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Saturday, October 8, 2011

The

Daily Citizen

TheDailyCitizen.com

Serving Searcy and White County, Ark., since 1854

Harding Relay for Life gets under way

The Harding Relay for Life kicked off Friday evening on the front lawn of the university. — Page 3A

Fire Chief Richard Picciotto

What: Spoke about his experience on 9/11 Where: Benson Auditorium at Harding University When: Thursday evening

NY fire chief talks 9/11 at HU

University hosts bestselling author

Week 6 of prep football in the books

Turn to sports to find out how White County’s high school football teams fared in Friday’s games. — Page 1B

City panel chooses Little Rock firm Local firm questions decision-making process

By Molly M. Fleming mfleming@thedailycitizen.com A new terminal will soon be under construction at the Searcy Municipal Airport, but that terminal will not be designed by a local architecture firm. The Airport Commission, chosen the Searcy City Council, recently looked at requests for qualified proposals and chose Steelman Connel Moseley Architects, PA of Little Rock, which beat out the Searcy firm Hoffman Architectural Inc. for the job. The decision was discussed during the Searcy City Council’s agen-

Searcy Council Agenda meeting

n Airport Commission chose Little Rock architecture firm n Council could reverse decision and pick local firm n Tax ordinance to be repealed and passed again because of technical error

da meeting Thursday evening. Each firm was asked to submit qualifications for the job, but they were not allowed to submit the proposed price for the structure. The commission then evaluated the Continued on Page 3A

City must change ballot issue language

By Molly M. Fleming mfleming@thedailycitizen.com City Attorney Buck Gibson told the Searcy City Council Thursday the city will have to repeal the tax election ordinance and pass a new ordinance with minor changes as requested by the state department of finance and administration. Gibson Gibson said he submitted the ordinance and the department had an issue with the wording of the ordinance.

Gibson said the ordinance title will have to be changed to read that the tax would be collected through a “sales and use tax” rather than from “gross receipts” as stated in the ordinance. The same change would be made throughout the ordinance wherever the phrase “gross receipts” is used. “Nothing will change substantively in the ordinance,” said Gibson. If passed, the tax will still be 1 percent for 15 months, starting April 2012 and ending June 30, 2013. The election will still be held Dec. 13.

Crowell crowned Harding Academy queen

By Marisa Lytle mlytle@thedailycitizen.com Harding University held its first American Studies Institute Distinguished Lecture Series for the 201112 school year Thursday evening with a lecture by New York Fire Department Picciotto Chief Richard “Pitch” Picciotto. Picciotto is the highestranking firefighter to survive the World Trade Center collapse that occurred as a result of terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. He was in a stairwell of the North Tower when it collapsed and was buried in debris for more than four hours. He is also the author of “Last Man Down,” a New York Times bestseller, and a 28-year veteran of the New York Fire Department. Dr. Jim Carr, vice president of Harding University, opened the evening with an introduction of Picciotto, after which a short video played in which Picciotto’s voice said he was on the 35th floor of the North Tower when the South Tower fell. “The rumbling was tremendous,” his voice said. “I saw the first tower fall and thought, ‘I have to get everyone out.’” The video ended by saying Picciotto’s actions saved thousands of lives. Picciotto then took the lectern and said everyone knows where they were on 9/11. He also knows exactly where he was. At 8:45 a.m. when the first tower was hit he was in the fire department. “My shift doesn’t start until 9 a.m.,” he said, “but I’m the chief, and so I get there around 7 a.m. to exchange information with the other chief.” On the radio, he heard that a plane had flown into the South Tower. He said from the start he did not think this was an accident, as some of the news stations were suggesting.

Single Parent Scholarship fund n Reception held Thursday n 20 scholarships awarded n More than $160,000 in scholarships given out since 2000

Group aids education for single parents Previous recipients have high retention rates

Lynley Crowell is crowned Harding Academy homecoming queen by escort Landry Shipman Friday evening at First Security Stadium. Crowell is the daughter of Donnie and Myra Crowell. Shipman is the son of Jeff and Laurie Shipman. Kyle Troutman/ktroutman@thedailycitizen.com

Continued on Page 2A

4 local men arrested by drug task force on various charges

Earlier this week, four area residents were arrested for possession of controlled substances, as well as other charges. n On Tuesday, the Central Arkansas Drug Task Force and White County Sheriff’s Office conducted a search at 280 Bunch Drive in Searcy. Investigators located components used in the manufacturing of methamphetamine and approximately two grams of suspected methamphetamine, val-

Drug arrests

n Three Searcy residents, one Augusta resident arrested n Methamphetamine, marijuana found with suspects n Only one suspect still held at White County Detention Center

ued at $200.  Cletus Craig Brown, 40, of Searcy was arrested for manufacturing of a controlled substance and possession of a controlled substance.

