Page 1

ARTS Page 19

FORUM End genocide in Darfur 12

HEALTH HISTORY

SPORTS Judges earn home win over Tufts 16 The Independent Student Newspaper

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B r a n d e is U n i v e r sit y S i n c e 1 9 4 9

Justice

Volume LXVII, Number 5

www.thejustice.org

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

STUDENT LIFE

New handbook draft published ■ The 2014 to 2015 Rights

and Responsibilities handbook will bring several procedural changes. By tate herbert JUSTICE editor

The draft of the 2014 to 2015 Rights and Responsibilities handbook was released this past Friday and is “expected to be finalized” within seven to 10 days of the draft’s release, according to an email sent to the student body by Senior Vice President for Students and Enrollment Andrew Flagel on Friday. Dean of Students Jamele Adams, however, provided a broader time frame for completion of sometime within the next two weeks in an email to the Justice. The most extensive changes, which Adams cited in an Aug. 23 email to the Brandeis community as the reason for handbook’s delayed release, are to University policies and procedures surrounding the issue of “sexual misconduct.” Major changes and additions include the introduction of a confidentiality policy for information learned during conduct processes, the addition of a victims’ bill of rights and the requirement that students

JEREMY PERLMAN/the Justice

DINING CONCERNS: Students organized a sit-in protest on Monday night to bring attention to issues that they have with Sodexo.

Students protest Sodexo meal plan changes and new dining protocols ■ Protesters gathered

outside of the Usdan Student Center to express their grievances. By Sarah scott JUSTICE contributing WRITER

Yesterday, students gathered outside of the Usdan Student Center in protest against Sodexo. There were also several students in Upper Usdan Dining Hall with signs that indicated the protesters’ grievances. Samantha Rockey ’17, who organized the protest, said in an interview with the Justice that “[t]he point of having a protest is to allow students a visible and effective and productive way to express their discontent, so there’s room for every complaint.” The protest, in which there were a variety of participants, took place from 5 to 7:30 p.m. Students made signs, collected

signatures from protesters and other students and talked to students about the recent dining changes On Monday, the Student Union hosted a dining forum, at which numerous complaints and voices were heard—ranging from allergy concerns, vegetarian and vegan concerns, cross-contamination and a lack of variety and quality in food. Rockey said that while she is very supportive of the Student Union, she feels that Sodexo has not allowed the Union to be as effective as it should be. Many students have raised the concern that there is now a lack of quality and variety in the food at Sherman and Usdan. There were also grievances against the lack of flexibility in regard to where meals can be used. Katie Blocklove ’16 said in an interview with the Justice that she felt that the dining plans don’t “meet student’s needs, quality decreased, availability decreased” and because of this, have

found responsible for forcible, nonconsensual intercourse be sanctioned by dismissal from the University. The handbook outlines specifically what sanctions a student may face depending on what category of sexual misconduct he or she is found guilty of. The draft will be finalized, pending the completion of professional copy editing, according to a note on the Department of Community Rights and Community Standards’ webpage. Reacting to the late release of the handbook, chairperson of the Student Conduct Board Matthew Chernick ’16 said in an interview with the Justice that “[a]s a department, we were upset that it was taking a long time. It’s necessary, and it’s unfortunate for the community, but it’s the only way to make sure the code is good for our community.” In “Section 3: Sexual Misconduct, and other Forms of Interpersonal Violence” a list of definitions specific to sexual misconduct has been added. The definition of “consent,” for instance, states that it the person giving it must be “cognitively aware” and that it must be “explicit, affirmative, and free of coercion, force, or intimidation.” It does not accept silence as a mode of consent and does not require resistance to communicate lack of

See HANDBOOK, 7 ☛

FACULTY

Professors discuss Concerned Listserv

“crippled students’ ability to determine what they need.” Many of the protesters’ complaints stem from the renovation of Lower Usdan Dining Hall and the changes in the meal plans this semester. Protesters felt that the meals were overpriced and did not like the fact that even off-campus students would have to have a meal plan beginning in 2016. Additionally, Rockey and other students at the protest said that they felt that the renovations were not the upgrades or improvements that the University and Sodexo advertised. Many were frustrated by the new buffetstyle set-up in Usdan Café because protesters felt they were more limited in their food choices. Arya Boudaie ’17 said in an interview with the Justice that the renovations were a downgrade in terms of food quality, availability and flexibility in the dining plan. He said that he wishes that the dining sys-

■ Administrators and

faculty convened last Thursday for their first meeting of the year. By rachel sharer JUSTICE contributing WRITER

The first faculty meeting of the year was held last Thursday and included not only a summary of recent University changes, but a discussion of recent sexual assault issues and faculty arguments over the private Listserv discovered last summer. The meeting began with a memo-

See PROTEST, 7 ☛

rial tribute to Prof. Luis Yglesias, who was a professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature at Brandeis for 42 years and passed away last May. Lawrence reported that a search for next provost is underway after current Provost Steve Goldstein ’78 announced this would be his last year in the position. A committee began an internal search over the summer, but the process is still ongoing. Lawrence mentioned the importance of finding the right person for the job, as the provost plays a key role in building the University’s academic vision and the successes it has had both structurally and financially.

See MEETING, 7 ☛

The African diaspora

Power stroke

Taking precautions

 A recent cluster hire initiative brings to campus two experts on the African diaspora.

 The men’s tennis team defeated Colby-Sawyer University in a home meet on Saturday.

 Threats made by one student toward other students are under investigation.

FEATURES 9 For tips or info email editor@thejustice.org

Waltham, Mass.

Let your voice be heard! Submit letters to the editor online at www.thejustice.org

INDEX

SPORTS 13 ARTS SPORTS

17 16

EDITORIAL FEATURES

10 8

OPINION POLICE LOG

10 2

News 5 COPYRIGHT 2014 FREE AT BRANDEIS. Email managing@thejustice.org for home delivery.


2

TUESDAY, September 23, 2014

THE JUSTICE

NEWS BRIEF

Professor’s Wikipedia biography page affected by libelous edits Last Friday, a webpage showing a biography for Prof. Mary Baine Campbell (ENG) on the popular encyclopedia website Wikipedia was edited by one of the website’s users. It added to the page a slew of remarks about Campbell’s opinion on the activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali, as well as some libelous claims. Campbell was one of many professors to speak out against the University’s decision to offer Hirsi Ali, the activist and author, an honorary degree at last year’s commencement ceremony. The webpage was edited on Friday, Sept. 12, at 2:58 p.m., the “view history” function on Wikipedia’s website reveals. Before the Sept. 12 editing, the webpage had described Campbell’s academic background and research as a Brandeis professor. The section added during the edit accused Campbell of being “extremely intolerant of any views besides her own,” and described her stance as “pathetic.” The edit continued on to say that Campbell described Hirsi Ali— who survived genital mutilation as a child in Somalia— as “an ignorant, ultra-right-wing extremist, abusively, shockingly vocal in her hatred for Muslim culture and Muslims, a purveyor of the dangerous and imaginary concept, born of European distaste for the influx of immigrants from its former colonies.” The text added during the edit described genital mutilation as an action “performed to keep women from having a chance at being unfaithful because by removing the clitoris and labia, sexual pleasure is greatly diminished if not removed altogether.” This new section concluded by making several claims about Campbell’s stance on the issue: “Many are of the stance that these so called ‘tolerant liberal scholars’ should be sent to these extreme Muslim nations and have their own lifestyles or beliefs judged,” it states. It continued on to make slurs in regard to Campbell’s sexual orientation, and described how “homosexuality” is punished in such nations. According to Wikipedia’s policies, which are stated on Wikipedia itself, the biographical webpages must “adhere to the biographies of living persons policy, even if it is not a biography, because it contains material about living persons.” The website also says, “Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately from the article and its talk page, especially if potentially libelous (sic).” Wikipedia users are encouraged to change defamatory or libelous information prior to contacting Wikipedia, although Wikipedia instructs its users to contact the organization only “[i]f such material is repeatedly inserted.” The Wikipedia page that describes the organization’s policies, however, also states that “[e]dits are not the responsibility of the Wikimedia Foundation (the organisation that hosts the site) nor of its staff and edits will not generally be made in response to an email request.” Wikipedia did not respond to a request for comment on its exact practices by press time. The IP address used by the Wikipedia user who edited the biographical webpage on Campbell is posted in the webpage’s history on Wikipedia—but the address has proven inconclusive in connecting an individual to the edits. The IP address used, 152.132.66, linked back to the Department of Veterans Affairs in St. Louis as of press time. Campbell did not respond to a request for comment by press time.

POLICE LOG Medical Emergency

Sept. 16—A faculty member in the Sachar International Center requested BEMCo to evaluate a female student who had fainted in his class. The student was conscious and alert at the time of the call. BEMCo treated the student, and she refused further medical treatment. Sept. 17—A student was transported via ambulance from Mailman House for a voluntary psychological evaluation at the request of Psychological Counseling Center staff. University Police assisted, and the party was transported without incident. Sept. 20—University Police received a report of an unresponsive female in Gordon Hall. University Police and BEMCo responded. BEMCo treated the party on the scene, and she was then transported by Weston Ambulance to the hospital for further treatment for alcohol intoxication. Sept. 20—Four students from Rosenthal South complained that

they had been adversely affected by a dry chemical fire extinguisher. BEMCo staff treated the parties on-scene with a signed refusal for further care.

Harassment

Sept. 16—The Office of the President received a prank phone call. University Police documented the incident in a report.

Disturbance

Sept. 14—University Police received a call from a community development coordinator reporting that a group of students had set off fireworks in the middle of North Quad. The CDC could not identify any individuals. University Police checked the area, which was all quiet upon their arrival. Sept. 19—A community advisor in East Quad reported hearing fireworks outside, somewhere near campus. University Police checked the area and were unable to locate the source of the noise. The area was quiet.

Sept. 19—A CA in Cable Hall reported fireworks going off in the area. After speaking to the reporting party, a University Police officer determined that the fireworks were heard near Tower Lot. A check of Tower Lot revealed no sign of fireworks being set off.

Miscellaneous

Sept. 15—A party reported seeing an old man exiting the woods near East Quad, getting into a small green car, which was parked at the top of the hill in front of the quad, and driving away. The man was gone upon arrival of University Police. Sept. 17—University Police notified the heating, ventilation and air conditioning staff of a call received about a bird in an air vent in Ziv Quad. Sept. 18—University facilities staff called to report a suspicious male in Theater Lot near Ziv Quad. University Police officers spoke with the reporting party and checked the area. No one fit-

PURSUING CAREERS

White House campaign to combat sexual assault

NOTE TO READERS The Justice is on hiatus for the holiday. Our next issue will be published on Oct. 7. Check www.thejustice.org for updates and breaking news.

CORRECTIONS AND CLARIFICATIONS n A News article incorrectly identified Allison Callahan’s ’16 graduation year. (Sept. 16, pg. 1)

n Both a News article and an Arts article about a screening and discussion of Soft Vengeance: Albie Sachs and the New South Africa failed to include the National Center for Jewish Film as one of the co-sponsors of the event. (Sept. 16, pg. 4, pg. 23) The Justice welcomes submissions for errors that warrant correction or clarification. Email editor@ thejustice.org.

Justice

the

www.thejustice.org

The Justice is the independent student newspaper of Brandeis University. The Justice is published every Tuesday of the academic year with the exception of examination and vacation periods. Editor in chief office hours are held Mondays from 2 to 3 p.m. in the Justice office. Editor News Forum Features Sports Arts Ads Photos Managing Copy Layout

editor@thejustice.org news@thejustice.org forum@thejustice.org features@thejustice.org sports@thejustice.org arts@thejustice.org ads@thejustice.org photos@thejustice.org managing@thejustice.org copy@thejustice.org layout@thejustice.org

The Justice Brandeis University Mailstop 214 P.O. Box 549110 Waltham, MA 02454-9110 Phone: (781) 736-3750

—compiled by Tate Herbert

WIRE BRIEF

—Marissa Ditkowsky

n A News article incorrectly spelled Brendan Weintraub’s ’16 name. (Sept. 16, pg. 1)

ting the description was found. Sept. 19—University Police assisted Waltham Police with a motor vehicle accident on South Street in front of the Epstein Building. No injuries were reported, and Waltham Police compiled an incident report. Sept. 19—A party called to report that a black male carrying packages was muttering to himself in Admissions Lot. The complainant stated that she believed he had no connection to the University and that she felt uncomfortable. University Police checked the area, and were unable to locate the man. Sept. 20—University Police arrested Eduardo Hernandez, 44, on an active warrant, and transported him to the Waltham Police station for booking. University Police were notified by Waltham Police through a GPS ankle bracelet activation that Hernandez was on University property.

GRACE KWON/the Justice

The Hiatt Career Center and Business program sponsored “Business Industry Night: Business, Consulting and Finance,” at which panelists and additional industry guests co-hosted networking for students.

WASHINGTON—President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden on Friday launched a new public awareness campaign at campuses across America to prevent sexual assaults. Called “It’s on Us,” the new campaign will try to get students and others on college and university campuses to play a part in trying to stop sexual violence before it happens. A new public service announcement aired for the first time on Friday. Advocates say that many rapes are not reported and that on campuses the assaults most often occur during women’s first two years at college by people they know. The new campaign will have a strong focus on engaging college-age men to take part in bystander intervention and raise awareness of the problem on campuses. Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network, an anti-sexual assault group, is one of the groups and companies partnering with the White House on the campaign. “One of the most effective ways to prevent rape is to mobilize men and women on campus to join together in stopping perpetrators before they can commit a crime,” Scott Berkowitz, president and founder of RAINN, said in a statement. “RAINN has joined the ‘It’s On Us’ campaign as a partner to help bring attention to the important role that students play in keeping their friends safe and preventing rape on campus. We also need to make sure that if a friend is sexually assaulted, students know how to support him or her and ensure they have access to the help they deserve through the National Sexual Assault Hotline and local resources.” Other partners include the NCAA; Electronic Arts, a video gaming company that will carry the message on its games; and Viacom, which will use it on MTV, VH1, BET and CMT. The new public awareness campaign is the latest in a series of steps the White House has been taking recently to reduce campus sexual violence. In 2011, the administration gave guidance to help schools understand their obligations under federal civil rights law to prevent and respond to sexual assaults on campus. —McClatchy Newspapers

ANNOUNCEMENTS Murder Mystery Game

Attend for a night of mystery and intrigue in the wild and romantic era of the Roaring ’20s. A party is being planned and you are invited. Solve the case to figure out who is next on the hit list. With the recipe for murder, The Juice Joint will be certain to be serving up a night of mayhem to remember. Saturday from 8 to 10 p.m. in The Stein.

