” Herbst says. “I think pushing back is the only way.”

American government does,” he says. “The data we're getting now says an increasing number of Jewish students on an increasing number of college campuses feel intimidated to express their Jewish identity because of debates around Israel, and that's bad.”

The struggle to turn these trends around, to perhaps break the negative thread of antisemitism that connects the past and the present, requires persistence and to some degree a willingness to take a long, internal view of our own hearts and conscience.

“I don't think these things get resolved; I think they get better or worse. I think the university administrators are now more sensitive about antisemitism than they were a couple of years ago. I don't think enough colleges took antisemitism seriously,” Herbst says. “More do now, and they have become acutely sensitive to expressions of bigotry and racism over the last few years.”

The well-known English author and journalist Jonathan Freedland believes a critical way to at least dent the cycle of antisemitism from generation to generation that Herbst has observed over the years is to document and communicate the important stories of Jewish history that will resonate with today’s audiences.

Last week, Freedland partnered with the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center in Skokie for a virtual presentation of the little known (up to now) story of Rudolph Vrba, one of the first escapees of Auschwitz who would go on to bear witness to the atrocities to European governments, most of which were initially unreceptive to the truth. Freedland tells Vrba’s story in his recently published book, The Escape Artist

“Vrba was the victim of a very specific kind of war against the Jews. That is something enduring,” Freedland says. “Jewish people can get depressed talking about it because it can seem like one of these absolutely perennial things that is just with us forever in history and doesn’t ever change. It’s just an enduring fact of our world.”

Freedland says the common thread between Vrba’s story and the world we live in today is false information and how it was used then and is used now to perpetuate a false narrative that can lead to atrocities like the Holocaust.

“Kanye West’s form of antisemitism is not even complicated. It’s old-school, old-fashioned, conspiracist Jew hatred in which Jews are the secret hidden hand behind world events and so on,” he says. “The other thing that is perhaps more surprising—and Kanye West is in a way part of this too because what he is spreading is untruthful, is that danger was absolutely central to the Nazi project against the Jews because the way they did it was through lies.”

definitely risen significantly,” says Dr. Jeffrey Herbst, President of American Jewish University (AJU) in Los Angeles, a center for Jewish research and talent serving the Jewish com-

racists and antisemites before social media and they organized, but social media has allowed them to find each other,” he says. “The language of social media is often course and there's not the kind of guardrails that there were occasion-

The vast majority of Jews see support for Israel—the land, the people, the state—as central to their Jewish identity, Herbst says. Judaism itself is intertwined with love of Israel, but that's different from saying that Jews necessarily support any particular government in Israel.

“Because I consider myself a patriotic American doesn't mean I like every single government that America's had or everything that every

In his book, Freedland refers to the story about fake showerheads in the ceiling of the gas chambers, and he says he remembers knowing that, but thinking that it was some kind of macabre joke, whereas now he understands it was central to the Nazi’s methods.

“They could not have done it on the scale they did it if they did not have orderly victims and orderly victims was only possible by the most constant, full-spectrum campaign of disinformation. They lied to their victims,”

NEWS 8 | SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND
NEVER FORGET From PG 1
Continued on PG 10
Dr. Jeffrey Herbst, President of American Jewish University. PHOTO COURTESY OF KATHLEEN HINKEL

SIMPLE PLEASURES

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he says. “When people talk about Holocaust denial, what you realize within history is that denial of the Holocaust was going on inside the

Holocaust and during the Holocaust. They were denying what they were doing. They were telling people every day, ‘We’re not really killing you; we’re resettling you’.”

Freedland believes that the antisemitic purge that swept up Rudolph Vrba was not the work of the Nazis or Germany. It was the work of the pro-fascist government in Slovakia, where Vrba was from, that persecuted Jews, put them on trains, and paid the Germans for the privilege, all with a lifetime guarantee that they would never return. That piece of Vrba’s story remains an important lesson for today.

“We get very easily dispirited by how hard this battle seems, what an uphill battle it seems to fight these lies that proliferate [online]—the hoaxes, the falsehoods, the conspiracy theories, and we can seem to be drowning in it,” Freedland says. “In a way, the point of telling Rudy’s story was to not feel defeated because whatever situation we’re in, his was harder, and yet he still had the strength to try and actually succeed in getting the facts out. It’s tough now, but we can look at his example and think, ‘There’s somebody who fought it even when it was way harder’.”

It was appropriate that Freedland partnered with the Illinois Holocaust

and religious groups that have been victims of genocide.

Kelley Szany, The Museum’s Senior Vice President of Education and Exhibits, says the organization wanted to host the event with Freedland in January in close proximity to International Holocaust Remembrance Day on January 27, because that day also specifically focuses on liberation, and Freedland’s book speaks to that.

Like Freedland and Herbst, Szany says the thread of misinformation that connects past and present is increasingly a concern, and it’s prompting the Museum to strengthen its already robust offering of education programs to counter the influence of the Kanyes of the world.

“The topic that Jonathan covers in his book is really about the timely lessons of the power of information. Was it possible to really stop what was happening?” Szany asks. “There are connections to today. More recent surveys in 2020 and 2021 are showing us that Americans, especially Millennials and Gen Z, don't know basic facts about the Holocaust amid rising racist and antisemitic hate crimes. The thread that you can pull through is this balance of misinformation as well as trying to get the information out.”

The challenge, Szany says, is how the Museum can continue to educate about what hap-

education is essential, but that it should be something that is taught with the idea that there were many signs during the Holocaust of threats to democracy that we could show today,” she says. “Students come to us in many ways as a safe place, using the Holocaust kind of as a jumping off point to what they're seeing in the world. What we have seen over the past four to six months has caused us as an organization to really begin to think that perhaps we are not doing enough. and that much more is needed to be done, particularly with partnerships with the non-Jewish community.”

In February, Barnard Cherkasov will begin his tenure as President and CEO of the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center, replacing Susan Abrams, who stepped down last summer. Cherkasov comes to the Museum at a critical time, and he too believes the education component of the Museum’s mission is as important as ever.

“I think to me, it just underscores how important it is that we continue to educate about hatred and atrocity, and more specifically about the Holocaust and its lessons, because even though it’s history, the lessons of it are as important today as they were at any point,” he says.