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Brown was incarcerated in the White County Detention Center and was later released on a $100,000 bond. n On Wednesday, the CADTF and Arkansas Department of Community Corrections conducted a search of a residence at 1106 West Race in Searcy. Investigators seized approximately one-fourth of a gram of suspected methamphetamine in the form of ice, valued at $25, and items of drug paraphernalia. George Chadwick, 38,

of Searcy was arrested for possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. Chadwick was incarcerated in the White County Detention Center where he is still being held on a $50,000 bond. n Also on Wednesday, the CADTF and Searcy Police Department executed a search warrant at 600 Horton Street, Apartment 7 in Searcy. The department seized a small amount of

INDEX LOCAL, 2A OPINIONS, 4A LIFESTYLES, 5A CALENDAR/OBITUARIES, 6A SPORTS, 1B CLASSIFIEDS, 5B

By Molly M. Fleming mfleming@thedailycitizen.com Thursday evening was a time of joy and recognition at the White County Single Parent Scholarship Fund, Inc. reception, honoring those who received scholarships for the summer and fall though the organization. Twenty scholarships were awarded to students from across White County. Since the program started in 2000, more than $160,000 has been awarded to single parents through the White County Single Parent Scholarship Fund, Inc., said Dan Newsom, executive director of the scholarship fund. “We review our recipients very carefully and have found that our scholarship winners have an 86 percent retention rate,” Newsom said during the awards ceremony at Arkansas State University-Searcy. Those who received a scholarship in the summer and fall semesters of 2011 are as follows: Darren Amundsen, Amy Bradley, Callie Collison, Debbie Elgen, Shelby Johnston, Tiffani Kiker, Brandie Langley, Heather Langley, Hermelinda Macias-Garcia, Tracy Martin, Kathy Pettis, Christina Pinner, Brenna Rogers, Annessia Royal, Allison Stanley, James Swanson, Crystal Taylor, Viki Vinson, Rita White and Amanda Wyman. The scholarships were made possible through the donations of various organizations, businesses and individuals in the county. The program originally started through the Bald Knob Rotary Club, but it has since become a county-wide effort. Those who donated to the scholarships include: the Bald Knob Rotary Club, Colton’s Steakhouse and Grill, Eaton Corporation, Entergy, Searcy

Continued on Page 2A

Continued on Page 3A

He that will not apply new remedies must expect new evils; for time is the greatest innovator. Francis Bacon

Philosopher, 1561-1626

Contact us: 3000 E. Race, Searcy, AR 72143, (Phone) 501-268-8621, (Fax) 501-268-6277


The Daily Citizen

Saturday, October 8, 2011 • Page 3A

Local

City: Panel picks LR firm

Harding University hosts Relay for Life

Continued from Page 1A

Harding students Lucas Waddell and Erin Chambers, bottom left, work on painting a dish at a booth set up Friday evening during the university’s Relay for Life event. Students paid $1 to paint a dish at the booth, which was organized by various campus clubs. All of the funds raised at the booth went to the American Cancer Society. Molly M. Fleming/mfleming@thedailycitizen.com On Thursday evening, scholarships were given to those who received them through the White County Single Parent Scholarship Fund Inc. Angle Cruz-Macias, 2, sleeps in the arms of his foster grandmother Karen Light while waiting for his mother receiving her scholarship. Molly M. Fleming/ mfleming@thedailycitizen.com

Fund: Local group aids education for single parents

Continued from Page 1A

Searcy Rotary Club, Ty Venable, Winston Collier and the Women Helping Others Foundation. Newsom said the scholarships are important to not only the recipients but to the future of White County. “These scholarships are making a real difference in the lives of single parent families,” Newsom said. “We like to say we are providing hope through education. In White County, we have 2,000 single parent families and about 46 percent of those live at or below the poverty level. We are helping them get out of that through education so they can help themselves, help their children and then help the community.” In total for 2011, the White County Single Parent Scholarship Fund has awarded 46 scholarships with a total of $27,825.

Rylen Johnson, 14 months, spends time with his great aunt Sharon Remagen, of Bald Knob. Rylen’s mother Shelby Johnston received a scholarship during the reception Thursday evening at the Arkansas State University at Searcy. Molly M. Fleming/mfleming@ thedailycitizen.com

To get involved or to make a donation, persons can reach Newsom at (501) 230-2414 or e-mail him at fabfour64@ sbcglobal.net. Donations can be mailed to: P.O. Box 8325, Searcy, 72145.

undercut authority. I hate that I missed it by two points.” Mayor David Morris addressed the council and audience following Hoffman. Morris said the council does not have to use SCM Architects, as the council still has the final say in the process. “But Mayor, we’ve had this discussion before about decisions made by commissions,” said Alderman Don Raney. “If we’re going to appoint people to commissions and not take their recommendation, then what’s the point of having people on commissions? We need to listen to the recommendation of the airport commission.” Raney said Hoffman may not be out of the running because SCM still has to reach a deal with the commission about the price for the terminal. “If SCM can’t reach a deal with the commission, then by law the commission is able to consider the next best firm, which would be Hoffman,” Raney said. The council told Kent to begin negotiations with SCM and if possible, have a deal ready to go by Tuesday’s meeting. If a deal is not possible by Tuesday then the council would call a special meeting to approve the deal so work can begin on the terminal. Other items moved to Tuesday’s agenda include the appointment of Mike Cleveland to the Searcy Tree Board; appointment of Greg Angel to the Searcy Board of Adjustment; approval of Kenneth Leininger for issuance of a taxicab license and resolution for the grant funds for playground equipment at the Searcy Sports Complex. The grant is made possible through the White River Planning and Development District. Morris said playground equipment is already purchased and on its way to the site; but somehow in the paperwork, the resolution for the grant slipped through the cracks. Two ordinances forwarded to Tuesday’s agenda include a rezoning ordinance for 2001 E. Hastings in Searcy, to rezone it from industrial to commercial, and a budget-amending ordinance. The council will meet on Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Searcy City Hall.