The Promise of Africa

In his address “The Promise of Africa” president of the Republic of Ghana, John D. Mahama, will discuss recent and current growth and development on the African continent and the need for the international community to support and encourage these new development achievements. He will highlight Ghana’s efforts to attain economic growth and reduce poverty in charting a sustainable course as a stable middle-income country. President Mahama’s talk is sponsored by the Heller School for Social Policy and

Management’s Sustainable International Development program as part of SID’s 20th anniversary celebration. Tickets are available at the Shapiro Campus Center box office. Monday from 12:45 to 1:45 p.m. in the Shapiro Campus Center Theater.

Irony and Dialectics: ‘One-Dimensional Man’

The University will host a conference to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the publication of One-Dimensional Man, the book of former Brandeis faculty member and Frankfurt School member Herbert Marcuse. The conference will explore Marcuse’s intellectual and political legacy and coincides with a recent archival discovery of an early draft of One-Dimensional Man, donated to Brandeis by Marcuse himself. Keynote addresses will be given by Frankfurt School scholars Martin Jay and Douglas Kellner. Wednesday, Oct. 1 and Thursday, Oct. 2 from 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the Rapaporte Treasure Hall.

Break the Fast

Join University President Frederick Lawrence and Kathy Lawrence at this year’s Break the Fast following the Yom Kippur holiday. The entire campus community is invited to gather on the Great Lawn. There will be lots of delicious food, all kosher. Saturday Oct. 4 from 6 to 9 p.m. on the Great Lawn.

Gittler Prize Lecture and Reception

A world-renowned Catholic Dominican priest from Peru, now a professor at the University of Notre Dame, Rev. Gustavo Gutiérrez. is a founder of Liberation Theology, which combines theology with social activism. He was awarded the 2014 Gittler Prize, which is hosted by the International Center for Ethics, Justice and Public Life on behalf of the Office of the President. All are welcome to attend his lecture. Next Sunday, Oct. 5 from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Rapaporte Treasure Hall.


THE JUSTICE

were left vacant after the regularly scheduled election two weeks ago. By Hannah Wulkan JUSTICE Editor

MORGAN BRILL/the Justice

ISRAEL EXCURSIONS: Eliezer Buechler ’16 spoke of his summer internship in Israel on Thursday at a reception held for grant recipients in the Rapaporte Treasure Hall.

Grant recipients share experiences By Saadiah mcintosh JUSTICE STAFF WRITER

Four recipients of the Frances Taylor Eizenstat ’65 Undergraduate Israel Travel Grant Program united at a reception on Thursday night to tell a group of more than 20 people of their experiences this past summer. The four students were Eliezer Buechler ’16, Viktoria Bedo ’15, Mirit Gendelman ’15 and Catie Stewart ’16. In addition to serving as a forum at which grant recipients were given an opportunity to talk about their experiences, the reception was intended to encourage current students to apply for this year’s undergraduate grant, according to Ambassador to the European Union Stuart E. Eizenstat, who is responsible for the grant. Rivka Cohen ’17, who was in the crowd, told the Justice that she “definitely want[s] to apply for this grant.” The grant, which awards a $2,500 travel stipend to students, was established and named in honor of Brandeis graduate Frances Taylor Eizenstat ’65, the late wife of the renowned ambassador. Ambassador Eizenstat kicked off the evening by telling the crowd about his wife’s relationship with the State of Israel, and noted that she traveled to Israel during her junior year at Brandeis as part of the now-defunct Brandeis Hiatt Program, which brought dozens of Brandeis students to Israel for semesters abroad. He called his wife’s year abroad “a transformative experience for her.” He went on to say that her year abroad “infused [within her] a love of Israel and deepened her already deep Jewish faith.” University President Frederick Lawrence made a brief appearance at the reception, noting that he was “delighted to have played some small part [in the establishment of] this program.” Later, President Lawrence was thanked for his patronage of the grant as the University’s president. Prof. Ilan Troen (NEJS), who mentioned his own Israeli heritage, introduced last year’s grant recipients. Gendelman, who is majoring in Business and International and Global Studies, used her stipend to study business and international relations at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. She also interned at HiTech Strategies, a management and consulting firm based in Tel Aviv, Israel. She said that she was grateful to have had the opportunity take courses with Israelis and hear from

3

Special election will be held to fill empty seats ■ Several Senate positions

Union Stuart E. Eizenstat spoke about founding the grant in honor of his late wife.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2014

Student Union

TRAVELING TALES

■ Ambassador to the European

renowned leaders as a student at Hebrew University. She told attendees that she “learned a lot about the differences between Israeli and American business cultures.” Buechler, a Near Eastern and Judaic Studies major, assisted with an archeological dig at Tel Abel Beth Maacah in northern Israel. He told the crowd about the history of Tel Abel Beth Maacah, which is an ancient region mentioned in the Bible. Buechler said that the Tel Abel Beth Maacah region was attacked by Ben Pader of the Aramite nation in Biblical times. Later, he said, the city was destroyed. An Arab village was there until 1948, when many chose to flee after the State of Israel was declared. According to Buechler, the city was barren until 2012. Buechler showed a series of pictures of his findings, which included ancient farming tools, gold coins and pottery. He said that he was “not sure what field [he] wanted to go into, but now archeology is definitely on the list.” Later, in an interview with the Justice, Buechler called his experiences “an excellent opportunity to actualize my passions.” Stewart, an English major, interned at Kav LaOved, a workers’ rights organization based in Tel Aviv, Israel. She said that the organization serves every faction of Israeli society—everyone from new immigrants to agricultural workers to Arab-Israelis—by advocating for their equal treatment and protection under Israeli law. Stewart said that she worked with a lot of migrant caregivers and underrepresented Palestinian workers. In an interview with the Justice, Stewart said, “With the grant, I was able to pursue my passions. I was able to work with social justice organizations...that informed things I’m going to do going moving forward in America but also my relationship with Israel.” Stewart said that she hopes to continue to advocate for workers’ rights here in the United States. Bedo, also a Near Eastern and Judaic Studies major, interned as a research assistant in the Jerusalembased Hartman Institute’s iEngage program, which brings six diaspora Jews to the institute as workers, interns and research assistants. Bedo said the she had the opportunity to help write a syllabus for a course in Israeli-American relations in addition to working on a revised version of The Zionist Idea, which is an anthology of writings by leading Zionist thinkers with renowned historian Gil Troy. Bedo said that she read several Zionists texts and even many writings that contest Zionism for her work on the book. Troen praised the grant recipients, saying, “They not only take away from Israel but give to Israel. So, as an Israeli, I thank you.”

Student Union Secretary Charlotte Franco ’15 announced in an email to students on Monday that elections for vacant positions in the Student Union will run from noon today to noon tomorrow. The student body will vote on one Class of 2016 senator, one Myra Kraft Transitional Year Program senator, one Foster Mods senator, one Ridgewood Quad senator, one Ziv Quad senator and one Village senator. Running for the position of Class of 2016 senator are Niki Laskarus ’16 and Meher Irani ’16. Irani wrote in an email to the Justice that she chose to run for the position because she feels that she can represent the views of the class well after spending two years together and because she has experience from serving as class president in high school. She wrote, “[T]o be honest, I’m not sure how much class senators can actually change. My hope is that I will assist with any major changes that are taking place and this is where representing the ideas of my class would play a ma-

jor role.” “I do have ideas of my own and ideally if I find that class senators can really step up and initiate changes, I would love to propose my ideas for the dining system… I would love to work with the Dining services to come up with ways to make the lines in lower Usdan shorter.” Laskarus wrote to the Justice that she chose to run because she wants the rest of her Brandeis career to be “exceptional,” and she feels that she should do as much as possible to make it happen. “I plan to get very involved with Student Events and Dining Services in order to take care of my class’ wishes,” she wrote. John Novas ’19, who is running for the position of Myra Kraft Transitional Year Program senator, did not respond to request for comment by press time. Brad Burns ’15 and Patrick Vaughn ’16 are running for the position of Ridgewood Quad senator. Burns wrote in an email to the Justice, “For three years I have complained about the Student Union and the way they handle issues ranging from dining to clubs… I want to see them do more, and I think with my experience as a student leader on campus, including President of [Brandeis Academic Debate and Speech Society] (one of the biggest clubs Brandeis has) I can help push it in a positive direction.”

He wrote that, if elected, he would like to work with the administration to find solutions to mailroom and dining issues, as well as work on updating University sexual assault protocols. He also said he hopes to work to find more ways for club leaders to interact and work together. Vaughn did not respond to request for comment by press time. Dor Cohen ’16 is running for the position of Ziv Quad senator. He wrote in an email to the Justice that he is running for the position because he thinks he will be able to understand and address issues in Ziv Quad and implementing solutions. Of his goals as senator, Cohen wrote, “I will work with DCL and facilities on ensuring that Ziv 127 & 128 will also be renovated, having quad-wide events to bring the Ziv community closer together, and convey the student body’s opinions on the failings of various services, including the mail, shuttle, and dining services.” He also plans to create a Ziv Quad Facebook page to increase communication among residents. Shereen Undavia ’17, Danny Kimmel ’17 and Anthony Nomakeo ’17 are running for the position of Village senator. None of them responded to request for comment by press time. As of press time, no one is running for the position of Foster Mods senator.

Faculty

Professor named chief historian of new exhibition at Warsaw museum ■ Prof. Antony Polonsky

(NEJS) has been involved with The Polin Museum of History of Polish Jews since 2010. By River Heisler JUSTICE Contributing WRITER

Prof. Antony Polonsky (NEJS) has been named the chief historian of the Polin Museum of the History of Polish Jews, located in Warsaw, Poland. The museum will open the doors of its permanent exhibition about the history of Judiasm in Eastern Europe on Oct. 28 of this year, after having been opened and displaying temporary exhibitions since April 2013. Polonsky began his role with the museum in 2010, when he was asked by the Association of the Jewish Historical Institute of Poland to evaluate the museum’s permanent exhibition for historical value. In June of 2013, Polonsky was appointed to the role of chief historian of the permanent exhibition. On June 27 of this year, when the permanent exhibition was handed over to the museum by the Association of the Jewish Historical Institute of Poland, Polonsky was appointed chief historian of the museum as a whole. Though it is over 4,000 miles from Brandeis, the Polin Museum plans to have close connections with the University. University President

Frederick Lawrence visited the museum, and Polonsky said in an interview with the Justice that many individuals affiliated with the museum wish to esPolonsky tablish ties with American academia and the American public, including the Brandeis community. The University’s connection to the museum came as a result of Polonsky’s involvement. Polonsky was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. With a background in German history, his interest in Polish history was not really planned. He said in a speech to Harvard University students at a Jewish Studies Program Seminar in November 2011, which he sent to the Justice, that “I believed (wrongly) that all the interesting topics in the history of German National Socialism had already been investigated and was drawn to analyze what I thought were similar manifestations in Poland.” There was, he believed, a loss of freedom which only affected the intellectual classes. However, he continued on to say, in the same speech, that “I was quickly disillusioned. It became apparent to me that the loss of freedom affected the whole of society.” It was this that drew him to studying Polish history.

The museum is comprised of a permanent exhibition, opening on Oct. 28, as well as several temporary exhibitions. The permanent exhibition, of which Polonsky is the chief historian, is overseen by a committee of the museum administration and will likely be updated annually. The exhibition surveys a thousand years of the history of Jews in Poland, though it does not confine itself to the political borders of Poland but rather explores the history of Jews in Eastern Europe. The exhibition uses “artifacts, paintings, interactive installations, reconstructions and models, video projections, sounds and words,” according to the museum’s website. It tries to focus not only on the victims of the Holocaust, but also those who survived as well as the time that preceded and followed the Holocaust. The museum website states “we give the floor to those who perished and those who survived.” Polonsky currently holds a position as the Albert Abramson Professor of Holocaust Studies, and he has written a three-volume history of Eastern European Jewry. He is currently on sabbatical and not teaching any classes, and he gave his last lecture at the University on Dec. 9, 2013. He is planning to retire from Brandeis in August 2015,but said in an interview with the Justice that he hopes to maintain connections to the University as a professor emeritus.

