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CAMP WOODLANDS Re-envisioning Outdoor Experience for 21st Century Girl Scouts

Madlen Simon, editor


CAMP WOODLANDS Re-envisioning Outdoor Experience for 21st Century Girl Scouts

Madlen Simon, editor


Camp Woodlands: Re-envisioning Outdoor Experience for 21st Century Girl Scouts Copyright @ 2016 University of Maryland All rights reserved, including the right to reproduce this work in any form whatsoever without permission in writing, except for brief passages in connection with a review.

Madlen Simon | Editor Justin Manongdo | Graphic Designer

CONTRIBUTORS Peter Cunningham Joshua Kilian Aren Knudsen Christiane Machado Joseph McKenley

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Anil Moore Sandra Oh Boun Renata Southard John Vogtman Abby Winter


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The ARCH 406 team would like to thank our clients, the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland, for entrusting us with this design research project. CEO Violet Apple and Board President Lynne Durbin engaged with us and encouraged us with their interest in and enthusiasm for our design explorations. Patricia Dash assisted us in empathizing with the girls, arranging for an afternoon with an impressive group of scouts and an overnight stay at Camp Woodlands. Jeffrey Boots assisted us with our site visits and taught us about the site and its requirements. Nancy Aiken, Debra Mastin, and Barb Nicklas participated in meetings and reviews, assisting us in learning about program and place. Jim Agliata wore multiple hats, as advocate for the Girl Scouts, architect, and lecturer in the UMD Real Estate Development program. The Board of the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland gave the team and our work an enthusiastic response. We are grateful to Margaret McFarland, Director of the Real Estate Development program, for putting together a multi-disciplinary project team including Don Linebaugh, Director of the Historic Preservation program. Don led the assessment of

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historic resources, advised us about regulatory issues, and joined us around the campfire. Architect Gary Ainge, AIA, Principal of HBRA Architects in Chicago, inspired us in a workshop focused on his design of Paul Newman’s Camp Hole-in-the-Wall and returned to critique our own design proposals. Structures instructor Mike Binder taught the students about heavy timber construction. As we prepared to finalize the design work, Bonstra Haresign generously hosted us in their office for an afternoon workshop with their staff, including Principals Bill Bonstra and David Haresign and architects and interns John Edwards, Jeremy Arnold, Marques King, Ashley Grzywa, Marek Hnizda, and Eric Gellman. Our work benefitted from design critiques by Professor and Architecture Program Director Brian Kelly, Professor of the Practice Peter Noonan, Lecturer Brittany Williams, and guest critic Lindsay May. We thank Cynthia Williams for extraordinarily capable contract administration. And, most of all, we thank the girls who taught us the importance of the outdoor scouting experience in their lives.


CONTENTS Introduction..................................................................1 Camping and Camp Architecture.............................11 History of Camping.....................................................................12 Camp Precedents.......................................................................14 Camp Planning Guidelines.........................................................15 Building Codes...........................................................................16 Cabins.........................................................................................18 Lodges........................................................................................19 Heavy Timber..............................................................................21 Didactic Architecture..................................................................28

Site Analysis...............................................................33 Location Maryland Scale............................................................34 Location Annapolis Scale...........................................................35 Location Neighborhood Scale....................................................36 Location Site Scale.....................................................................37 Population Density......................................................................38 Wind Data...................................................................................39 Wind Analysis..............................................................................40 Topography.................................................................................41 Sea Level Rise........................................................................... 42 100 Year Flood Plain...................................................................43 Water Flow................................................................................. 44 Erosion........................................................................................45 Soil Map.....................................................................................46 Corrosion of Steel.......................................................................47 Corrosion of Concrete.................................................................48 Zoning ...................................................................................... 49 Zoning Breakdown......................................................................50 Path and Place............................................................................51 Circulation...................................................................................52 iv


Circulation Synthesis..................................................................52 Procession..................................................................................54 Sections......................................................................................55

Historic Resources.....................................................63 Existing Structures on Site......................................................... 64 Lamb Lodge...............................................................................78

User Experience.........................................................83 Girl Scout Workshop: user profile...............................................84 Girl Scout Workshop: questions and responses.........................92

Master Plans..............................................................111 Team Geo..................................................................................112 Team Fire..................................................................................114 Team Element...........................................................................122

Gateways...................................................................133 Team Geo..................................................................................134 Team Fire..................................................................................137 Team Element...........................................................................141

Lodges.......................................................................145 Team Geo.................................................................................146 Team Fire..................................................................................176 Team Element...........................................................................221

Campsites and Cabins.............................................251 Team Geo..................................................................................252 Team Fire..................................................................................276 Team Element...........................................................................304

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INTRODUCTION


INTRODUCTION A multi-disciplinary team at the University of Maryland’s School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation was asked to re-envision the outdoor experience for Girl Scouts as we explored a new future for Camp Woodlands, a mid-century Girl Scout camp in Annapolis, Maryland. The project was initiated by Margaret McFarland, Director of the Real Estate Development Program, who invited Don Linebaugh, Director of the Historic Preservation Program, and me, an Associate Professor of Architecture, to join the team. Ten Master of Architecture degree program students in the ARCH 406 Graduate Architectural Design Studio began the design thinking exploration with me.

would be a diverse mix of girls living in a swath of the state spanning from inner city Baltimore to the suburbs. Accessibility was a requirement, making the outdoor experience available to girls of all abilities. We were encouraged to provide a range of outdoor experiences and to maximize the use of the waterfront. We were asked to provide cabins for individual troops, campsites to accommodate multiple three or four troops, and a lodge with interior and exterior gathering space for 250 – 400 girls. We discovered that learning was integral to the Girl Scout experience. Didactic architecture became a key concept for our team, designing the buildings themselves to offer a learning experience for the girls.

Design thinking step 1: empathy The first step in our design thinking process was empathy, gaining deep understanding of the Girl Scout experience by interacting with the girls and immersing ourselves in their outdoor place. We kicked off the project with a visit to Camp Woodlands on a hot afternoon in early September. We turned off Riva Road in Annapolis, passed through the gate, and immediately left suburbia behind as we entered the woodland environment. The first sign of human presence we encountered was Lamb Lodge, award-winning teepee-inspired design of architect Charles Lamb, founding principal of RTKL. We met our clients, representatives of the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland, to learn about the site, the users, and the program requirements. We learned that the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland were interested in creative thinking to turn Camp Woodlands into a model for the Girl Scout camp of the twenty-first century. A focus on sustainability was mandatory. We were encouraged to maximize opportunities to use the camp throughout the year. Respect for the natural environment of the site was important, with a particular focus on the fragile slopes of the ravine. There

Following the meeting, we set out to explore the site. Armed with a site plan created from client information and Google Earth photos, we walked south along the eastern edge of the ravine. We found ourselves in a woodland environment with tall trees, a mix of deciduous and evergreens, with little underbrush. We discovered that the topography lines on our site plan translated into a dramatically steep ravine cutting through the campground. We saw squirrels and imagined snakes. From time to time, breaks in the trees gave us views of suburban houses, reminding us that the woodland idyll was just a small break in the development pattern of the area. Along the path, we discovered another architectural landmark, an A-frame lodge called Starlet. When we rounded the bend of a hill called Davy Crockett, we felt a sense of release as the tree-sheltered path opened up to the expanse of the river. We sensed how exciting it would feel for the girls to emerge from the woods to experience the river environment and water-related activities.

2 | Introduction


Photos By: Don Linebaugh


On the hot, still day of our visit, the prospect of cooling off in the river and its breezes was enticing. We understood Davy Crockett as a special place on the edge of the site with the potential to connect to spectacular river views. Returning from the water’s edge, we encountered the mouth of the ravine, mostly dry on the day of our visit, but, we imagined, a running stream in rainy weather, and found ourselves unable to cross to explore the east side of the camp. We realized the challenge of providing an accessible route around the site.

sion about the girls’ outdoor scouting experiences, their hopes, dreams, and desires. Then, we moved to the tables, where the girls worked in small groups with graduate students to sketch ideas for the ideal camp experience. The design team came away from these interactions with surprising new understandings. We were impressed with the girls’ leadership abilities. From the oldest down to the youngest, they clearly understood their responsibility to reach down and teach the less experienced campers what they themselves had learned. They felt a strong identity as members of a troop, but also valued “me” time as necessary for their personal identities. For some of the girls, time at camp was a chance for temporary relief from significant family responsibilities. The sense of getting away and entering a new reality was important. While we had expected the girls to want to stay connected via their electronic devices, we were surprised to find that they all expressed a desire to “unplug” in order to truly experience the outdoors and interact with their camp-mates. They viewed the outdoor experience as an opportunity to learn in and from nature. The design team captured our understanding of the girls in a set of user profiles. These photos and narratives, reproduced in Chapter one, helped the team move forward to define the project.

We retraced our steps to the northern end of the site, then took the trail that crossed to the western edge of the ravine, discovering yet another distinctive place on the site, a remote wooded area with tent platforms ruined in a past storm. As daylight began waning, we returned to the Lamb Lodge area, retrieving sleeping bags and cooking supplies from the vans, and moved into the cabin called Point of View, our home for the night. We lit the campfire behind the cabin, prepped food in the kitchen, and grilled burgers, corn, and veggies over the coals. As darkness fell, we gathered around the fire to enjoy the results of the team’s culinary efforts. We built up the fire and began telling stories, going around the circle, with each team member contributing an episode to the tale. By the end of the evening, it was clear that we had forged a bond through the Design thinking step 2: deine magic of sharing a fire circle. We realized the significance of eve- We began the definition phase by informing ourselves about the nings around the fire to the Girl Scouts outdoor experience. various aspects of the project. The team studied the Girl Scout organization, the history of camping, camp architecture, timber conThe night in the hot, airless cabin strengthened that bond as we struction, the physical context of Camp Woodlands, the regulashared a sleepless night battling mosquitoes. Miserable as we tory environment, climate, ecology, topography, water, vegetation, were, we realized that by immersing ourselves in the girls’ experi- and historic resources. We learned that Camp Woodlands and its ence, we had learned a critical lesson about the importance of de- buildings follow design guidelines for Girl Scout camps planned signing campsites and cabins in harmony with nature to provide and constructed in the mid-twentieth century. We realized our openvironmental comfort. We were up before dawn to break camp portunity to re-examine these standards and propose new design and head back to the University for early classes. concepts for the twenty-first century. We found that the site was a wooded enclave in a developed area, lacking secure delineation Once we had immersed ourselves in the Girl Scouts’ experience, from a busy road to the north and suburban housing to the east we were ready to interact with the girls. Volunteer Pattie Dash as- and west. We discovered that water was the key organizing force sembled a focus group of Girl Scouts ages eight to seventeen. on the site, with storm water rushing onto the site at the north and We designed a questionnaire that the girls completed in advance, coursing through the steep ravine to the river at the south. preparing them for our questions. The girls spent an afternoon with us at the University of Maryland. We started in a circle for discus4 | Introduction


Photos By: Justin Manongdo


The ravine bisects the site, organizing it into east side and west side, and providing sharp contrasts between the flatlands and the cliff sides. We learned that the ravine is an exciting place to be and a fragile zone with a need to protect against erosion. Climate analysis confirmed our observations that the inland areas of the site are hot and still, with light breezes only at the river’s edge. We studied the potential effects of climate change on the site, finding that sea level rise would bring the river deeper into the site at the southern end of the ravine. The site analysis reinforced our sense that the site offers distinctly different experiences of place. The analysis is documented in chapter two.

the realm of water, and Volcana the realm of fire. They planned the girls movement around the site as a journey through these elemental experiences.

Guided by their design concepts, the three teams proposed master plans for Camp Woodlands. The three master plans are reproduced in Chapter five. The next step was to develop key elements of each master plan. Each team located a gateway, campsites and cabins, and a lodge in their plans. Individual team members took on the challenge of developing alternative design concepts for these buildings. Architects tend to think with their hands and to think by making, so the ideation phase morphed into the next The survey of historic resources, carried out by graduate student phase of design thinking, prototyping. Abby Winter, under the direction of Professor Don Linebaugh, identified Lamb Lodge and Starlet as existing buildings to be pre- Design thinking step 4: prototype served. A graphic summary of the historic resources survey is in- In the prototyping phase, individual team members developed cluded in chapter three. Full details are provided in a separate their designs by modeling and drawing, both physically and digidocument. tally. Design thinking step 3: ideate

Team Ele located the gateway near the existing gate. Team Geo and Team Fire located the gateway at the southeastern corner of The graduate students organized into three teams in order to gen- the site. The ten alternative proposals for the gateway design are erate alternative design concepts for the outdoor experience at found in chapter six. Camp Woodlands. Team Ele’s cabin designs were inspired by the four elements. The Team Geo was inspired by the varied geography of the site. They Oceanus cabin, for example, highlights water collection. Team identified four areas of the site, Mesa, Plateau, Ridge, and Cape. Geo took inspiration from geography in the design of the cabins. They sited the new Lodge on the Mesa and proposed campsites The youngest campers would stay in the relatively tame landscape for the Plateau, Ridge, and Cape. Sense of place derived from of the Plateau in cabins inspired by Native American longhouses geography and inspired the place-based architecture of the camp found in similar geographic areas. Older girls would stay on the buildings. Ridge, closest to the stars, in tree houses inspired by space capsules, near the historic Starlet A-frame cabin. Team Fire was inspired by our own magical experience around the campfire. They proposed a series of campsites with cabins ringed The oldest girls would stay on the Cape, overlooking the water, on around fire circles, giving the girls a sense of community from their platforms with sail-like tents. Team Fire’s cabins offer a variety of shared experience of the campfire. architectural experiences, including underground burrows taking advantage of the earth’s insulating properties to keep campers Team Ele imagined the site as four distinct realms, each character- cool in summer and warm in winter. The campsite and cabin deized by one of the four elements, earth, air, water, and fire. Terra sign proposals are found in chapter eight. was the realm of the earth, Stratus the realm of the air, Oceanus 6 | Introduction


Team Ele located the new lodge on the hill overlooking the river. Three lodge proposals offer three different alternatives. Aren Knudsen and Christiane Machado proposed lodges curving along the contours of the hill, enclosing a hilltop courtyard and opening to sweeping views of the river. Peter Cunningham proposed a linear lodge stepping down the hillside from its hilltop entry to a boathouse at its watery base.

six architects and interns, all alumni of the University of Maryland. Iteration is a key element of the design thinking process. Students revised their design proposals throughout the semester based upon their increasing knowledge and feedback from testing their work with clients, practitioners, and faculty.

Design thinking loop: iteration The students presented the final iteration to faculty and practitioners, including Gary Ainge, who returned from his practice in Chicago to review the design proposals for the master plan, gateway, campsites and cabins, and lodge. The culmination of the semester was the team’s presentation of alternative visions for the future of Camp Woodlands to the Board of the Girl Scouts of Central Team Fire located the new lodge on the edge of the ravine. Anil Maryland. Moore, inspired by Japanese palace architecture, ranged a series of pavilions around a courtyard, providing a safely enclosed Madlen Simon space for the girls to gather. John Vogtman, Abby Winter, and Joseph McKenley designed linear, two-story lodges looking across the ravine to the historic Lamb Lodge. Team Geo located the new lodge on the Mesa, overlooking the dramatic slopes of the ravine. Josh Kilian’s lodge is modeled on a Native American kiva. Renata Southard’s lodge uses rammed earth to evoke the southwest mesa architecture. Sandra Oh Boun’s lodge fans out from the mesa top.

The lodge design proposals are found in chapter seven. Design thinking step 5: test The students tested their design thinking with the clients, architects, and faculty critics. Periodic meetings with the clients, represented by Girl Scouts CEO Violet Apple, board president Lynne Durbin, members Debra Mastin and Nancy Aiken, architect Jim Agliata, volunteer Pattie Dash, and facilities manager Jeffrey Boots, offered opportunities for the team to present their design proposals at various stages of development and to receive formative feedback. Professor of the Practice Peter Noonan brought his camp design experience to an early critique of the students’ work, as well as a mid-semester review of master plans, campsites, and cabins. Bonstra Haresign Architects invited us to their Washington DC office for a workshop. The three student teams rolled out their preliminary drawings on conference tables for a working session with 8 | Introduction


Photos By: Justin Manongdo


CAMPING & CAMP ARCHITECTURE


A Brief History of Camping in the U.S.

Summer camps in the United States evolved out of a desire to return to nature, and nostalgia for the primitive, preindustrial landscape. The Industrial Revolution drew a multitude of rural laborers to urban centers with the promise of steady factory work, but the stagnant and dirty factory air caused a variety of health problems for workers. By the end of the19th century, cities began to build urban parks to provide workers with an escape from the city.

Frederick Gunnand, who owned a school for boys, founded the first summer camp in the United States. In 1861, he lead his first

session at Gunnery Camp in Washington, Connecticut, where boys hiked, fished, and learned to cook over an open fire. Then, in 1874, the YWCA found Sea Rest camp in Asbury Park, New Jersey. The affordable camp was developed for the health and wellness of a new class of women workers. Surprisingly, it took the YMCA another 11 years to found their own camp for men nearby in New York. In 1902, Laura Mattoon, the head of Science at New York City’s Veltin School for girls, founded Camp Kehonka to provide girls with a hands-on science education that only nature could offer. A new tradition is born with the idea of the outdoors as a learning lab for girls, as well as boys. Dr. Luther Gulick and his wife Charlotte founded Camp Wohelo (who later became Camp Fire Girls of America) in 1910 as a response to the Boy Scouts of America. Wohelo was an anagram for: “Work, Health, Love” and a curriculum developed for

19th Century - View of Central Park. Retrieved from: http://www.nycgovparks.org

Girls canoing at summer camp. Retrieved National Film Preservation Society. www.filmpreservation.org

During that time, Military officer Henry Hopkins Sibley developed his version of the bell tent, for which he submitted a patent in 1858. These early portable shelters, based on Native American tepees were manufactured in bulk, and the tradition of temporary camps for leisure was born.