“To me, as a refugee to the United States who came here fleeing antisemitism, seeing it rising up here adds an extra level of sadness.”

pened during the Holocaust while survivors are disappearing or passing away.

“How do we marry that with education about the Holocaust that will help teach young people that Holocaust

“The antidote to prejudice, to hatred, is education,” he says.

NEWS 10 | SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND
Museum and Education Center to spread the word about Rudolph Vrba’s remarkable story. The Museum has for more than a decade documented the stories of Holocaust survivors and victims, as well as the stories of other ethnic Cherkasov adds that because he sees America as a place whose promise is that everyone will be judged on their merits and be given equal opportunity, there’s still work to do before the country lives up to that promise.
NEVER FORGET From PG 8
The Illinois Holocaust Museum Education Center sponsors a robust set of educational exhibits for young students to learn more about the Holocaust and Jewish history. PHOTO COURTESY OF KATHLEEN HINKEL PHOTO COURTESY OF SCOTT EDWARDS PHOTO COURTESY OF ILLINOIS HOLOCAUST MUSEUM PHOTO COURTESY OF ILLINOIS HOLOCAUST MUSEUM
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RETAIL RESURGENCE

Watch just about any teen comedy from the ‘80s or early ‘90s and you’re likely to see a scene or two that takes place in a mall. Back before eBay and Amazon and Internet commerce ruled the shopping world, malls were centers of commerce and communities, and Hollywood knew it.

Much has changed in the ensuing decades.

The Internet is filled with slide shows of “dead malls,” empty, rundown structures that have been abandoned by retailers and shoppers alike. But while thousands of malls across the country have shuttered, some developers are reimagining the mall as we move through the 21st century.

A prime example of how malls are being reshaped for the future is Westfield Old Orchard in Skokie. Westfield survived the Internet commerce explosion and, more recently, the COVID-19 pandemic, and the shopping center continues to thrive. But some see room for growth. A lot of room.

Paris-based Unibail-Rodamco-Westfield (URW) owns and operates 80 shopping centers in 12 countries, including 21 in the United States, Westfield Old Orchard

among them. In December, the company announced a significant expansion of the center that will include additional retail, modern residences, chef-led dining, entertainment, gourmet markets, and upscale health and wellness facilities.

“Westfield Old Orchard already provides an exceptional experience for our customers, local residents, and our office workers,” says Geoff Mason, executive vice president of operating management and development for URW in the U.S. “Our bold new vision for the center will dramatically enhance its offering and further establish it as the preeminent live, work, shop, and play destination on the North Shore.”

URW Senior Vice President for Development Stephen Fluhr, who is spearheading the Westfield development for the company, says that while the mall business over the years has taken some separate paths depending on where the malls are located, some malls are just destined to become something else entirely. They may retain a little bit of retail, but the real estate may still be useful for something, not just a mall.

“On the other side of the equation, we have these flagship retail centers like Old Orchard that have never really been in jeopardy at all, Fluhr says. “We continue to benefit from some of these other consolidations. Retailers, entertainment venues, and

restaurants are seeking locations like Old Orchard that are these flagship fortress destinations that continue to get stronger and the vision that goes along with that is we've got plenty of space for retail.”

A lot of people have grown up going to the malls and have memories from spending a lot of time in shopping centers, including Fluhr himself, and he sees the plans for Westfield Old Orchard as continuing the connection people have with physical shopping centers.

“We've actually been talking about it for a long time. The ability to do what we're doing now is the result of many years of internal efforts in the industry to line up ownership and line up rights,” he says. “Malls are pretty complicated entities in terms of who owns what and agreements between the department store and the landlord. So, it's taken some time to get those untied and get them all right to set up what we believe is the next right step in the evolution of the malls.”

The Old Orchard project will focus primarily on the north end of the mall where a new Bloomingdale’s has already opened—under the “Bloomie’s” brand—and the opening in 2024 of the old Lord & Taylor building, which will be divided up into four sections for different, yet-to-be-named retailers.

“We really felt it was primed from a palette perspective at the mall to say, ‘This is a great area to start to really redefine and create a new destination on the side of the mall that is a little bit different’,” Fluhr says. “Of course, we can add the residential up top, and there are other uses too that we look at over time. Hotels are great, medical offices are great. There's a series of complementary uses that makes sense to have on-site because people that either live there or work there or come to use the services will also benefit from having them all there.”

Fluhr says the consumer experience is really the point of the redevelopment of flagship centers. URW is a little further ahead than Westfield Old Orchard in developing Garden State Plaza in Paramus, New Jersey, and is deep in development of a similar project, Westfield Montgomery, in Bethesda, Maryland.

“What we want to do and what we want to create makes them all even better in terms of what we're bringing,” Fluhr says. “With these projects, we seek out best in class co-developers. We're retail developers and we want to partner ourselves with somebody who is the best multifamily residential developer out there so they can bring that expertise and we can do it together.”

Maybe there is life after Orange Julius after all.

LIFESTYLE & ARTS 12 | SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND
Skokie’s Westfield Old Orchard mall, long a destination for shoppers from the North Shore and beyond, will get some new additions in the coming years to draw even more consumers. A rendering of the new Westfield Old Orchard mall, which will be expanded in the coming years.

CARP CONTROL

The Water Resources Development Act, which cleared the House and Senate and was signed by President Biden in December, offers Illinois and Great Lakes states significant resources to fight the infiltration of carp.

Great Lakes preservationists received a significant boost in December with the bi-partisan passage of the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA). The Act provides significant resources for protecting the Great Lakes, including funding for preventing the infiltration of carp, which can do significant damage to marine life.

The WRDA is typically passed every two years and its main function is to authorize activities for the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers such as navigation and ecosystems restoration. This round specifically sets aside funding for the Brandon River Lock and Dam south of Joliet along the Des Plaines River. The Lock is used to raise vessels going into Chicago and vice versa.

The dam was chosen five years ago as the choke point for building a multilayered technology system to stop invasive carp, big head, and silver carp, from moving north towards Lake Michigan.

According to Joel Brammeier, President and CEO of the Alliance for the Great Lakes, the pre-construction, engineering, and design phase of the projects has been in the works for more than a year. The WRDA essentially provides

pre-funding for the project, which will speed up the timeline and lessen the danger of carp slipping into Lake Michigan.