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THE JUSTICE

TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 23, 2014

5

STRESS RELEASE

BRIEF University investigating threat A student said that he wanted to harm several other students and the incident is currently under investigation, according to Director of Public Safety Edward Callahan in an email to the Justice. Last Tuesday, Callahan sent out an email to the Brandeis community advising students of the incident. The email said that the University has been in touch with each person who this student said that he wanted to harm, both “to explain how we are responding to this information” and “to offer them our support.” Callahan wrote in an email to the Justice that he could not comment on what exactly the student said. According to this week’s media log, compiled by University Police and obtained by the Justice, University Police and members

of the Dean of Students Office interviewed six female students at 3 p.m. on Tuesday regarding potential threats made by a male student. The log stated that a third-party source reported the threats to the University. Callahan’s email to the Brandeis community stated that University Police have issued a no-trespass order against the student and that the Waltham Police Department has been advised. The student is not allowed on campus at this time. Callahan wrote that he could not comment on the student’s whereabouts. “There is no reason to believe there is any danger to campus at this time and we will continue to monitor this situation,” he wrote. —Marissa Ditkowsky

CAMPUS SPEAKER

Speaker addresses track II diplomacy ■ Yair Hirschfield discussed

his book ‘Track-Two Diplomacy toward an Israeli-Palestinian Solution, 1978-2014.’ By ALISHA STEINDECKER JUSTICE CONTRIBUTING WRITER

The Crown Center for Middle East Studies and the Master’s Program in Coexistence and Conflict hosted a book launch and discussion of TrackTwo Diplomacy toward an IsraeliPalestinian Solution, 1978-2014, led by its author, Yair Hirschfeld, last Thursday. Hirschfeld is a professor of Middle Eastern History at the University of Haifa, the co-founder of the Economic Cooperation Foundation and played a prominent role in negotiating the 1993 Oslo Accords. Hirschfeld first gave the audience an inside perspective on track II diplomacy, which is a discussion run by non-officials of disputing parties with the goal of settling disputes in an environment that is less delicate than that of official negotiations, and elaborated on the implications of the recent war between Israel and Hamas in Gaza. Hirschfeld explained that his book reaches into the depths of track II diplomacy, which is a back-channel way of negotiating and, according to Hirschfeld, has the potential to help solve the conflict for many valuable reasons. First, those who are a part of this type of secret discussion are not obligated to carry out the decisions, which allows participants to be more productive in ironing out differences; second, track II diplomacy allows a free flow of information and direct access to leadership; third, the actual actors have to be involved in the decision making process; and fourth, it allows for the opportunity to listen before talking. The author also presented examples in which track II diplomacy had been successful, such as the 1984 London Agreement, which outlined a peaceful resolution to the Arab-Israeli conflict based on United Nations resolutions 242 and 338.

In order for track II diplomacy to be a success, Hirschfeld said that issues that are agreed upon must be implemented immediately. Both sides cannot first attempt to solve the core issues of control over Jerusalem, borders, refugees and security, because those are the most difficult to resolve. Instead, progress should be made where it is possible, on less controversial issues, and then implemented in increments. Hirschfeld was a part of the team that negotiated the 1995 “Beilin-Abu Mazen Understanding,” which was the first proposal for a permanent status agreement between Israelis and Palestinians. He elaborated, saying that since those negotiating the agreement did not have the authoritative power to execute it, the understanding created an illusion that it was possible to solve the conflict. In the future, he said that this is what has to be done—building a sub-structure to move forward is necessary. Hirschfeld continued on to explain how the recent war in Gaza was a “game-changer” because it has created a window of opportunity on behalf of the Israelis and Palestinians. He said it is essential for both sides to move forward, and for both parties, it is dangerous not to move forward. Hirschfeld argued that there are four major conditions that need to be realized for the peace process to occur: the strategic environment, or the position of other regional and international actors, must be understood by both parties; the Israelis must make concessions in the West Bank and Gaza; internal dialogue between Israel’s right and left, as well as between Palestinian factions, must be built so that the peace process is not undermined; and Hamas must be prevented from rearming. “[B]ased on this talk, I believe Dr. Hirschfeld’s work can help us gain a deeper understanding of both the breakdown of Israeli-Palestinian talks and, more broadly, how track-two negotiations support conflict resolution,” Suzanne Rothman ’13, a Crown Center affiliate, wrote in an email to the Justice.

MORGAN BRILL/the Justice

EYES ON ISRAEL: Dr. Yair Hirschfield, left, discussed his book last Thursday.

MIHIR KHANNA/the Justice

HINDU TRADITION: Guru Romapada Swami led an event focused on meditation, stress control and spirituality last Tuesday.

Namaskar hosts guru to speak on spirituality ■ The group continued their

effort to raise awareness of Hindu, Sikh and Jain culture on campus during the event. By SHERRY SIMKOVIC JUSTICE CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Namaskar, a student group established to educate and promote Hindu, Jain and Sikh culture and spiritual heritage, hosted its first event of the year last Tuesday. Vaishali Gupta, the University’s Hindu chaplain, helped to plan an event to host Romapada Swami, a Hindu guru, on stress control, meditation and spirituality. “I see the students in their first weeks of college. Any approach to stress management, any type of council, makes sense for college students in general,” said Gupta in an interview with the Justice. Romapada explained that members of Namaskar enjoy exploring spirituality and spiritual practices and that his program would provide practical resources, such as mediation, to deal with stress management and would help provide the students with ways to enhance their spirituality. “I hope to add value to the lives of the students,” Romapada said in an interview with the Justice. “Life has its stresses, and student life isn’t free from stresses. I hope to provide methods to face stress with a practical and spiritual approach.” Romapada spoke of the difference between healthy stress and toxic stress. To deal with worry and future stresses, Romapada used an analogy—imagining worries as rocks. He said, “Life throws rocks at us. It hurts, but you can’t change or reverse it. We can either pick

the rock up and beat ourselves with it, or we can toss it in the air and consider our options. Don’t deny that the rock was thrown but work within your powers to make the situation better,” he said. Romapada continued to discuss medical research that suggests that meditating and relaxing actually facilitate the natural healing processes of the body. The event concluded with students chanting a mantra in unison with Romapada while holding Hindu prayer beads in their hands. Many students said they find that meditation is the answer to stress management. Shruti Vaidyanathan ’16, co-president of Namaskar, said in an interview with the Justice that she grew up in a Hindu family that “was very focused on spirituality.” She said that took the advice of her grandparents when she was 12 years old to meditate on a daily basis. But once she came to college, she said that she did not keep up with her ritual as much as she had at home. “I distanced myself from my culture and my faith.” “Recently I’ve come back to it. I attended a Hindu spiritual retreat over the summer for five days. I meditate in the morning and do yoga in the afternoons,” she continued. “I enjoyed this session very much because it not only furthered my spirituality but it also showed me how to apply these techniques practically.” Niveda Baskaran ’15, who serves on the executive board of Namaskar as co-president along with Vaidnayathan, said in an interview with the Justice that “[p]resentations like these are not only important for the Hindu community here at Brandeis, but are also really good for expanding Namaskar’s membership.” The group hosts two major events throughout the year, Di-

wali, the festival of lights in the fall, and Holi in the spring. This year, Diwali is taking place during Fall Fest on Oct. 24. Baskaran explained that there would be a puja, or a prayer ritual, followed by a dinner. She added that it would be possible to make diyas, which are clay lamps, and rangoli, which is a form of artwork, throughout the night. Last February, the University postponed the opening of a Hindu prayer space until a later, unknown date. The prayer space was supposed to be housed in the Harlan Chapel; however, some members of Protestant community contested that they would be uncomfortable sharing the space. In regard to last winter’s controversy, Vaidyanathan commented that “[w]e don’t need a permanent prayer space immediately. But we do need a place to worship. Having a permanent space on a campus so devoted to diversity, unity and social justice will make the community stronger.” She continued, “We were able to have a civilized discussion last winter [following the controversy] to get awareness out there, but there are still several misconceptions that are held about Hinduism. It hurt at first to discover the ignorance of the general population but like [Dean of Students] Jamele Adams says, ignorance is an opportunity to educate and share peacefully.” This past Tuesday’s program was designed to include not only Hindu students and members of Namaskar, but also the entire Brandeis community. Namaskar, according to Vaidyanathan and Gupta, hopes to hold more events that will enhance interfaith understanding in the future.


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THE JUSTICE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2014

7

HANDBOOK: Special Examiner’s Process clarified in changes to conduct manual CONTINUED FROM 1 consent. The updated definition also does not allow for previous consent to be valid over time. The introductory terms in Section 3 also include a provision for the University to take “interim measures” for students who are accused of sexual or gender-based misconduct. The term does not give an exhaustive list of interim measures that may be executed but does say that students “will be suspended from” any “roles in which they have a power dynamic over others, or are charged with responsibility for representing the University” while their cases are being adjudicated. A “Victims’ Bill of Rights” is appended to Section 3, and lists services for survivors of sexual assault, including options for counseling services and notifying law enforcement, as well as the rights of both parties in the conduct process to have “others” present during Special Examiner’s Process proceedings and for both parties to be informed of outcomes along the way. There is not a time limit under which the survivor must be notified of his or her options as listed in the Victims’ Bill of Rights, according to Adams. If a victim’s rights as defined the new bill of rights are violated, he or she may “seek any of the resources listed in the Survivor’s Resource Guide and/ or the Title IX officer,” and contact the Dean’s office, Adams wrote in an email to the Justice. The definition of the special examiner’s role itself, however, has also changed. The new edition of the handbook states—in detail that was not included in two years since the role of the examiner was created—that the

special examiner “may be a University employee or a contracted, external expert.” When the Special Examiner’s Process was first introduced in fall 2012 to investigate and generally handle cases of sexual or gender-based violence separately from the Student Conduct Board, then-Director of Student Rights and Community Standards Dean Gendron told the Justice for a Sept. 4 article that the special examiner could be someone within the Brandeis community but did not necessarily have to be. In a June 30 email to the Justice this year, however, Ellen de Graffenreid, former senior vice president of communications, wrote that “generally outside consultants were employed for the complex investigations of sexual misconduct.” According to Adams, a University employee has acted as a special examiner in only one case to date. Asked about potential conflicts of interest that could arise with a University employee acting as a special examiner, Adams wrote that there would be no conflict of interest “as long as there are no direct reporting lines shared between the Examiner and the ‘Decision Maker/DOS or designee.’” The April 4, 2011 “Dear Colleague" Letter on policy surrounding sexual violence and harassment in schools and universities, issued by the office of the assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, stipulates that schools’ investigations should be “impartial” but does not expand upon this requirement for internal investigations. The role of “co-examiner,” also new as of this year’s edition of the handbook, is defined as a “member of the faculty or staff, named by the Title IX

compliance officer, who is present at all interviews ... held by the Special Examiner.” This co-examiner, according to Chernick, “will be double-checking and following the process to make sure the code is followed and to help the outside person understand our community as it works and lives.” He described that he believes the co-examiner’s influence is “none, if any.” The role replaces, and is intended to be similar to, the role of “Observer” in the previous two years’ handbooks, according to Adams. In terms of sanctions for sexual assault or gender-based violence, the handbook has been changed this year to place “forcible non-consensual intercourse” in a class of its own. It is the first and only violation of sexual conduct that has a required punishment of dismissal from the University should a student be found guilty, according to the updated handbook. The code’s new confidentiality policy, introduced in Section 17 (Identifying Concerning Behavior and Initial Procedures), requires “[a]ny Brandeis student who is involved in any informal or formal adjudication process ... is required to respect the privacy of any person about whom information is learned during the process” and forbids them from openly discussing “new information about [the facts of a case] that is learned in a conduct process.” Information “discussed or provided in” the conduct process can be shared only on a “need-to-know” basis, excluding all but those with a “familial, legal, or medical” relationship with either of the students, according to the updated handbook. However, parties to a case may speak publicly about the conduct pro-

CONTINUED FROM 1

JEREMY PERLMAN/the Justice

SPREADING THE WORD: Signs were placed outside of the Usdan Student Center in combination with student tabling to garner attention for the protest Monday night.

PROTEST: Students aim to work with Sodexo tem were like last year. “Essentially, what’s not broke, don’t fix it,” Phillip Skokos ’15 said in an interview with the Justice. Skokos and Blocklove also both agreed that Upper Usdan should accept meals instead of only dining points. With so many issues at hand, the organizers of the protest said that they knew that there were many suggestions for solutions. Rockey said that she wanted to make sure that the protest provided students with a chance to be heard and that participants would be able to show University administration and Sodexo that they really cared about their cause. A sit-in was organized in the

from the University. Section 2 now includes the Non-Discrimination and Harassment Policy, which has been moved up from Section 12, and an amnesty provision has been added. The provision states that students who report behaviors in Section 2—titled “Respect for the Health, Safety, and Rights of the Community”— “will not be subject to disciplinary action for minor code infractions discovered as a result of contacting University officials or support staff.” The entire handbook is prefaced with a definition of terms and conditions, such as “accuser,” “accused,” “amnesty” and explanations of formal versus informal adjudication. Throughout the entire text, the handbook also reminds students that University records of conduct proceedings are always subject to court order. This year’s Rights and Responsibilities handbook is almost 30 pages longer than last year’s version, amounting to 87 pages, compared with the 2013 to 2014 handbook’s total of 58 pages. According to the DSRSC web page, revision of the handbook is conducted with the feedback of the “Rights and Responsibilities Committee,” as well as faculty, students, the Dean of Students and other administrators. “I will say for this year there was a significant, larger portion of student feedback through surveys and just individual or email feedback to Dean [Gendron] ... when he was drafting the code,” said Chernick. “I think the code is the best code we can have possible,” he said when asked whether the draft released this weekend reflects student input. —Marissa Ditkowsky contributed reporting.

MEETING: Lawrence discloses financial progress to faculty

GIVEN A SIGN

CONTINUED FROM 1

cess itself, according to Adams. Involved parties may also openly discuss “the facts or their personal opinions about those facts as they came to know them prior to the participation in a conduct process.” According to Adams, the confidentiality policy applies to all types of cases, including regular conduct board hearings and those under the Special Examiner’s Process. The conduct code states that the confidentiality policy “is not intended to discourage a Brandeis student from seeking advice or redress from oversight or judicial entities external to Brandeis.” Asked about the potential of a situation arising in which it may be necessary for a student to breach confidentiality in order to seek redress, Adams acknowledged the possibility and wrote that “we will rely on the spirit of the policy, which [is] keeping our students safe and protected.” “Section 4: Maintenance of Academic Integrity” introduces an office that is new to Brandeis as of this past February: the Department of Academic Integrity—headed by Erika Lamarre, former director of Community Living and the director of Student Conduct prior to Gendron. The section also outlines the characteristics of new “infringement[s] of academic integrity.” Specifically, section 4.1 advises students against selling exams, reports or course information or sharing course materials from a previous course “for use other than for study assistance in a current course.” A specific penalty for this violation is not listed, but general “infringement of academic honesty” may result in automatically failing an assignment or course or suspension

hope that many people would be able to attend and air their concerns. There were cards addressed to Sodexo including questions about how to improve the dining experience to which students could respond. Rockey told the Justice that one of the cards asked what specific food a student would like to see in the dining halls, and students could respond with their specific requests. Blocklove noted that while there were no suggested solutions, a list of student complaints and specific reasons about the new dining hall renovations and meal plans was provided for Sodexo. She said that she hopes to work cooperatively with Sodexo to come up with solutions.