1858 - U.S. Patent 14,740 showing Sibley’s claim for his tent. Retrieved from Wikipedia.

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1861 - YWCA founds Camp Sea Rest. Retrieved from SocialWelfareHistory.com

1918 - Camp Fire Girls. Retrieved from UA Archives. www.flickr.com/ photos/uaarchives

Founder Juliette Gordon Low with Girl Scouts, 1913. Retrieved from GirlScouts.org


camp activities to support these core values, centered on domes- In 1962, the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland was founded as an tic arts. official chapter of the Girl Scouts. Disney’s The Parent Trap was released the previous year, and mirrored the cultural phenomena Then, in 1912, Juliette Gordon Low formed Girl Scouts of America of summer camps. For most middle class families, summer camp to foster individual growth, character and self-sufficiency. She had was a rite of passage. The Girl Scouts were different; they extendformed a Girl Guides group in Scotland 1911 with the help of Sir ed this privilege not only to middle class girls, but to girls of all Robert Baden-Powell (founder of the Boy Scouts), and returned to socioeconomic backgrounds. In fact, one Girl Scout camp quietly Savannah, Georgia with a plan to form a similar group for girls. As desegregated during this time of heightened racial tensions. the Girl Scouts grew in popularity, individual chapters opened. In 1944, the Girl Scouts acquired a 34-acre site outside of Annapolis, Today, the Girl Scouts provide educational and exploratory camps and Camp Woodlands was born. The Teepee (Lamb Lodge) was to a multitude of girls from diverse backgrounds. Camps offer proadded in 1954. Designed by Charles Lamb, the lodge was a tribute grams with curriculum focused on STEM, the arts, water exploto the architect’s mother, Ruby, who was Council Commissioner for ration, and everything in between. The core values of individual the Anne Arundel County Girl Scouts. Together, through teamwork growth, character, and self-sufficiency are still promoted through and collaboration, Lamb, his parents, and the Girl Scouts Council the teamwork and skills developed in hands-on experience. These erected this historic landmark building. experiences have touched the lives of countless girls.

1923 - Girl Scouts reading American Girl magazine. Retrieved from http://blogs.archives.gov/

1944 - Lamb Lodge was added to Camp Woodlands. Retrieved from LambLodge.org

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1961 - Screen still of The Parent Trap. Retrieved from ChildStarlets.com

1960s - Girl Scouts prove to be a forward thinking institution. Retrieved from GirlScouts.org

2015 - Girl Scout campers enjoying a meal. Retrieved from http:// www.gscm.org

2015 - Girl Scout campers. Retrieved from http:// www.gscm.org


Camp Planning Precedents

Hole in the Wall Gang Camp in Ashford, CT; offering security for campers cabins sit in a cul-de-sac.

Camp Hayward in Sandwich, MA; communal amenities (such as the amphitheater) are positioned around the water’s edge.

River Valley Ranch Camp in Manchester, MD; camp buildings are arranged along a central axis in the center of the site and recreation areas occupy the edges.

Girl Scouts of Eastern Pennsylvania, Camp Laughing Waters in Gilbertsville, PA

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Girl Scouts of America Camp Planning Guidelines (1959)

Julian Harris Salomon wrote Camp Site Development in 1959 as a guideline for the Girl Scout’s camp. Salomon says, ”the basic units of a Girl Scout camp are much the same. They consist of housing for campers and staff (generally tents), a wash-house and toilet, and a shelter, which may be a canvas fly, an open pavilion, or a winterized cabin.” (P. 15) Salomon, 1959, p. 70, Campers Cabin

Salomon, 1959, p. 54, Wash-house

Salomon, 1959, p. 34, Primitive Troop Camp

Salomon, 1959, p. 67, Tent Platform

Girl Scouts camping happens in three forms: 1. Troop Camping - as an individual troop camps 2. Day Camping - different troops camp together for a day 3. Established Camping - different troops camps together for multiple nights. Because of the variety of camping forms, a Girl Scouts camp must provide flexibility in its configuration.

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Building Codes Type IV Heavy Timber Construction is referred to as “Mill Construction” because of its origin in early industrial era fire resistant construction. It is used widely throughout the Mid-Atlantic and New England regions, due to wide availability of materials. In residential and lodging situations, exterior walls must be minimum 2 hour fire resistant. Sprinkler systems are required throughout buildings containing in part or in whole R-1 occupancy; however, buildings less

Sizing for built-up or solid wood beam. Retrieved from The Architect’s Studio Companion by Edward Allen & Joseph Lano

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than 4 stories and 60’ high may use less expensive NFPA 13 residential system. For systems that are sprinkled with commercial systems, the maximum area allowed is 184,500 SF over 5 floors. Maximum height is limited to 85 feet, and the maximum area for any single floor is 61,500 SF. Maximum height: 60’ Maximum area for any single floor: 20,500 SF

Sizing for wood decking. Retrieved from The Architect’s Studio Companion by Edward Allen & Joseph Lano


Cabin Precedents

The following precedents offer important examples of various forms of versatile architecture. With similar programs, site conditions, and materials, each of these projects provides insights into possible solutions to shared constraints in our work with Camp Woodlands.

The Great Barrier House sits in a area that is susceptible to flooding, a constraint addressed by Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects through the use of stilts. As such, the home has minimal impact on the site and its surround environment. The Architects blur the line between the interior and exterior through the use of glass sliding doors. The flexibility of the sliding doors provides the The Maison Demontable is a pre-fabricated home designed by occupants generous ventilation, reducing the need for central air. self-taught architect Jean Prouve. This single room dwelling was The transparent nature of it’s walls also provide passive heating originally built to help house the French population of the destruc- through the sun. tion of World War II. The lightweight structure could be assembled by a small team in just two days. The Maison Demontable is a Another project by Corsson Clarke Carnachan Architects is the great example of a single room, prefabricated dwelling that has Coromandel Bach. This family dwelling is subtle in its design, with the ability to be moved to various locations across a site. many features that can be adapted to various dwellings constructed on remote sites. Corsson Clarke Carnachan Architects say Similar in it’s single room, simple design, Le Corbusier’s Caba- “The living room is open to the outside and the sun, a metaphorinon also demonstrates the importance of designing furniture and cal tent or campsite, while the bunkrooms are enclosed and cool.” storage to maximize the use of a limited space. The small square The private rooms are pushed to either side of the dwelling with house was a studio for Le Corbusier that faced the Mediterranean the shared living space sandwiched between. The use of wood sea and was intended to blend in with its surroundings. Composed materials is featured elegantly in it’s expression of the structural of four walls and a roof, this could be considered Le Corbusier’s members. version of the primitive hut. The OAB Holiday village is a campsite near Castellbell i el Vilar Verstas Architects designed a fully functional and transportable in Barcelona, Spain. Designed by architect Carlos Ferrater, from cabin called City Cottage in Helsinki. This solar powered home a distance the metallic buildings sit like tents in a forest cleartakes cues from boat designs in its implementation of built-in fur- ing. Prefabricated elements are combined with masonry material niture and storage. Although it is a single room dwelling, areas to form cabins that appear alien in their environment. Here we can such as the kitchen and living space are distinguished through see an example of architecture which wants to separate itself from changes in floor height. This allows for maximum use of space its surroundings, creating a unique village environment within the while still designating various program areas in the cabin. trees.

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Cabin Precedents

Jean Prouve, Maison Demontable

Le Corbusier, Cabanon

Verstas Architects, City Cottage

Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects, Great Barrier House

Crosson Architects, Coromandel Bach

OAB, Holiday Village

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Lodge and Heavy Timber Precedents

Miller Hull, The Wharf at Point Loma

Miller Hull, The Wharf at Point Loma

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The Tillamook Forest Interpretive Center is located in Tillamook State Forest in Oregon. With an exhibition hall, classrooms, labs and a wide range of programs, this precedent offers an intriguing look at large scale architecture in remote locations. Given that it is located in the heart of a forest that is mined for timber, the choice of materials is clear. Many parts of the center can be admired for its use of heavy timber members and connections. The pedestrian bridge in particular, with its 250’ span across the river, provides a great example of how heavy timber can be used structurally as well as aesthetically. The Wharf at Point Loma is another project by Miller Hull located in San Diego’s America’s Cup Harbor. Miller Hull take the nautical nature of the surrounding area and apply that theme towards their architecture. With Camp Woodland’s relationship to Annapolis, it is important to note how the architecture can reflect the culture and environment of the site. As with Tillamook Forest, the material selection is an important part of the design process. The building structures make use of both heavy timber and galvanized steel fittings. The combination of metal and wood help to give the marina a sense of place on the waterfront. “Embedded in the landscape and revealing the nature of its site and materials, the Pacific Rim Estate embodies the spirit of the Northwest. It is at once modernist and timeless.” - Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Nestled into the hillside, the Pacific Rim Estate is a unique precedent for how it integrates itself with the waterfront site. The estate seems to cascade down the hillside, using green roofs to blur the line between where buildings begin and the hillside ends. Similar to the Miller Hull projects, heavy timber structures are a important part of the estates design.


Lodge and Heavy Timber Precedents

Miller Hull, Tillamook Forest Center

Miller Hull, Tillamook Forest Center

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, Pacific Rim Estate

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, Pacific Rim Estate

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Heavy Timber Construction

Multi-story construction with decking on beams. Retrieved from Heavy Timber Construction: Wood Construction Data. Copyright © 1961, 1990, 2003 American Forest & Paper Association, Inc.

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Multi-story construction with decking on beams and girders. Retrieved from Heavy Timber Construction: Wood Construction Data. Copyright © 1961, 1990, 2003 American Forest & Paper Association, Inc.


Heavy Timber Construction

Column anchorage. Retrieved from Heavy Timber Construction: Wood Construction Data. Copyright © 1961, 1990, 2003 American Forest & Paper Association, Inc.

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Floor beam and column framing. Retrieved from Heavy Timber Construction: Wood Construction Data. Copyright © 1961, 1990, 2003 American Forest & Paper Association, Inc.


Heavy Timber Construction

Floor beam and column framing. Retrieved from Heavy Timber Construction: Wood Construction Data. Copyright © 1961, 1990, 2003 American Forest & Paper Association, Inc.

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Roof beam and column framing. Retrieved from Heavy Timber Construction: Wood Construction Data. Copyright © 1961, 1990, 2003 American Forest & Paper Association, Inc.


Heavy Timber Construction

Floor framing at exterior walls. Retrieved from Heavy Timber Construction: Wood Construction Data. Published by American Forest & Paper Assoc.

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Floor framing at exterior walls. Retrieved from Heavy Timber Construction: Wood Construction Data. Published by American Forest & Paper Assoc.


Heavy Timber Construction

Beam and girder framing. Retrieved from Heavy Timber Construction: Wood Construction Data. Copyright © 1961, 1990, 2003 American Forest & Paper Association, Inc.

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Hinge connection. Retrieved from Heavy Timber Construction: Retrieved from Heavy Timber Construction: Wood Construction Data. Copyright © 1961, 1990, 2003 American Forest & Paper Association, Inc.


Heavy Timber

Images courtesy of Vermont Timber Works

Post-and-beam construction - Typically squared-off timbers that are held in place by large wooden pegs.

Heavy timber construction of a dining hall use wood and steel joinery.

Closeup of wood and steel joinery - king post with webs and steel tension ties.

Post base connection - some common base connections are steel boot, steel bracket, steel rod and washer, plywood deck, and plywood rod plate.

Steel tie rods provide open ceilings while still retaining the beauty and strength of a heavy timber truss.

Steel frame joints provide a unique look for timber structures by merging steel and wood materials.

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Didactic Architecture Precedents WaterShed Built in 2011 and designed to be integrated with the Chesapeake Bay watershed, WaterShed is University of Maryland’s prize winning entry into the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon According to the team, “WaterShed is a solar-powered home inspired and guided by the Chesapeake

Bay ecosystem, interconnecting the house with its landscape, and leading its dwellers toward a more sustainable lifestyle.” http://2011.solarteam.org/about#sthash.fM75cOAq.dpuf

WaterShed Retrieved from: http://chronicle.com/blogs/buildings/files/2011/09/watershed.jpg 27 | Camping & Camp Architecture


Didactic Architecture Precedents

Retrieved from: http://2011.solarteam.org/images/uploads/digitalgraphic_architecture_ld-copy-519x346.jpg

Retrieved from:http://2011.solarteam.org/images/gallery/structure/CIMG4321.JPG

The mechanics of harvesting rainwater and of collecting solar energy are expressed in the butterfly roof form.

The exposed wall studs and roof rafters expose the story of the unconventional wood framing strategy. The Watershed’s landscaping tells the story of how fragile the Chesapeake Bay watershed’s Eco system is and acts, ” as a micro-scale ecosystem, emulating the environment of the Chesapeake Bay watershed.” http://2011.solarteam.org/design/living-systems#sthash.jnOCDq8y.dpuf By designing the landscape in this way the users is engaged in the importance of their footprint on the Chesapeake Bay watershed’s ecosystem.

Retrieved from: http://2011.solarteam.org/images/uploads/digitalgraphic_livingsystems_ld-copy-519x346.jpg

The living landscape is essential to the functioning of the building and the flourishing of the occupants within.

28 | Camping & Camp Architecture


Didactic Architecture Precedents Philip Merrill Environmental Center Located in Annapolis, Maryland and built in 2001, the Philip Merrill Environmental Center is a LEED Platinum certified building. This makes it one of the world’s most energy efficient buildings. Given its didactic design, the architecture tells a story of how it achieves its sustainability as well as how the building was assembled. With building components that rely on the input of the users, for example, a mixed mode natural ventilation system*,

the architecture provides the occupants an opportunity to learn about passive design strategies. “Ventilation System has indoor/outdoor temperature and humidity sensors which notify occupants when conditions are optimal for natural ventilation; the mechanical system turns off employees are alerted to manually open windows.” (http://www.cbe. berkeley.edu/livablebuildings/pdfs2007/submittal_philip_merrill.pdf)

Philip Merrill Environmental Center Retrieved from: http://www.blhill.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Chesapeake11.jpg 29 | Camping & Camp Architecture


Didactic Architecture Precedents

Retrieved from: http://www.cbf.org/image/area---about-cbf/offices-operations/maryland/Merrill-Center-brochure-sketch-New_695x352.jpg

Retrieved from:http://www.solaripedia.com/images/large/3122.jpg

The building comprises two shed roofs sloped to the south to capture the bay view, breezes and solar energy.

Rainwater collection tanks are integrated into the north elevation – expressing the designs sustainable agenda.

Retrieved from: https://chesapeakejournal.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/philip-merrill-center-21.jpg

Retrieved from: http://assets.inhabitat.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2010/08/CBF-Merrill-EnvironmentalCenter-11.jpg

By using timber as a structural element, assemblage is easily comprehended because the joints and connections are expressly left exposed.

Especially noted on the interior, materials are left raw and the ductwork and services are left exposed.

30 | Camping & Camp Architecture


SITE ANALYSIS


Location: Maryland Scale Analyzing the site at this scale shows how Camp Woodlands relates to the counties included in the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland district. This diagram also indicates approximate

travel times. Travel times could be used to target additional campers outside of the district in near by counties such as Prince Georges, Calvert, Talbot, Montgomery, and Kent.

Carroll County

Baltimore County

Howard County

Harford County

Baltimore City Kent

Anne Arrundel

Montgomery

Camp Woodlands

Queen Anne’s

Prince Georges Talbot

30 min

60 min

90 min

34 | Site Analysis

Calvert


Location: Annapolis Scale Viewing Camp Woodlands at this scale shows the sites location in relationship to downtown Annapolis, the major routes of transportation, and a few major points of interest. The camps

35 | Site Analysis

close proximity to Annapolis could be used as a selling point to encourage Girl Scouts and other campers to choose Camp Woodlands.


Location: Neighborhood Scale This scale shows Camp Woodlands relationship to major roads, waterways, and surrounding building. The camp is generally surrounded by low density housing to the North and South, Riva

Road and more low density housing to the East, and Broad Creek to the West. Additionally, further up Riva Road to the Northeast, there is a medium density commercial zone.

Camp Woodlands

1000’

36 | Site Analysis

4000’


Population Density Medium Desity Housing and Commercial Areas

Low Desity Housing and Green Space

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Location: Site Scale This aerial photograph indicates that the site is heavily wooded and shows the perimeter of the Camp Woodlands. It also

Vehicular Traffic

highlights the major paths, roads, and buildings throughout the camp grounds.

Pedestrian Traffic / Vehicle Access Pedestrian Only

Riv

aR

d

Camp Woodlands

100’

38 | Site Analysis

400’


Wind: Raw Data Three nearby wind monitoring sites located at the Naval Academy, Lee Airport, and Edgewater / South River were analyzed for average monthly wind speeds. Data from each site suggests that winter winds generally blow from the Northwest, however; wind in the spring, summer, and fall can be highly variable. Wind speeds at the Naval academy generally range from 8

to 10 miles per hour (mph), while wind speeds at Lee Airport and Edgewater / South River range from 1 to 5 mph. Based on proximity and site details it is more likely that wind conditions at Camp Woodlands are more similar to Lee Airport or Edgewater / South River.

Naval Academy

South East Winter Winds North West Summer Winds

Edgewater / South River

East to South East Winter Winds Variable Summer Winds

Lee Airport

South East Winter Winds Variable Summer Winds

39 | Site Analysis

http://www.windfinder.com/


Wind: Analysis The arrows below represent wind direction for winter winds (shown in blue) and summer winds (shown in red). Winter winds generally blow out of the Northwest while summer winds are difficult to predict but seem more likely to come out of the Southeast. The site visit indicated that there was a breeze coming off Broad

40 | Site Analysis

Creek towards the shore however, there was very little wind or air movement further inland near the camp sites. With generally low wind speeds in variable directions it is unlikely that any sort of wind turbine would provide a significant source of energy.