“The project itself has been authorized, so there's authorization to build these technologies into the Brandon Lock that will dramatically reduce the risk of carp moving through,” Brammeier says. “The interesting thing about this legislation, what it does, what it changes, is that it’s essentially a prepayment for the first year of construction, which is unusual for the Federal Government.”

Another positive development from the legislation, Brammeier says, is that it increases the federal share of construction costs to 90 percent, which means the local partner, in this case the State of Illinois, is responsible for only 10 percent.

“This is a really big deal because it means that the federal government will pay for the lion's share of the cost,” he says. “It turbo charges

“Even though it may not be visible on a day-today basis, it is a pernicious kind of pollution— biological pollution—that actually completely disrupts how fish and wildlife survive and thrive.”

Brammeier says we've been pouring billions of dollars into programs that are making the ecosystem healthier and making the Great Lakes shorelines more beautiful and accessible to people. Then along comes the invasive species to undermine all of that investment.

“Specific to carp, it's not as though coastal Illinois is prime invasive carp habitat. These fish thrive in long rivers, they thrive in inland lakes, and they thrive in bay areas and wetlands and coastal areas where there are a lot of food and reproduction opportunities,” he says.

and provides momentum toward getting this project built, which is all really good news. Not to say that there isn't more work to do; there absolutely is, especially making all the states come along and participate in supporting the project. But we've come a long way in the last five years.”

For residents of the North Shore who live along the lake, and for those who frequent the area’s beaches, there’s a lot to know about why carp and other invasive species are such a danger. While much of the public’s image of carp comes from watching You Tube videos of carp jumping into recreational boats along rivers and waterways, the real damage they can do is under the water.

“The thing with invasive species is that it's basically impossible to completely predict how they're going to affect the lakes. But you can look at history and you can see where invaders like zebra mussels have basically changed the food web of the great lakes,” Brammeier says.

But those same long rivers and streams across our region are also home to blue ribbon trout and are big tourism drivers for fly fishing and other outdoor activities. Brammeier says the Great Lakes states, or the people of the Great Lakes, are losing more than $200 million in tourism opportunities due to invasive species in the water.

That loss of tourism revenue, and the environmental damage caused by invasive species, is the reason why Brammeier sees passage of the 2022 WRDA as such a big win. The bi-partisan effort indicates protecting our waters from invaders like carp is still a priority

“Members of Congress have been pretty clear that they will not tolerate new invasions,” he says. “Even way back to the Bush Administration and the Obama Administration, you saw bipartisan support for Great Lakes issues. I think this is one of the top-tier issues that people in this region care about, and that makes it more straightforward to make a case that it merits strong federal funding and strong partnerships from the states.”

LIFESTYLE & ARTS THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 | 13
Photography courtesy of Alliance for the Great Lakes/Lloyd DeGrane

A SPIRITED COLLABORATION

Between the ages of 10 and 18, Jenny Solberg often climbed trees in her neighbors’ yards in the fall months and shook, shook, shook the limbs.

The now 34-year-old Jenny Solberg Katzman, mother of a precious hat trick (Sienna, 4; Wade, 2; and Eva, six months)—had placed a sheet of tarp atop a stretch of lawn to serve as a gathering material for falling apples.

Or plummeting pears.

“You could say I was cross-training in the trees,” the Winnetka resident says with a laugh. “But I never told my high school soccer coach about it; he probably would have considered it unsafe.”

Katzman’s father, Charlie Solberg, had sanctioned the lofty activity. Back then, the patriarch of the family needed the fruit as step one in the five-step process of producing a fruit brandy. The other four steps: chop fruit (via a bicycle-powered chopper); press fruit; ferment fruit; distill fruit.

“It was my family’s hobby and passion,” says Katzman. Her father had learned to distill in the abundant fruit-growing region of Austria, where he’d played professional hockey as a forward.

Years later, when Katzman was living in San Francisco and working for the international tech company Meltwater, her husband, Taylor, encouraged her to morph the passion project into a business.

Katzman then ran the idea by Solberg.

“My father told me he’d start a business with me, but only if I moved back to Chicago,” Katzman recalls.

Head east, young woman. And that’s what she did.

The father-daughter entrepreneurs launched Rhine Hall Distillery in 2012. Katzman runs the day-to-day operations of Rhine Hall, a distillery with 14 products that focuses on European-style fruit brandies. These delicious brandies, crafted from 100 percent fruit, are described as eau de vie (water of life).

“Or,” Katzman elaborates, “the purest expression of fruit.”

14 | SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND NORTH SHORE MONEY
Winnetka’s Jennifer Solberg Katzman tells the story of co-founding Chicago-based Rhine Hall Distillery with her father, Charlie Solberg.
Jennifer Solberg Katzman Photography by Katrina Wittkamp

Solberg, 69, also owns Solberg Manufacturing, an industrial equipment supplier based in Itasca.

The production space at Rhine Hall—located in Chicago’s Kinzie Industrial Corridor and named after the Austrian ice rink Rheinhalle, where Solberg once skated and slapped shots for a salary—is open to the public for tours, tastings, cocktails, events, and more.

“My father is innovative, always has been,

and he’s someone who doesn’t like doing things conventionally,” says Katzman, who after Barrington High School earned an NCAA Division I soccer scholarship at the University of Vermont.

“He’s also a sounding board for me, as well as a mentor,” continues Katzman, the youngest of Solberg’s five children. “What I love about what I do is building relationships with growers and makers, along with learning all about the fun ways other cultures make products. My husband and I went to Normandy, where I learned how the French make apple brandies.”

Katzman majored in European Studies and minored in marketing at Vermont. How prescient.

She took an entrepreneurship course in college and—eerily—had to come up with a marketing plan for picking and selling apples (yes, apples) at a farmers market. The professor was impressed and praised Katzman for creating a cogent, sumptuous presentation.

“What my professor said to me that day motivated me to pursue a business career,” Katzman recalls. “I remember it so well; I can see her now. I’ve been goal-driven all my life. I like having a goal in mind and putting the pieces of the puzzle together to get there.”

Rhine Hall Distillery has been a great success thanks to the potent blend of a committed father-daughter combo.