He then went on to discuss the University’s current financial situation. Lawrence said that he was pleased to announce that out of a goal of $100 million, Brandeis has already passed the $40 million mark in increasing the Catalyst Fund, which was initiated in January to help fund scholarships for undergraduate students and fellowships for graduate students. According to an April 1 Justice article, the University had already raised over one-third of its goal by press time. A class of 1990 alumna recently donated $1 million toward scholarships and endowment, and an anonymous donor gave $2.5 million. Lawrence stressed that the University will continue to look for young alumni to donate. Brandeis ended its last fiscal year in a deficit but finished $2 million ahead of its initial goal. Although still in debt, the University is in less debt than anticipated, and thus the goal of being in surplus for next year is on track. Lawrence also mentioned the multiple investments the school made in terms of renovations. Ziv Quad, the Foster Mods, Schwartz Auditorium and Usdan Dining Hall were all renovated this summer, and a new space was created for the Lemberg Children’s Center. In terms of admissions, Lawrence said that the Class of 2018 is larger than expected because it received the highest number of applications in the University’s history. The first-year class is comprised of just over 860 students, which is higher than the average of 820. The class also has a high percentage of international students. While the goal is to return to 820 students per class, Lawrence said that “over-acceptance is a positive sign” and is “gratifying.” Moving forward, Lawrence began to discuss the topic of sexual assault on campus. He said that while the University has “come a long way in the

last few years,” there is still more to be done in terms of addressing this issue. He mentioned that while the University has already hired Shelia McMahon as a sexual assault and prevention specialist, reorganized the Health Center and hired a new counseling team, it must continue to develop and expand training, including training all faculty and staff about University protocol surrounding sexual assault. He said that compliance with Title IX is legally necessary but is “not sufficient,” as the University must go above and beyond, and be “leaders” in preventing sexual assault and violence. Afterward, as the floor was opened for questions, Prof. Sue Lanser (ENG) stood up to speak about the leaked emails amongst faculty from the “Concerned” Listserv. Specifically, she addressed Lawrence’s response to the issue—an online letter which was released in July—and said it was seen by many faculty members as a call to restrict the faculty’s freedom of expression. She went on to read a letter signed by many members of the English department, which called for Lawrence to make another public statement, this time defending free speech and the faculty members who have been attacked in articles about the Listserv and through hate mail. Lawrence responded that the letter was a call for civility and should not be interpreted as a restriction of free expression because all political views are welcome at Brandeis. In the letter, Lawrence stated that he “comdemn[s]” many of the “abhorrent” statements made by faculty but the University maintains its “staunch support of freedom of expression and academic inquiry” and in the future, must handle disagreements in an “open, civil” manner. Prof. Jonathan Sarna (NEJS) stood up to discuss his views, adding that rhetoric is important, and that statements made in emails sent across the Listserv were “appalling,” and he was

“ashamed” of some of the language used in the emails. Many other faculty began to express their views as well, but Lawrence ended the discussion by saying a forum should be held at a different time to discuss this topic in full. Prof. Irv Epstein (CHEM), speaking on behalf of the provost, discussed grants, special programs and new initiatives from the summer. Prof. Jané Kandev (PHYS) was named as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor, an honor that gives recipients a $1 million grant to conduct research. Other professors who received grants were Profs. James Haber (BIOL), Mary Jo Larson (Heller), Isaac Krauss (CHEM) and Palmira Santos (Heller). The Rose Art Museum also received a $100,000 grant from the Mellon Foundation to support future programs, hire a Curator of Academic Projects and help integrate the museum more fully into Brandeis curriculum. Prof. Dan Perlman (BIOL), the associate provost of innovation and education, discussed the newly-designed Center for Teaching and Learning. Located on the second level of the Farber Library, this center will facilitate changes in curriculum, provide workshops and conduct confidential consultations and classroom visits. The official opening of this center will take place from Oct. 6 through Oct. 8, during which Dr. Craig Nelson, a nationally recognized scholar of teaching from Indiana University, will conduct a series of workshops on effective teaching and ways to maximize student learning. Finally, Prof. Tom Pochapsky (CHEM) presented the agenda for the first Faculty Senate meeting. At the meeting, he said that faculty will address Title IX issues, retirement fund issues during a time of financial crisis, scheduling issues and the potential implementation of plagiarism software called “Turnitin.” The meeting concluded with the introduction of new faculty.


8

features

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2014

just

THE JUSTICE

Scholars for justice

VERBATIM | ELEANOR ROOSEVELT In all our contacts it is probably the sense of being really needed and wanted which gives us the greatest satisfaction and creates the most lasting bond.

ON THIS DAY…

FUN FACT

In 2004, at least 1,070 in Haiti were reported to have been killed by floods during Hurricane Jeanne.

More people study English in China than speak it in the United States of America.

RUDERMAN SCHOLARS: From left to right: Jennie Bromberg ’15,

Deanna Marion ’15, Elizabeth Chalfin ’15, and Jennifer Louse Lee ’15. GRACE KWON/the Justice

The Ruderman Family Foundation sponsors scholars who are passionate about promoting rights for those with disabilities By BRIANNA MAJSIaK AND MARIYA GREELEY JUSTICE STAFF WRITER AND CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Having a disability places one in the world’s largest minority group. According to the U.N., around 15 percent of the world’s population— an estimated one billion people— live with disabilities. The Ruderman Social Justice in Disabilities Scholars Program is working toward the inclusion and full community participation of people with disabilities. The innovative program, founded in 2013, is funded by a $450,000 grant from the Ruderman Family Foundation, an organization that promotes the acceptance and understanding of all people. The program is a collaboration between the Heller School for Social Policy and Management, The Lurie Institute for Disability Policy and the Health: Science, Society and Policy program, and cites it’s goals on the Brandeis website as “identifying, supporting and training undergraduates to become future leaders in disability-related fields.” The scholarship will include a total of 15 scholars over a period of four years. Principle overseer of the program, Prof. Susan L. Parish (Heller) is the Nancy Lurie Marks Professor of Disability Policy, director of the Lurie Institute for Disability

Policy and associate dean for research at the Heller School. She is currently teaching the course “Disability Policy,” open to all undergraduates, for the first time. “This scholarship blends research experience, course work and paid internships, thanks to the generosity of the foundation and I’m just really thrilled to be a part of it,” said Parish, who has worked in the field of disabilities for many years. The Ruderman Family Foundation is a Jewish institution that has a long history of supporting the full inclusion of people with disabilities in the community. The foundation advocates worldwide with offices in both the United States and Israel. “What we share with them is of course our passion and commitment for social justice. That’s why this fellowship and scholarship program is such a great fit for both the University and the foundation,” Parish explained. Scholars are selected through an application process in their junior year from the HSSP major. Over the following summer the program allows them to participate in internships in the field of disabilities, while receiving a $2,000 stipend. During their senior year they then take classes required for the scholarship and participate in research in disability policy areas. “To the best of my knowledge

this is the first disability policy scholarship for undergraduates in the United States. I do not believe there’s another one like it. The blend of [the internship, classes and research] gives students just terrific exposure to disability issues from several different vantage points,” Parish said. Students awarded this scholarship have a wide range of interests in disability issues and typically pursue work in the field after graduation. “In the first cohort of students who started with us in February, one of the two students is working as a researcher, addressing disability issues in the research that she’s doing with partners locally in greater Boston,” Parish said. The current cohort of schoalrs—Elizabeth Chalfin ’15, Jennie Bromberg ’15, Jennifer Louse Lee ’15 and Deanna Marion ’15—are interested in many different areas of disability policy. “One is very interested in access and physical accessibility for individuals with disabilities and another is interested in health care access for individuals with disabilities,” Parish said. In 2014, the four Ruderman Scholars will complete the research portion of the program in collaboration with senior scientist and lecturer, Prof. Marji Warfield (Heller). “Often times you don’t get these kinds of experiences until you’re in a graduate program,”

Warfield said. “One of the challenges young people with disabilities have often is making a smooth transition into adult roles and adult life,” Warfield said. She cited entering the workforce, health care and independent living as typically difficult transitions. “As they’ve gone through education they’ve been eligible for services through the education system … once they turn 22 they can move into the adult system, but their ability to access services is more dependent on budgetary issues.” Her research will focus on participants of a program called Making Healthy Connections, part of Partners for Youth with Disabilities, in which disabled youth and their families develop skills and support networks to improve their transitions to independence. The research will include both a quantitative evaluation of Making Healthy Connections’ long-term benefits and more in-depth interviews about the transitions and challenges these disabled youth face. “What we’re trying to do is look at transition across these multiple domains,” Warfeild said, “and how do you make your way when you’re dealing with all of these at once.” Another primary focus of the program is how to change policy to ensure communal inclusion

for people with disabilities. In the United States, the Americans with Disability Act and the 2008 amendments to the Americans with Disability Act provide significant protection for people with disabilities. However, Parish believes that United States policy still has a long way to go before disabled people can fully exercise their civil rights. “I frankly don’t think these laws go far enough in promoting the full inclusion of people with disabilities. We still see the situation of people with disabilities having the lowest employment rates in the country, they’re most likely to be poor out of any subgroup of individuals,” Parish noted. The Ruderman Social Justice in Disabilities Scholars Program has a principal mission of effectively advocating for the full community participation and inclusion of people with disabilities. This advocacy in turn helps prepare the next generation of leaders in disabilityrelated fields. “Fundamentally we all have a responsibility to one another,” Parish said. “When we see a marginalized group, we as a society have a responsibility to act, and this touches deeply on our understanding of Brandeis’ mission and commitment to social justice generally.”

Editor’s note: Jennie Bromberg ’15 is a staff writer for the Justice.

JEREMY PERLMAN/the Justice

POLICY FOR PROGRESS: The Lurie Institute, located in the Heller School, creates social policies integrating individuals with disabilities into mainstream health care and education.

RUDE Bromb and Je are th the sc


THE JUSTICE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2014

A history of motion

PHOTO COURTESY OF JASMINE JOHNSON

NEW ACADEMIC THOUGHT: Profs. Johnson (AAAS/WGS), pictured above, and Childs (HIST) are members of an emerging class of scholars who see the African diaspora as a phenomenon that is historically seminal.

Newly appointed Profs Jasmine Johnson and Greg Childs research the history of black movement through dance and the African diaspora By max shpilman JUSTICE contributing WRITER

Marcus Book Store is the oldest black-owned book store in the nation. Owned by Raye and Julian Richardson, the store’s name pays homage to Marcus Garvey, a charismatic proponent of the PanAfricanism movement. Located in San Francisco’s Fillmore District, a historically black neighborhood, the book store has long been an inspiration for civic engagement groups pursuing racial equality. The bookstore also has been home to one of Brandeis’ newest professors. Prof. Jasmine Johnson (AAAS/ WGS) is the Richardsons’ granddaughter. Along with her colleague Prof. Gregory Childs (HIST), Johnson was hired as a part of a cluster -hire initiative to improve studies of the African diaspora at Brandeis. The goal is to expand Africa diaspora studies to encompass a global analysis aimed at comparing other

diasporas to one another. Chad Williams, the chair of the African and Afro-American Studies department, who oversaw the new hires, believes that the African diaspora is something deeply embedded in all of our personal histories. “To study the African diaspora is to in effect study humanity. African diaspora studies, as a formal and embodied practice, enables us to develop the necessary interdisciplinary tools for understanding our place-past, present and future--in constantly evolving world,” Williams wrote in an email to the Justice. Jasmine Johnson defines the African diaspora as “the forced dispersal of African peoples across seas, the residual communities that those movements engendered, and the connections and disconnections across that map.” Johnson teaches courses at Brandeis that consider topics from black authenticity and feminism to African diaspora dance.

PHOTO COURTESY OF JASMINE JOHNSON

EXPRESSION OF FREEDOM: Johnson explains that she studies dance to see “how blacks dance, even if they are not the ones dictating the movement.”