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qualifications using a check sheet and scored each firm based on various dimensions of the job. The firm with the highest score, which was SCM, was given the job. SCM beat out Hoffman by only two points, but there were many areas on the score sheet where Hoffman lost points. Those areas included experience with project planning and start-up services, knowledge and experience with state and federal requirements, experience with contract management, experience with competitive bidding process, quality of work and staff to be assigned. Hoffman made up for the loss of points in the categories about the proximity of the firm to the project and the familiarity the firm has with the area. Rick Kent with the airport commission spoke to the council during the meeting about the commission’s decision to go with SMC. “I’d much rather do business with someone local, but we are recommending SMC,” Kent said. Barry Hoffman with Hoffman Architectural addressed the council about the commission’s decision. “What a missed opportunity for local jobs and local tax revenue,” Hoffman said. “We are qualified to do this project. Something is flawed in the process if you choose the out-of-town firm because they are a larger firm. For this project to get funneled out to Pulaski County, where it will help them with their jobs and their tax revenue, seems like a shame to me. Normally this process has an interview portion so it’s not so objective. Some of the concerns the commission has with our firm would have been addressed in an interview process. I know they’re concerned that I’m the only man with the firm, but if they would have sat us down for an interview, the commission would have learned that we actually have a crosscontinuation agreement with another firm in case something were to happen to me.” “We already supported our local economy in regards to this project by going to Carol’s Copies to make that brochure you’re holding in your hands right now. I’m sure I’m the only firm in your process that paid Searcy taxes to get those brochures made. The last thing I want to do is

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Thursday, October 13, 2011

The

Daily Citizen TheDailyCitizen.com

Serving Searcy and White County, Ark., since 1854

Beebe getting ready for big game Judsonia council re-visits flooding issue Friday’s contest against Blytheville has major playoff implications for the 4-2 Badgers. — Page 1B

The city of Judsonia plans to obtain estimates to fix a culvert that has caused flooding problems. — Page 3A

Council approves LR architect

Council, commission went by state law when picking service

By Molly M. Fleming mfleming@thedailyicitizen.com Despite hearing from Searcy architect Barry Hoffman with Hoffman Architectural about why his firm should have been chosen for the airport terminal job, the Searcy City Council chose Steelman

Searcy City Council

n Approved rate for service with SCM Architects of Little Rock n Repealed and re-passed tax election ordinance n Working on updating taxi cab license ordinance

Connel Moseley Architects, PA of Little Rock. The council made the decision based on the recommendation of the Searcy Airport Commission and

passed the recommendation during the council meeting on Tuesday night. To make the decision, the commission evaluated the qualifications of both architect firms using a check sheet and scored each firm based on various dimensions of the job. Those two firms were chosen from a larger list of eight firms, which was narrowed down by the Airport Commission Committee. The entire process of choosing

a firm is outlined in state municipal law under the section pertaining to the procurement of professional services. Mayor David Morris said the committee used the process outlined in the state law to pick the designated firm. “If the only criteria was being local, then that would be the only question asked. I think Hoffman does excellent work,” Morris said. Continued on Page 3A

New exhibit now open at Searcy art gallery

Fall festival

Who: Sidney Deener What: To host fall festival When: Tonight from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Where: Sidney Deener gym Cost: 25 cents per ticket to be used on games and food

School to host fall festival tonight Proceeds will fund playground items

Tom Killough, president of the Searcy Arts Council, reflects on an ivory crucifix he bought from a Buddhist temple. Above the crucifix, made circa 1800, in a frame are two angels welcoming Christ into Buddhist heaven, Killough said. “Christ is rather broad-minded,” he said. “Don’t you think?” Many other items from his collection are on display in the Searcy Art Gallery, which is open Tuesday through Friday from 1 to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. through Nov. 26. Marisa Lytle/mlytle@thedailycitizen.com

Asian works on display until Nov. 26

F

By Marisa Lytle mlytle@thedailycitizen.com or any who have ever wanted to travel to Asia, a trip to the Searcy Art Gallery would be a good start. “Reflections on Asia,” a new exhibit featuring multimedia works by local artist Daniel Adams and What: ‘Reflections Oriental art on Asia’ and antiques Who: Original from artwork by Daniel the Tom Adams and selected items from Killough the Tom Killough Collection, Collection will be on Where: Searcy Art display Gallery, 300 E. through Race Avenue Nov. 26. When: Now Adams through Nov. 26 is a professor in the Department of Art and Design at Harding University, where he teaches printmaking, graphic design and a variety of art history and visual aesthetic courses. His work is widely exhibited and collected. The works on display in the gallery are the result of a semesterlong visit to Australasia last fall, which Adams took with his wife, another faculty family and 39 university students. Tom Killough, president of