“A fruit brandy is a difficult product to make, and it’s challenging at times to source fruit (apples, pears, cherries, apricots, and plums, among others),” Katzman says. “But

we’ve figured out how to be successful at it. We’ve done that by staying loyal to fruit-based products—our core.”

But the best part of her career to date has nothing to do with Rhine Hall Distillery’s bottom line and everything to do with her business partner.

“I am the luckiest girl in the world to work with my dad,” Katzman says.

Rhine Hall Distillery is located at 2010 West Fulton Street in Chicago. For more information, visit rhinehall.com.

THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 | 15
NORTH SHORE MONEY
Rhine Hall Distillery Still
thematlingroup@compass.com Glo | 847.951.4040 Zack | 847.722.2977 on The North Shore, throughout Chicagoland and Beyond. The Matlin Group and Compass have you covered We look forward to an amazing 2023! The Matlin Group is a team of Real Estate agents affiliated with Compass. Compass is a licensed Real Estate broker with a principal office in Chicago, IL and abides by all applicable Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only, is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, and changes without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of Real Estate brokerage.
Rhine Hall Distillery products

1.

SELL WHILE INVENTORY IS STILL LOW

Inventory is still low compared to more normal years, and that isn’t going to change overnight. For sellers, that means your house should still be in demand among potential buyers if you price it right..

2.

SERIOUS BUYERS ARE STILL LOOKING

Unlike the frenzy of 2021- 2022, the buyer demand has moderated a bit but there are a lot of buyers searching for their next home. Buyers are dealing with inflation and high mortgage interest rates and no longer operating from a place of fear and scarcity but they are still looking!

3. GET YOUR HOME IN SHOWING SHAPE

Declutter your home. We always tell our clients, it is better to start going through your things now and in a thoughtful manner than be rushed when it is time to move. Hire contractors for repairs now. Also, think about neutralizing your home with paint colors and carpet - give your home a fresh feel!

4.

HOME PRICES ARE NOT PROJECTED TO CRASH

Demand is still high on the North Shore but price your home right. An overpriced home sits on the market and buyers begin to wonder what is wrong with it - a mentality formed from the last 2 unprecedented years.

5. BUYERS START PLANNING NOW

Reach out to your Mortgage Broker and start the pre-approval process and discuss fluctuating interest rates. If you don’t have a lender we are happy to share recommendations with you. When mortgage rates come back down, those waiting on the sidelines will jump back in. Your advantage is getting in before they do!

16 | SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND TIME TO THINK 2023 SPRING MARKET... OVER $65 MILLION SOLD IN 2022* // ONE BILLION IN CAREER SALES * *Source: Includes all career individual and team sale reported by MRED and previous years SCAN HERE TO START STRATEGIZING WITH YOUR LOCAL EXPERT NOW… Megan and John would love to discuss your home with you!
THE TRUSTED NAME ON THE NORTH SHORE FOR OVER FOUR DECADES! NOW
THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 | 17 JOHN MAWICKE // 312-342-4278 // JMAWICKE@ATPROPERTIES.COM MEGAN MAWICKE BRADLEY // 312-307-1157 // MMAWICKE@ATPROPERTIES.COM “It’s not just our business…It’s our neighborhood!” Barbara Mawicke COMING SOON IN DESIRABLE EAST KENILWORTH! 627 WARWICK 5 Bedrooms, 4.5 Baths $2,745,000 132 ABINGDON 4 Bedrooms, 5.5 Baths $1,795,000 TOP 1 % OF CHICAGO AREA AGENT $ 65 M UNDER CONTRACT/SALES* 40 + HOMES UNDER CONTRACT* * MRED LLC BASED ON CLOSED SALES DATA 1/1/2022-12/31/2022

#ON MY MOBILE

“I love Instagram mostly for finding inspiration for my classes from yogis I admire like @chelseayoga, @cathymadeyoga, @yogavered, @tova.yogafit, and @yogadailytutorial. Cooking is my second favorite hobby. My go-to cooking pages are @halfbakedharvest, @ ambitiouskitchen, @minimalistbaker, @cookieandkate, and @lastingredient.”

#IN

MY AIRPODS

“One of my favorite things in connection with teaching yoga is making class playlists. I am constantly adding songs to my Spotify playlists and then as my class approaches, I arrange the songs into the perfect playlist. I always start with two to three slower songs like Adele’s “Easy on Me,” Ed Sheeran’s “Make it Rain,” Billie Eilish’s “When the Party’s Over,” or Beyoncé’s “If I Were a Boy.” Then I pick up the pace and volume during the Sun Salutation A with songs with good beat and energy like Nelly & Florida Georgia Line’s “Lil Bit,” Aerosmith’s “Sweet Emotion,” or 2Pac’s “Changes.” I continue with rap, classic rock, and country during the Sun Salutation B and Sun Salutation C, until I wind down with one to two slow/meaningful songs at the end, like Jeff Buckley’s “Hallelujah” or A Great Big World’s “You’ll be Okay.”

#ON MY NIGHTSTAND

“I devour historical fiction set during WWII. I feel that it’s important to learn about what our ancestors went through in order to provide us with the religious liberties that we enjoy today. Soon there will be no more Holocaust survivors, so it is important to hear as many stories firsthand as possible and to share those stories with our children and their children. Some of my favorite novels are The Nightingale , The Tattooist of Auschwitz , The Rose Code , My Enemy’s Cradle , The Book of Lost Names , and Once We Were Brothers .”

LIFESTYLE & ARTS 18 | SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND
Northwestern Law graduate TRACY WOLFE practiced law as a Chicago commercial real estate attorney before taking a professional break to raise her now 12-year-old daughter and boys ages 7 and 10. During this time, she delved deeper into her daily yoga practice and is now an athletic vinyasa flow instructor at Glencoe’s Reach Yoga and Northbrook’s Lifetime. Wolfe still applies the skills she learned during her 14-year legal practice: attention to detail, not of words but of every muscle in the body; deliberation, not of thought but of movement, and preparation, not of documents but of sequenced yoga flows. Here is how Glencoe’s Wolfe stays on-trend between breaths.
#HASHTAG
ILLUSTRATION BY TOM BACHTELL

What color is strength, optimism, and joy?