Johnson cites her family’s bookstore as the inspiration for her interest in Africa diaspora studies. She recalls that racial politics were always a core part of her life. “My crib was set up right behind the counter,” Johnson recalled. “At a very young age, it was part and parcel of my life to be engaging in conversations about black politics.” Johnson began to immerse herself in African diaspora studies as an undergraduate student at the University of California, Berkeley. She found that there were simply too many questions and not enough answers to resolve questions of black belonging, the meaning of home and what it means to be dispossessed. She continued to pursue the subject, and in 2012, she obtained her doctorate from Berkeley in Diaspora Theory, Black Feminism, Dance and Performance Studies. Her thesis was titled “Dancing Africa, Making Diaspora.” “I love [the study of Africa Diaspora] because it is the most explosive way to think about the world and the operations of power,” Johnson said. Greg Childs, another recent hire and fellow researcher of the African Diaspora, shares the sentiment that the African diaspora is about the history of the distribution of power in the world. “The history of the African Diaspora is one strand of the underside of the history we like to tell ourselves about human progress and the triumph of modernity,” Gregory Childs wrote in an email to the Justice. “As the saying went during the colonial era of Brazilian history: ‘no slaves, no Brazil’. Slavery and what we now think of as globalization went hand in hand.” Childs first became immersed in the language of the African diaspora through 1990s-era hip-hop, such as the 1993 Nas lyric “Afrocentric Asian, half man half amazing.” It was through Mos Def and Talib Kweli’s group Black Star that he discovered Marcus Garvey’s Black Star Shipping Line, a fleet of boats that the Jamaican leader of social movements envisioned as part of his “Back to Africa” vision. “It reveals itself through an array of connected

PHOTO COURTESY OF GREGORY CHILDS

EVOLVING MOVEMENT: Childs sees the study of the African diaspora as “an ongoing dialogue between different forms of knowledge about black existence.” mediums, from music to dance to political testament, and so it is a history that is by necessity remembered and studied in an interdisciplinary way,” Childs wrote.“To pursue African diaspora studies is to pursue an always already ongoing ‘dialogue’ between different forms of knowledge about black existence.” Johnson’s research also capitalizes on this inherently multi-media nature of African diaspora research to emphasize not the politics of black social movements, but black movement itself as a product of oppressive institutions of power. “My research focuses on the way that black folks move due to diaspora travel, gentrification, and how that movement defines blacks,” Johnson said. “I look at how blacks dance, even if they are not the ones dictating the movement.” Dance comprises an important part of black movement. It is also one of Johnson’s passions. “I’ve always been dancing,” Johnson said. “My professional career in dancing was inspired by my research on ethnography and West African dance. I had been practicing every day to de-

velop a full understanding of it, and eventually dance instructors asked me if I wanted to join a company.” While teaching at Northwestern University, Johnson performed with the Muntu Dance Theatre of Chicago. Also a member of the Wula Dance and Drum Company and Ballet Merveilles de Guinee, Johnson’s experiences performing have taken her across the globe to Chicago, New York, Mexico and West Africa. Next semester, she will begin offering a course in the African and Afro-American Studies department called “Dancing the African Diaspora: Key Terms, Grammars.” Johnson spoke of leaving a legacy at Brandeis of a culture imbued with critical thinking when it comes to power and institutions that perpetuate racial inequities. “I want to foster a community of thinkers who are constantly refusing the kinds of ‘isms’ that we often inherit. I would love for folks to be able to reiterate the deep significance of the black diaspora and the history of the world.”

—Rose Gittell contributed reporting.

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10 TUESDAY, september 23, 2014 ● THE JUSTICE

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Rachel Hughes, Editor in Chief Tate Herbert, Senior Editor Glen Chagi Chesir, Managing Editor Sam Mintz, Deputy Editor Jaime Kaiser and Jessie Miller, Associate Editors Marissa Ditkowsky, News Editor Hannah Wulkan, Acting News Editor Rose Gittell, Acting Features Editor Max Moran, Forum Editor Avi Gold, Sports Editor Emily Wishingrad, Arts Editor Morgan Brill, Photography Editor Rebecca Lantner, Layout Editor Brittany Joyce, Copy Editor Aliza Kahn and Talia Zapinsky, Acting Advertising Editors

Assess Rights and Responsibilites draft After much anticipation from the entire Brandeis campus, a draft of the 2014 to 2015 edition of the Rights and Responsibilities handbook has finally been released. The draft of the handbook was disseminated in a campus-wide email on Friday sent by Senior Vice President for Students and Enrollment Andrew Flagel. A link to the handbook is posted on the webpage for the Department of Student Rights and Community Standards, accompanied by a notice that the final version is “pending professional copy editing.” Flagel wrote in his email that the final version should be available in seven to 10 days—meaning that the handbook should officially launch between Friday, Sept. 26 and Monday, Sept. 29—an entire month after it has been made public each academic year in recent memory. This delay continues to befuddle this board; we remain displeased and confused as to how such an important document for the Brandeis community can be delayed to this extent. Regarding the handbook’s content, the procedural changes that we have gathered from the draft of the 2014 to 2015 edition— namely an overhaul of the way the University handles reported incidents of sexual assault and misconduct, as well as changes in the way academic integrity is outlined— leave us feeling both hopeful and dubious. Section 3 of the handbook, which, in the 2013 to 2014 edition, was titled “Sexual Responsibility: Seeking and Communicating Consent,” and took up just two pages, appears over nine pages in the draft of the 2014 to 2015 edition and is titled “Sexual Misconduct, and other Forms of Interpersonal Violence.” Section 3 in the 2014 to 2015 draft addresses the issue of consent in sexual encounters much more comprehensively than any previous draft; it categorizes the issue of consent into consent over time, in relationships, impaired consent and also includes several nuanced definitions and examples of sexual harassment.

Clarify problematic langauge This board is pleased with these new categorical and specific definitions of consent and sexual harassment. Outlining whether and when consent can be given eliminates room for misinterpretation of cases and ensures all Brandeisians are well aware of the indispensable nature of consent. The newly released draft of the handbook includes a new clause on amnesty under Section 3—specifying that amnesty is granted to students who report sexual misconduct—and that reporting students “will not be subject to disciplinary action for minor code infractions discovered as a result of contacting University officials or support staff.” This clause stands as problematic; we wonder what differentiates a “minor” code infraction from a major one and how and by whom that is to be determined and whether this decision-maker has the wellbeing of every student involved in a report of sexual misconduct in mind. Another new, yet potentially problematic, item in the draft of the 2014 to 2015 code, outlines privacy procedure for students involved in conduct investigations through the University. The new mandate—found in Section 17 of the handbook draft—states that all information discussed or provided during a conduct process is confidential, save for within relationships of a familial, legal or medical nature. We wonder if the language of the clause goes a step too far. We are reticent that the vagueness of this item provides the possibility for students to be legally bound to silence when speaking out could be their only means of justice— for example, if they were falsely accused of misconduct or if the conduct investigation process was unjustly executed. However—and whenever—the final draft of the handbook is released, this board hopes and expects it will serve as a tool for ensuring the welfare of our student body.

Welcome African Diaspora hirees Last March, the University announced its hiring of two new professors, as well as a Florence Levy Kay fellow, as part of a cluster-hire initiative to improve studies on the African Diaspora. Prof. Jasmine Johnson joined the African and Afro-American Studies department and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies program, while Prof. Gregory Childs joined the History department. Additionally, Prof. Derron Wallace (ED) was appointed to the Florence Levy Kay Fellowship as part of his postdoctoral studies. This board commends the recent hires, which signify Brandeis’ commitment to interdisciplinary and comprehensive learning in this critical field of study, as well as the University’s taking of a proactive role in a growing field. This semester, Johnson is teaching “Performance and the Politics of Black Authenticity” while Childs teaches “Resistance and Revolution in Latin America and the Caribbean.” Johnson also plans to teach two classes next semester. Wallace is teaching “Critical Perspectives in Urban Education.” The cluster-hire initiatives represent Brandeis’ commitment to build a diverse, interdisciplinary curriculum. Brandeis must uphold its reputation as an institution of innovative scholarly research. In interviews with the Justice this week, Johnson and Childs explained the importance of expanding African Diaspora studies to include a more global analysis that

Expand Brandeis curriculum compares different diaspora cases. Johnson’s interest in African Diaspora studies is based on the country’s oldest black-owned bookstore, started by her grandparents. Childs’ interest is based on an appreciation for 1990s hip-hop. Both these professors bring impressive scholarly backgrounds, as well as a personal connection, that already reflects their positive contribution to African Diaspora studies. African diaspora studies is a growing field, and Johnson’s curiosity influenced her interest in the topic. Johnson’s motivation stems from the status quo of “simply too many questions and not enough answers to resolve questions of black belonging, the meaning of home, and what it means to be dispossessed.” Wallace was drawn to Brandeis for its potential as a home for his field of scholarship. As he put it in an Aug. 27 BrandeisNOW article, “As I dug deeper and deeper, between the latitude of the position and the history here, all roads led to Brandeis.” We hope the University continues to support and encourage new hires in critical subject areas, as well as diversifying the areas of study and classes available to students through the professors they hire. By employing individuals such as Johnson and Childs, the respective departments are enhancing their own programs as well as the reputation of the University.

GABRIELA YESHUA/the Justice

Views the News on

A New York Times/CBS News poll has found that President Obama’s approval ratings are similar to George W. Bush’s ratings in 2006. About 40% of Americans approve of the President and 50% disapprove, comparable to Bush’s 37% and 56% during his sixth year in office. While 70% of Americans disapprove of Congressional Republicans, 45% say they would vote for a Republican if the 2014 midterm elections were being held today, as opposed to 39% who say they’d vote for a Democrat. Do you approve of Obama, and do you plan to vote Democrat, Republican or neither in 2014?

Jassen Lu ’15 As a Democrat, I am inclined to support President Obama, although I do realize the problems of the current government. While little has been accomplished in his second term, we truthfully cannot blame it all on the president. Ultimately, he is not a member of Congress, and he cannot force Congress to agree with everything he has proposed, especially with a divided government that is increasingly ideological and uncompromisingly stubborn to cooperate or compromise. Unfortunately, many members, for whom reelection is the top priority, have made it a high priority, some even openly, to oppose the president on nearly every policy front for six years now to show their constituents that they are ideologically pure. Having seen the consequences of divided government (such as the 2013 government shutdown), I am reluctant to place Congress under further Republican control, so I plan on voting Democrat in 2014. Jassen Lu ’15 is a Politics major, senior editor of the Brandeis Law Journal and a Justice Forum staff writer.

Joseph Lanoie ’15 I find it wonderful people are becoming more self-aware, involved and independently thinking in political affairs. Personally, I see President Obama’s appeal and popularity. Despite this, his actions do not benefit the American people but harm our lives and wallets. President Obama must move rightward to have our country prosper. Concerning my voting habits, I believe in private voting. There is an innate liberty in not having to disclose for whom I cast my ballot. In 2012, my boss wanted to learn if I voted for Obama and almost fired me due to my silence. In the name of the private ballot, I do not wish to say who I support. I will vote for people who endorse constitutional authority, limited government, self-evident rights and a free unregulated marketplace of products and ideas. Those who do will earn my praise and my vote. Joseph Lanoie ’15 is the President of the Brandeis University Tea Party Nation and is a staff writer for the Hoot.

Carly Chernomorets ’16 I’m planning on voting Democrat in the upcoming election because my political beliefs and core values are best represented by the Democratic platform. These statistics ignore the larger political reality that congressional Republicans are, in large part, responsible for our political dysfunction. While President Obama may partially be to blame, Republicans have been unwilling to work with Democrats, which is slowing down the political process. For instance, congressional Republicans have minimized the significance of climate change and other environmental issues, which are undeniably important. Although I don’t agree with every choice Obama has made in his presidency, I appreciate the work that he has done in regards to sexual assault on college campuses and anti-discrimination laws against LGBTQ+ people in the workforce. Carly Chernomorets is an Undergraduate Department Representative in the Politics department and a Justice Arts staff writer.

Dor Cohen ’16 Marred by various scandals, violated red lines and general ineffectiveness, President Obama’s tenure has been a disappointment. On foreign policy, the White House has made countless missteps, not all of which are completely the president’s fault, including not backing up red lines in Syria and Iran, not acting against Russia’s expansionism, watching Iraq as it crumbled apart and souring relations with various allies. Furthermore, Obamacare’s rollout was a failure, with the website crashing on it’s first day and millions of Americans losing their health care coverage despite assurances by the president that they would be able to keep their existing policies. The president’s time in office has also included several scandals, including the Internal Revenue Service’s investigation of conservative organizations and the National Security Administration’s wide-scale spying on American citizens. In this November’s elections, I plan to vote for the Republican Party, in the hopes that Republican candidates will be able to improve our foreign policy positions and economic situation. Dor Cohen ’16 is the vice president of Brandeis Republicans.


THE JUSTICE

READER COMMENTARY Orientation addresses critical issues In response to your article “Discuss stress of social adjustment during Orientation” (Sept. 9): It is no secret that Orientation is big on icebreakers and fun exercises that reflect Brandesian values. However, because we know college is not only about having fun, the schedule balances silly activities with more serious programming on very important topics. Move-in day offers academic information sessions as well as the Students’ Panel, where current Brandesians cast a more realistic spin on what new students can anticipate as they use their own experiences to dispel misconceptions about college life. Faculty-led book discussions give new students a glimpse of what it is like to discuss literature in a college classroom. The iCare video, screened on Day Two, depicts the most common struggles new students face—eating healthily, peer pressure and drinking alcohol, roommate conflicts, making friends, procrastinating—and how to best handle them. Most importantly, new students are guided through debriefs following programs that feature mature themes and serious issues. Examples include the Diversity program, Choose Healthy: Encourage Everyone’s Responsibility and Safety and Speak About It, a bystander intervention program that addresses sexual assault on college campuses. These debriefs are dialogues within Orientation groups in which new students share ideas, experiences and assumptions for the purposes of personal and collective learning. They are designed to help new students air their comments, questions and concerns about the material they have seen. All discussions taking place within Orientation groups follow safe space guidelines, and students are only asked to share what they are comfortable sharing. The reality is that no university completely lives up to the media’s depiction of college life. Orientation does its best to give new students a glimpse into Brandeisian life within a week, but truly the best way to learn is through experience. Orientation is somewhat of a whirlwind, and this is intentional. We immerse new students in Brandeis life so immediately and so fully that (we hope) they barely have time to be homesick. However, we know that not every single student will love every part of Orientation all of the time, so if nothing else, we want to make sure our new students feel prepared. Nevertheless, there is always room for Orientation to improve. The best way to enact the changes one wants to see is to become a part of the program—applications come out after winter break! —Nicole Cardona ’15 was an Orientation Leader for the Class of 2018 Orientation.