Topography- Slope Analysis The slope on the site varies significantly. Camp Woodlands is home to a broad range of slope from areas that

Legend are relatively flat to areas that have up to a 90% slope.

60% - 90% Slope

0% - 10% Slope

41 | Site Analysis


Projected Sea- Level Rise According to the U.S. Global Change Research Program, sea level is projected to rise anywhere from two to six feet by 2100. The maps below highlight this projected change and its impact

Legend on the site. The maps are based on projected outcome by the United States Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the National Ocean Service.

6 Foot Rise 4 Foot Rise 2 Foot Rise Existing

42 | Site Analysis


100 Year Floodplain A 100 year flood is an extreme hydro logic event with a 100 year recurrence interval. A hundred year flood does not mean that it occurs only once in a hundred years, but rather that there is

Legend a 1 in a 100 chance of an extreme flood in any given year. This diagram demonstrates the impact of such an event upon Camp Woodlands.

100 Year Floodplain Existing

43 | Site Analysis


Water Flow The diagram below illustrates the flow of water through the site. Since any water that enters the site flows directly into the stream and then eventually empties into the Chesapeake Bay, it is important to reduce the amount of pollution entering the stream. The implementation of rain gardens not only filter the water

44 | Site Analysis

before it has access to the stream, but it also allows for 30% more water to be absorbed in the soil before making its way to the stream. This will also aid in erosion control, preventing more sediment from entering the stream.


Topography- Erosion Hazard Since the topography on the site varies significantly with slopes that range anywhere from 2% to 90%, there is an increased

Legend risk of erosion in certain areas. The areas most susceptible to severe erosion are the areas that have the steepest slope.

Severe Moderate Slight

45 | Site Analysis


Soil Map

Legend Annapolis Fine Sandy Loam 40-90% Slope Wide water 0-2% slope Collington, Wist, and Westphalia 25-40% Slope Collington-Wist-Urban Complex 0-5% Slope

46 | Site Analysis


Corrosion of Steel After conducting a web soil survey through the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), it was found that the site is moderately corrosive to steel. Factors in the soil that affect

Legend corrosion include soil moisture, particle size distribution, and the acidity of the soil. A way to prevent this corrosion is to treat any steel before it is installed. Moderately Corrosive

47 | Site Analysis


Corrosion of Concrete The soil on the Camp Woodlands site is highly susceptible to corroding concrete. Factors that determine this corrosion are the moisture content and acidity of the soil along with the sulfate

Legend and sodium content. The risk of corrosion is decreased if the concrete is installed within one soil type. Highly Corrosive Moderately Corrosive

48 | Site Analysis


Zoning Context Camp woodlands is immediately surrounded by one primary district, the R2 residential zone. This area is designated for lowdensity suburban units. Camp woodlands can expect the area around their property to be occupied by primarily single-family detached residential housing. The zoning law does not permit apartment buildings or any other high-density programs within the R2 district.

49 | Site Analysis

Other significant locations near Camp Woodlands include Annapolis High School, just half a mile to the northeast. Continuing past Annapolis High School lies the Commercial Office District (C2). This zone is generally intended for office buildings. Across from the entrance of Camp Woodlands is Saint Constantine and Helen Greek Orthodox church.

R2 - Residential

C2 - Commercial


Zoning Breakdown

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Path and Place Within the camp there are certain points of interest that campers and visitors encounter as the move through the site. These act as nodes which are linked by paths and trails. This diagram high-

lights the major points of interest, their surrounding areas, and how they are linked together.

Vehicular Traffic

Pedestrian Traffic / Vehicle Access Pedestrian Only Points of Interest

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Circulation: Path Vehicle traffic enters Camp Woodlands from Riva Road and travels down the main driveway. Shortly after entering, visitors can turn left and drive towards the cell tower or continue straight towards Lamb Lodge. If continuing straight, visitors reach a fork in the road where traffic veers right and moves around a loop that leads to Lamb Lodge. After passing Lamb Lodge, the road meets up with the main driveway and continues back out to the

52 | Site Analysis

street. Parking is located around the perimeter and interior of the loop. The main path (vehicle accessible but predominantly pedestrian) continues back into the camp and leads to the water front. If turning left, the road ends just past the cell tower in a cluster of cabins and transitions into a pedestrian trail leading towards additional camp sites. Based on the site visit this path did not seem to be vehicle accessible.

Vehicular Traffic Pedestrian Traffic


Circulation Synthesis: Path and Place This diagram shows how current circulation routes are being used to link places and points of interest. Circulation on this site is very linear and requires campers and visitors to walk to a destination and return on the same route they took to get there. There

is very little opportunity to take side trails, skip certain places, or generally deviate from the main path. The current circulation routes also make it very difficult to get from Holly Hill to the waterfront.

Vehicular Traffic Pedestrian Traffic Points of Interest

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Procession: Path and Place When traveling though Camp Woodlands towards the river, campers and visitors encounter a series of significant buildings, spaces, and camp sites. The way a place is encountered can make a big impression on how it is perceived and remembered,

and is therefore important in developing fond and memorable experiences for campers. This diagram highlights important places with call outs and photographs as they are encountered walking through the camp.

Vehicular Traffic

Pedestrian Traffic / Vehicle Access Pedestrian Only Points of Interest

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Existing Site Section (NE-SW)

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Existing Site Section (NW-SE)

56 | Site Analysis


Existing Site Section (NE-SW)

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Wetlands Section SECTION A

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Wetlands Section SECTION B

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Ravine Section SECTION C

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HISTORIC RESOURCES


Existing Structures on Site

Camp Woodlands is a 34-acre camp facility in Annapolis, Maryland, owned and principally utilized by the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland. The camp is bounded on the west by Broad Creek and on the east by Riva Road. A steep ravine runs through the middle of this heavily wooded parcel. The Camp Woodlands property contains twentyfive existing structures ranging in date from 1964 to the end of the 20th century. These structures include three latrines, one bathroom, one shower house, twelve cabins, two garages, four storage sheds, one pavilion, and Lamb Lodge. In addition to these twenty-five main structures, the site contains a wooden dock into Broad Creek, and several wooden tent platforms. The property also contains a modern cell phone tower along Riva Road.

design and engineering by Charles Lamb, a principal of the architectural firm RTKL, and possibly eligible for its connection to the history of Girl Scouting and more broadly the summer camping movement. The MHT has not made a formal determination of eligibility for the Lodge, nor have they nominated the site to the Keeper of the National Register of Historic Places for inclusion. The MHT is also working with the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland on an easement on the Lodge structure as part of a restoration grant from the State of Maryland.

Camp Woodlands is also listed on the Anne Arundel County Inventory of Historic Properties (AA2353) for its historical connection to Girl Scouting and because of the architectural significance of Lamb Lamb Lodge was documented as part of the Modern Movement Lodge. in Maryland project (MoMoMa), a grant-funded study done by the University of Maryland for the Maryland Historical Trust (MHT). The A more detailed inventory of existing structures and discussion of MoMoMa authors, Isabelle Gournay, Mary Corbin Sies, Erica Schul- the impact of various preservation laws, national, state, and local, on tz, Darian Schwab, and Ben Riniker, completed an extensively re- plans to update the camp was also prepared as part of this studio searched National Register of Historic Places nomination form in project. This appendix is a separate volume and is available at the 2006, arguing that the Lodge was eligible for nomination to the Na- offices of the Girl Scouts of Central Maryland. tional Register under Criterion C because of its mid-century modern 64 | Historic Resources


Catalog of Existing Structures

A) Lamb Lodge (Teepee)

Architect: Charles Lamb Date:1954 - Original building Mid-1960s - Annex addition Use: Recreation, auditorium, education, social meeting space Materials: Concrete and brick foundation. Wood, glass and metal walls. Asphalt shingles on roof as well as glass and metal.

65 | Historic Resources

Inside View of Lamb Lodge

Abby Winter


Site Map of Existing Structures A. Lamb Lodge B. Honey Bee Lab (Gypsy Cabin) C. Point of View D. Latrines (tan) E. Merrimen Cabins F. Debbie’s Gifts G. Bathrooms

O. Cabins P. Shed Q. Latrine R. Pavilion (Macy Kitchen) S. Latrine T. Boat House

H. Starlet I. Pump House J. Shop Garage K. Davy Crockett Equipment Shed L. Shower House M. Elizabeth (Cooking Shelter) N. Cell Phone Tower

G

E F

E E E

I

U. Tent Platforms V. Dock

E D C

H

J

L K

T

A V S

B R.

U

M Q P

O O

RIV A

U

O

RO AD

N U

U U

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U

Abby Winter


Catalog of Existing Structures

B) Honey Bee Lab (Gypsy Cabin) 38’ 3”

Date: 1964 Use: Learning Center, Office Materials: Wooden frame, wood siding, asphalt shingle roof, cinder block piers BEE LAB

16’ 2 1/2”

OFFICE

C) Point of View Date: 1964 Use: Storage, cooking, food preparation, food storage, eating, sleeping, group activities Materials: Wooden frame, stone chimney, asphalt shingles, wood siding, concrete slab

56’ 3”

BR STORAGE BR

MULTI-PURPOSE/SLEEPING

CLOSET

26’ 3”

KITCHEN

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Abby Winter


Catalog of Existing Structures

D) Latrine Date: Pre 1975 Use: Bathroom, 3 stalls Materials: Concrete blocks on concrete slab, brick lined pits, fiberglass panel roofs, wooden doors

10’ 2”

7’ 2 1/4”

E) Merrimen Cabins (5) Date: Post 1975 Use: Lodging Materials: Wood framing, wood siding, asphalt shingle roof, wooden piers

38’ 3”

16’ 2 1/2”

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Abby Winter


Catalog of Existing Structures

F) Debbie’s Gifts Date: Post 1975 Use: Tool storage, food preparation, food storage, merchandise stand Materials: Wooden frame, wooden siding

23’ 7 1/4”

16’ 1”

G) Bathrooms Date: Post 1975 Use: 4 bathrooms, 3 sinks Materials: Vinyl siding, concrete foundation, asphalt shingles

38’ 3”

16’ 2 1/2”

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Abby Winter


Catalog of Existing Structures

55’

UP

BUNK BEDS

CHIMNEY

H) Starlet

18 ’

BUNK BEDS

STORAGE

Date: Pre 1975; New roof added in 1977 Use: Cooking, food preparation, food stroage, dining and sleeping Materials: Wooden Aframe, concrete foundation, asphalt shingle roof

54’ 9”

UP

UP

DECK

20’ 9”

CHIMNEY

I) Pump House Date: 1952 Use: 100 AMP Electric server, 220’ deep water well, 500 gallon underground storage tank Materials: Slag concrete block walls, concrete slab, asbestos roof shingles

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23’ 4 1/2”

7’ 11”

Abby Winter


Catalog of Existing Structures

J) Shop Garage Date: 1960 Use: Storage for nearby High school Materials: Aluminum siding, metal frame, cinder block foundation, sliding metal doors, corrugated metal roof

40’

20’ 2”

K) Davy Crockett Equipment Shed Date: Pre 1975 Use: Storage for gardening tools Materials: Portable type equipment shed set on cinder block foundation, fiberglass roof panels, wood siding, wood framing

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8’ 1/2”

8’ 1/4”

Abby Winter


Catalog of Existing Structures

L) Shower House 21’ 9”

HO T WA TER HE ATER

BA THRO OM

SI NK

BA THRO OM

Date: Pre 1975; Remodeled in 1990 Use: Bathroom, Shower, Sinks Materials: Wood frame and wood siding on one side, concrete blocks on the other, wooden ramp

17’ 4”

SH OW ER SH OW ERS

M) Elizabeth (Cooking Shelter) 42’ 6 1/2”

Date: 1964 Use: Fitness/exercise, food preparation, storage Materials: Wooden frame on concrete slab, asphalt shingle roof, wood siding

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24’ 7”

Abby Winter


Catalog of Existing Structures

N) Cell Phone Tower

51’ 11”

Date: Post 1975 Use: Cell phone tower service Materials: Wooden, gated fence 52 ’ 6 1/2”

O) Cabins (3) 16’ 2”

Date: Post 1975 Use: Lodging Materials: Wood frame, wooden siding

16’ 7 1/2”

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Abby Winter


Catalog of Existing Structures

P) Shed Date: Post 1975 Use: Storage Materials: Wood frame, wood siding

8’ 2 3/4”

7’ 9 3/4”

Q) Latrine Date: Pre 1975 Use: Bathroom, 4 Stalls Materials: Concrete blocks on concrete slab, brick lined pits, fiberglass panel roofs, wooden doors

10’ 2”

5’ 4 3/4”

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Abby Winter


Catalog of Existing Structures

R) Pavilion (Macy Kitchen - Holly Hill) Date: Pre 1975 Use: Cooking over fireplace, dining Materials: Wood open frame, concrete slab, asphalt shingle roof

24’ 11 1/2”

15’ 9”

S) Latrine Date: Pre 1975 Use: Bathroom, 3 stalls Materials: Concrete blocks on concrete slab, brick lined pits, fiberglass panel roofs, wooden doors

13’ 2 3/4 ”

5’ 4 1/4”

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Abby Winter


Catalog of Existing Structures

T) Boat House Date: 1960 Use: Storage for 6 boats on the outside and the inside is also used for storage Materials: Wood frame on concrete footings, corrugated asbestos roof

3’ 11 1/2”

3’ 11 1/2”

U) Tent Platforms Date: 1956,1957,1962 Use: Area to pitch and place tents Materials: 2”x10” wood framing with 2”x4” rails on concrete block piers, wooden platform

14’ 1/4 ”

12’

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Abby Winter


Catalog of Existing Structures

V) Dock Date: 1958 Use: Platform for swimmers and boat entry Materials: Wood

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Abby Winter


Lamb Lodge Floor Plan “In the early 1950s, the teepee at Girl Scouts’ Camp Woodlands was conceived and built by a team of volunteers that included the Anne Arundel County Girl Scouts Council, the Naval Academy Math Department, and numerous Girl Scouts and their families. For young architect Charles Lamb, just out of college and working at a new architectural firm later to be known as RTKL, it was a family affair. By

78 | Historic Resources

1950, both of his parents, Reginald C. and Ruby M. Lamb, were serving on the Camp Council, and his mother, who was the current Commissioner, broached with him the idea of donating his abilities. Sadly, neither parent survived long enough to see the teepee through to its completion, nor did they see their son receive the 1954 AIA Certificate of Merit for its design. In recognition of his parent’s contributions to the Girl Scouts they went on


Lamb Lodge Section to name the building after them at its dedication ceremony in May 1954. Inspiration for the conical, circular design was taken from the Girl Scout custom of grace before meals, and taps in the evening. At those times they’d gather in a circle, holding hands and singing. The central fireplace offered 360 degrees of visibility.

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The challenge of building a lodge to accommodate 100 Girl Scouts at the dawn of the Baby Boom with volunteer manpower and limited funds netted a result that exceeded expectations. And now, almost sixty years later, it is poised to be included in the National Registry of Historic Places.�- Girl Scouts of Central Maryland


Lamb Lodge North Elevation

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USER EXPERIENCE


Girl Scout Workshop: user profile

Name: Nala Age: 10 yrs old Girl Scout Experience: Since 3rd Grade About Me: I started Girl Scouts when I was in 3rd Grade. I’m in Girl Scouts because of Zhanaya’s mother, who is the troop leader. I’m from Baltimore and go to Kip Academy. Girl Scouts is way different from Kip Academy. In both groups we learn something and go on trips and wear uniforms. In Girl Scouts we get to sell cookies, go to different places, meet people, and earn money for field trips. Sometimes we have competitions and get prizes for selling cookies.

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Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: user profile

Name: Abby Age: 10 yrs old (5th Grade) Girl Scout Experience: Since Kindergarten About Me: I go to Grain Factor Elementary School. It’s down in Belair where I live. People think you’re really weird if you drive your car, because in Belair, everyone walks. I’ve been a Girl Scout ever since I started in Kindergarten. Our troop meets in the church two times per month. I’ve gone to camp twice. I went to Camp Hidden Valley for the Harry Potter theme and the Hollywood theme. They taught you Harry Potter things like astronomy and herpetology and potions. They had cabins. At the end, the roast marshmallows on the campfire. After that we have a talent show.

85 | User Experience

Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: user profile

Name: Roxine Age: 17 yrs old (Senior) Girl Scout Experience: Since 2nd Grade

About Me: I am a student at Western School of Technology and Environmental Science in Catonsville. I was born in Jamaica and I was a Brownie there. Once I came to America and got settled down, I became a Girl Scout. I live in a single parent home and my brother needs me to help care for him and I do cooking and cleaning. I need a break from what’s going on at home. I play soccer; I’m actually the captain. I am going to go to Towson University or University of Maryland in Catonsville. When you go to camp, you want something different from what you do at home – go to school, go home, go to the mall. I take on a lot of responsibility at home, so when I go to camp, I get an opportunity to explore, be adventuresome. Some outdoor activities I would like to see: zip line, tubing, fire-starting, canoing, kayaking, exploring nature to collect specimens and analyze them. Jamaica is a poorer country, so going on camping trips isn’t a usual thing there. The concepts they teach here, like leadership and friendship are the same.

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Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: user profile

Name: Jenna Age: 14 yrs old Girl Scout Experience: 9 yrs About Me: Jenna has been a Girl Scout for nearly 9 years. She loves the camaraderie of the Girl Scouts, and values the friendships that grow from regular troop meetings and summer camp, which she attends on a regular basis. Her favorite part of camp is being in the woods, and enjoying time outside. She loves to spend time with her friends, to challenge herself, and to simply unplug. Jenna loves to read, and she is currently reading a Jack London novel. She thinks it would be nice to give girls an outdoor place to read, draw, or have a quiet conversation during their “Me Time” part of the day. As much as she loves to be around friends, she truly cherishes her time alone when she can collect her thoughts. Some of Jenna’s favorite camp activities include swimming and water activities in general, camp fires, and outdoor activities such as flashlight tag. She is excited to see how Camp Woodlands can adapt to suit the needs and wishes of Girl Scouts like her.”