New exhibit

the Searcy Arts Council, spent many years in Asia with the Far East Division of the University of Maryland, which is headquartered in Japan. During his stay, he appeared in movies, on television and on stage at the Imperial Theater. He also collected art from artists he knew and antiques from countries he visited, such as Russia, Nepal, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, China, Sikkim, India, Korea and the Philippines. A reception for the exhibit will be held today at the Searcy Art Gallery from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Adams and Killough will be present to greet guests and answer questions about the pieces. While Killough’s pieces are part of his personal collection, Adams’ pieces are available for purchase. Adams explained the origin of the idea for the exhibit. “During the summer of 2010, we were looking ahead to the 201112 gallery season, and I suggested that we put this show together. I need a reason to make art, and I knew that I would be going to South East Asia in a few weeks. I would gather images and ideas while in the Harding University in Australasia (HUA) program. Tom has been a great collector of art and artifacts over the 40-plus years he lived in Asia. I thought that

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Today: Sunny. Highs in the upper 70s. Northwest winds 10 to 15 mph. Tonight: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower 50s. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph. Vol. 157, No. 246 ©2011 The Daily Citizen

These two pieces by local artist Daniel Adams are framed in pairs and demonstrate the difference between Cambodian (left side of each frame) and United States (right side) power lines. Adams, a professor in the Department of Art and Design at Harding University, along with his wife, another faculty family and 39 students spent last fall semester at the university’s campus in Australasia. Marisa Lytle/mlytle@thedailycitizen.com

might make an interesting show of impressions of Asia from an American point of view along with art works created by Asians.” Killough said he has been an appreciator of art since childhood. “I’ve always had a great respect for artists and artisans,” he said, “for people who can conceive something and actually make it.” “In Asia I liked finding things I loved to keep. A Russian friend of

mine named Alvatena Nikolaevna believes that things find you, and you just have to take them home with you, which is an unusual outlook. She also believes antiques are something to look at, and looking at them keeps them alive. The Japanese attitude toward things is that they are floating and just drift through time and are there after we’re gone.”

INDEX NATION & STATE, 2A OPINIONS, 4A LIFESTYLES, 5A CALENDAR/OBITUARIES, 6A SPORTS, 1B CLASSIFIEDS, 5B

Continued on Page 3A

By Molly M. Fleming mfleming@thedailycitizen.com When the recess bell rings at Sidney Deener Elementary School in Searcy, the students play on equipment that has been at the school for a number of years. But the revitalized school Parent Teacher Organization wants to change that. The organization — which until last year was not functioning — has made it its mission to help the school get new playground equipment. “Until last year, nothing had been done to update our playground equipment because the PTO just died,” said Shannon Derrick, PTO president. “Last year, we decided to sell cookie dough and the kids did a really good job. They really want new equipment because their current equipment is outdated.” To help raise funds for the playground equipment, Derrick and the rest of the PTO helped organize the second annual cookie dough sales program. The school raised around $21,000 this year, which is $1,000 less than last year, but the school also has fewer kids. Continued on Page 2A

Next meeting

Who: Pangburn City Council Next meeting: 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 8. Where: Butch Pearce building, 508 W. Main St.

FBLA approved to build skate park

By Erica Sirratt Special to The Daily Citizen PANGBURN — The Pangburn Future Business Leaders of America was given permission by the city council to build a skate park within the city park close to the ball field. The FBLA approached the council last month and asked if they could build the skate park, but the council wanted to wait and make sure there would be no liability issues. Mayor Gary Doyle said he spoke with the city attorney and that he was assured the

Continued on Page 2A

I have always had the courage for the new things that life sometimes offers. Wallis Simpson Royalty, 1895-1986

Contact us: 3000 E. Race, Searcy, AR 72143, (Phone) 501-268-8621, (Fax) 501-268-6277


The Daily Citizen

Local

Thursday, October 13, 2011 • Page 3A

Judsonia re-visits flooding issue

Tom Killough, president of the Searcy Arts Council, describes how this piece in his personal collection depicts cranes, which are a symbol of happiness in Japan, and bamboo, a symbol of strength. This piece and many others of Killough’s collection are on exhibit at the Searcy Art Gallery, along with original works by local artist Daniel Adams. “Reflections on Asia” will be on display at 300 E. Race Avenue through Nov. 26. Marisa Lytle/

Money allotted for trunk or treat event

mlytle@thedailycitizen.com

Gallery: Asian art exhibit on display

Continued from Page 1A

Killough’s collection includes such items as a 300year-old Buddha statue, a gold screen depicting scenes of ancient war, three stone rubbings in marble bas-relief, paintings by Hiroshi Kado he purchased in the 1960s and 1970s, a needlework depicting cranes and bamboo, a meditative mandala painted by Buddhist monks, an ivory crucifix from the 1800s, an incense burner, and a watercolor painting of mythological creatures from Indonesia. On the stairway of the gallery hang three stone rubbings, which depict characters from a work called “Ramayana,” a work Killough said is similar to “The Iliad” and was written by a poet around 2,000 years ago. “The story tells of one of the younger wives of the king who plots for the prince and princess to go into the forest to live. The princess is captured by monsters, but with the help of monkey people, the prince and his brother rescue her. They go back home, and everything is forgiven. I got this work from Bangkok, Thailand in the 1960s. They don’t allow anyone to make these reliefs anymore because they don’t want to wear the marble down.” Killough pointed to one of his favorite pieces, a section from the Japanese gold screen. “Tosa painted this screen,” he said. “The woman in the scene is wearing red, which only young women could do. There’s a writing set in the picture, which indicates she is trying to correspond with her lover, who has gone to war. You can see there are strands of her hair that are out of place, and she looks disheveled. Something interesting about this is the reverse perspective the artist used. See how the items in the distance are actually larger and look closer that the objects in the foreground. It’s also a little ironic to have that pine tree in the foreground because it stands for happiness and life.” Adams said almost all of the large pieces of his in the exhibit are woodblock prints. “I draw the image in reverse on a block of wood, and carve away all the nonimage areas and roll the raised portions of the wood with ink,” he said. “I then apply paper and pressure to transfer the ink from the block to the