TUESDAY, september 23, 2014

Hold NFL accountable for player behavior

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By AARON DVORKIN Justice Staff Writer

Like any good business, the National Football League does everything it can to protect its assets. However, there often comes a time when the economic interests of a company conflicts with its basic ethical code. In recent months, the NFL has established that they value business over maintaining the integrity of the league. Given the recent domestic violence scandals surrounding the NFL’s most important assets, its players, the questions which must be addressed are “to what extent can and should a business go to protect their assets?” and “who is responsible for holding that business accountable if they go too far?” Many have been asking these questions in regards to Roger Goodell, the embattled commissioner of the NFL who has been widely criticized for his apparent mishandling domestic violence cases in recent months involving five NFL players. Two of those five (Adrian Peterson and Ray Rice) are considered to be the faces of their respective franchises and are integral to the success of the teams and by extension, the league. The criticism started flooding in when Goodell gave Ray Rice, the running back for the Baltimore Ravens, a two game suspension for assaulting his then-fiancée in an elevator in Atlantic City’s Revel Casino in February. Critics pointed out that Goodell had given much harsher punishments to players for seemingly less egregious offenses. Josh Gordon of the Cleveland Browns was given a year-long suspension (which was recently reduced to ten games) for having marginally more marijuana in his urine sample than allowed. Goodell defended the decision in a press conference on Sept. 19 by claiming that Rice gave him an ambiguous account of what took place in the elevator during a meeting on June 16. According to an exposé by ESPN’s Outside The Lines, several unidentified sources claim that Rice told Goodell the truth about what happened in the elevator in the meeting. Even if Goodell is being truthful about the meeting, a two-game suspension is still much too lenient in light of the original video, which Goodell did have access to and which shows Rice dragging his unconscious fiancée out of the elevator. The constant lies and extreme lack of transparency from Goodell and his subordinates seem to warrant some kind of action by those who are responsible for holding him accountable: the owners of NFL teams. However, the owners have not called for a vote, and the commissioner recently stated that he has no reason to believe that his job is in jeopardy. There is a troubling trend in this country of corporations not being held accountable for their actions. It is unexplainable, for example, how federal bank regulators have not taken

NATE BEELER/MCT Campus

any of the banks responsible for the Great Recession to trial despite the fact that The Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, created by Congress in 2009 to examine the causes of the recession, found that mortgage fraud on the part of the banks was a significant factor which caused the collapse. Federal regulators have instead made it their policy to reach settlements with the banks. However, those settlements are often smaller than the sum of the profits the banks received while partaking in the illegal activities.

There is a troubling trend in this country of corporations not being held accountable for their actions. This practice effectively validates the actions of the banks by allowing them to walk away from the situation with a net gain. Similarly, by not holding Roger Goodell accountable for his lies and lack of leadership, the NFL owners are validating his actions and, by extension, the actions of those he failed to appropriately discipline. In response to the recent NFL scandals, Senator Corey Booker (D-NJ) has reintroduced legislation that would remove the tax-exempt status of the league office, which is currently counted as a nonprofit. The revenue generated by the tax would go toward state domestic abuse programs. Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) has introduced the legislation multiple times in the past but has repeatedly been unable to gain any cosponsors. The legislation is unpop-

ular because most Senators seem more interested in preventing losses of revenue for teams in their states than providing an incentive for the league to act morally. Whether this is due to campaign contributions or other ties between politicians and the teams in their states/districts, it is clear that Congress puts profits over justice and integrity just as the owners do. This reluctance to dole out punishment displayed by the league, the owners and our government is a testament to the trend of valuing business over morality. Adrian Peterson, one of the best players in the league and the face of the Minnesota Vikings franchise, was only suspended by his team for beating his fouryear-old son with a small tree branch after a sponsor, Anheuser Busch, issued a statement harshly criticizing the league’s conduct. Despite being arrested for domestic violence in August, San Francisco defensive lineman Ray McDonald remains on the active roster and has not been disciplined by his team or the league office. The lack of discipline in his case may be a result of the fact that he is not as highprofile of a player as Peterson or Rice are, and therefore the league will not receive as much criticism for the situation. It is unjust to have a code of conduct predicated on the best interests of the business rather than those of the victims. The lack of action on the part of the NFL during the recent scandals is a sign that the system must be changed. It has become abundantly clear that additional checks to the league’s power need to be put in place, and those checks cannot be other corporate heads who share the same business interests as the NFL. The league must establish an independent regulatory commission to monitor the actions of the league office. Like any good business, the NFL does its best to protect its assets, and like any fair society, we must ensure that we can hold businesses accountable when they act unjustly in their attempts to protect those assets.

Celebrity political statements sidetrack public from critical issues Max

Moran the bottom bunk

On Sunday, the United Nations launched an ambitious new women’s rights campaign aimed at people that don’t care about women’s rights campaigns. Titled the “He for She” campaign, this multifaceted lobby hopes to frame women’s rights as an issue that equally affects both men and women, and one in which both sexes should be equally involved. It couldn’t be more timely or more accurate. The Women Against Feminism movement has been gaining traction in recent years, promoting its misconception of feminism as being anti-men and of self-described feminists as being entitled and whiny, blaming society for all of their personal problems. It’s more critical than ever that we understand that gender equality is, in the words of the He for She website, “not only a women’s issue, it is a human rights issue that requires [our] attention.” The announcement of He for She received huge media attention on Sunday, more than any event at the U.N. in recent months. But after reading multiple news articles from multiple news organizations covering the event, I have yet to find even one that states the campaign’s title, He for She, in more than one sentence. Instead, all of the news has been focused on the person announcing the announcement, as

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it were. Emma Watson, the actress who played Hermione in the Harry Potter movies, gave a 20 minute speech at the U.N. on Sunday explaining her own perspectives on gender equality and why she supports the new He for She campaign. Watson was recently named a U.N. Women’s Goodwill Ambassador, the same title awarded to both a princess of Thailand and actress Nicole Kidman. Notably and ironically, some of the media seemed to care more about Watson’s appearance than they did about her feminist campaign. The very first sentence of the UK Daily Mail’s article on the speech is “With her elegant outfit and chic make-up, Emma Watson looks all set for another film premiere.” Watson is a talented actress, and her ability within her art translates brilliantly into political speech-giving. Her speech was both moving and intelligent, but it followed a curious trend. The first rule most of us are taught about imperative or persuasive writing is to avoid “I” statements; don’t talk about yourself, talk about your ideas. But Watson kicked things off with an allegory about being called “bossy” for wanting to direct plays at a young age and told how her personal decision to be a feminist was “uncomplicated.” A direct quote: “I am from Britain, and I think it is right that as a woman I am paid the same as my male counterparts. I think it is right that I should be able to make decisions about my own body. I think it is right that women be involved on my behalf in the policies and decision making of my country.” The message of both the media and the speech itself seem clear: feminism isn’t important for its own sake, feminism is important because Watson

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thinks it’s important. We understand the issue only as it relates to her, not on its own, highly complex terms. Of course, Watson is far from the world’s only celebrity spokesperson; Bono most notoriously has done concerts raising money to fight famine and AIDS in Africa. It’s a pretty smart media ploy. Celebrities put a human face on often scary issues and theoretically make it trendy to be socially conscious. Except the ploy doesn’t often work as intended. When the media story isn’t the speech but the spokesperson, the takeaway is a shift in public perception of the star, not the problem. We will now perceive Watson as an “advocate” when we think about her, but the cause for which she advocates will likely be less clearly explained and ultimately less relevant than the fact that she does stand up for something at all. How brave of Watson, stating her opinions to the world’s diplomats, how wise of her to have those opinions in the first place. Never mind the content of the speech, or how best to make her ideals a reality. The glamour shot of Hermione at a podium is more important. It’s a guarantee in our celebrity gossip-obsessed culture that the speech won’t be forgotten, but it’s hard to believe that anyone will care enough about it to do anything as a result. Feminists will smile that a star agrees with them, sexists will disregard the event entirely, and the world goes on. The most quotable segments of the speech will be immortalized in Buzzfeed GIFs, but CNN won’t run another story on the He for She campaign. It’s not that celebrities themselves are shallow or that their opinions and advocacy are ingenuine. It is a matter of how the media covers most

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anything and everything that stars do, and how we, the consumers, like to think of their lives. Everything becomes a red carpet, even the serious work of advocacy. But, as the counterargument goes, isn’t this speech raising awareness for its issue? Even if no real change comes out of it, isn’t it at least a victory to raise awareness? To me, calling it a win to “raise awareness” for a cause is like calling someone a brilliant chef because they can follow a recipe. It’s not a bad thing at all to raise awareness, but it isn’t an achievement. True change raises awareness on its own for being true change. I have high hopes for what Watson will do as a U.N. goodwill ambassador: she was and is a hugely influential figure to a generation of young women, and her efforts to even ally herself with the U.N. show how much she cares about this issue. This only raises my expectations for what she can and should do, though. If she is serious about being a Goodwill Ambassador, Watson should transcend her media image as an actress and become equally known for her philanthropy. It’s not impossible; Bill Gates makes more headlines for his charity work than his computers these days. Watson is clearly both intelligent and passionate, so she is certainly capable of being more than a figurehead. Performing the standard work expected of someone in this position—giving speeches to diplomats—isn’t a news event. We shouldn’t applaud someone just for giving one of the hundreds of speeches that will be given at the U.N. this year about feminism while simultaneously being a movie star.

Editorial Assistants

Rothstein

Photos: Grace Kwon

Copy: Melanie Cytron, Kathleen Guy, Angie Howes, Grace Lim,

Copy: Catherine Rosch

Mara Nussbaum, Carmi Rothberg Layout: Corey Cohen, Rachel Cohen, Ricky Miller, Josh Sander Illustrations: Marisa Rubel, Mozelle Shamash-Rosenthal, Ga-

Staff News: Kathryn Brody, Saadiah McIntosh Features: Casey Pearlman, Brianna Majsiak Forum: Jennie Bromberg, Mark Gimelstein, Jessica Goldstein, Kahlil Oppenheimer, Jassen Lu Sports: Daniel Kanovich Arts: Carly Chernomorets, Kiran Gill, Ilana Kruger, Rachel Liff, Nate Shaffer Photography: Hannah Chidekel, Mihir Khanna, Abby Knecht, Bri Mussman, Guillermo Narvaez, Jeremy Perlman, Abigail

briela Yeshua


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TUESDAY, september 23, 2014

THE JUSTICE

FORUM

Uphold promises to end genocide with action in Darfur By JESSICA GOLDSTEIN justice staff writer

The Antonov plane looms in the air, soon to bring about the destruction of a village and a community. As bombs hit the ground, the earth becomes charred. Men, women and children flee for their lives. Then the government leaves the dirty work to the Janjaweed. Formed from the Arabic words “man,” “horse” and “gun,” their name can fool you because it excludes one very relevant piece of the puzzle—terrorism. This isn’t a militia group that fights against some great army but a group whose singular purpose is to destroy the lives of civilians in whole or in part. The genocide in Darfur began in 2003, and 11 years removed from its start, it persists as one of the greatest ongoing humanitarian crises. Following decades of governmental neglect of Darfur, Darfuri rebel groups launched a series of attacks against the Sudanese government. The government struck back with massive bombardments on villages and the creation of the Janjaweed. John Prendergast of the Enough Project put it well when he said the Sudanese government’s policy is to “drain the pond to catch the fish.” Thinking massive civilian death and suffering will lead to the inevitable downfall of the groups who took up arms against them, the Sudanese government has wreaked havoc upon the country’s Darfur region. The Save Darfur Coalition’s estimates put the death toll at 300,000 and those displaced at 3 million. Now, I wouldn’t be surprised if you haven’t heard much about the genocide in Darfur lately. We thought it ended, right? But Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir is still very much at work, and the Janjaweed terrorist group is back. They are an essential element in the orchestration of heinous crimes in Sudan such as the destruction of food and water supplies and widespread rape, torture and murder, but oftentimes their importance falls from the headlines. And now, the organization which, in its former Secretary-General’s words, is supposed to “chart a course for the world’s people in the first decades of the new millennium,” is acting like the Janjaweed isn’t a threat. If the United Nations is charting its course for how it will respond to genocide throughout the millennium, it is charting one of inaction and tolerance, not leadership. 10 years ago this month, Colin Powell, then secretary of state, concluded that genocide had been committed in Darfur by the Sudanese government and the Janjaweed. Whether or not genocide is occurring in Darfur has been a subject of great contention. Proving what international law calls the “intent to destroy” is a challenging task. Darfur is not like Rwanda where the ethnic divides were so distinctive, and cries of destroying the “cockroaches” (Tutsis) were blasted on the radio. However, the Arabdominated government of Sudan abandoned the black African Darfuris, leaving them underdeveloped and lacking autonomy. They also encouraged Arab Janjaweed militias to essentially finish the job once the bombing of