According to the Pantone Color Institute (Pantone), the 2023 Color of the Year is just that—a “shade rooted in nature, descending from the red family” called Viva Magenta.

“In this age of technology, we look to draw inspiration from nature and what is real,” says Pantone’s Executive Director Leatrice Eiseman. “Rooted in the primordial, PANTONE 181750 Viva Magenta reconnects us to original matter. Invoking the forces of nature, PANTONE 18-1750 Viva Magenta galvanizes our spirit, helping us to build our inner strength.”

It's a color that she says “vibrates with vim and vigor,” a powerful hue that promises excitement and drama.

Pantone originally created the Pantone Color of the Year educational program in 1999 to engage the design community and color enthusiasts around the world in a conversation around color.

“We wanted to draw attention to the relationship between culture and color,” says Laurie Pressman, Pantone Vice President. “We wanted to highlight to our audience how what is taking place in our global culture is expressed and reflected through the language of color. This thought process rings just as true today just as it did back in 1999. That’s one of the major reasons why, each year, so many around the world look forward to our Pantone Color of the Year announcement.”

Viva Magenta was received just as ceremoniously in 2023 as interior design professionals

VIVA MAGENTA

in our lives and homes,” she says. “It can create a glorious vision in any room; in the hallway, it would welcome visitors into a playful space or create an exciting office room to help get those creative juices flowing.”

James Greenwood, Brand and Interiors Expert at Graham & Brown adds, “It is easy to be put off using a bright color like this in the home, however we think this is easily translatable into a homey hue and our fearless Vixen paint is the perfect melding of a rich red with pinkish undertones. This stunning color looks playful in a brighter light, or sophisticated in a smaller cozy space.”

But the influence of color extends to other parts of the home.

It can also add a hint of boldness to any kitchen, hospitality setting, or eatery, as shown by the latest Kiss & Rell solid surface offering by by Durasein.

These Viva Magenta-inspired solid surfaces are not only beautiful, but antibacterial, making them an ideal surface for both kitchen and bath applications. Durasein materials are also resistant to mold and mildew, along with being food safe, non-toxic, non-porous, and low VOC.

and other tastemakers greeted this vibrant hue.

“Pantone’s Color of the Year may seem like a brave choice for paint if you’re a more classic and reserved decorator who usually remains loyal to the steadfast nature of a neutral,” says Paula Taylor, Trend Specialist at Graham & Brown. “This color, however, reflects the need

for self-expression and confidence, inviting us to be more open and show our personalities to the world.”

Her go-to paint hue from Graham & Brown?

“A splash of our Vixen paint can create the vibrancy and warmth that we are so in need of

Juliska, a modern iconic tabletop brand, is also embracing the Pantone Color of the Year with its French-inspired, soft filigree placemat. It's truly a work of master workmanship with an encircled weave pattern and a lovely backdrop to frame your place settings.

“This powerful and empowering color encompasses pure joy and the freedom of experimentation within the home,” adds Taylor. “This is a warming color that can really be worked into any room, whether it is in the furniture, window dressings, or of course, the walls!”

LIFESTYLE & ARTS THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 | 19
THE NORTH
SHORE WEEKEND
The North Shore Weekend combines a local news digest of doings and reviews with stunning art and photography for which the NS Weekend is known, together with lifestyle features, which enriches the leisure time of our devoted Saturday and Sunday readership since 2012. Telephone Inquiries 847.370.6940 THE NEW advertising@nsweekend.com
Pantone’s Color of the Year is unveiled, influencing everything from the paint on our walls to the hues of our interiors. Here’s a glimpse of this “brave and fearless” statement color for 2023.

RUNNING TIME: 1 hour, 34 minutes

RATING: 3 stars

DOG GONE

Based on a true story about a beloved adopted pooch that goes missing and the distraught family that turns life upside down trying to find him, Dog Gone is carefully designed to warm the hardest of hearts.

The title refers to two things: (1) the crisis surrounding the missing pet that plunges the distraught family into the search, and (2) the alternative G-rated exclamation “doggone” that is politer than “goddam”, which, at one time or another, everyone in the movie would like to utter.

When Fielding Marshall (nicely played by newcomer Johnny Berchtold) graduates from the University of Virginia, his classmates and colleagues all leave for lucrative jobs and career moves up the ladder of success. But instead of applying himself in preparation for the real world, which would please his worried parents, Fielding visits the pound and adopts a dog, names him Gonker, and moves back to his family home.

His Mom and Dad are appalled, but in to time they are playing fetch and falling for Gonker through sickness and health. One day on a walk down the 2,200-mile Appalachian Trail, Gonker chases a fox into the woods without his leash and doesn’t come back. Devastated, the whole family shifts into high gear, including Dad (Rob Lowe), who never approved of the dog in the first place, and Mom (Kimberly Williams Paisley), who just wants her son to be happy.

Dad packs up Fielding and hits the road, while Mom stays home, puts her life on hold, and negotiates the paper work that involves posting rewards, printing flyers, appealing to rescue organizations that specialize in finding lost animals, and manning the phones. People join far and wide, on websites and social media, including a motorcycle gang, a waitress, two hostile drunks, and more than 100 concerned strangers who are suddenly looking far and wide for Gonker.

In full disclosure, in the screenplay by Nick Santora and the sensitive, underplayed direction by Stephen Herek, is the passion dog lovers share for dogs that practically amounts to a worldwide religion. The people responsible for Dog Gone (including star Rob Lowe, who is also the executive producer) obviously hope this obsession will extend to movie buffs, too.

Loyal to the book by Pauls Toutonghi, the film teaches the Marshall family to take pride in each other’s character and courage in time for a happy ending. This is interesting, because despite the cynicism that permeates any film about family values, Dog Gone takes great pains to avoid sentimentality. It’s a tearjerker with mature intentions.

I respect that because I’m a sucker for movies about dogs. It’s the only subject left that leaves me unequivocally smiling and reaching for a Kleenex at the same time.

This one has the earmarks of real intelligence. The actors are dedicated and understated.

The yellow lab that plays Gonger is pretty terrific, too. He’s no Benji, but as the old song goes, “If this isn’t love, it’ll have to do—until the real thing comes along.”