By M. A. Webb Special to The Daily Citizen JUDSONIA — The city of Judsonia plans to obtain estimates to add a new gate valve to a culvert that has caused the city flooding problems in the past. Mayor Ricky Veach brought the issue of flooding to the council for discussion at the regularly scheduled meeting on Tuesday night.   Frankie Hodge appeared before the council during the meeting in May and requested the city’s help with flooding at his house. At that time Hodge stated that, during periods of heavy rainfall, seep water accumulated in his yard and he had to pump it out. Hodge suggested a valve or a gate would prevent water from flowing onto his property. Veach updated the council on the situation and stated that the city had inspected the valves saying, “We checked the valves and they are as good as we are going to get them.”

Veach suggested that the city purchase a six-inch pump in order to prevent the flooding. Veach estimated that a new pump could be obtained for no more than $15,000 and the price of a used pump would be half of that. Alderman David Conley inquired about the cost to fix the culvert. The council agreed that attempting to fix the problem within the culvert would be the best course of action. According to Veach, the water would still need to be pumped even if the city made repairs to the culvert. Veach stated that he would talk to somebody regarding the cost to make the repairs and the city could address the issue of a pump at a later time. In other business, Police Chief Ray Coffman requested that his department be allotted money to purchase candy for the upcoming Trunk or

Trick event to be held on Oct. 31. Veach recommended that the city allow $250 to purchase candy. The council unanimously agreed. Coffman also reported that the police cruiser that the council voted to replace the head was now running. According to Coffman, the bar light had been replaced by a dash light. Alderman Kitty Conley presented the parks report to the council and stated that the light on the pavilion that shines on the flagpole needs to be replaced. Conley also stated that two of the basketball goal nets needed to be replaced. Another issue with the parks that Conley presented was the presence of a dead tree near the walking trail that needed to be removed. Conley also said that the new swing seats were too high and needed to be lowered. The next meeting of the council will be 7 p.m. Nov. 15. The council meets the second Tuesday of each month at the Judsonia City Hall.

the appointment of two people to two separate city boards. Mike Cleveland was appointed to the tree board and Greg Angel was appointed to the board of adjustments. Cleveland is the city’s code enforcement officer and Angel is a Searcy Realtor. The council also approved three budget adjustments, an appropriation of $297,000 to the 2011 Taxiway Grant revenue account; an appropriation of $26,403.33 to Capital Equipment E-One Typhoon Pumper expenditure account. The council also amended an ordinance passed in July regarding the Searcy Parks and Recreation Capital Fund. A grant for the administration of grant funds from the White River Planning and

Development Commission was approved by the council. The grant will be used to purchase playground equipment at the Searcy Sports Complex. The grant money has already been used, as the passing of the grant resolution was a formality that was forgotten during the earlier process, Morris said. Morris reminded the council about the White County Cleanup, which is under way. In the next couple of months, Morris said he hopes to finalize the 2012 budget, which he said should long be completed before the state’s Feb. 1 deadline. The council will meet again on Nov. 3 for its agenda setting meeting and the regular meeting will be on Nov. 8.

Next meeting

Who: Judsonia City Council Next meeting: 7 p.m. Nov. 15 Where: Judsonia City Hall

Council: Little Rock architect approved

Continued from Page 1A

This print (left) by local artist Daniel Adams called “Tran Quoc Pagoda” hangs on a wall in the Searcy Art Gallery with the wood block from which it was made. Adams traveled to Asia last year for three months with a group from Harding University. The trip provided inspiration for the works displayed in the exhibit “Reflections on Asia,” which will be at the gallery through Nov. 26. Marisa Lytle/ mlytle@thedailycitizen.com

paper. Many people compare it to the way a rubber stamp works. Woodblock printing is the oldest form of printing we have on Earth. I liked using it, as it helps me to slow down and really observe the forms, in this case, temples, pagodas, mosaics and other man-made forms that we are not so familiar with in the United States.” One work he particularly likes, Adams said, is his woodblock print “Tran Quoc Pagoda.” “Tran Quoc Pagoda is one of the oldest Pagodas in Hanoi. A pagoda is an entire complex devoted to Buddha. In the West we tend to mistakenly think that the multi-tiered tower is the pagoda — it is a tower. This particular pagoda had many shrines along with the tower and great hall. These shrines are dedicated to the monks who worshiped at Tran Quoc Pagoda. I really enjoyed the reddish brick and the almost claustrophobic quality of the tower and shrines creating a maze-like pathway through the pagoda.” Another print on display is hung alongside its woodblock and Adams’s original journal entry in which he sketched the image. Called “The Killing Fields,” the print depicts skulls piled on top of each other, an image Adams saw while traveling in Asia. Adams and Killough appreciate the opportunity to exhibit their work and collection together. “Tom's collection is so varied because he traveled far and wide while living in Japan,” Adams said. “His pieces have

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great sensitivity and depth. I appreciate being able to show along side these works. They show the insight of culture that Tom acquired through the years of his stay in Asia. In contrast, I was there barely over one month.” “We are so fortunate to have a world-class university like Harding here,” Killough said, “and to have top-notch professors, such as Daniel Adams, Beverly Austin and John Keller, to cooperate with.” The Searcy Arts Council’s new exhibit "Reflections on Asia," multimedia works by Daniel Adams and Oriental art and antiques from the Tom Killough Collection, will be on display at the Searcy Art Gallery located at 300 East Race Avenue through Nov. 26. The gallery is open Tuesday through Friday from 1 to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Admission is free. A reception for the exhibit will be held today from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the gallery. For more information, persons may call (501) 279-1094.