MORGAN BRILL/the Justice

villages was completed by the Sudanese army. Since the initial statement from Powell, the International Criminal Court has indicted al-Bashir on 10 counts of crimes against humanity, war crimes and genocide. According to The Atlantic, Powell used the word “genocide” in an attempt to spur international action. He also inspired the creation of the U.S. citizen-based Save Darfur movement, which in turn pressured the U.N. into deploying additional military forces in 2006. Last month, though, the U.N. Security Council voted to stay in the region for only 10 more months, and at that time, the mission to disarm the Janjaweed will come to a close. The U.N. has stated that the mission to disarm the Janjaweed was doomed to fail—taking away weapons from the most powerful tribes in Sudan is near impossible. All the while, the U.N. is crippling under the competing interests of the P5. This troop withdrawal comes at an incredibly poor time as the power the Janjaweed wield has become somewhat legitimized as of late. The group was deemed the Rapid Support Forces by the Sudanese government in August 2013 and are newly armed and uniformed. And yet, the U.N. is preparing to leave Darfur behind, accepting the idea that genocide is not preventable. What ever happened to our commitment to “never again,” our commitment to act when

we witness mass slaughter, even if it’s difficult? Throughout the years, various leaders in the West have spoken about a world devoid of genocide but have done little to make this ideal a reality. We need to turn away from the false political promises and get to work on a strategic peace process. Therefore, we need to understand that the only achievable way to bring peace to Darfur is to see that Sudan is at peace. A step in the right direction is the Sudan Peace, Security, and Accountability Act of 2013. Sponsored by Rep. James McGovern (D-MA), the bill seeks to allow for human rights and conflict resolution in Sudan through encouraging a democratic transition to a newly elected president, improving access to humanitarian aid, imposing new sanctions against Sudanese officials and improving old ones, emboldening the international community to sign on to these sanctions and ensuring accountability for human rights crimes committed by Sudanese government officials. In the long run, all of these proposed actions may not be achievable or realistic. The transition from a country that is essentially run by a dictator to one run by a democratically elected leader is tricky. However, imposing sanctions against the Sudanese government and ensuring accountability for actions committed by Sudanese officials is realistic. By doing this, the international community will finally eliminate al-Bashir’s “divide-and-

conquer” strategy, by which he distracts the international community from one atrocity by performing one act of normalcy. Most recently, he allowed southern Sudan, an oil-rich region of his country, to become the independent Republic of South Sudan. All the while, he was committing atrocities in South Kordofan, a region of Sudan where many allied with South Sudanese communities live. This balance of leniency and abuse has distracted the international community, but we cannot allow it to continue. History cannot be allowed to remember al-Bashir for his political maneuverings—he has committed genocide, and he must be held responsible for it. Bashir is the only sitting head of state wanted for the crime of genocide by the ICC. While his actions alone did not cause the grievous atrocities that occur in Sudan, we need to realize that the legitimization of the Janjaweed is just one of the results of the latitude the international community gives him. Throughout all 11 years of the genocide in Darfur, no matter how many terrible things the “president” of this country manages to do, he gets away with it. It seems as if nobody in the international community is anything but talk. It seems as if nobody in the international community wants to see “boots on the ground.” But what the international community doesn’t realize is that a peace in Sudan is achievable, that “man,” “horse,” “gun” shouldn’t mean absolute power.

Complaints about Sodexo policies do not deserve student protest Kahlil

OPPENHEIMER unedited justice

In my high school, everyone loved to hate English 11 and Advanced Placement United States History. By “loved to hate,” I mean that people made extreme efforts to go out of their way to complain about those classes. In fact, people often spent more time complaining about the workload from the classes than they did actually doing the work. I was convinced that APUSH and English 11 were the worst classes I could possible take, a year before I was even eligible to take them. So, naturally, I entered junior year apprehensively and with a closed mind. “Ugh, I’ll hate English 11, so why bother trying?” As for APUSH, I was so turned off by the idea of it that I didn’t even take it. But after the first day of English 11, it became immediately clear to me that the problem was not with the class but with the complaining student body. I don’t even know from where the complaints originated, but my expectations were far from met. I entered thinking I’d have to slave my life away, but instead I had to “slave away” 30 minutes a day of only semi-interesting reading. Scary, I know. The opinion came from a group mentality. People like to complain. People also like to

hear their complaints echoed by other people. It’s validating and makes us all feel like we’re the victim of some terrible institution called “school,” “society,” “life” or what have you. Psychologists sometimes call this groupthink, when the desire to be part of a group becomes more important than critically analyzing an opinion, leading to bad decisions. It’s problematic because it closes our minds off and alters our perception illogically. I hated a class I hadn’t even seen a single assignment from—a year before I took it. A similar group mentality has surfaced on our campus surrounding Sodexo’s food services. As first-years entered their residence halls this year, Orientation Leaders and community advisors alike uttered warnings of the horrors of Sherman Dining Hall’s menu before new residents had even put their bags down. The same thing happened to me as a first-year. The words generated a visceral reaction and I found Sherman unappetizing before I had even eaten a single item of food. Even returning students last year found an inner hatred for Sodexo before eating a single bite of its food in its first year at Brandeis. “Sherman is not edible” was a popular phrase exchanged before Sherman had opened under Sodexo for the first time. I found myself closing my mind off because other people were doing the same. I found myself joining the mob. Now, I say “the mob” proverbially, but it’s worth noting that “the mob” has materialized as a Facebook group, the Sodexo Fan Club, and into a protest. While funny at times, the Sodexo Fan Club group begs to be criticized as so-called “first world problems.” The group

consists of a bunch of complaints that our food isn’t prepared well enough and isn’t prepared at the right times.

Being in a position of receiving servitude is a privilege and a rare one at that. The group is littered with sarcastic praises of Sodexo: “Thanks so much Sodexo for making sure David and I get all the carbs we need,” and “Praise be Sodexo … for graciously allowing me to experience what an Orwellian power dynamic truly feels like.” While framed satirically, the Sodexo Fan Club iconifies a perverse sense of entitlement that we’ve acquired. Since when do we have the right to anything that’s being served to us? And since when is any sort of dining service comparable to a dystopian society? Being in a position of receiving servitude is a privilege and a rare one at that. For a mostly liberal campus that prides itself on compassion toward developing nations and lauds the atrocities of leaving lights on in the bathroom or not buying “cruelty-free” shampoo, we sound like hypocrites to be complaining that some minimum-wage workers aren’t willing to work long hours or didn’t cook our

pancakes just right. It’s come to a point where those of us who actually like the dining services have to lower our eyes and voices when we say so out loud out of fear of being ostracized. “Well, I guess it’s cool to have vegetables and protein with every meal, not everyone has that luxury” we mumble. And yes, it is amazing that we have that. Considering that much of the American population can’t afford healthy food and has to settle for fast foods, it’s incredible that we have the luxury of vegetables and proteins. Protest can be a beautiful and incredibly inspiring means of change. On Feb. 1, 1960, four African-American students sat patiently through threats and denied service at the white’s only Woolworth’s in Greensboro, N.C. They wanted to dismantle structural segregation and racism, and they weren’t going to wait around for someone else to do it. It seems that some students at Brandeis have decided that we have our own protestworthy cause. On Monday, students sat in at Usdan Student Center to show Sodexo that they want change and that they aren’t going to wait around for someone else to do it. While seemingly admirable, the reasoning behind the protest is incredibly petty. We’re acting like our lack of coffee on Sundays is a structural system of injustice, and it’s disgusting. I also can’t help but wonder if this protest happened because the cause warranted it or because the people organizing it want to say that they organized a protest. Group mentalities are dangerous, and in our case, flat out disgusting. Entitlement is disgusting, and we should be better than that.


THE JUSTICE

September 23, 2014

13

MSOCCER: Men push shutout streak to four

PRESSING OFFENSE

CONTINUED FROM 16 game-winning streak, averaging 3.6 goals per game over the season. The game was a very close contest with a goal from Soboff separating the two teams. Soboff’s goal came in the 23rd minute from good work by Vieira on the wing, passing it to Soboff to slot it in to the back of the net. The Judges had five shots over the first 10 minutes but could not find a way past the WPI defense until Soboff’s goal.

The goal was all Brandeis would need, holding WPI without a shot on goal for the game and surrendering just five shots overall. The Judges added five shots in the second half for an 11-5 shot advantage overall. The team will not get any breaks in their upcoming schedule, traveling to Babson College tomorrow for a game at 4 p.m. and welcoming Wheaton College (Mass.) on Sept. 30, but with their recent form, the Judges have given themselves every opportunity to win.

XC: Squads turn in strong races at meet CONTINUED FROM 16 fourth-place finish of 18:03.10. Dolins shaved nearly 30 seconds off her time from last year and jumped one spot from last year’s race. Kelsey Whitaker ’16 placed 23rd overall out of the 272 competitors with a time of 18:52.42. Both Whitaker and Dolins set course personal records with their sub-19 minute finishes. Lydia McCaleb ’17 set a personal record in the five-kilometer race with a finish of 19:18.49, good for 37th place. Ashley Piccirillo-Horan ’17 ran a 19:36.47 for a 53rd place finish, and Kyra Shreeve ’18 rounded out the sub-20 minute racers with a 63rdplace finish in 19:41.85. Molly Paris ’16 and Maggie Hensel ’16 rounded out the Judges’

competitors with 110th and 138th places, respectively. “I think I speak for the team as a whole when I say we are excited [from] the performance [on Saturday],” Garvey said. “We ran really well and we are excited for the rest of the season to come,” he continued. Garvey said he thinks the weekend's performance bodes well for the rest of the season. “I think that we’re cautiously optimistic for the rest of the season,” Garvey said. “Getting in the top-10 in New England is a possibility, it is a very competitive region—arguably the best in the country—but I think we have a shot.” Both squads return to action on Oct. 4, traveling to the Keene State Invitational in Keene, NH.

BRIEF Team tops Colby-Sawyer at home MIHIR KHANNA/the Justice

HIGH STEPPING: Forward Haliana Burhans ’18 races down the wing during the Judges’ 1-0 win over Lesley University on Saturday.

WSOCCER: Judges earn pair of home wins with shutouts CONTINUED FROM 16 into the top-left corner to give the Judges a 1-0 lead. Though the Judges’ defense conceded two shots over the remaining 10 minutes, only one was on target and was easily saved by Savuto. “The focus of our defense has always been unity. The defense communicates constantly on every play, and they all support each other,” said Savuto. “A huge part of our success has also been the fact that [defensemen] Haley Schachter [’16] has really stepped into her leadership role as both an upperclassman mentor and center back.” Brandeis recorded 19 shots against Lesley the sixth straight game the team has recorded at least 10 shots. “I think that the team culture right now strongly supports the idea that we will never lose faith in our ability to win games through our sheer grit and mental toughness,” Savuto said. “We constructively critique ourselves after every game regardless of the result. I also firmly believe that one of the reasons for our success in our 2012 season was our status as the "underdog," and I think we've reclaimed that title this

year. No opponent we face is beneath us, and we all know that every single game will be a battle.” Edalati is now tied for the team leader with five goals on the year after scoring twice against Gordon earlier in the week. Brandeis opened the scoring against Gordon in the 41st minute with a hardearned goal scored by Edalati. Edalati took a corner kick and put a header on net, but her shot was cleared off the line by the Gordon defense. The rebound came right back to the striker and, Edalati put home her own rebound for the 1-0 lead. The squad did not have to wait long after the halftime break to double their lead, dominating possession over the first five minutes of the second half. Forward Samantha Schwartz ’18 netted her sixth goal of the season in the 50th minute, using her speed to turn around a Gordon defender and tuck the ball inside the left post to give the Judges a 2-0 lead. The Judges scored twice more over the final half hour to secure the 4-0 lead but gave up five shots to Gordon after holding the opposition without a shot during the first half. Forward Lea McDaniel ’17 netted her first goal

of the season in the 68th minute, cleaning up a rebound from a header by forward Haliana Burhans ’18. Facing pressure from the Gordon offense, the Judges put the game away with a goal of their own in the 85th minute. Szafran played the ball forward to Edalati in the midfield, and the striker took one touch to get around the Gordon defense before netting her second goal of the game to give the Judges the 4-0 final. The assist was Szafran’s second of the game, having previously assisted Schwartz’s goal, and the forward is now tied for the team lead with four assists this year. The squad is not getting ahead of themselves with the recent successes. “It's awesome whenever we win a game, but we want to try to improve how we play each game and never become complacent or satisfied with where we are,” McDermott said. “Our intensity in games and in practice has been amazing and that, along with our desire, to win makes it very hard for other teams to compete with us.” The Judges return to action today at Wellesley College at 4 p.m. before welcoming Bowdoin College to Gordon Field on Saturday at 1 p.m.

The men’s tennis team hosted Colby-Sawyer College on Saturday for their only meet of the fall season, and the team came away with a dominant 8-1 victory to start the year. The Judges put the pressure on their opponent right from the start during the doubles matches and never let up, dropping just two sets overall between the three doubles matches and the six singles matches. The number one doubles match between the pairing of Danny Lubarsky ’16 and Brian Granoff ’17 and the Colby-Sawyer pairing of sophomores Cass McCann and Myles Utell was an 8-2 rout in favor of the Judges. The number two and number three doubles matches played out in much the same way, both of them finishing 8-2 in favor of the Judges. Michael Arguello ’17 and Jeff Cherkin ’17 paired up to win the number two doubles match, while Michael Secular ’15 and Alec Siegel ’15 paired up to win the number three doubles match between the two teams. The team’s success continued into the singles matches, where Arguello won the number one singles match against ColbySawyer senior Nathan Taschereau 6-4, 6-1. The lone loss for the Judges on the day came in the number two singles match, when Ryan Bunis ’17 fell to Utell in a close match. Bunis dropped the first set 5-7, rebounded in the second to take the set 6-3 but eventually

lost in the third tie-breaking set 10-5, the only two sets lost by the Judges all day. Brandeis bounced back in the number three singles match with a win from Eric Miller ’16. Miller played a close first set against McCann, but he pulled away with a shutout in the second set to continue the Judges’ success on the day. Cherkin, in the number four singles match, got a win over Colby-Sawyer freshman Andrew Peloquin with a quick first set and a closer second set, winning 6-1, 6-4. In the number five singles match, Matthew Zuckerman ’14, M.A. ’15 took down senior Sergio Spassof in two quick sets, 6-3, 6-1. In the sixth and final singles match of the day, Ben Fine ’15 got a win over Colby-Sawyer freshman Ryan Broderick and capped off the team’s strong performance with an impressive showing of his own. Fine won his match in straight sets 6-2, 6-0, sealing the match for the Judges. The team will see limited action during the fall season, participating in just two additional events before taking a break for the winter. The Judges will compete at the Intercollegiate Tennis Association Regional Championships this weeknd and then take part in the Wallach Invitational, hosted by Bates College, on October 11 and 12. —Daniel Kanovich