LIFESTYLE & ARTS 20 | SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND
Illustration by Tom Bachtell Famed film critic Rex Reed weighs in on Dog Gone and A Man Called Otto. A new film starring (and produced by) Rob Lowe about a lost dog is sure to warm your heart.

A MAN CALLED OTTO

An attempt at a feel-good movie starring Tom Hanks has moments of charm but is a little too sweet in the end.

RUNNING TIME: 2 hours, 6 minutes

RATING: 2 stars

A Man Called Otto is a plodding and predictable take on the 2016 Swedish film A Man Called Ove, dusted off to please viewers desperate for a bit of feel-good optimism in a current cinematic atmosphere of depression, violence, and mean-spiritedness—transported from Scandinavia to Pittsburgh, and tailored to fit the ingratiating personality of Tom Hanks.

It's not his finest hour on film, but I guess he had to do it (it was produced by Rita Wilson, a.k.a. Mrs. Tom Hanks). The result, written by David Magee and directed by Marc Foster, is a follow-the-dots flick with a few moments of charm that aims to be a feel-good crowd pleaser, but lacks enough freshness and insight to make it anything special.

Otto is a modern-day Grinch who sees the joy in nothing. Deeply depressed by the death of his beloved wife six months earlier, forced into early retirement by the company he works for, and feeling utter worthlessness, he's lost he will to live.

Criticizing and judging the neighbors in the ugly cul de sac where he lives, he rants at everyone who fails to properly recycle their garbage or neatly parallel park, and he's infuriated by the stray cat that hangs around his door longing for affection. He thinks everyone is an idiot, he looks forward to no pleasure, and he thinks constantly about new ways to commit suicide. He even insults the clerk in the hardware store who sells him the rope to hang himself.

A running gag that interrupts each new attempt he negotiates to do himself in—carbon monoxide, home-made noose, a leap into the path of an oncoming train, all for the purpose of humor—grows tedious fast while Otto becomes more obnoxious in every scene. As the goodnatured, even-tempered star works against type to make the exasperating Otto likeable, we wait for something to change him back to Tom Hanks.

Something finally does when a Mexican couple with two small daughters pulls up a U-Haul and moves in next door. Otto is a cantankerous old grouch who hates everybody, so the sudden devastation of his reverie provides a new source of annoyance. Tom, the husband, drives him mad borrowing ladders, tools, and everything safely and neatly stored in Otto's garage, but Marisol, the wife, has so much warmth and personality that no measure of rudeness and rejection can drive her away.

The film is at its best when it concentrates on the relationship between Hanks and Mexican actress Mariana Trevino, as a wonderful and spirited Marisol. (Some will say she steals the picture.) Before you can say pico de gallo, Marisol is delivering home-cooked meals, Otto is babysitting the kids, reading children's stories aloud, and repairing their appliances.

And that's not all. He befriends a young transgendered boy and teaches him it's OK to be different. He reaches out to care for an old friend who is comatose. And he engages everyone on his block in a fight against the greedy capitalists from the real estate firm that wants to evict the entire neighborhood for profit. With a multitude of new reasons to find value in himself at last, Otto decides to keep living so he can help everyone who needs him because they're too clueless to help themselves. In the end, the film (and Otto) are overflowing with love, which is not entirely convincing, and the audience overdoses on molasses.

My biggest problem with this treacle is not the waste of Tom Hanks, who is rarely so flawed and bloated with bad advice that he alienates his fans beyond redemption (although as the fatuous Col. Parker in Elvis he came dangerously close). It's the fact that serious and challenging subjects (multiculturalism, the housing crisis, sexual discrimination, euthanasia, prejudice against immigrants, for starters) are introduced and dismissed faster than a list of appetizers at Taco Bell.

The movie is so overloaded with saccharine that you need a shot of insulin to get through it.

LIFESTYLE & ARTS THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 | 21

MATERIAL PURSUITS

This weekend’s curated luxury trends.

HUMPHREYS OF HENLEY, a luxury concierge travel company, partners with British 5-star hotels and international travel agents to create authentic, immersive, rarefied, and edifying experiences for visitors to the United Kingdom. An imaginative selection of itineraries includes quintessentially British enjoyments: a private tour of “Downton Abbey,” also known as Highclere Castle, where Lady Carnarvon may join you for coffee and pastries; shooting parties on a private estate, and the only “access all areas” pass to the Henley Royal Regatta. Founder Sam Evans explains, “We open doors, including those of Windsor Castle for behind-the-ropes tours of the State Apartments, and to the Wormsley Estate, home to the Getty family and their vast private library.” Insider knowledge ensures that guests experience the English season in style—avoiding traffic jams, securing the best reservations, and chauffeurs and helicopter pilots working in perfect harmony. This year, guests are invited to celebrate Her Majesty the queen’s Platinum Jubilee. The Humphreys Jubilee Collection features seven packages celebrating the queen’s seven decades of service. Guests will be hosted by those who have worked with the Queen or who are family members, including Lord Maurice Fermoy, first cousin to Princess Diana. They will enjoy experiences that reflect the queen’s passions and interests while getting to know Her Majesty and the life of a royal a little better. With Humphreys of Henley, it is quite possible to live royally. For more information, visit humphreysofhenley.co.uk.

Since 1920, Architectural Digest has celebrated design talents, innovative homes, and products— providing endless decoration, lifestyle, and travel inspiration. With 10 global editions, the magazine is an authority renowned all over the world for publishing only the very best of today’s interior design. In this new compilation, ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST: THE MOST BEAUTIFUL ROOMS IN THE WORLD, gorgeous interiors are highlighted telling a unique story of not only the decor but of a country’s culture. The editors of Architectural Digest’s international editions hand-selected a collection of their most treasured spaces spanning from the United States to Italy and from the Middle East to China, and beyond. Brimming with stunning imagery and rich international inspirations, this unparalleled curation of global interiors is a must for every library of interior design. Architectural Digest: The Most Beautiful Rooms in the World, Rizzoli New York, 2020 is available locally at Barbara’s Bookstore in Burr Ridge, 630-920-1500, barbarasbookstore.com, or at rizzoliusa.com.