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Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: user profile

Name: Zhanaya Age: 10 yrs old Girl Scout Experience: 4 yrs About Me: I live in Baltimore. I started Girl Scouts at age 6. It is good to have your mother as a troop leader because you’re always the first one to pay dues and get a spot on a trip. We meet at Thomas Jefferson School. Most of the girls come from the city and some from the country. I went to the White House for a camping trip and met the first family and their dog. We slept in a tent on the South Lawn. We had the first lady and the President come out and sing with us. It rained, so we slept in the Office Building. We all got to be on the news. That was the only time I went camping.

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Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: user profile

Name: Heather Age: 16 yrs old (Junior HS) Girl Scout Experience: Since 2nd Grade About Me: I started Girl Scouts in 2nd Grade. I’m an Ambassador Level Girl Scout now. I’m from Columbia, Maryland. My mom was trying to get my brother to join the Boy Scouts and I was like, “I want to do that!” What I really love about Girl Scouts is because it’s for all kinds of people. There’s even politics in Girl Scouts. I’m a delegate and got to travel to Utah. It’s really fun for every type of person and that’s what I love about it. It instills girls with confidence and leadership.

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Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: user profile

Name: Ursula Age: 16 yrs old Girl Scout Experience: 13 yrs About Me: I live in a suburban type area in Anne Arundel County. This is my 13th year as a girl Scout. I started when I was four. With age, you get different challenges. With more age, you get more opportunities to lead. When you’re young, maybe you’re scared. When you’re older, you’re on the other end of it and you get to give back and get to help lead and to teach girls things you got to do. STEM is good. I’ve been homeschooled all my life. We’ve never had a lot of money in my family. I had an opportunity to go to camp with horses. I spent the last two years doing the Wrangler in Training program. I think this is an important aspect of camp.

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Photo By: Justin Manongdo


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Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: questions and responses Question: Tell us about your favorite place. Where is it? What is it like? How do you feel when you are in your favorite place? What do you do in your favorite place?

Responses: My favorite place, not to be bias, because I am from there, but it would be a beach on Jamaica. It was warm and cozy. When I am there usually for vacation, I feel happy, comfortable and relaxed. I swim, dance, eat and explore. The window seat at my local library. Loud, safe, read but homework too. Camp Conowingo and my dance studio My favorite place is my room. No Response The Beach. Sandy and wet. Happy. Swim and dig and hunt for crabs. Well, I have been to numerous places and I don’t necessarily have a favorite place. Just like variety. Florida, Great Grandma’s house, pick frint, swim, and swim. I feel happy, free and stress less. My favorite place is my house because it is comfy and I now it the best of all places. The beach, I am so happy when I am there, I like to play in the water and bury my feet in the sand. My favorite place is Dave and Busters. Dave and Busters is an American restaurant and entertainment business. When I am at Dave and Busters I feel happy and excited to play all the games that I can play. When I am at my favorite place I sometimes eat but mostly I don’t. When I am at Dave and Busters it feels like I am in game land. My favorite place in the world is Camp Conowingo. Which is one of our four campus in GSCM. When I am there I feel like I have a true connection with the people around me and the environment. My favorite thing to do at this place is sleep away camp; I do high adventure and work with kids In addition to noting that a few liked their room, the corner of a couch and closet were mentioned. It feel safe and comfortable.

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Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: questions and responses Question: Have you ever fallen asleep somewhere different from your bed? Where? Can you imagine a fantastic place to sleep? What would it be like? How would you feel when you were falling asleep? What would it feel like to wake up there?

Responses: Yes, my sofa. Lying on a water bed in a pool. Sleeping on top of a tree house. Or sleeping over my friend’s house. It would be relaxing, maybe a little scary, but enjoyable. I have slept in Wyoming and Florida and campe. Nope. Many different places from camping for 13 years. Yes, at a sleep away camp. The coziest bed in the world. Relaxed when falling asleep - slept at friend’s house and camp. lilac room on beach. Yes, in the car. A tree. Wet. Tired. Strange but fun. Yes, in a hotel, at cousins and aunts house. Yes, camp out at the White House. I fell asleep on my couch because we wanted to. I liked it a bit more than my bed because it’s fluffier and squishier and I led that when I woke up I just kept closing my eyes because it was really comfy and easy to fall asleep. Everywhere, yes you would be on the waterfront, it would feel great to look out the window and see the water, and it would be wonderful with the sunset to look at. Yes, I am part of a group called Yong Marines, and I was able to sleep in a tent. With one buddy in two sleeping bags. When I am sleeping I feel like I am in dream land with pillows under my head. A fantastic place for me to sleep is in a bed store because there will be so many beds I can sleep on. It will be awesome because the beds will be real soft. I have fallen asleep places other than my bed numerous times. Whether it be in a winter cabin or a youth hostel in London. Something that I think is important in a place to sleep in the terms of camp is it needs to be different than home. Different enough that when you wake up at night for half a second you have no idea where you are. I think a tree house would be pretty cool. When you wake up you should feel refreshed. Additional comments made by the girls not reflected in comments: Tent, cots, washing machine, boat, benches, under the bed, floor, couch.

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Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: questions and responses Question: What is the best experience you ever had outdoors? Where were you? Tell us about the place. What did you do there? Were you alone? Or with other people? What was great about the experience? How did it make you feel?

Responses: Going to camp Woodlands was enjoyable. Camp Woodlands has a lot of trails and it is surrounded by nature. I was a camp counselor; I took care of girls who were younger than me. While I was there I was never alone. I was always with someone. I experienced things I have never experienced before, like kayaking. A destination trip. Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Nature everywhere! Hiked, learned about nature, etc. Girl Scouts from all over the U.S. Singing around the fire with S’mores. Somewhere I belonged. When I was taking care of a horse named Val and I made her look beautiful. I don’t know I can’t think of one. Softball at park, had bleechers, trees, dirt and grass. Was with other people and had fun. Camping at the White House and meeting the first family. I was in my backyard and we saw some deer running across our yard. I was with my sister and my mom. Assateague Island, there were so many ponies and horse. There was a beach, I went swimming and watched horses. My whole family was there, I was with my family. It made me happy. The best experience I have has was walking outside in the rain and watching it rain. What I did was walk to a park than walk back to my house. I was not alone, I waswith an adult. The great thing was it was not cold or hot. It made me feel great to walk in the rain. My school rock climbing trip to Santa Barbara, California. I was with a group of high school aged boys and girls about 12. We did service such as trash removal and we painted a mural on a water tank to cover up graffiti. Also the main part of our trip was the climbing –we learned repelling and belaying skills as we put them into practice all week long. We were one hundred feet in the air on the side of cliffs. I loved it because I felt really independent traveling without my family and being in charge of my own provisions while camping. I also loved the personal challenge of the climbs. We did a lot of reflections. Additional comments made by the girls not reflected in comments: On the ground watching the meteor shower, kayaking at Camp Woodlands, Counselor in Trainin Program, England with Girl Scouts Jamboree – walked on stilts and Wrangler in Training Program.

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98 | User Experience

Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: questions and responses Question: Tell us about an outdoor experience that made you feel powerful. Where were you? What activity were you doing? What was the special power that you used?

Responses: I attended Nationals for track and field in 2015; I became an All American Athlete. It was in Norfolk, Virginia. I was practicing and working out until the day I competed. I competed in the 6*800 relay. I used ENERGY. Climbing the rockwall. Camp Conowingo. Courage. A lot of them made me feel powerful because it felt like I was making a difference. Pennsylvania. Climbing. I climbed with my eyes closed. Softball, just made me feel strong. In my backyard, climbing a playset and reaching the top and like I’m on top of the world. When I went on the trailblazer at Hershey Park. It was really fun. When I went backpacking, C&O Canal. Starting a fire with flint and steal. Perseverance. An outdoor experience that made me feel powerful was I was able to be put in a magazine at an event. I was at the White House with my group talking. The specialpower was that we were all able to get along and not talk about eachother. Being a CIT1 this summer at Camp Conowingo with the leadership program we were doing I felt like after all the years I went to the camp I was helping make it amazing for the girls just like others had done for me. I enjoyed the opportunity to share my outdoor skills as well as learn new things. Waking with kids made me feel powerful, just holding a brownies hand on a creek hike I felt like I was doing things that mattered. Additional comments made by the girls not reflected in comments: Piney Run Day Camp - Leadership skills gained. Backpacking 16 miles over two days and camping.

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100 | User Experience

Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: questions and responses Question: Tell us about an outdoor experience that was scary. Where were you? What made it a scary experience?

Responses: I was attending Camp Woodlands and I had a group of young girls following behind me as I led them to the lake.There was a moment of fear, when we thought a snake was in the woods. It was scary because the young girls were all afraid and I was afraid that they would run away and it would become a chaotic situation. Camping with my troop. Camp Whippoorwill, it was infested with ticks!! A large storm at Camp Conowingo when we did not have proper shelter. None really. Teepee during a thunderstorm. Finding bees nest in teepee. The beach. I flipped when I was riding a wave. Can’t think of any. Taking out the trash and all the bugs out there during the night time. When I went on the trailblazer at Hershey Park, it was really fun. It was also a bit scary because it went sideways and it was fast. My first summer camp, it was my first time away from home. One day I was standing with my older cousin and there was a spider on my shoulder. What made it scary was that I didn’t see it but it was big from how my cousin described it. The “bee attack” at Camp Conowingo in 2010. I was a Cadette and it was pretty terrifying since this was only my second week of sleep away camp. I was watching everyone else around me getting hurt and there was nothing I could do. Even the counselors were in total panic. I remember an ambulance coming since people wereallergic. The whole thing was a mess. It was scary since nobody knew what to do.

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102 | User Experience

Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: questions and responses Question: Have you ever had a camp experience? What was the best part of your camp experience? What was the worst part of your camp experience?

Responses: Yes, I have camp experience. The best part is making new friends, learning new things and chasing your fears. The worse part is leaving. Yes. Sitting outside watching the stars. It ended too soon and I got sick. Multiple experiences over 13 years of Girl Scouting. Best part is getting away from pressures such as social media, society and academics as well as getting unplugged from technology. Learning new things. Nothing was the worst part. Best –S’mores and new friends. Worst –thunderstorms. Yes. Swimming. Throwing up. No, I haven’t had a camp experience. Yes, at the White House on the South Lawn. We couldn’t bring our phones. Yes. I went to 2 Girl Scout camps. The themes were Harry Potter and Hollywood. The best part was doing activities and being with friends. I don’t think I have a worst part. When I went away to camp for 2 weeks, I made a lot of new friends. There was no bad experience. Yes. My camp experience was not much fun. The real good thing about that was that we were able to eat S’mores. The bad thing about that was that I had to use the bathroom and I was far away from it. I sincerely hope that everyone filling out this survey has been to camp before. Well I have too many experiences to count so I will just speak generally. Camp is wonderful. Since it is so calming the way it takes you away from the worries of your life. Nature puts you in a more reflective, deeper mind set. With camping I have seen so many people connect in ways they couldn’t anywhere else. The worst part is food, a lot of times people don’t have the background and knowledge to make good camp food.

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Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: questions and responses Question: What is your favorite outdoor activity? What do like about the activity?

Responses: Doing nothing, I think but if you go outside you should be active so if it involved an activity where the person is active I would enjoy the activity. Swimming and gossiping. Boating. Nothing. I don’t have one. None. Went to day camp, didn’t like doing school like work. PE test, sprints at school on the field outside. Running. I don’t like running because I just don’t like it. Don’t have one. I love the outdoors. My least favorite sport to play outdoors is running back and forth from one cone to another. The reason I hate it is because when you on teams and you start slowing down your team is made because they are losing. I am personally not a fan of water activities. I hate canoeing, but that is probably just since I have to do it so frequently. I also really don’t bugs or dead things that sometimes we will come across but that isn’t so much of an activity.

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106 | User Experience

Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: questions and responses Question: What do you want to be when you grow up?

Responses: I would like to be an engineer, business executive or somewhere in the field of business/marketing. Writer. No response. A singer. An artist or teacher. A musician, author, editor, artist, or anything that a smart person can do and make a lot of money. I want to be a pediatrician and heart and brain surgeon. A professional basketball player. I really don’t know what I want to be. I do want to be a farmer sometimes. Photographer. A doctor or an electrical engineer but mostly a doctor. Well my dream job is to be a spy but that’s not going to happen. I plan on studying either business management or internal relations. Then working as management or with NSA or the state department or CIA.

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108 | User Experience

Photo By: Justin Manongdo


Girl Scout Workshop: questions and responses Question: If you could be any animal what would you be and why?

Responses: I would be a Cheetah because I am a runner and they are the fastest animal on earth and they are also very fierce. Horse, to roam wild and free. A horse or Unicorn. A Unicorn so I can fly in the air and do magic. A puppy, husky because there are cute. A dolphin. They have a lot of fun. I wouldn’t but a dolphin is pretty.

A puppy because they are adorable and I’m a dog lover. A cat because I like to sleep and be lazy. Fox, because they are quiet. The animal I would like to be is a dog because dogs look cute when they are puppies. Some sort of monkey so I could swing from trees and climb to great heights. I would also have thumbs still which would be very helpful.

Additional Thoughts and Comments: Whichever camp is chosen for the major remodel, I think should be equipped with amenities that leaders can use to teach their girls skills like orienteering, Geocashing, knot tying, but also soft skills like team work.

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MASTER PLAN


Camp Woodlands Master Plan Geo Theme: The Geology theme site plan embraces the distinct character of Camp Woodlands’ unique topography, and focuses on the advantage of the camp’s location near Annapolis on the Chesapeake Bay. The Bay is the largest estuary in the United States, and poses a real educational value. With supportive ecologicallyfocused programming, Camp Woodlands could position itself as the premier environmental learning camp in the region. Girls who are interested in flowers or birds could flourish in outdoor learning platforms, and build a life-long relationship with

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the Chesapeake Bay. There are four areas of focus in this proposal. First, a sense of place is created through the introduction of “neighborhoods” named for their physical topography, making them memorable. Next, the edge is enhanced with a thickened border of conifer trees to preserve an authentic wilderness experience for campers. Then, a discovery path closes the loop of circulation, and unifies the camp. Finally, the concept of arrival is defined by distinct views, carefully designed as clearings that follow the natural vegetation pattern of the region.

Team Geo: Joshua Kilian | Sandra Oh Boun | Renata Southard


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: diagrams The neighborhood concept is reinforced by individual programs; each relates to its specific site. Plateau is dedicated to flora and fauna and with that in mind, Lamb Lodge will be re-purposed as a nature center, complete with labs for Daisies and Brownies to look more closely at specimens they gather in the woods. Ridge focuses on astronomy and the stars, and Starlet will be renovated as an astronomy lab complete with a telescope on the upper level. The lower level will house an updated shower and restroom facility. This new astronomy lab will assist

Juniors and Cadettes in planning star-walks and exploring the night sky.

Neighborhood Zones

Border

Path and place

Axes

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Next, Cape will embrace the bay and the study of marine life; a new boathouse will be added. The boat will act as a mobile lab for Seniors and Ambassadors, allowing them to explore the Bay. Finally, Mesa will focus on community, as the site of the new lodge. Here, troops will come to gather around the metaphorical and literal table.

Team Geo: Joshua Kilian | Sandra Oh Boun | Renata Southard


Camp Woodlands Master Plan Fire Theme: Each campsite is designed around a central campfire and connects axially though site lines to the main campfire and outdoor gathering space of the lodge. We also tried to create a special draw to the camp by developing the unique features of the site, these being the waterfront and the ravine. Additionally, we tried to improve connectivity by developing a looped system connecting all areas of the camp and improving ADA access to

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the water front. To do this we created a hierarchy of paths which include roads, high-lines and boardwalks, hiking trails, and zip lines. We also wanted to preserve as much of the natural site as possible by using existing paths and roads, re-purposing Lamb Lodge and Starlet while maintaining their identity and historic importance, and designing cabins to the create a minimal impact on the site.

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley | Anil Moore | John Vogtman | Abby Winter


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: program

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Team Fire: Joseph McKenley | Anil Moore | John Vogtman | Abby Winter


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: diagrams

Existing and New Conditions

Zone Diagram

Existing Conditions (Grey), Rehabilitate (Black), Proposed (Red), New Clearings (Tan)

Water Front (Blue), Activity Zone (Tan), Camp Site (Red Dot), Ravine (Green)

Site Lines and Circulation

Ravine

Water Front

Points of Interest Site Lines Hiking Trails Vehicular Traffic Zip Line Boardwalk

Path, Sight Lines, and Place Sight Line (Red Dashed Line), Place of Interest (Red Circle), Hiking Trail (Black Dashed Line), Vehicular Traffic (Grey Solid Line), Zip Line (Thin Black Line), Boardwalk (Thick Black Line)

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Team Fire: Joseph McKenley | Anil Moore | John Vogtman | Abby Winter


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: program - recreational activities

Dock and Boat house/Marine Lab: This structure will sit at the end of the existing dock, acting as a gateway to Camp Woodlands from the water, and an end to the procession of paths from the camp. It will store small boats, kayaks, and canoes on the water level and house a marine lab on the upper level.

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Zip line: In order to further the exploration of the ravine, a zip line will be introduced to provide a way to explore the ravine from above or within the tree canopies. The zip line decks will be atop rock climbing walls.

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley | Anil Moore | John Vogtman | Abby Winter


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: program - recreational activities

The Marshwalk: The marswalk is a boardwalk that leads into the marsh and connects to nature trails, allowing the girls to explore the ravine’s ecology further.