The

The other criteria under the law include the specialized experience and technical competence of the firm, the capacity and capability of the firm and the past performance of the firm. The commission and SCM agreed to a 6.25 percent fee, which means that SCM will be paid 6.25 percent of the total construction cost of the airport terminal project. The council approved the percent fee. In other business of the council, the tax election ordinance and the ordinance setting the date for the tax election, which were both passed in September, were both repealed due to a technical error with the wording in the ordinance. The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration asked City Attorney Buck Gibson to rewrite the ordinances using the phrase “sales and use tax” instead of “gross receipts” when the ordinances discuss how the tax will be collected. The council then passed the ordinance again with the phrase “sales and use tax” in place. “Everything about the tax is still the same,” Morris said. “It will still run for 15 months. We will still vote on Dec. 13 and it will still be a 1-percent tax. Nothing about the tax itself has changed.” The council decided during the meeting to table the issuance of a taxi cab license to Kenny Leininger. Alderman Don Raney and Gibson will review the current taxi cab ordinance and update it by the November meeting before Leininger is issued a license. “He is already operating in the city, so I commend him for doing what is right by coming to us,” Morris said. The council approved

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All real, personal, and improvement taxes are due October 17th. All mail postmarked after October 17th will receive a penalty. You can pay your taxes with a credit card by calling toll-free 1-800-272-9829 or online at www.countyservice.net. Convenience fee will be added for credit card payments.

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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2011

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Serving Searcy and White County, Ark., since 1854

HARDING ACADEMY ENJOYS WEEK OFF FORESTRY OFFICER: BOSS KNEW OF SHORTFALL The Wildcats and Lady Wildcats are enjoying time off before Beebe Tournament next week. — PAGE 1B

A former Arkansas Forestry Commission official said his boss knew about financial problems. — PAGE 3A

Economy expected to improve

Searcy chamber, economic expert reflect on positive financial signs BY MOLLY M. FLEMING mfleming@thedailycitizen.com

Searcy and the surrounding areas may be able to start seeing

the light at the end of the dark recession tunnel. With the city projecting higher revenue in 2012 than in 2011, Searcy Chamber of Commerce President Buck Layne said there are a number of reasons the economy may be on the upswing. “We’ve had an increase in the number of jobs in our community,” he said. “Some of our existing industries have added

some jobs. The new hotels have contributed jobs as well, and we’ve added new retail. We have had a number of ribbon cuttings this past year. There really isn’t just one major reason that the economy has improved, but there are a combination of different improvements in the area.” Layne said that the chamber expects this trend to continue into 2012.

Beebe City Council

“We’ve had a number of gas-related companies looking at our community recently,” he said. “Some of them are in their final process of picking a community for their company. We’ve also been told that the drilling rigs will get back to work soon. Some of them will be returning because their leases are set to expire soon.” Please see ECONOMY | 2A

BALD EAGLES SPOTTED IN SEARCY

Next meeting: 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 23 Where: City hall

Multiple grants awarded to Beebe

Beebe cemetery costs increase BY ERICA SIRRATT Special to The Daily Citizen

BEEBE — The City of Beebe has been awarded various grants for repairing East Idaho Street, building new dugouts at the ball field, and cameras for the police cars and officers. The city held a special public hearing in March regarding the condition of East Idaho Street and met with Carrie McIntosh of White River Planning and Development. At that time, it was estimated that the project would cost about $150,000 and the city was awarded between $175,000 and $200,000. The city was granted $194,520 to repair the street. White River Planning and Development is in control of the money and has Please see GRANTS | 2A

Marisa Lytle/mlytle@thedailycitizen.com

A great blue heron waits for his next meal to come swimming by at the rainwater pond on the Searcy Wastewater Treatment Plant premises Tuesday. The same areas hosts various waterfowl, such as ducks and egrets, as well as birds of prey, including the red-tailed hawk and the bald eagle.