A room refresh with Merinda Studio’s newly launched kids collection, including double daisies wallpaper in robins egg, cotton candy, and sunshine; all washable and available in peel and stick. The MERINDA KIDS COLLECTION also features pillows and fabric, including customizable initial wall art to add a personal touch to any space. For more information, visit merindastudio.com.

LIFESTYLE & ARTS 22 | SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND
2022 In Review 74 TOTAL TRANSACTIONS Over $65 Million SOLD AND UNDER CONTRACT 9.8 AVERAGE DAYS ON MARKET 23 UNDER CONTRACT AS POCKET LISTINGS 3 NEW TEAM MEMBERS Jacqueline Lotzof Licensed Real Estate Broker jacqueline.lotzof@compass.com 847.917.8220 Stephanie Malk Licensed Real Estate Broker stephanie.malk@compass.com 630.750.7835 Lotzof Malk Residential is a team of real estate agents affiliated with Compass, a licensed real estate broker and abides by federal, state and local Equal Housing Opportunity laws. 1866 Second St. #100A, Highland Park IL 60035. *MLS Data: 1/1/22-12/31/22
THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 | 23

MORTON’S

For my money, the Northbrook outpost of Morton’s The Steakhouse remains one of the last unabashedly “non-ironic” steakhouses in these parts. At a time when so many “modern” steakhouses are trying to source the most exotic cuts of foreign beef, glamor up the glitziest dining room, and deliver cocktails so fluorescent they should have their own Crayola marker color, here sits Morton’s—classic, classy, and confident.

When it comes to steakhouses, intangibles matter. The color scheme here is elegantly monochromatic: classic tuxedo colors—midnight black meets evening-gown white— frosted with enough glass and silver accouterments to make the whole room sparkle.

No one has overthought the seating either. Morton’s chairs prioritize comfort in ways that the new wave of modish contraptions—

which seek style points over simple functionality—simply don’t.

And then there’s the elegant soundtrack. No blaring pop hits overhead nor any “chic” playlists uploaded from some quirky server’s iPhone. Instead expect a gentler score. Piano ditties. Instrumentals. Classic tunes. All mellow enough that you can actually enjoy a conversation without screaming across the table.

The menu is also refreshingly direct. No overwrought descriptors. Just basic titles. Jumbo shrimp cocktail. A half dozen oysters on the half shell. Lobster bisque. Chopped salad. Center-cut filets. Double-cut prime pork chop, etc. Honey-Balsamic salmon. And plenty of sides, from sour cream mashed potatoes to creamed spinach.

After years of experience, I’ve found that beginning with seafood starting and closing with different cuts of beef is the way to go, as Morton’s seafood appetizers are often miniaturized versions of its entrees.

When your server points to the crab cakes

LIFESTYLE & ARTS 24 | SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND
The Northbrook outpost offers a delicious throwback to the golden age of unpretentious steakhouses. Lemon Souffle
FOOD & DRINK
Jumbo Lump Crab Cake

COCKTAILS

Morton’s bar knows its staples—good martinis and Manhattans—and offers smart whiskey choices to boot. But occasionally, you may want some novelty. Here are two tipples worth a sip.

AVIATION

on your menu and tells you, “We do it right. Lots of crab, very little filling,” she actually means. Expect very little breading and big tufts of crab meat, which delivers a full-flavored taste of the ocean that tough to come by this side of the Chesapeake.

There’s a surprising finesse to all the sauces that accompany the seafood offerings. The house’s apricot chutney is spiked with both horseradish and black pepper, which proves to be a spicy-sweet foil to the Morton’s bacon-wrapped scallops. And the white wine sauce that accompanies giant curls of garlicky Shrimp Alexander delivers just the right amount of creamy ballast.

The salads are, without a doubt, Chicagosized portions that can feed a duo, if not a table. The most nuanced and richest of the bunch is the spinach chopped salad, which gets tossed in a smoky-sweet bacon vinaigrette, topped with shredded egg, sweet slivers of onions, and more bacon than you’ll find in grandma’s BLT.

Chef Miguel Sandoval says the key to Morton’s success is its years of experience working with high-end broilers, which not only reach 1,200 degrees but cooks his Allen Brothers steaks from the top down. The resulting crispy outer layer of char seals in the juices within the interior of the steak.

Our pick? The well-marbled bone-in porterhouse, which is accompanied by a concentrated au jus—we’re talking prime rib worthy here—which amplifies without overwhelming the steak’s corn-fed flavors.

But the surprise of the evening may be an often-overlooked gem: Morton’s bone-in veal chop, a mellowed and nuanced ultratender cut that’s topped with a bone-marrow butter so nutty and umami rich it would

makes a well-aged parmesan taste limp in comparison.

Sides abound, but ordering a secret offthe-menu classic mac and cheese may be your best bet, especially if you’re partial to an incredibly powerful blend of Gruyere, cheddar, Swiss and cream cheese, complete with a crispy roof of crisped breadcrumbs.

For dessert, you should swing the other way: go soft. Roughly 30 minutes before you want your sweets, order a single serving of the house’s soufflé. The lemon soufflé—a brown muffin-top that recedes into a loamy base—is the best of the bunch. But a slice of the house key lime pie, which toes the line

between sweetness and citrus, with unusual deft, is a close second.

By the close of all this old-school luxuriousness you’ll probably want a moment to yourself. And spend some time doing what all good steakhouses should compel you to do: Talk about memories of days gone by and visions of future without a trace of irony in sight.

Morton's, The Steakhouse, is located at 699 Skokie Boulevard in Northbrook. For more information, call 847-205-5111 or visit mortons. com.

Perfect as an aperitif—or a main course option if you like some gentle floral notes with your earthy gin botanicals. It doesn’t hurt that it’s a looker and perfect for seasonal springtime sipping.

This is an old-school masterpiece, created in London in the 1920s, so it aligns perfectly with Morton’s classic vibe. Scotch never tasted so mellow. Be warned though: They go down extremely easy.

LIFESTYLE & ARTS THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 | 25
A blend of Tanqueray Gin, Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur, The Bitter Truth Violet Liqueur and Lemon Juice, garnished with an Italian Luxardo Cherry BLOOD AND SAND Glenmorangie 10 Year Single Malt Scotch stirred with Luxardo Sangue Morlacco Cherry Liqueur and finished with Carpano Antica Formula Sweet Vermouth Key Lime Pie Jumbo Shrimp Alexander

HOMETOWN HENDER

When Tim Hender, 49, was Timmy Hender, Deer Path Middle School 8th grader, he’d join his peers on weekends in the basement of the Gorton Center in Lake Forest to listen to music, shoot pool, pocket more friendships.