The Highline: is an ADA accessible pathway that goes midway through the ravine, connecting a few camp sites, the proposed lodge and the bridge to Lamb Lodge.

highline

zip-line

road road ropes course marshwalk marsh walkway path path

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Team Fire: Joseph McKenley | Anil Moore | John Vogtman | Abby Winter


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: perspective This is an aerial shot of the site model from the water side. Here, all four campsites can be seen on their respective land nodes. Lamb Lodge can be seen in the distance and Starlet is seen to

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the left. The river, the ravine and the way the different paths connect to the site can all be seen through this view.

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley | Anil Moore | John Vogtman | Abby Winter


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: perspective This is an aerial shot of the site model from the road side. Procession through the campsite can be seen through this view. Upon initial arrival, campers have the option to go left across the ravine

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to the lodge. They also have the option to go to the right by foot. This path leads past many campsites and down to the river.

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley | Anil Moore | John Vogtman | Abby Winter


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: aerial perspectives

View from Riva Road (East to West)

View from Lamb Lodge to new lodge site

View from Broad Creek (West to East)

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Team Fire: Joseph McKenley | Anil Moore | John Vogtman | Abby Winter


Camp Woodlands Master Plan Element Theme: The Girl Scouts mission is to “build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.� It implies a desire to be better citizens in the world and to be better caretakers of the earth. We extract from this that a girl scout needs to be comfortable in both a built, civilized environment as well as out in the wilderness with only herself and her troop to rely on. Team Ele, short for Elements, uses the four elements (Earth,

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Air, Water, and Fire) as a way of understanding the core facets of nature. They are also the building blocks of a civilized environment; they provide, nourishment, warmth, and shelter. We use the four elements as a way of organizing the activities and the architectural language of the camp. Progressing through the camp, you pass historic Lamb lodge, the dining hall, and cabin row, ending at the lodge overlooking the water.

Team Element: Peter Cunningham | Aren Knudsen | Christiane Machado


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: diagram Along with the four elements, Camp Woodlands is organized around two main portions of the site. The urban or developed zone and the natural zone. The relatively small site for the camp makes it challenging to truly immerse oneself in the natural habitat. Team Ele’s approach was to reinforce the boundary of the property by planting coniferous trees that help to mask views into the adjacent property. Along with thickening the border, the

team wanted to limit the number of separate sites that would be needed for each structure. Instead, an urban zone runs along the north edge of the ravine and a natural zone occupies the south side. The natural zone remains undeveloped, and provides an important area for visitors to retreat into the woods and experience a natural environment. The Girl Scouts would use this area for various activities such as scientific research or nature hikes.

URBAN ZONE

NATURAL ZONE

LINES OF SIGHT 1/128� = 1’

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Team Element: Peter Cunningham | Aren Knudsen | Christiane Machado


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: cabins While each cabin at Camp Woodlands share a similar theme in their design, each also has it’s own unique attributes associated with the Four Elements. Each campsite has 3-4 cabins organized around a hollowed portion of a deck. Just as the bonfire in the natural zone brings the entire camp together, the fire-pit in each cabin campsite brings each troop together. Moving from right to left is the Terra Cabin, which is rooted in the earth by it’s

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green roofs and luscious gardens. To the left is the Stratus Cabin, which in the center opens to the sky from its enclosed structure and takes advantage of natural ventilation. Next, is the Starlet cabin which would be restored to its original form and purpose, and function as a cabin, standing as a historic landmark of the camp. Last is the Oceanus cabin, whose angled roofs collect rain water which is stored in cisterns and used as gray water.

Team Element: Peter Cunningham | Aren Knudsen | Christiane Machado


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: aerial perspective

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Team Element: Peter Cunningham | Aren Knudsen | Christiane Machado


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: elemental kingdoms

Oceanus

Stratus

Terra

Volcana

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Team Element: Peter Cunningham | Aren Knudsen | Christiane Machado


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: team building obstacle course (TBOC) Linking all of the buildings in the north half of the site is a decked, elevated walkway which connects the east and west sides of campus through a pedestrian only, ADA compliant path. The path dually serves as the launching point for a Team Building Obstacle Course – the TBOC. The course consists of activities that lead a scout troop throughout the camp. The activities can only be completed as a team, and as the troop advances

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through the course, activities also increase in difficulty. There would be 10 different obstacles throughout the camp; these consist of orienting site puzzle, trust fall, blindfold walk, plank bridge, balancing platform, rope bridge, balance beam, Jacob’s ladder, rope swing, and rope wall. Lastly, where the TBOC crosses the ravine, it would be placed strategically to terrace the bank and mitigate erosion, as shown in the sections on the opposite page.

Team Element: Peter Cunningham | Aren Knudsen | Christiane Machado


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: sections through ravine crossings

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Team Element: Peter Cunningham | Aren Knudsen | Christiane Machado


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: program - wooded area activities

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Team Element: Peter Cunningham | Aren Knudsen | Christiane Machado


Camp Woodlands Master Plan: program - gardens

Plant yield by month

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Team Element: Peter Cunningham | Aren Knudsen | Christiane Machado


GATEWAY


Camp Woodlands Gateway The wall-like gateway both physically and symbolically separates the quiet campsite from the boisterous Riva Road. The pulledapart form of the gateway reflects the ancient pueblo theme of

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the proposed lodge, and the natural materials evoke a sense of place at the campsite.

Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Camp Woodlands Gateway Camp Woodlands: Main entrance into camp. It is fitted with a security booth/office and heavy wooden doors. The design is inspired by pueblo revival architecture, complete with decorative corbels and carved columns.

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Camp Woodlands Gateway This gateways design embraces the idea of movement, but takes a slightly different approach. Instead of the common swing arm gate, this version is raised and

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lowered by a pulley system. In addition to the security gate, there is also an office at the gate that would double as a look-out post and security check.

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Camp Woodlands Gateway Form: Bridge Construction: Glulam, Plyboard and Heavy Timber

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Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Camp Woodlands Gateway This Gateway is meant to be a transition from the man made environment to the natural environment. An evenly spaced promenade of trees leads up to the gateway echoing the control and organization of suburbia which campers are leaving behind. Once campers pass through the stone wall and covered bridge they enter into a pristine uninhibited natural environment. The covered bridge is a precursor to the lodge which features a large

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Gateway like entry space formed by trusses and heavy timber. The covered bridge is meant to create a memorable and notable entry into Camp Woodlands that will raise excitement and anticipation as the campers are arriving. The sign-age is meant to be simple and sophisticated to remind people that they are entering Camp Woodlands without being overly flashy.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Camp Woodlands Gateway Inspired by the Japanese Tori Gate, an arbor-shaped structure that serves to symbolize the threshold between the sacred and the non-sacred, Camp Woodlands gateway serves a similar

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purpose: marking the threshold between the urban world and a natural retreat. By extruding the form in a repetitive pattern, this symbolism is extended even further.

Team Fire: Anil Moore


Camp Woodlands Gateway This gateway proposal is located at the front entrance of the camp. It is situated right at the fork in the road where the private access road veers off to the right front the main public road into the camp. This gateway was designed with security in mind, since there are no physical gates or fences around the property. This design has a security building connected to a main gate

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for the camp and a secondary gate for the access road. Cars have to stop, check in with the gate attendant, and then proceed through the necessary gate with granted permission. This design allows girls to feel more secure and for the troop leaders and staff to know who is leaving and entering the camp.

Team Fire: Abby Winter


Camp Woodlands Gateway The gate is structured with four posts in order to create a portal that compresses space and views, preparing the entrant for a grander path shaped by tall trees. The four posts also provide shelter for the attendant who opens and closes the gate. Furthermore, when the gate is open, which is how it will mostly be viewed, it can lock into posts, and the design of the gate will

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remain visible. Timber columns stand in four groups and support beams that slide between them. The wood columns rest on a stone base and the beams are supported by metal straps. The gate is constructed of metal with insignia representing each of the four elemental zones of Team Ele’s camp design.

Team Geo: Peter Cunningham


Camp Woodlands Gateway The Camp Woodlands gateway as part of the Team Elements master plan incorporates many aspects of the camps design into one memorable procession that ushers visitors onto the property. Proceeding through the gate, visitors are transitioned from the developed world of Annapolis into the natural habitat of Camp Woodlands. The gateway consists of two pedestrian paths that flank the main road through the camp. The iron gates

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are secured to stone columns. Between the columns is a water fountain that slowly circulates water from the gate into channels that run along the road. Entering the camp on foot, visitors pass over the water on wooden decking that meets the camp boardwalk (TBOC) and continues to guide them through Camp Woodlands. The natural tunnel that is formed by the oak trees reaching across the road symbolize the transition into the woodlands.

Team Geo: Aren Knudsen


Camp Woodlands Gateway The entry gate is a threshold into Camp Woodlands. It symbolizes leaving behind a technology centered, driven world and entering one that is simple and being one with nature. For this reason the gate design is simplistic and has elements that tie it in with nature. The base of the structure emerges from the ground and becomes the foundation for the gateway. The rest of the structure is composed of wood including the columns, girders, and beams; all of which culminate with an overhanging trellis. The overhanging trellis supports a variety of vines, which bloom

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at various times during the season. There is also an allee of trees before and after passing through the gateway. The allee of trees are in the same rhythm as the columns and blends the transition into the site. The canopies of the trees also create an enclosed space that acts like an extension of the gateway covered trellis. When individuals come into the camp they know that they are transitioning into a new experience and leaving their old world behind.

Team Geo: Christiane Jones Machado


LODGE


Lodge: exterior perspective Inspired by Puebloan architecture, this lodge is designed to collect and process storm water and gray water, while delicately returning it to the ravine and eventually the Chesapeake Bay, via constructed wetlands. The lodge is to be nestled in the side of the “Mesa,� framing the ravine, allowing for this intervention in

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the water cycle. Also, the generous northwestern views help express to the campers these sustainable and environmental concerns. The expressive structure employs local materials which helps exude a sense of place in both Camp Woodlands and Annapolis, Maryland.

Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Lodge: interior perspective Upon entrance of the lodge, there is moment of compression followed by an explosion of space and light. This interior functions as both a dining hall and assembly space, while serving as a hinge, connecting the other programmatic elements (kitchen,

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meeting spaces, restrooms, etc.). A mezzanine level wraps around the perimeter of the space, providing circulation to the administration wing and the green roof, and allowing for aerial views of the filtering wetlands and ravine.

Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Lodge: site plan The ground floor of the lodge consists of three major zones: the assembly space, the kitchen wing, and the utility wing. The open nature of the assembly space and kitchen wing allows for flexible usage. A channel is carved out of the floor slab to redirect water

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from the kitchen sinks, the entry sinks, and the restroom sinks. The gray water joins the storm water in the center of the assembly space, and is then released into the wetlands. As the campers wash their hands, they can see this process happening.

Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Lodge: second floor plan The second floor of the lodge houses the administration wing and the green roof. The administration wing is composed of various offices and meeting spaces, and a lounge, all oriented to pro-

149 | Lodge

duce generous views of the ravine and wetlands. The green roof, located directly above the kitchen, allows the girls to grow and maintain their own food or other plants.

Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Lodge: sections

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Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Lodge: model

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Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Lodge: diagrams

Circulation

Water Circulation

Sustainable Features (Passive ventilation, passive lighting, photo-voltaic powered radiant heating)

Parti and Site Relationship

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Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Lodge: diagrams

Water Channel Detail

Structure

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Team Geo: Joshua Kilian cation


Lodge: diagrams

Water Cycle

Expressive Structure

Precedent

Precedent

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Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Lodge: exterior perspective Inspired by Peublo Revival architecture, this lodge is designed to be the main gathering space for Camp Woodlands. Located at Mesa, it is meant to bring people to the “mesa� or table; a place to socialize and gather. The lodge is placed on the northwestern part of Mesa, hugging the curves of the topography. Taking more

155 | Lodge

inspiration from the Anasazi Indians, who were cliff dwellers that built their homes into sides of cliffs, the lodge steps back into the topography, blending into its surrounding context. Its placement provides views to Starlet, Davy Crockett, and the water.

Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Lodge: site plan The Anasazi Indians had a strong connection to nature, the design of the building mimics a form found in nature. In this case a “seashell”, inspired the shape of the building. Using the ribs of the seashell as inspirations for placement of beams, it fans out into the space; creating a defined structural form. At the exterior of the main entrance is a circular gathering space, where troops would gather before entering the dining hall. Upon entering, there is a sense of compression and

release as the girls fan out into the space. The compression comes from the entrance point, where the roof is at its lowest slope. Once inside, the room expands and releases the visitors into the space, while framing the views of the water and surrounding buildings. The second floor is reserved for administrative offices, storage, and additional flex spaces.

KITCHEN

OUTDOOR DECK

RETRACTABLE NANA DOORS

SERVICE DRIVE

FOOD PICK UP

DINING HALL

OUTDOOR ASSEMBLY SPACE

GARDEN TERRACE

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Lodge: second floor plan The second floor comprises of administration offices, additional flex spaces, and storage areas. There is a common area that

provides that can be used as an activity area or assembly area.

FLEX SPACE

STORAGE

FLEX SPACE

COMMON AREA

FLEX SPACE

FLEX SPACE

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Lodge: interior perspective Upon entering the dining area, visitors are released into the space, where it opens and expands the view of the outdoors. Retractable Nana doors allow for further interaction with the outdoors. This space serves as a dining area and assembly space, where it can sit 250 people.

Interior perspective of dining hall.

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Lodge: diagrams

PARTI: SEASHELL

STRUCTURE

EXPOSER vs. ENCLOSURE

INTERIOR vs. EXTERIOR

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RADIAL ORDER

Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Lodge: diagrams

TOPOGRAPHY

ENTRY

VIEWS

PUBLIC vs. PRIVATE

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Lodge: elevation

South Elevation

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Lodge: section

Building Section: Sustainable features include a green-roof that helps with thermal control within the building. Water that filters off the roof is directed down towards the garden terrace. The large overhang provides shade during the summer, while letting in sunlight during the winter months.

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Lodge: elevation

East Elevation

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Lodge: elevation

West Elevation

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Lodge: section

DINING

ADMIN/FLEX SPACE

KITCHEN

COMMON AREA

ADMIN/FLEX SPACE

Transverse section

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Lodge: model

View of upper deck and ground floor.

View towards main entrance

Structural frame.

Structural frame: Beams extend in and out onto the deck.

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Lodge: exterior perspective This proposal for a lodge on Mesa springs from a desire to unite the new with the old through a visual connection. The building is situated on the Mesa where lines of sight from Lamb Lodge and Starlet intersect. The courtyard welcomes campers as they ascend from Lamb Lodge. Upon arrival, they encounter a fire circle which slows the pace and reorients them toward the entrance of the building.

167 | Lodge

The earthen walls of the building are designed to appear as if the ground plane has folded up and over the building. Ground becomes wall, which transitions into green roof and reaches out over the edge of the Mesa. This rammed earth wall / green roof combination acts as insulator, protecting from harsh northwestern winds in the winter months. The green roof also helps to filter rain water, which is collected in a cistern under the kitchen.

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Lodge: site plan The main level floor plan arranges space into public and private zones. As users enter the building at the intersection of these two zones, they may move to the left, down a hallway toward the office and private gathering rooms; or they may move to the right onto a loft, which overlooks the dining space and allows for additional seating; or they may move straight ahead, toward the stair and ramp, which realigns them with a view of Starlet.

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The main dining hall seats between 180 and 200 campers, while the over head loft space can seat 25 - 30. Storage for tables is located under the ramp, adjacent to the main room. The more private wing of the building houses administrative offices and a smaller gathering space for troops that have special business or award ceremonies held in a less public fashion.

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Lodge: lower level plan The lower level of the building is truly the main attraction. The experience begins with the vertical circulation, which is designed to invite use: the angular approach to the dining room allows users to descend along the glazed edge, which opens up to dense forest. Girls can experience the breath-taking views from above and within. The dining area is vast and open, allowing for dual use as a gymnasium space. The kitchen, which is tucked under the loft, is accessible for food delivery through

service road. Stations for cooking are arranged into six groups, so multiple troops may choose to cook their own food at the same time. The kitchen becomes a celebrated space through the addition of a water wall. Water from the roof system drains through a light well, into the cistern below. A row of unisex toilet rooms flank the south wall, and a washing station is visible to all, making it convenient for campers to wash up, as they come and go.

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Lodge: interior perspective The interior of the lodge on Mesa brings indoor gathering area together with the outdoors. Large windows give way to breathtaking views of the ravine, which the Mesa overlooks. The windows allow for day-lighting year round. During the summer months, the sun is shielded by the overhang of the roof, but in colder winter months, the sun is able to penetrate the glazing to the floor slab.

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The solar heat gain is stored in the concrete floor, and heat is released gradually over a period of time, decreasing the need for conventional heating methods. To supplement this passive heat strategy, radiant heating is added for comfort during the coldest months, but would be used as a supplementary source, instead of a primary one,

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Lodge: sections Section views reveal the relationship of the building to the landscape. To emphasize the dramatic intersection of the flat summit and deep ravine that makes Mesa spectacular, the building is tucked into the hillside. This arrangement allows for a majority of the flat area to be utilized for activity space, and for a storm shelter in cases of inclement weather. A ravine-side balcony supports outdoor activities, such as bird-watching and seasonal dining,

large operable dining room walls open up to the outside, letting nature into the building. The building’s green roof system acts as an additional layer of insulation, and is supported by large timber trusses. The space under the loft creates a compressed zone, where circulation naturally occurs. A pick-up window from the kitchen is located here.

Longitudinal Section

Transverse Section

171 | Lodge

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Lodge: elevations The southeast side of the building captures the manner in which the building meets the ground. The hillside has a level plane and a moderate slope on the north side. On the east and west sides, the slope is much more dramatic. This more moderate slope enables an ADA path and a road to meet the ravine side of the building. Because of this entrance, the kitchen may be stocked more easily, either because smaller trucks may approach the

building, or because the path allows for a hand cart to be easily navigated down the hill. The lodge sits in a thick forest cover of deciduous and coniferous trees, which aid in passive strategies for moderating the building’s temperature. Specifically, the density of forest helps to shade the building in summer, and block wind in the winter months.