“They are probably hanging around the plant because they’re looking for waterfowl, such as egrets and ducks, that are injured that they can eat.” Karen Rowe

Associated Press

Bird conservation biologist

National bird present in state year-round, though some migrate BY MARISA LYTLE mlytle@thedailycitizen.com

Some locals have had cause to feel more patriotic lately, as well as more in tune with nature, due to recent sightings of the national bird symbol of the United States — the bald eagle. This weekend, The Daily Citizen received several reports that bald eagles had been sighted along Davis Drive in Searcy, near the City Wastewater Treatment Plant. Roy Richards has worked at the treatment plant for two years and said he knows the eagles have been coming to the plant as least as long as he has been there. “There is usually one eagle that shows up, sometimes two,” he said. “They come in late October or early November and stay

until mid-January or sometimes longer.” According to “The Sibley Field Guide to Birds,” bald eagles are uncommon and “found along lakes, rivers and coasts where prey is abundant and prominent trees afford nest sites and an unobstructed view of surroundings.” The treatment plant offers such an environment, with its variety of trees and rainwater pond full of fish and other birds on which to prey. The question that arises is why are these eagles spotted only during the winter months, when the Sibley guide states they are present in Arkansas year-round? According to Karen Rowe, bird conservation biologist for the Arkansas Game and Fish

WEATHER Today: Mostly sunny. Highs in the lower 50s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph. Tonight: Partly cloudy. Rain likely. Lows in the mid 30s. Southeast winds 5 mph. Vol. 157, No. 305 ©2011 The Daily Citizen

Arkansas jobless rate drops to 8 percent

Bald eagles ■ Have been sighted on Davis Drive in Searcy ■ Are present in Arkansas all year, but many migrate here from more northern states during winter ■ City Wastewater Treatment Plant is prime birdwatching territory

Commission, two types of bald eagles can be found in the state. “First, there are the eagles that nest here year-round,” she said. “Then, there are the eagles that spend the winter here and then go nest somewhere else in the spring.” Rowe said the number of bald eagles in Arkansas grows from

about 40 adult pairs and 40 juveniles in the summer to approximately 5,000 during the winter. “The eagles staying at the water treatment plant are probably those that are just here for the winter,” she said. “They are probably hanging around the plant because they’re looking for waterfowl, such as egrets and ducks, that are injured that they can eat.” Dr. Nathan Mills, associate professor of biology at Harding University, said bald eagles nest at several locations along the Little Red River year-round. “However, there are also eagles that migrate into Arkansas during the winter months,” he said. “These birds can commonly

INDEX NATION & STATE, 2A OPINIONS, 4A LIFESTYLES, 5A CALENDAR/OBITUARIES, 6A SPORTS, 1B CLASSIFIEDS, 5B

Please see EAGLES | 2A

LITTLE ROCK — Arkansas’ unemployment rate for November fell to 8.0 percent from 8.2 percent the month before. The Department of Workforce Services said Tuesday the state added a net 6,400 jobs in November, the third straight month that the number of employed people has risen in Arkansas. The unemployment rate in November 2010 was 7.9 percent, one-tenth of a percentage point lower than November 2011. About 3,800 of the November 2011 job additions were in retail as businesses hired workers for the holidays. Jobs in educational and health services increased by 2,100 positions, with most related to hiring in child daycare and individual-family services. Manufacturing added 900 jobs for the month. As expected with the season, construction jobs fell by 1,600 and jobs in tourism fell by 1,300.

Our life always expresses the result of our dominant thoughts. SOREN KIERKEGAARD 19th Century Danish philospher and author

Contact us: 3000 E. Race, Searcy, AR 72143, (Phone) 501-268-8621, (Fax) 501-268-6277


The Daily Citizen

Page 2A • Wednesday, December 21, 2011

FROM PAGE ONE

House GOP rejects 2-month payroll tax cut BY ANDREW TAYLOR Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The House Tuesday rejected legislation to extend a payroll tax cut and jobless benefits for two months, drawing a swift rebuke from President Barack Obama that Republicans were threatening higher taxes on 160 million workers on Jan. 1. Obama, in an appearance in the White House briefing room after the House vote, said the two-month compromise is the only way to stop payroll taxes from going up by two percentage points. “Now let’s be clear,” Obama said in a surprise appearance in the White House briefing room. “The bipartisan compromise that was reached on Saturday is the only viable way to prevent a tax hike on January 1st. The only one.” Obama said failure to pass the Senate version of the payroll tax cut extension could endanger the U.S. economic recovery, which he described

as “fragile but moving in the right direction.” House Republicans controlling the chamber want instead immediate negotiations with the Senate on a year-long plan. But the Senate’s top Democrat on Tuesday again ruled out talks until the House passes the stopgap measure. “President Obama needs to call on Senate Democrats to go back into session ... and resolve this bill as soon as possible,” said House Speaker Boehner, R-Ohio. “I need the president to help out.” If Congress doesn’t break the stalemate and pass a bill by the end of the year, payroll taxes will go up by almost $20 a week for a worker making a $50,000 salary. Almost 2 million people could lose unemployment benefits as well, and doctors would bear big cuts in Medicare payments. The House vote, 229-193, kicks the measure back to the Senate, where the bipartisan two-month measure passed

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

House Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., walks off the floor of the House chamber on Tuesday in Washington. The House rejected legislation to extend a payroll tax cut and jobless benefits for two months, drawing a swift rebuke from President Barack Obama that Republicans were threatening higher taxes on 160 million workers on Jan. 1. on Saturday by a sweeping 89-10 vote. The Senate then promptly left Washington for

the holidays. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., says he won’t allow bargain-

ing until the House approves the Senate’s short-term measure. “I have been trying to negotiate a yearlong extension with Republicans for weeks, and I am happy to continue doing so as soon as the House of Representatives passes the bipartisan compromise to protect middleclass families, but not before then,” Reid said. The House vote caps a partisan debate on Obama’s jobs agenda, which has featured numerous campaignstyle appearances but little real bipartisan negotiation, other than Senate talks last week that produced the twomonth extension. The Senate’s short-term, lowest-common-denominator approach would renew a 2 percentage point cut in the Social Security payroll tax, plus jobless benefits averaging about $300 a week for the long-term unemployed, and would prevent a 27 percent cut in Medicare payments to doctors. The two-month,