And perhaps, like any 13-year-old boy, hope to become cooler than Joe Cool.

“Many of us would also head out to roam around Lake Forest,” Hender recalls. “That’s what we did at ‘Hot Spot’ events at Gorton. Then we’d make our way back to Gorton, where our parents picked us up.

“We had fun at Gorton. Gorton was a big part of my childhood, a special place. Time spent there created many fond memories.”

Count on the grown-up Hender to stick around for the entirety of an entirely different kind of Gorton event on February 9—and drive himself to his home in Lake Forest afterward.

The Center on Illinois Road plans to show The Loyola Project, a highly compelling, straightshooting 2022 documentary about the 1963 NCAA champion Loyola University-Chicago men’s basketball team.

It was underwritten by Northwestern Mutual. Early last year Hender and one of his mentors, Joe Guin, co-founded Compass Financial Partners (CFP), a Northwestern Mutual private client group that moved from Vernon Hills to Lake Forest last month and reduced Hender’s commute to a three-block stroll.

The 88-minute film revisits the Game of Change—Loyola vs. Mississippi State, in an NCAA regional semifinal at the height of the civil rights movement—and chronicles how Coach George Ireland’s harassed, resolute Ramblers broke racial barriers and changed basketball forever.

The Gorton Center event, in essence, will serve as the unofficial tip-off to CFP’s community presence in Lake Forest.

Patrick Creadon, who directed an ESPN 30 for 30 documentary, directed The Loyola Project, which weaves archival footage and modern-day interviews and provides inspiration in the fight for equality. Former Loyola shooting guard Lucas Williamson co-wrote and narrated it.

Gorton-fan-for-life Hender picked Gorton to present it.

“It’s an ideal setting, a gathering place in the heart of the community,” says Hender, a Gorton Center board member for nine years, including the two years (2017-2019) he guided it as chairman. “The John & Nancy Hughes Theater’s cinematic technology is fantastic. Why not show it there?

“It’s a Chicago story and it’s an inspirational story,” he adds. “Those who see it will come away feeling good, realizing how far we’ve come

as a nation since the 1960s. But there’s still too much divisiveness in the U.S., too many people pushing for discord. I want to push the other way and celebrate the similarities all of us share.

“I want a world that’s colorblind.”

Hender has been a true-blue Lake Forester, through and through. And through. He dated his future wife and Northwestern Mutual colleague, Alana, for three months at Deer Path Middle and took her to the senior prom at Lake Forest High School in 1992. But they were good friends first, after connecting as 8th graders in the DPMS cafeteria.

“I remember talking with her as the jukebox

played a Men Without Hats song,” says Hender, who wrestled for two years and served as a varsity soccer captain at LFHS. “You know the one … the song they played over and over.”

Maybe it was The Safety Dance

Or Pop Goes the World

The University of Vermont graduate (Tim) and the University of New Hampshire graduate (Alana) got married in 2000, returned to Lake Forest three years later, and raised children Julia (21 years old, Tulane University), Brody (19, Elon University), and Cooper (16, LFHS sophomore).

Alana works as a Northwestern Mutual

growth and development coach, who helps new advisors at the firm.

Tim’s parents, George (“Gig”) and Mary Jane, still call Lake Forest home.

Brody shot his first hole-in-one at Onwentsia Club in Lake Forest, a week before his father aced a hole at Sandy Valley Golf Resort in Nekoosa, Wisconsin.

Anything you can do, Son, I can do the same.

Dad Hender is also a Community Church of Lake Forest & Lake Bluff board member.

The primary organizers of last fall’s LFHS 30-year reunion at Knollwood Club?

Tim and Alana.

“I love the people of Lake Forest, first and foremost,” Mr. Hender says. “They’re great people, with great values. I made a lot of friends at Gorton (as a child and as an adult) and learned a lot in my years as a Gorton board member.

“I also love the beauty of Lake Forest, the beach, everything about it.”

Hender—who traded at the American Stock Exchange in New York and at the Chicago Board Options Exchange, before joining Northwestern Mutual in 2011—has spent a third of his life, at least, at Bruce Springsteen concerts (he’s attended 20) and another third of his life in, on, or near water. Tim and his father sailed a J/46 named Windrush in a boatful of Chicago Yacht Club to Mackinac races. Tim water skis, surfs, and swims when he’s not running or snowboarding.

But he makes splashes indoors, too, as a private wealth advisor. Compass Financial Partners’ mission is to help families navigate their journeys to financial security. Service-focused CFP is recognized by Northwestern Mutual as one of its top wealth management advisory teams in the country and is a founding member of the FORTUNE 500 company’s Private Client Group—an exclusive selection of advisors who provide sophisticated advisory strategies for high-net-worth clients and their families.

“Building relationships is my favorite part of work,” says Hender, who strives to fill each day with purpose, prayer, positivity, and patience.

“Friends become clients; clients become friends. At Compass we’re good at making a difference in people’s lives. Every day I wake up with the aim to serve others and make the world a better place.

“All of us can do that, even in small ways, repeatedly.”

Visit Gorton Center’s site, gortoncenter.org, for more information about the center’s 7 p.m. screening of The Loyola Project on February 9 (a reception starts at 6 p.m.). Gorton Center, 847-234-6060, is located at 400 East Illinois Road, Lake Forest.

Visit compass-fp.com for more information about Compass Financial Partners, located at 272 East Deerpath Road, Suite 204, Lake Forest.

SUNDAY BREAKFAST 26 | SATURDAY JANUARY 21 | SUNDAY JANUARY 22 2023 THE NORTH SHORE WEEKEND
Lake Forest High School graduate Tim Hender returned to Lake Forest in 2003, served as board chair of the city’s Gorton Center from 2017 to 2019, and—just last month—moved his wealth management advisory team to Lake Forest.
But there’s still too much divisiveness in the U.S., too many people pushing for discord. I want to push the other way and celebrate the similarities all of us share.
Tim

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