Southeast Elevation

Southwest Elevation

Northeast Elevation

Northwest Elevation

172 | Lodge

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Lodge: diagrams

Program / Functions

Concept diagram

173 | Lodge

Structural diagram

Sight lines

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Lodge: diagrams

Passive Design Strategies: Solar heat gain and natural Materials: Green roof construction ventilation

Materials: Timber truss with exposed bolted connections

Passive Design Strategies: Rain water collection and Materials: Rammed earth construction filtration

Division of Spaces: Public / private / shared

174 | Lodge

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Lodge: process work - models

Model: Connections of beam to girder to column`

175 | Lodge

Model: Lodge structure and large dining space

Model: Lodge within the larger context of the site

Models: Formal studies / development of lodge

Precedent: Pit houses of the Mesa Verde

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Lodge: exterior perspective The concept for the lodge design was born out of the idea of preserving and creating very strong connections on the site. The lodge is perched atop the ravine between a proposed central campfire and Lamb Lodge, across the ravine. The design takes advantage of the views over the ravine towards Lamb lodge and also respects the axis between the campfire and Lamb lodge,

Lamb Lodge by stepping back from the axis on both sides, creating a void space which has been programmed as a terraced rain garden and amphitheater. This void space then, becomes a part of a glorified procession between the camp fire and Lamb Lodge.

Camp Fire

176 | Lodge

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Lodge: diagrams

Relationship of Building to Land Form

Daylighting: Direct sunlight is blocked in the summer and the space is then ambient lit.

Passive Strategies: The space takes advantage of summer and winter sun angles, allows for cross ventilation and the earth’s natural insulation properties.

The north and south facing facades are the most open, while the east and west are solid.

Perforations in the solid walls facing the southeasterly summer winds allow for better airflow.

Systems Diagram: Active and Passive strategies are combined to create a thermally comfortable space.

177 | Lodge

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Lodge: diagrams

Water Run-off Strategies: Uncollected water from the roofs run into a detention basin and is processed through a terraced rain garden before returning to the ravine.

Conceptual Section

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Development of Form

Form of the Space

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Lodge: ground floor plan The proposed lodge is split into two parts by the terraced rain garden - the administration and meeting space and the main assembly space. The separation of spaces allows camp administrators an enjoyable level of privacy, while still remaining very accessible to the campers. The dining/assembly space seats 242 people and has direct access to the kitchen and an external assembly space (a deck).

1. Administration and Meeting Space 2. High Line 3. Terraced Rain Garden 4. Bridge to Lamb Lodge 5.Outdoor Assembly Space 6. Indoor Assembly Space 7. Kitchen

5 2

4

1 6 3

7

179 | Lodge

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Lodge: upper floor plan 8. Meeting Room 9. Storage/Services 10. Ramp over Detention Pond

8

11. Catwalk 12. Outdoor Patio Space

9 11

10 12

180 | Lodge

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Lodge: interior perspective The main volume within the lodge is the assembly/dining hall. it is a double height space with a series of expressive glue laminated columns that curve to become to the beam structures for the roof. The space is designed to take advantage of tree top views through large garage doors, over the ravine and across

181 | Lodge

to Lamd lodge. The space is also designed to be light filled, airy and expressive of its materiality and assembly. The material palette is simple and expressive of its use, it consists of: timber, stone, glass and light steel - very little of the assembly is hidden.

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Lodge: elevations and sections The lodge is perched at the top of a steep slope that leads down into a ravine. In addition to sitting up high above the ravine, the lodge is also nestled into the side of that slope. This positioning allows the height of the lodge, though monumental, to relate to the height of Lamb Lodge which it connects to via the bridge. The positioning also allows the lower level to take advantage of the earth’s natural insulation properties, reducing heating and

182 | Lodge

cooling costs considerably. The form of the space opens up to the ravine and to Lamb Lodge and bows down almost to the camp fire in the opposite direction, that is, both the north and south facade are paying hommage to the context it faces. This height consideration along with the expressive glulam columns, generates a sleek building form that is very much in tune with the genus loci of the place.

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Lodge: elevations and sections The lodge is designed based on a system of 11’ x 11’ bays. This allows for a rhythmic elevation where the expressed columns in the facade take on a nature akin to that of a row of trees in the woodlands.

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The north facade as shown consists predominantly of large, glass paneled garage doors that allow for a year-round indooroutdoor relationship.

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Lodge: interior perspective The dining/assembly hall

184 | Lodge

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Lodge: exterior perspective The terraced garden that doubles as an amphitheater.

185 | Lodge

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Lodge: exterior perspective Public approach to the lodge with the outdoor patio in view.

186 | Lodge

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Lodge: process

First iteration

First iteration

Second iteration

Second iteration

Third iteration

Third iteration

187 | Lodge

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Lodge: model

188 | Lodge

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Lodge: section Above the ravine, across from the preexisting Lamb Lodge, the proposed new lodge pulls inspiration from traditional Japanese architecture to create a series of buildings that wrap around a centralized outdoor gathering space. With the blending of traditional and modern building techniques and materials, the lodge becomes an extension of the ravine that blurs the lines of interior

189 | Lodge

and exterior spaces. Together these two processes create a dialogue between the forested setting and the lodge. The wooded area surrounding of the site gracefully progresses up the ravine and flows through the lodge. The lodge is able to delicately rest at the top of the ravine, creating a safe haven at the edge.

Team Fire: Anil Moore


Lodge: section The main interior gathering space’s structure is kept as light as possible, optimizing northern views into the ravine as well as southern views into the woods. The space is anchored by two heavy, Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired fireplaces, placed on the west and east end of the space. Both the northern and southern

190 | Lodge

walls are composed of glass garage doors which, during optimal weather, can be opened to allow for the space to extend to the outside. A mesh network of interlacing wood overhead helps to define the space.

Team Fire: Anil Moore


Lodge: elevation

West Elevation

East Elevation

191 | Lodge

Team Fire: Anil Moore


Lodge: elevations

North Elevation

South Elevation

192 | Lodge

Team Fire: Anil Moore


Lodge: floor plan Like the Eastern Cabins, the foot print of the lodge has been designed to give Camp Woodlands a greater level of flexibility. A free plan is created by keeping the post-and-beam construction type seen in traditional Japanese architecture. Through this free plan, the columns become the only vertical load-bearing

193 | Lodge

components within the structure. This allows for a majority of the structure to be as light as possible, minimizing large stretches of load-bearing walls. This method of construction enables a more organic connection between the exterior and interior.

Team Fire: Anil Moore


Lodge: diagrams

Sun Path

Light Penetration Diagram: Summer sun angle (redorange) and Winter sun angle (sea green).

Ventilation

Building to Ground Relationship: The proposed lodge becomes an extension of the ravine by building it up.

Form of Interior Space

Form of Building

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Team Fire: Anil Moore


Lodge: diagrams

Axis

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Views- A continuous view is created from the major spaces of the new lodge to Lamb Lodge.

Structural Grid

Team Fire: Anil Moore


Lodge: diagrams

Site / Precedent to Urban context

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Team Fire: Anil Moore


Lodge: diagrams

Safe-Danger Relationship (Level 3)

Safe - Danger Relationship (Level 2)

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Team Fire: Anil Moore


Lodge: diagrams

Safe - Danger Relationship (Level 1)

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Team Fire: Anil Moore


Lodge: exterior perspective The driving force behind the design of this lodge is to create a grand portal or entry space into Camp Woodlands. It serves as a transition point where girls leave behind their parents and move into the world of camp. This perspective highlights the promenade where parents and scouts walk from the parking lot to the main entrance of the lodge. The outdoor space could

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also serve as a place where girls can relax under the trees, do outdoor activities, and meet with their troop. The lodge is meant to appear iconic, light, and transparent which is emphasized by the glazed entry space and delicate structural elements. This will help create a memorable experience for all those that attend camp.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Lodge: diagrams exterior approach Once settled into a campsite, scouts will generally experience the proposed lodge from the ravine. They will approach the lodge from either the skyline, which runs parallel to building, or across a pedestrian bridge that spans the length of the ravine. The building is viewed as lofty and delicate within the landscape creating an iconic and memorable experience. Campers enter

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through the lower level and proceed right to enter the dining hall, left towards the kitchen to pick up food, or straight up the stairs to the upper floor. Prior to entering the building campers also have the choice of turning left and going up an ADA accessible ramp to the upper level deck or turning right towards the outdoor dining area and Skyline.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Lodge: interior perspective The dining hall is characterized by a twenty foot double height space with a large central stone fireplace. It contains sixteen to eighteen tables which seat twelve to fourteen people each. This seats a total of 192 - 252 people. Storage closets are located along the interior wall which are designed to store the tables and

201 | Lodge

chairs so that the space can be used as a large multipurpose room. The doors and windows shown on the right open to the Highline creating a dynamic indoor outdoor space where campers can eat outside or simply enjoy the weather on a nice day.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Lodge: upper level plan The main entry to the upper floor of the proposed lodge occurs on the south side of the building. Parents and campers approach the lodge from the fire pit or parking lot by walking through a colonnade of trees towards an inviting front porch followed by a transparent lobby space with views to the ravine. The lobby space also includes a balcony that looks down on the dinning hall and central fire place. The east side of the building contains

202 | Lodge

administrative offices, an indoor flex space, a single ADA bathroom, and an elevator. The focal point of the space is a large central linear staircase that leads down to the dinning hall and out towards the ravine. The steps double as a seating area for campers to watch skits and performances as well as “hang out� with friends. These steps could also serve as a meet up point for troops before dinner.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Lodge: lower level plan The lower floor of the lodge functions predominantly as a dining hall for the girl scouts. Campers enter this floor by way of the back porch from either the bridge or the Highline. Upon entering, campers encounter a grand staircase where they can choose to proceed up to the second floor, right to the dining hall, or left towards the kitchen. The kitchen is equipped with a long counter that serves as a place where campers can pick up their food.

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Bathrooms are located in the back on the south side of the building. The dining hall is highlighted by a large fireplace which is the focal point of the room and serves as a gathering place for campers. The dining hall also has doors and windows that open to the Highline creating a joint indoor/outdoor space helping to blur the lines between interior and exterior space.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Lodge: longitudinal section This section cuts through the building longitudinally looking towards the fire pit and front entry space. It shows the flex space and kitchen on the left, the entry space and main staircase in the

204 | Lodge

center, and dining hall on the right. Some other important features include operable polycarbonate panels on the roof, and the balcony overhanging the dining hall from the upper level.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Lodge: transverse sections These two sections show a transverse cut though the proposed lodge and adjacent ravine. The top rendering highlights the main entry space, grand staircase, and bridge. It highlights the outdoor balcony and demonstrates how the stairs are really meant

205 | Lodge

to be a continuation of the natural topography. The bottom section shows the Skyline, dinning hall, and storage closets. Both of these sections highlight the importance of topography and show how the entry sequences respond to the changes in elevation.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Lodge: elevations The entry to the lodge is highlighted by a tall transparent entry space articulated by delicate trusses reminiscent of the entry gateway. This can be viewed as a secondary gateway that the campers move through when entering the camp. This space is important because it is the point at which campers leave their parents behind and are placed into the care of their troop lead-

206 | Lodge

ers. It truly is a portal in the sense that as they move through this part of building they are transported into Camp Woodlands and now have access to the skyline which leads to the various campsites. The administrative and dining hall spaces which flank the entry are meant to be more horizontal to and solid to contrast the main entry space.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Lodge: site model (1/32nd scale)

Building relationship to Lamb Lodge showing bridge and skyline

Building relationship to fire pit showing bridge and entry promenade

View from Lamb Lodge across bridge and ravine to proposed lodge

Birds eye perspective of entry promenade, lodge, and ravine

207 | Lodge

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Lodge: site model (1/16th scale)

Front view

Rear view

208 | Lodge

This series of models focused on exploring the buildings relationship to the topography. Through the different models it becomes clear how the front entry and rear entry occur on different floors and how that relates to the change in topography and pedestrian bridge.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Lodge: structural model (1/16th scale)

Birds eye view

Entry view

209 | Lodge

Top view

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Lodge: process diagrams

Site context in terms of topography and axis between Lamb Lodge and fire pit

210 | Lodge

Building placement with respect to topography.

Building placement with respect to axis between Lamb Lodge and fire pit

Top: Interlocking building spaces Left: Building relationship to outdoor space

Public vs. Private

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Lodge: process diagrams

Axis and regulating lines

Circulation

Program

Airflow and building response to summer sun

Airflow and building response to spring and fall sun

Airflow and building response to winter sun

211 | Lodge

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Lodge: sustainability diagrams

Airflow and building response to summer sun

Airflow and building response to winter sun

Summer airflow

Summer and winter airflow enhanced through fans

212 | Lodge

Water cycle

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Lodge: precedents Since the location of the lodge was placed near the bridge and the Highline, this design chose to incorporate the with the building. The inspiration came from Ame’s gate house, a house with an incorporated tunnel. Rathbon dining hall at Lehigh University

AME’S GATE LODGE -USE OF STONE -GATEWAY THROUGH THE HOUSE

213 | Lodge

was looked at because it is situated on the side of a mountain and has amazing views. This design took inspiration from the “dog trot” style house which is two structures attached by a common roof. Lamb Lodge was also looked at for inspiration.

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY DINING HALL -MOUNTAINOUS SITE -WINDOWS PROVIDE GREAT OVERLOOK

LAMB LODGE -HEXAGONAL SHAPE -HEAVY TIMBER CONNECTION

Team Fire: Abby Winter


Lodge: floor plans - first floor This first floor plan shows the different spaces in the two structures as well as the shape of the exterior space. The octagonal exterior space recalls back to the geometric shape of Lamb Lodge. Instead of using it in the structure the geometric shape was used as the outside space where girls can gather. The building on the right is the dining hall, kitchen and storage area. The

building to the left is the welcome area and lounge and has space for a few office rooms. There is an outdoor space between the two buildings, under the common roof, where girls can gather or eat. The lodge is directly next to the Highline. Girls can access the Highline and bridge through the lodge.

Table Storage

Office Space

WC

WC

Closet

Outside Space

Welcome/Lounge Area Dining Space Storage

down

WC Industrial Kitchen

Office Space

214 | Lodge

Team Fire: Abby Winter


Lodge: floor plans - basement floor This second floor plan shows how the bottom floor is dug into the side of the ravine. This level is very multi-functional. The open space in the center has movable partition walls to be used by individual troops. There is also a smaller kitchen for groups to use. A few offices, maintenance and storage can also be found on this level. In addition, this level can be used as a storm shelter for all girls. Evolution of Building and Exterior Space

Down

Office

Maintenance

Down

Storage

WC

Down

WC

Small Kitchen

Storage

Lamb Lodge Floor Plan

215 | Lodge

Team Fire: Abby Winter


Lodge: elevations Materiality of the building is based on whether that particular part of the building is public or private. The public areas, towards the center of the building, are glazed. The purpose of this is so the girls can have a straight view across the ravine to Lamb Lodge.

The exterior spaces of the building are private and are made with masonry construction. Cross bracing can be seen in the glazed windows. Visible structure can teach girls about structure and buildings.

PROGRAM PUBLIC PRIVATE GLASS

STONE

th Elevation tion North

South Elevation

West Elevation

216 | Lodge

East Elevation

Team Fire: Abby Winter


Lodge: sections These sections show the relationship between the new lodge and the old lodge. The new lodge is located directly across from Lamb Lodge so the girls can always remember the new while

experiencing the new. This section also shows the foot bridge that we propose to cross the ravine.

Cross Section with Lamb Lodge

TRANSVERSE SECTION Scale: 1’ = 1/4”

217 | Lodge

Team Fire: Abby Winter


Lodge: diagrams These diagrams show the building in relationship to the sun, wind, rain. The goal of this design is to prevent soil erosion so we proposed a terraced slope to naturally slow water run off into the

ravine. Rain water can also be collected with the building and be reused in water used to wash hands.

E

SUN MOVEMENT

USE TERRACING TO CONTROL EROSION WATER REUSE SYSTEM

AIR CIRCULATION

Summer

Winter

COVERED VS. UNCOVERED

218 | Lodge

MOVEMENT THROUGH THE BUILT IN TUNNEL

SUNLIGHT AND ROOF ANGLE

Team Fire: Abby Winter


Lodge: perspectives

EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE

INTERIOR PERSPECTIVES 219 | Lodge

Team Fire: Abby Winter


Lodge: model

Site Context

220 | Lodge

Back of the Lodge

Team Fire: Abby Winter


Lodge: site plan This design celebrates the moment of separation between land and water. It functions like a boat house with grand views out over Broad Creek. In order to link over thirty feet of topography, the building cuts into the side of Davy Crockett, with an entrance on grade where scouts and vehicles will arrive as well as at water level where boats can launch and be stored. This design incorporates the four elements, earth, air, water, and fire in its materiality, space making, and sustainable design strategies. Campers arrive at the lodge on axis with a square clearing

221 | Lodge

in the forest where a hand washing fountain sits in the center. Campers progress through the atrium along a planter of trees and a green wall until they reach a stair at the end of the balcony and proceed downwards. They will pass by the kitchen which will be have several openings to encourage troops to use the kitchen, developing a personal sense of responsibility for what goes on inside. Finally, campers will move into the dining room which is a double height space glazed on three sides and punctuated with a large fireplace and chimney.