$33 billion cost would be financed by a 0.10 percentage point hike in home loan guarantee fees charged by mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which the administration says would raise the monthly payment on a typical $210,000 loan by about $15 a month. The House passed a separate plan last week that would have extended the payroll tax cut for one year. But that version also contained spending cuts opposed by Democrats and tighter rules for jobless benefits. Both the House and Senate bills included a provision designed to force Obama to make a decision on construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, which would deliver up to 700,000 barrels of oil daily from tar sands in Alberta, Canada, to refineries in Texas. The provision requires him to issue the needed permit unless he declares the pipeline would not serve the national interest.

EAGLES: Winter brings more eagles to state when birds breeding in northern states migrate south CONTINUED FROM 1A

be seen at the Wastewater Treatment Plant. In addition, it is frequently possible to see multiple bald eagles at the Bald Knob NWR [National Wildlife Refuge] during these months.”

Dan Scheiman, bird conservation director for Audubon Arkansas, also said that bald eagles are more numerous in the state during the winter, when birds breeding in northern states migrate south. “In the winter, there are

more eagles in Arkansas,” he said. “If they are not territorial, they tend to group together, and you see them in more places.” He added that sewage plants all over the nation are good habitats for birds and that it is not uncom-

mon to find bird watchers visiting such sites. Richards echoed this statement, saying eagles, egrets, geese, ducks, kingfishers, kingbirds, common backyard birds and even peregrine falcons have hung about the city

water treatment facility. “One guy came here [to the plant] and sat at our gate for two hours,” he said. “I went and asked him what he was doing. He said, ‘You have a peregrine falcon out there!’ They’re really rare here.”

According to Richards, people have lined up in vehicles along CW Drive to watch birds at the treatment plant, while those who live along the River Oaks golf course have sufficient opportunity to spot bald eagles.

GRANTS: Beebe Police granted $10,679 through American Recovery Act, $3,500 from state agency CONTINUED FROM 1A

hired Whitlow Engineering services for the project. City Clerk/Treasurer Carol Crump-Westergren, said that the city doesn’t know when the project will be started. The city was also granted a $37,642 matching grant from the Department of Parks and Tourism to build new dugouts at the city ball field. The

new dugouts will be chain link fencing and they will be completely enclosed. The Beebe Police Department was granted $10,679 through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and $3,500 through the Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration. This money will be used to purchase video cameras that will be permanently mounted in each

police car and video cameras that will be attached to every officer’s uniform. Lt. Brian Duke said the use of cameras will protect the officers against complaints and can be used as a training tool for new officers. In other business, the city resigned the contract with Clarence Ross for his services at the Beebe City Cemetery for 2012. Ross increased his rate from $400 per grave to $450

per grave so the city council increased their rates from $450 per grave to $500. Another contractor, Jerry D. Adams, submitted a proposal for the cemetery contract for $375 per grave. Alderman Becky Short said she wanted to keep the contract with Ross because he’s done the work for so many years. The contract with Ross was approved with a 5-1

ECONOMY: Improvement a sign consumers feeling more confident CONTINUED FROM 1A

Regions Bank President Donnie Miller said the increase in the revenue for the city reflects how the consumers are feeling about the economy. “It’s a little bit of a sign that the consumers are feeling more confident about the economy,” Miller said. “We’ve had a number of good construction projects this past year. I heard someone else say the other day that while at the first of the year, national economists were saying the economy was better, but we didn’t have the numbers to show that. But now, national economists are saying the economy isn’t as strong, but that’s really not the case. When you look at the what’s going on with the retail sales at Christmas — that’s a great sign. That’s the only way we can get

out of where we’ve been — people have to have the confidence to spend some.” Not only are consumers spending more, businesses are spending more as well. The number of building permits for Searcy was projected for 2011 as $100,000 but as of Nov. 30, the amount of building permits had exceeded that projection by $33,405. The city projects to end the year with $145,532 collected from building permits. Layne said he and the rest of the chamber are excited about the economic possibilities that await in 2012. “[The chamber] plans to

Local economy ■ Gas drilling coming back ■ Building permits on rise ■ Local economy expected to rebound

continue to work with our existing industries because that’s where a majority of our new jobs originate,” he said. “We want to take care of what we have here first, which includes our industrial, commercial, and retail businesses. And of course, we’re going to continue to work to attract new businesses. We’re

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vote with Alderman Tracy Lightfoot casting the nay vote. Lightfoot said that Adams does good work too and it’d be cheaper for the city. A representative from CoBridge Broadband spoke to the council about a five-year franchise contract since the company has been successful this year. CoBridge Broadband, formerly called Charter

Communications, hasn’t received any complaints in the past several months, according to Mayor Mike Robertson. The city approved the contract with CoBridge through December 2016. The next city council meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 23 in the city hall due to Christmas. The council meets at 6:30 p.m. on the fourth Monday of the month.

Corrections The Daily Citizen corrects factual errors promptly and courteously. If you have a correction or clarification, please call Editor Jacob Brower at (501) 2688621 or e-mail him at jbrower@thedailycitizen.com.


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