Team Element: Peter Cunningham


Lodge: floor plans

ELEMENTS LODGE

2ND FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0”

N

BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0”

N

222 | Lodge

Team Element: Peter Cunningham


Lodge: sections and elevations

ELEMENTS LODGE

NORTHWEST ELEVATION SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0” SOUTHWEST ELEVATION SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0” N N

LONGITUDINAL SECTION SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0” TRANSVERSE SECTION SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0” N N

223 | Lodge

Team Element: Peter Cunningham


Lodge: perspectives

ELEMENTS LODGE

224 | Lodge

Team Element: Peter Cunningham


Lodge: diagrams

Elements

Connection between building, land, and water

Sun lighting Strategies Energy Saving Strategies: Roof overhang and horizontal louvers Water filtration through green wall; block summer sun but allow winter sun geothermal heat pumps; storm water run off recycled as grey water; south facing louvers; natural ventilation through high operable windows; deciduous trees to south, coniferous trees to north; thermal mass of concrete wall allows for more gradual temperature changes. 225 | Lodge

Team Element: Peter Cunningham


Lodge: details and models

BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN

N

COLUMN, GIRDER, AND BEAM CONNECTION DIAGRAM

226 | Lodge

Team Element: Peter Cunningham


Lodge: exterior perspective Acting as the anchor for the string of buildings along the inhabited zone, the lodge is the culminating feature of the elemental campsite; like a castle nestled deep within the walls of the city. The form of the building receives campers as they enter the Oceanus zone and serves as a backdrop that reorients you along the road. Part of Camp Woodlands charm is it’s location on the water that is surround by nature. The Elemental lodge celebrates that relationship

227 | Lodge

while touching the ground lightly and making use of several different sustainable features to minimize its impact on the environment. With a large dining/assembly hall, kitchen, and administrative area, the lodge takes on a variety of uses. The lodge looks out over the water and offers pristine views throughout the building and deck area. Leading down to the water, the terraced landscape grows food for the kitchen while providing a unique procession to the lake.

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Lodge: site plan the open area. The north side of the open space has additional seating that is created through a series of terraces that lead up to the green-roof. The TBOC connects directly to the lodge decking and ADA ramp that also leads up to the green-roof.

OFFICE / ADMINISTRATIVE

MECHANICAL

STORAGE

STORAGE

MBLY ASSE A

KITCHEN

DININ G/

The area in front of the elemental lodge is outdoor space that can accommodate up to 250 people, providing a flexible area that can be used for a variety of activities and performances. The decking along the outside of the lodge acts as circulation while the steps down to the ground provide seating all around

WR

WR

1/8” = 1’0

OFFICE / ADMINISTRATIVE

MECHANICAL

STORAGE ORA AGE

STORAGE

DIN ING /

AS SE MB LY L

KITCHEN CHEN

WR

WR

N

228 | Lodge

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Lodge: site plan The lodge is made up of an assembly/dining hall, serving area, administrative area, and kitchen. The commercial kitchen has the ability to serve up to 250 people while also providing individual prep areas for girl scout troops to cook and store

their own food. A service road runs to a loading dock on the back of the lodge that feeds directly into the kitchen. This provides easy access for deliveries and keeps the back of house services away from the main entrance and activity space.

ADMIN/OFFICE

STORAGE

MECHANICAL

WATER ACCESS ROAD

LOADING DOCK / BOH ACCESS STAFF/ PRIVATE PARKING

OFFICE / ADMINISTRATIVE

MECHANICAL

STORAGE

OFFICE / ADMINISTRATIVE

STORAGE

MECHANICAL

ORA AGE STORAGE

STORAGE

KITCHEN

DIN

ING

DIN ING

/ AS

SE

/ AS SE MB LY L

MBL Y

CHEN KITCHEN

T.B.O.C. CIRCULATION WR

KITCHEN ASSEMBLY/ DINING

WR

WR

WR

WASHROOM

Site circulation

229 | Lodge

Program

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Lodge: section This section is taken through the main entrance of the lodge. The solid nature of the front facade conceals the view of the water until you pass through the door and it is revealed to you in spectacular fashion. The green roof slopes up towards the water like

a wave crashing over the ravine. This form receives the breeze coming off the water and provides natural ventilation throughout the lodge.

EARTH REMOVED

230 | Lodge

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Lodge: sustainability diagrams One of the lodge’s primary sustainable features is the green-roof. The insulation of the green-roof provides many cost saving benefits in both the summer and the winter. The diagrams below help to visualize the energy saving systems that are implemented into

Green-roof insulation

231 | Lodge

the lodges design. The angle of the roof is such that it blocks the hot summer sun while letting in the winter sun, helping to cool in the summer and heat in the winter.

Sun path in the summer and winter

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Lodge: east elevation

232 | Lodge

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Lodge: west elevation

233 | Lodge

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Lodge: interior perspective A view from inside the dining hall, the shape of the lodge follows the contours of the topography, providing spectacular views from every seat. The presence of the structural system brings the canopy of the trees inside the lodge while showing how the

234 | Lodge

building supports itself. The abundance of windows along both facades provides natural ventilation and minimizes the buildings environmental footprint.

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Lodge: perspectives The roof is one of the primary sustainable elements in the lodge and is therefore celebrated. As you approach the roof from the north side of the open space, the ground of the hill turns into the roof above the kitchen area. The sloping roof above the dining/ assembly hall showcases how the truss is holding up the green-

roof. A wooden walkway cantilevers over the east facade and facilitates a closer look to the sustainable elements of the lodge while also providing a unique vantage point to the activities in the courtyard below.

Interior perspective from the main entrance

West Facade overlooking the water

West facade

Green-roof and walkway above the east facade

235 | Lodge

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Lodge: diagrams

OFFICE / ADMINISTRATIVE

MECHANICAL

STORAGE

STORAGE

DIN ING

/ ASS

EM

BLY

KITCHEN

WR

WR

Earth removed for the kitchen is reused in the terraces that form the courtyard.

OFFICE / ADMINISTRATIVE

Circulation through the lodge

MECHANICAL OFFICE / ADMINISTRATIVE

STORAGE

MECHANICAL

STORAGE STORAGE

STORAGE

KITCHEN CHEN

/ ASS EM BLY

BLY BL

WR

WR

Spacial organization

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ING DIN

ING DIN

/ AS

SEM

KITCHEN

WR

WR

Relationship of solid to void

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Lodge: model The physical model that was created for the lodge and the surrounding site served as a tool for understanding how the building related to its immediate environment. The form of the topography is shaped through the terracing that is used to help reinforce and stabilize the already eroding ravine

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where the proposed lodge is located. Erecting the Elemental lodge would not only provide a mixed use building with tremendous views, but also help to stabilize the surrounding area and prevent unwanted runoff into the Chesapeake bay.

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Lodge: model

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Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Lodge: exterior perspective As the campers emerge from the TBOC (Team Building Obstacle Course) they immediately encounter the main gathering area for the lodge- enough for 200 people to gather. Here they can sit around a large campfire, toast some s’mores, and perhaps tell

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some ghost stories or they can make their way to the main entrance of the lodge. The view below is from the green roof looking down into the main gathering area.

Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Lodge: site plan The exterior social room is not only shaped by the building surrounding it but also by the vegetation. The facade on the entrance side of the lodge is seen as more of a wall with windows punched through it while the walls on the exterior are more of a frame. This makes one go from an enclosed space to an exposed space with expansive views of the water- it creates an unexpected wow factor. The lodge houses a large hand washing area that the girls can go through before entering the line to

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pick up food and then sitting down for a nice meal. This main floor plan also has a commercial kitchen with a large walk in refrigerator along with an administration area. Above the main dining space is a mezzanine that both overlooks the dining area and leads to a green roof on either side. The main dining area also doubles as a flex space with tables and chairs that collapse into the ground.

Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Lodge: upper floor plan The upper floor plan shows the mezzanine level that overlooks the main dining space. This mezzanine acts as a connection to the green roofs on either side. It also includes an edible garden and provides views into the social area below and the expansive views to the water. The green roof above the commercial kitchen

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emerges from the ground and is accessible from the gravel road. Two elements that drove the design of the plan was the location on Davy Crockett and the proximity to the water.

Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Lodge: lower floor plan The lower floor plan includes more administrative areas along with flexible spaces that can incorporate smaller activities during rainy days. The piston that lowers from the collapsible tables and chairs from above is incorporated into the walls

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so that the space remains usable. From this level there is also access to the water below through a series ramps that are also ADA accessible.

Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Lodge: sections The section on top cuts from the water through the commercial kitchen and into the exterior social space. There is a very important relationship between the roof and the space inside. The green roof is an edible garden where the girl scouts can expand their knowledge about growing their own food. Directly below this is the commercial kitchen where campers can learn healthy ways to prepare their meal.

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Finally for the best part, the girls can eat what they made either on the large deck or in the dining area. The section on the bottom cuts through the main dining area and mezzanine. Here it is easy to see the double height space of the dining area and how the mezzanine level connects to the green roofs.

Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Lodge: interior perceptive View from the main dining space looking at the mezzanine level.

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Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Lodge: interior perspective View from the mezzanine level looking out to the captivating

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views of the water.

Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Lodge: elevations The elevation on top shows how the facade is a frame allowing for beautiful views of the outside. The section- elevation on the bottom shows how the facade is a wall with windows punched through it. The section- elevation also highlights a fundamental section through the main social area. The green roofs retain 60- 70% water,

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any excess water is channeled into the retaining pond in the center of the gathering area. The retaining pond allows for water to drain slower which decreases erosion. Furthermore, the terraced rain gardens that step down into the water also helps alleviate the erosion problem by slowing down water and increasing infiltration rates.

Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Lodge: diagrams

Relationship Between Building and Land

Circulation: Main

Circulation: Upper

Circulation: Lower

The Elements

Enclosure/ Exposure

Private/ Public

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Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Lodge: diagrams and precedent

Water Diagram

Food Cycle

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Sun and Wind

Delft Library Precedent

Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Lodge: model

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Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


CAMPSITE & CABINS


Cabin: exterior perspective The Cape Campsite is named for it’s proximity to the water and is designed to reflect the nautical character of the Chesapeake Bay and Annapolis These aquatic characteristics inform the program of the site as well, where campers are encouraged to study the Chesapeake Bay marine life and weather systems. A small weather tower and boat house installation will make these

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studies possible. This campsite is located on the current “Davy Crockett” clearing, where the cabins’ positioning evokes the sense of sailing out to sea. Each of the three cabins sleeps 16 campers, providing a campsite total of 48, or three troops. The Cape campers will learn about respecting the Chesapeake Bay watershed as well as enjoying a nautical camping experience.

Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Cabin: interior perspective and plan

Interior Perspective: the Cape cabins are designed to reflect the experience of Cape Cabin Plan: The open nature of the floor plan allows the campers to cusbeing aboard a sail boat. The cabin consists of a platform, a structural mast, and tomize their arrangement of sleeping mats. During the day, the sleeping mats can retractable sail-like canopies. This composition gives the campers the opportunity be stored in the “hull” to make room for activities. to “rig” their own cabin.

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Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Cabin: campsite plan The Cape Campsite is arranged such that the cabins appear to be sailing off to sea, with views out towards the water. Furthermore, the cabins are staggered to allow exposure to the southern summer breeze. Along with the cabins is a lighthouse, situated

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at the intersection of the footpaths. The lighthouse marks the entrance to the campsite, serves as a weather tower, and provides extra storage. The bathroom and outdoor shower stalls are nestled in the trees, just above the clearing.

Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Cabin: section Site Section

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Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Cabin: diagrams Canopy Arrangements

Weather Protection

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View

Sun Shade

Breeze

Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Cabin: diagrams

Structure Diagram: (From top to bottom) Steel mast, canvas canopy, aluminum Cabin Siting Diagram: The cabins are staggered to allow for views (green) to the framing, timber decking and supports, concrete footing water, and southern breeze (blue).

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Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Cabin: model Study Model

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Team Geo: Joshua Kilian


Cabin: exterior perspective The Plateau Campsite are located north of Lamb Lodge and is the First set of three cabin typologies. Lamb lodge is in shape of teepee and was once the main dining hall, in response to Lamb lodge, the Plateau cabins are conceptually inspired by the Iroquois Long house. Traditionally, the Iroquois Native American were farmers that lived in long, narrow, rectangular buildings known as a long house. These were large enough to house 30-60 people and made of wooden poles and dried brush as covering. Two sets of

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five cabins are placed near a shared bath house. It is intended to be used year round and can sleep 18 girls per cabin. To keep with the methodology of nature, Lamb Lodge is programed to be a nature center where girls can engage in learning about plants and wildlife, additionally a garden is located near Lamb Lodge where girls staying at Plateau can further understand the importance of growing their own food.

Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Cabin: campsite plan The Plateau Campsite is layer out in a radial organization, surrounding the campfire. Access to the cabins is provided by a series of ramps that wraps around and connects to each cabin. In between each cabin is a shared bathhouse that is surrounded

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by trees to provide privacy. Building up the edge with coniferous trees also helps provide a sense of privacy for each group of cabins.

Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Cabin: precedent

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Cabin: interior perspective and plan

Interior Perspective: The Plateau Cabins are inspired by the Iroquois Indian longhouse. The structure of the longhouse is a long narrow room, wooden poles were bent to create the arch of the roof. Beams and columns are placed between bunk beds to give separation of space within the cabin; while trusses gives visual view of how the cabin is put together.

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Plateau Cabin Plan: Is designed for the younger girls, such as Brownies and Daisies. One long narrow rectangle gives shape to the cabin. The front of the cabin houses the girls sleeping quarters, while the smaller room in the back of the cabin is for the troop leaders.

Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Cabin: sections

Transverse section: Windows are placed at level of buck beds, providing each girl with a view to the outside. Operable skylights are located in the roof, to allow heat to rise and escape, while shutters are placed on each window to provide shade.

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The shutters are designed to be interactive, placed on a pulley system; girls are able to control the angle of the shutters. Having the shutters on a pulley system allows for shading during the summer and allows sunlight in during the winter.

Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Cabin: section

Operable windows in the back of the cabin and screen doors allows for ventilation throughout the cabin. While operable skylights allow light in and heat to escape.

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Cabin: elevations

South Elevation

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Cabin: elevations

West Elevation

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Cabin: diagrams

Site Key

Parti

Radial Organization

Building Relationship

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Team Geo: Sandra Oh Boun


Cabin: exterior perspective The Ridge Campsite is named for its location on the ridge. Thematically, it responds to the existing A-frame building (Starlet), which is perched on the ravine. Here, the earth seems to meet sky, and with the theme of sky, the program is based in astronomy. Starlet will be re-purposed as an astronomy lab, complete with star maps and an observation platform and telescope in the upper floor, and new bathing and toilet facility in the lower level.

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The ridge campsite is organized off the trail, and the cabins are arranged behind Starlet, among the trees. The site sleeps up to 84, with the cabins ranging in size and accommodating 8 - 12 campers. The troops who stay in Ridge will enjoy the zip-line, star guided-walks, and an intimate look at the night sky in relation to season. The program is meant to excite campers about the various aspects of science (astronomy) and the natural world.

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Cabins: interior perspective and plan

Interior Perspective: Camping is like space travel, in that one packs only what Ridge Cabin Plan: the hexagonal footprint and operable storm shutters that is needed, and leaves nothing behind. With this in mind, the Ridge Cabins are double as roof cover give the appearance of a satellite. Polygonal restdesigned to mimic a space shuttle with transformable and built-in furniture. The rooms are outfitted with compostable toilets and sinks. structural elements are visible from the outside - trusses suspend the cabin pods in space.

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Team Geo: Renata Southard


Cabin: section

Sections: Although the Ridge cabins are suspended in air, they are ADA accessible through a series of ramps. This ramp system also connects the cabins to one another, allowing for a community to exist in the sky and troops to visit one another without having to touch the ground.

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Team Geo: Renata Southard


Cabin: elevations

North Elevation (Summer): For the summer months, the insulated panels move to the south side of the cabin to block the sun’s hot rays. In its place, a porous panel is inserted to open up to cool northern breezes. Because the panels are rearranged by season, there is no extra storage required.

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North Elevation (Winter): Elevations are interchangeable with this flexible design. The campers are responsible for rearranging the movable panel walls, according to the angle of the sun. For the winter months, the most insulated panels face the north side to block the winterly winds.

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Cabin: elevations

East Elevation: These are the solstice elevations, which last year round as the moderate sides of the building. Panels on these two sides need only be changed in specific conditions, such as high wind.

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West Elevation: The west elevation is also a solstice elevation.

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Cabin: diagrams

Panels moving away from frame (Plan view)

Structure:(from bottom up) concrete base, concrete South Elevation: slab,Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs), lightweight Diagrams of panel configurations aluminum truss system w/ steel tension rods, aluminum frame for skylights, retractable aluminum roofing panels.

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North Elevation: Diagrams of panel configurations

Passive heating / cooling Strategies

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Cabin: diagrams

Photo Collage - Schematic Design Process and Precedent.

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Location of site within larger context of Camp Woodlands boundary.

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Cabin: diagrams

Cabins are arranged around Starlet like a cluster of stars and connected through a series of ramps.

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Zones

Parti diagram of Ridge Plan.

Pleiades, also known as M45 or the Seven Sisters, is an open cluster in the constellation of Taurus.

Materials: Structural Insulated Panels (SIPS) for the wall system

Team Geo: Renata Southard


Cabin: campsite plan Consistent with the design of the group master plan, the a camp fire. design for this camp site centers around The cabins are burrowed into the earth in response to the stagnant and warm air that was observed on site. By burrowing into the earth, the temperature in the cabin will be that of the constant temperature below the frost line, which

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is approximately sixty (60) degrees Fahrenheit year-round. Burrowing into the ground also brings a sense of whimsy to the camp site, by evoking an experience reminiscent of Alice in Wonderland, or the rabbit hole. Each cabin holds fourteen (14) people which is enough to host a troop and their leader. There are four (4) cabins and one (1) eating pavilion in the camp site.

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Cabin: interior perspective, plan and section

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Cabin: sections

Front Elevation

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Cross Section

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Cabin: diagram - earth sheltering benefits

Earth Sheltering Benefits

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We can learn from common animals that practice earth sheltering

Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Cabin: material choices

Rammed Earth Walls:

Louvered windows:

Heavy Timbers:

Rammed earth construction offers the same strength and insulation properties as concrete, however it is made of earth and not cement. This then, is a more sustainable material as it has a low embodied energy. Rammed earth construction also adds to the didactic nature of the cabin - by making the cabin of earth, it makes it more apparent that the reason the cabin remains cool is because of the earth itself.

Operable louvered windows allow the amount of natural ventilation to be increased in the summer and decreased in the winter to create the optimum thermal comfort. Glass louvers also allow sunlight to penetrate the space, providing light and heat in the winter.

Heavy timbers are used to hold up the earth covered roof above the cabin space.

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Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Cabin: model

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Team Fire: Joseph McKenley


Cabin: exterior perspective In response to the sylvan setting and existing conditions, Davy Crockett, Eastern Camp was designed for the more knowledgeable, adventurous camper. Situated between the waterfront and the ravine, the cabins radiate outward from a central fire pit that allows for optimal views of both land features.

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By drawing from traditional Japanese architecture, each cabin sits gently atop a light footprint up in the trees and offers campers the opportunity to customize their sleeping quarters through a series of sliding panels. Overall, Eastern Camp can sleep up to 48 campers, with each cabin capable of hosting ideally three campers but able to accommodate up to 12.

Team Fire: Anil Moore


Cabin: section The Eastern Cabins were designed to give campers the greatest degree of flexibility in creating their sleeping space. The design—with an open air pavilion and walls with a series of remov-

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able external and internal sliding panels—allows for spaces that can easily be connected or disconnected from one another.

Team Fire: Anil Moore


Cabin: section

South - North S Section 284 | Campsite & Cabins

Team Fire: Anil Moore


Cabin: floor plan Floor Plan: In contrast to the communal symbolism that the fire pit holds for the Scouts, the cabins in Eastern Camp are based on the complementary Girl Scout ideal of self-reliance. By keeping the cabins small and limiting the number of campers per cabin to three, the campers are given the opportunity to experience camping on a more personal level. The idea of self-reliance is further emphasized by a series of sliding panels that separate the interior from

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the exterior and that sub-divide the interior into three separate, but equal compartments. Even as the sliding panels offer opportunities to connect, at the same time, Scouts are able to completely close their individual space to the outside. Beyond offering the girls their own private space while at camp, it also provides the opportunity for the girls that stay at Eastern Camp to learn about passive heating and cooling.

Team Fire: Anil Moore


Cabin: elevations

South - North Elevation

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West - East Elevation

Team Fire: Anil Moore


Cabin: campsite plan and diagram

Site Plan: In the Eastern Campsite, cabins are arranged to take full advantage of passive solar heating, natural cooling, and views of the waterfront. Each cabin is placed to respond to the context of the site, following the natural curve of the landscape. Upon entering the campsite, one is greeted by a centrally-situated fire pit. Limiting the campsite to just one centralized fire pit enforces the Girls Scouts’ ideals about community and togetherness. Also, located in the northwest corner of the campsite is a winterized pavilion with a small kitchen and storage space; a revamped bathroom and shower facility is located at the existing shower house, just north of the campsite.

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Site Diagram: Cabins are organized based on sight lines (red dashed line) to the other campsites (highlighted by circle) and to the waterfront. This allows for unobstructed views from the fireplace to the space outside the campsite.

Team Fire: Anil Moore


Cabin: diagrams

Structural Diagram: The cabins at Eastern Camp follow the simple post-and-beam construction type, typically seen in traditional Japanese Architecture.

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Light Penetration Diagram: Summer sun angle (redorange) and Winter sun angle (sea green).

Ventilation Diagram: Depending on how the girls set up the sliding panels, cooler air is allowed to flow freely through the cabin while warmer air is vented out through vents in the ceiling.

Precedent: Traditional Japanese Tea House.

Precedent: Traditional Japanese Interior.

Team Fire: Anil Moore


Cabin: exterior perspective This perspective shows how the proposed campsite would be perceived when approached from the direction of the new lodge. Each cabin would help to define a circular boundary around the central campfire and a raised boardwalk would serve to connect each cabin. The boardwalk would also further define the circular

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nature of the campfire. The purpose of this campsite is to create a more urban, communal camping experience for campers that do not feel comfortable roughing it in the wilderness quite yet. It would also be an ideal location for hosting large troops that want to stay in close proximity to each other.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Cabin: campsite plan The proposed campsite is located due north of the lodge and is connected directly to the highline by way of an elevated boardwalk. The boardwalk enters the campsite, circles the central campfire and connects directly to the front porches of all four cabins. The bathhouse stands just outside camp. There is also a direct connection to the Camp Woodlands central campfire via the southern walking trail which helps develop axial symmetry

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though the site. The circular nature of this design makes it easily reconfigured to the clients needs. The bathhouse could be moved to the main circle for ease of access and an additional open air dining pavilion could easily be added. It should also be noted that each cabin has it’s own rear fire pit for more intimate troop setting away from the main fire.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Cabin: precedent studies

Sleeping in the Walls - Private Residence, Danny Williams

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Sleeping in the Walls - Monticello, Tomas Jefferson

Barn Typology - Thistle Hill Farm, Northworks Architects

Basilica Typology - Austrian Postal Savings Bank, Otto Wagner

Basilica Typology - Deer Lake Lodge

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Cabin: exterior perspective This view highlights the symmetrical nature of the proposed cabins. Similar to the lodge and gateway it has exposed heavy timber columns and a repetitive truss system. This helps to create a similarity and branding amongst the buildings. The exposed structure also adds an element of didactic architecture which al-

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lows the girls to learn about construction and building technology while at camp. The cabin is set amongst a densely wooded background with a shared open outdoor space in front for large campfires, skits, and gatherings. The cabins and trees serve to create a wall to develop the idea of an outdoor room.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Cabin: interior perspective This interior perspective highlights three main features of the cabins: the idea of sleeping or inhabiting the walls, a glass interior fireplace, and an open view to nature. The bunks give the girls a sense of privacy while the open central space provides a place for gathering. The fireplace acts as an anchor to the room

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and provides additional space for the girls to gather around after a long day of hiking outside on a cold day. This cabin is designed to provide year round occupancy. Each girl would also have cubbies for storage space within and below the bunk.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Cabin: plan The proposed cabin plan features 8 bunk beds capable of sleeping 16 people. Each bunk has a window and cubbies for personal storage. The cabin features a central rear interior fireplace and front and back porch. Each cabin also has a rear outdoor

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fire pit which serves as a more private meeting area for individual troops. It is designed for campers who are looking for a more comfortable, communal camping experience.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Cabin: sections and elevations These sections and elevations highlight how glazing is used to create transparency through the cabin in both the transverse and longitudinal direction. Operable windows are used to improve air flow, increase natural lighting, and develop views to the campfire

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and surrounding environment. Since these cabins are built on piles and have minimal impact to the site, they could potentially be moved and repositioned throughout Camp Woodlands as necessary.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Cabin: sketching, diagramming, and process work

Interior Perspective

Exterior Perspective

These plan diagrams show how the design process stemmed from the idea of sleeping in the walls. First, beds are carved out of the two walls. Then, a window is carved out of each sleeping area and the front and back of the cabin are opened for air flow. Finally, the front and back are extended for exterior porch space.

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Section

These section diagrams show how the building was manipulated in section to 1) allow for increased light and air circulation and 2) reduce the building footprint by raising it off the ground.

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Cabin: model

Exterior view showing structure and bunk beds

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Exterior view looking showing entry, clear story, and solid bunk area

Team Fire: John Vogtman


Cabin: precedents Lamb Lodge and Starlet, two of the iconic buildings at Camp Woodlands, were the main inspiration for this cabin design. When interviewed, the girls expressed their love for these two structures. Therefore, we wanted to create a cabin that celebrated the two. We also took the design of teepees and tents into con-

sideration while designing. The extended and exposed structure on the cabin is representative of the structure in Lamb Lodge. The interior structure, two floor layout and deck bring aspects of Starlet into the cabin design. The curtains of the camp open and close similar to the entrance of a tent.

-A FRAME -OVERHANGING ROOF -BALCONY -EXPOSED INTERIOR STRUCTURE

-SKYLIGHT ON TOP -GEOMETRIC SHAPE -EXPOSED STRUCTURE LAMB LODGE

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STARLET

-TEE PEE SHAPE -BLINDS SIMILAR TO OPENING A TENT TENT CAMPING

Team Fire: Abby Winter


Cabin: elevations The front and back facades are completely glazed to give the cabin a welcoming and open feel. The first floor has windows above each girl and troop leader’s bed so they can have a view to the outside. There are sky lights towards the top, like in lamb

lodge, to allow natural sunlight into the cabin. The slanted overhang, similar in appearance to the overhang in Starlet, extends enough to block the summer sun. However, in the winter, the sun can penetrate into the cabin.

Summer

Winter

FRONT ELEVATION

BACK ELEVATION

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SIDE ELEVATION

SIDE ELEVATION

Team Fire: Abby Winter


Cabin: sections The cabin has a main entrance level with a front porch and an ADA ramp that leads to the entrance. There are interior stairs that lead to a second level where girls can hang out and see their friends down below. This level also extends to the outside to create a second floor balcony in the front of the cabin.

Below shows what the cabin would look from the inside when the tent curtains are closed and open. The windows on the top and bottom can both be opened to allow for air circulation as seen to the right.

CROSS SECTION 2

CROSS SECTION 1

CURTAINS CLOSED

CURTAINS OPENED

CROSS SECTION 2

CROSS SECTION 2

CROSS SECTION 1

CURTAINS OPENED

CURTAINS CLOSED

CURTAINS CLOSED

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Team Fire: Abby Winter


Cabin: floor plans and aerial These floor plans show the interior stair placement as well as the arrangement of beds. Each cabin can accommodate 20 girls in 10 bunk bends and 2 troop leaders in 2 single beds. Each bunk

bed gets a corresponding dresser. Each bunk bed also has a window. The bunks are situated between structural studs to define their individual space.

TRANSVERSE SECTION

CROSS SECTION 2

CROSS SECTION 1

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

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SECOND FLOOR PLAN

AERIAL VIEW

Team Fire: Abby Winter


Cabin: campsite plan and exterior perspectives The campsite is located where the Merrimen cabins are currently located. They are shown on the site plan as dashed rectangles. There are four cabins in this campsite as well as a central campfire and a pavilion to cook and eat. The campsite lies between

otal: 5 Buildings, 40 Girls

the main access road and the ravine. There is a center path that runs between the cabins. The cabins are positioned so that they receive the morning sun and the summer cross breezes from the south east. E W

S

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Team Fire: Abby Winter


Cabin: model These two models show the exterior of the cabin as well as the interior structure. The cabin is made of all wood, specifically the

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types of wood found at the campsite itself. The top of the cabin has a metal cap, much like Lamb Lodge.

Team Fire: Abby Winter


Cabin: campsite plan and exterior perspective The Oceanus Cabin explores the relationship between building and water, and attempts to teach through its architecture how water travels from the sky to the sea and how buildings can assist in this process. The metal roofs of the Oceanus Cabins make noise when it rains and spread wide to catch the water which is then funneled through large drain pipes and down channels that flank the ramp. The cabins nearest the ravine would serve

as sleeping quarters. Bunk beds line the walls and in the corners, the bunks frame a smaller space where the girls can sit and read or think with more privacy. There is a large open space in the middle of each cabin as well as a deck in front of the cabin which provide the troop with their own inside and outside gathering spaces. The two remaining buildings are a bath house and a kitchen shared by both troops.

OCEANUS CABINS

BATH HOUSE

KITCHEN

CABIN SITE PLAN SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0”

N

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Team Element: Peter Cunningham


Cabin: section and elevation

OCEANUS CABINS

CABIN SECTION SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0”

N

CABIN ELEVATION SCALE: 1/8” = 1’0”

N

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Team Element: Peter Cunningham


Cabin: perspectives

OCEANUS CABINS

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Team Element: Peter Cunningham


Cabin: exterior perspective The Stratus campsite provides the Girl Scouts with a unique camping experience that will help adapt them to life in the woodlands. Two cabins, a kitchen, and bathhouse surround a communal center. While fire is used as the hearth of the Team Elements campsite’s, helping to organize the cabins around a central area, each campsite has its own special connection with one of the four elements. The Stratus campsite is no different, connecting the Girl Scouts with the wind, sky and stars. Drawing inspira-

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tion from Phillip Johnson’s Glass House and a traditional Dogtrot cabin, the two stratus cabins utilize the transparent nature of its design to keep the girls connected with the outdoors at all times. The center breezeway provides a shared space between the sleeping quarters that is open to the wilderness but sheltered from the elements by a skylight, creating a space that can be used for activities in any kind of weather.

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Cabin: campsite plan WASHROOM

The stratus campsite can accommodate 28 girls or as many as 56 girls with the use of bunk beds. The kitchen building provides a place for individual troops to cook and dine without needing to go to the main lodge. The girl scouts circulate from the TBOC (team building obstacle course) and follow the path into

the center of the campsite where they are redirected towards one of the four buildings. The center circle in the campsite acts as the fire-pit and communal area for a variety of activities. The tiered seating that surrounds the campfire is topped with grass providing places to sit or lay down and gaze at the stars.

KITCHEN

LIVING

N

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Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Cabin: plan The design of the campsite and cabin is intended to blur the line between indoors and outdoors and encourage the communal activities that the spaces provide. The connection

with nature is ever present through all aspects of the design such as the breezeway, glass facades, and large skylights.

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Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Cabin: section This section is taken through the middle of the cabin, exposing the glass facades and structural trusses. The didactic nature of the cabin’s design shows the girl scouts how the building holds itself

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up through the dramatic presence of the structural elements. The truss not only provides plenty of glazing for ambient light but also angles the roof to the center, continually motioning towards the sky.

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Cabin: section SUMMER SUN

Taken through the center of the sleeping quarters, this section highlights the large skylights that stretch the length of the cabin. Each girl is provided their own shelving and storage area to give

them their own sense of place within the cabin. The diagram to the right demonstrates how the positioning of the cabin helps to soak up the sunlight, minimizing the need for electric lights. WINTER SUN

SUN PATH -- NTS

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Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Cabin: south elevation

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Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Cabin: west elevation

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Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Cabin: interior perspective Inside the cabin, the connection to the outdoors is always present. Camping trips are often remembered for the connection with the stars, laying on the ground and gazing out into space as you fall asleep. In the stratus cabin, the skylights are positioned in the center of the sleeping quarters lining up with the

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foot of each bed. At night, the girls can gaze up at the stars together, just as they would outside. The positioning of the cabins is such that the morning sun will shine down through the center of the cabin and out of the eyes of sleepy campers.

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Cabin: perspectives Operable shades on each window provide an adjustable amount of privacy in the cabin. Even with all of the blinds down, the cabin is filled with natural light through the skylights and clear-story.

The Stratus cabin gives the girl scouts a truly unique camping experience that redefines the notion of sleeping under the stars.

Interior Perspective

Turning the corner

Perspective

Shades Down

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Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Cabin: diagrams

Structural system of columns and trusses.

Natural ventilation

Organizational diagram of solid and void

Location of skylights

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Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Cabin: iterations The final design was developed through different explorations that produced many iterations of the stratus cabin. Find-

ing a balance between transparency and privacy brought about many options, some of which are represented below.

Back of cabin: creating a heavier facade.

Partially enclosing the breezeway provides a more private communal area.

Front facade without cross bracing.

PV panels on the roof generate power for the campsite.

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Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Cabin: model Physical models were used throughout the design process as a means of studying the various design elements that were being

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considered. The model below was built to represent the final iteration of the cabins design.

Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Cabin: model

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Team Element: Aren Knudsen


Cabin: exterior perspective The Terra Cabin is situated in close proximity to the ravine and is nestled into the landscape. The cabin takes advantage of its close relationship with the ground allowing for social activities to take place on the green roof. The roof itself looks like an extension of the ground space with small amphitheater like areas which house the sleeping quarters below. The main social area

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also features a fire pit and a dining area located under a pergola allowing for plenty of areas for smaller or larger groups to gather. The entrance to the cabin is located along the TBOC (Team Building Obstacle Course) and is minimally visible from the social area creating a separation between the public and private areas.

Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Cabin: campsite plan The Terra Campsite was designed around a radial scheme that also takes topography into account. The cabins are carefully choreographed on the site to allow access from the social area to the entrance of the cabin, which is a difference of 10 feet in height. In between the two cabins there is an area that has stairs and an

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ADA ramp that connects the two spaces. Incorporated in between the ramps are small terraced rain gardens that slow down the percolation of water minimizing erosion on the site.

Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Cabin: plan The Floor Plan for the Terra Cabin consists of a central social area with sleeping areas on either side. The social area includes a small kitchenette with a small fridge so the troops can store and prepare food when they are not eating at the lodge. It also includes enough space to accommodate a table. The indoor/ outdoor spaces are further blurred by a trellis overflowing with fragrant vines that is an extension

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from the social area. Each cabin houses one troop and has separate sleeping quarters for 2 troop leaders. It also has two separate sleeping areas that allow for younger campers to be separate from older campers. Showers and restrooms are also an amenity of this cabin.

Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Cabin: section This section highlights the different zones located within the campsite. The public zone- or social area includes the fire pit and amphitheater areas, while the private zone- or the cabin, houses the sleeping areas. The terraced green roof has a

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relationship with the inside of the cabin. By angling the roof it projects a more prominent view of the ravine.

Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Cabin: interior perspective The structure inside of the cabin is exposed so that campers can begin to recognize connections and understand its structure. As the sun rises each day, the girls will be able to wake up and see a beautiful framed view of the ravine from their bed

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and as they go to sleep they can look up and gaze at the stars and be one with nature. Each camper has her own shelving unit located right next her bed so it makes it easy for her to find a good outfit to go on a new adventure with.

Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Cabin: elevations

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Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado


Cabin: diagrams and model

Cabin Plan Circulation

Site Plan Circulation

Private/ Public

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Cabin Model

Team Element: Christiane Jones Machado



Camp Woodlands Re-envisioning Outdoor Experience for 21st century Girl Scouts