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THE JUSTICE

jUDGES BY THE NUMBERS

Tuesday, SEPTEMBER 23, 2014

15

WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL

Men’s Soccer UAA STANDINGS

TEAM STATS Goals

2014-2015 Statistics JUDGES Emory NYU WashU Rochester Carnegie Chicago Case

UAA Conf. W L D 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

W L 7 0 7 0 6 1 4 1 4 1 5 3 5 3 4 3

Overall D Pct. 0 1.000 1 .938 0 .857 1 .750 2 .714 0 .625 0 .625 1 .562

Michael Soboff ’15 leads the team with five goals. Player Goals Michael Soboff 5 Tyler Savonen 4 Zach Vieira 4 Josh Ocel 3

Assists Josh Ocel ’17 leads the team with five assists. Player Assists Josh Ocel 5 Evan Jastremski 3 Foti Andreo 2 Mike Lynch 2

UPCOMING GAMES: Tomorrow at Babson Tues., Sept. 30 vs. Wheaton (MA) Sun., Oct. 5 vs. Case

WOMen’s Soccer UAA STANDINGS

TEAM STATS

2014-2015 Statistics

Goals

Carnegie Chicago WashU JUDGES Emory Case NYU Rochester

UAA Conf. W L D 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

W 7 7 7 6 4 5 4 3

L 0 0 0 1 0 1 3 2

Overall D Pct. 0 1.000 0 1.000 0 1.000 0 .857 2 .833 1 .786 0 .571 2 .571

UPCOMING GAMES: Today at Wellesley Saturday vs. Bowdoin College Tue., Sept. 30 at Smith College

Samantha Schwartz ’18 leads the team with five goals. Player Goals Samantha Schwartz 5 Sapir Edalati 5 Cindey Moscovitch 2 Holly Szafran 1

Assists Sapir Edalati ’15 leads the team with four assists. Player Assists Sapir Edalati 4 Holly Szafran 4 Samantha Schwartz 3

VOLLEYBALL UAA STANDINGS

TEAM STATS Kills

2014-2015 Statistics WashU Emory Carnegie Chicago NYU Case Rochester JUDGES

UAA Conf. W L 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Overall W L 16 2 14 2 9 3 13 5 11 5 8 4 7 8 4 7

Pct. .889 .875 .750 .722 .688 .667 .467 .364

UPCOMING GAMES: Tonight vs. Simmons Saturday vs. Emmanuel Saturday vs. Colby-Sawyer

Maddie Engeler ’16 leads the team in kills with 91. Player Kills Maddie Engeler 91 Liz Hood 86 Jessie Moore 75 Summer Koop 73

Digs Elsie Bernaiche ’15 leads the team in digs with 168. Player Digs Elsie Bernaiche 168 Shemira Pennyman 105 Julie Kim 80 Liz Hood 53

cross cOuntry Results from the UMass Dartmouth Invitational on Saturday.

TOP FINISHERS (Men’s)

TOP FINISHERS (Women’s)

8-Kilometer Run RUNNER TIME Jarret Harrigan 25:26.66 Quinton Hoey 25:46.72 Ryan Stender 25:49.85 Matt Doran 25:58.65

5-Kilometer Run RUNNER TIME Maddie Dolins 18:03.10 Kelsey Whitaker 18:52.42 Lydia McCaleb 19:18.49 Ashley Picirillo-Horan 19:36.47

UPCOMING EVENTS: Oct. 4 at the Keene State Invitational Oct. 18 at the Connecticut College Invitational

GUILLERMO NARVAEZ/the Justice

CUT SHOT: Outside Hitter Liz Hood ’15 (center) prepares a spike during the Judges’ sweep of Emerson College on Thursday.

Judges sweep regional foes in home matchups ■ The women used a 20-6 run in the fourth set against Wheaton College to come back for a five-set win. By Noah Hessdorf Justice contributing Writer

After a difficult start to their season, the women’s volleyball team has started to pick up some momentum after winning both of their matches this week. Playing with home court advantage in both matches, the Judges came back to defeat Wheaton College in five sets on Tuesday and defeated Emerson College in three sets on Thursday. The win on Thursday gave the Judges victories in three of their last four matches, bringing their overall record to 4-7. The Judges defeated Emerson by a final score of 25-21, 25-21, 25-10. Emerson stayed with the Judges all throughout the first two sets, as the Judges only came away with 25-21 wins. The third set was a totally different story as the Judges finished the short match that did not even last an hour and a half. Outside hitter Liz Hood ’15 led the team with 12 kills and .407 hitting percentage. She was followed by middle

blocker Summer Koop ’16 who had an impressive 10 kills of her own. Middle blocker Jessica Kaufman ’17 recorded eight kills and two blocks. Kaufman said that the improved play has come with an understanding of coach Aleisa Vaccari’s system. “Things have really started to click for the team lately,” she said. “We’ve really started to embrace and understand the way coach Vaccari wants the team to run, as well as being more understanding of each other.” Setter Julie Kim ’18 had an exceptional game in which she tallied 37 assists to go along with 12 digs. Libero Elsie Bernaiche ’15 played solid defense with her 15 digs. Tuesday’s game against Wheaton College was not quite as easy as the three setter against Emerson, as the Judges needed the full five sets to defeat Wheaton by a score of 19-25, 20-25, 25-22, 25-15, 15-11. Facing the possibility of losing the match in three sets, the Judges found themselves down 22-20 in the third set. The team rallied to win the next five points and win their first set of the match, 25-22. Kaufman added that the team turned their mentality around in the third set. “After the second set we all came together and realized that our team is better than how we were playing,”

she said. “Everyone started communicating, celebrating, and focusing on the win that each of us knew we were capable of.” The Judges started the fourth set by losing nine of the first 14 points, but then managed to reel off an incredible 20-6 run to win 25-15. The fifth and final set again saw Wheaton take the early lead when they were up 5-2, but once again, the Judges stayed composed and resilient. The Judges went on to win eight of the last 11 points to take the fifth set by a 15-11 score. Hood once again led the team with 15 kills but was followed closely by fellow outside hitter Jessie Moore ’18 who had 14 kills. Bernaiche once again played tremendously consistent defense with another 15 digs. Kaufman said she felt confident about the team’s chances going forward. “I think that if we continue to play how we’ve been playing and know that we can always do better, there will be no stopping us,” she said. “Confidence is going to be the key to our success, so it will be our confidence that pushes us through as far as we can go.” The Judges take their hard-earned winning streak into tonight’s match at home against Simmons College, beginning at 7 p.m.

PRO SPORTS BRIEF American League Central race goes down to the wire between Detroit Tigers and Kansas City Royals As the Major League Baseball season draws to a close and many division races have been long locked up, the American League Central remains as up in the air as it did in the middle of August. Though the Detroit Tigers held a four game lead over the Kansas City Royals at the trading deadline, the last day to add players for the postseason roster and the beginning of the stretch run of the regular season, the two teams have traded the top spot in the AL Central and are figured for an intense final week of the regular season. By the middle of August, the Tigers not only gave away their divisional lead to the Royals, but fell a full three games behind Kansas City on Aug. 23. At the time, it seemed like their

prized midseason acquisition, starting pitcher David Price, had not even been enough to secure the division title—let alone postseason and World Series hopes. Price was acquired on July 31 from the Tampa Bay Rays as part of a three-team trade with the Rays and the Mariners and made his debut six days later. Price tossed 8 2/3 innings in his debut against the New York Yankees, giving up three runs but striking out 10 batters and not giving up a walk. Since the beginning of September, neither team has been able to gain separation from the other, and with the Oakland Athletics the strongest contender a wild card spot and the Seattle Mariners just behind the Royals, the two teams remain almost exclusively focused on captur-

ing the division crown. The two teams were last tied in the standings on Sept. 9, and since then, the Tigers have gone 6-3 to gain a two-and-a-half game lead over the Royals. Armed with arguably the best pitching staff in baseball—with Cy Young winners Price, Justin Verlander and Max Scherzer, accompanied by Rick Porcello and the nowinjured Anibal Sanchez—the Tigers held the divisional lead for much of the year. Detriot is also home to one of baseball’s top offenses, led by first baseman Miguel Cabrera, a twotime Most Valuable Player award winner, and have scored 731 runs this year, second most in the MLB. The offense also ranks within the top five in batting average, on base

percentage, slugging percentage, hits and runs batted in. Yet, the Tigers have had difficulty putting away a Kansas City team that has scored just 613 runs this year—17th across baseball. What the Royals lack in offense, they make up in pitching and defense, especially in the bullpen. The Royals have, at best, a leagueaverage offense but make up for it with one of the best bullpens corps in baseball. The Royals have converted 80 percent of all save opportunities thus far this year, and the team’s bullpen has given up just 31 home runs, the fourth fewest in baseball. Led by closer Greg Holland, who has converted 43 of 45 save opportunities to wins, the Royals have hung on behind the high-powered Tigers.

The Royals held first place for a few days in mid-June, but Detroit came storming back to seize a division lead they would hold until midSeptember. Since then, Kansas City has been as far as six games out of first place, far enough for Detroit to get comfortable but close enough that Kansas City could still make a run for the title. The two teams met for a pivotal three-game series last Friday through Sunday, with Detroit taking two of the three games to take a two-game divisional lead entering play on Monday. With a strong September thus far, the upstart Royals are looking to do just that and are taking the divisional race down to the wire. — Avi Gold


just

Sports

Page 16

SERVICE WINNER The women’s volleyball team put together a two-game winning streak at home, p. 15.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

TOP SPEED

Waltham, Mass.

Women’s soccer

Squad continues good form in wins ■ The Judges outshot the

visiting Gordon College 32-5 in Wednesday’s 4-0 victory at home. By Avi gold JUSTICE editor

The women’s soccer team extended its winning streak to six games with a pair of home wins last week, edging past Lesley University 1-0 on Saturday afternoon and dispatching Gordon College 4-0 last Tuesday. The Judges improved their record to 6-1 overall and are averaging nearly three goals per game and giving up just 0.3 goals during the streak. “Last week was an important opportunity to showcase that our team will not let prior losses [affect] our playing mentality,” said goalkeeper Michelle Savuto ’15. “Having lost last year to both Gordon and UMass Boston, we were excited at the chance to

prove ourselves.” Midfielder Sapir Edalati ’15 netted the Judges’ only goal on Saturday in the 79th minute, her second gamewinning goal in as many games. The Judges dominated possession for most of the game through a strong defense, including a 10-1 shot advantage, but were unable to put a shot past the Lynx defense. “Defense is always a major focus for our team, regardless of which position you play,” said defensemen Julia McDermott ’17. “Not only has our back line been great, but our midfield and forwards have been organized and getting back to defend really well. We can't be successful as a defense unless each player does her part.” The Judges finally put themselves in front on their eighth corner of the game when Edalati converted a set piece in the 79th minute. Edalati received a pass off a corner kick from forward Holly Szafran ’16 and blasted the pass past the Lesley goalkeeper

See WSOCCER, 13 ☛

Cross country

Teams race to top-five finishes at local meet ■ Maddie Dolins ’17

MORGAN BRILL/the Justice

ONE-ON-ONE: Forward Mike Lynch ’17 outruns at Tufts defender during the Judges’ 2-0 victory Saturday on Gordon Field.

Judges use late goal to get past Tufts at home ■ Goalkeeper Joe Graffy ’15

was not forced to make a save in a 1-0 win over Worcester Polytechnic Institute. By Colin warnes JUSTICE contributing WRITER

Though they found themselves outplayed for most of the first half and without a shot on target, the No. 5 men’s soccer team snuck past Tufts University with a 2-0 win on Saturday. The win was their second victory over a previously undefeated team last week, defeating Worcester Polytechnic Institute 1-0 last Wednesday, and improve their record to 7-0 as a result. The first half started as a very even affair with both teams sharing possession equally. However, as the half went on, the Judges began to slowly lose their grip of the middle of the field. With the first half ending with seven shots on goal for Tufts, the away side convincingly controlled the game. At that point, the squad was running out of ideas, since their game is very much centered around going through the middle of the pitch, according to coach Michael Coven. “They challenged for everything, and they were fit, and they ran after

everything,” he explained. “What we did [in the second half] was we moved [Midfielder Michael Soboff ’15] from up top to the middle. He gets the ball, and he can keep the ball. Plus he is a physical player himself, and [defenseman Connor Lanahan ’16] started hitting longer balls—that was a big difference too,” Coven continued. Though the second half started similarly to how the first half ended, as time went on, Brandeis began to slowly create chances and see more of the ball. The catalyst to this change was a 52nd minute shot by midfielder Josh Ocel ’17. The shot was only just saved by the Tufts sophomore goalkeeper Scott Greenwood, who tipped the shot over the bar. Tufts began to feel less comfortable playing against a more determined and physical Brandeis middle after the hour. The speed of defenseman Robbie Lynch ’15 on the right and the physicality up top to receive those long balls helped create more chances for the Judges. In the 68th minute, a cross from the right presented Brandeis with their best scoring chance. Soboff rose to nod the cross towards the goal with the crossbar being the only barrier between Brandeis and a goal.

Finally, Brandeis forced a breakthrough in the 79th minute off a corner. Ocel hit a well-placed cross into the middle of the Tufts box, and while the away team scrambled to try to get it out, it found its way to Soboff. Soboff provided a great pass across the goalline to Lynch, who slammed home his first collegiate goal and gave the Judges a 1-0 lead. “You know, once we got that first goal, then the adrenaline is going, and they said ‘hey we can win this game,’” Coven said. Though Brandeis began to really show their domination following the goal, Tufts almost snuck a goal in with a one-on-one against goalkeeper Joe Graffy '15. The goalkeeper came out with the win in that duel, producing a fine stop and preserving the lead. After a lot of pressure, Brandeis finally found themselves their cushion. Forward Zach Veira ’17 received a long ball from the back, managed to push the ball past the Tufts defenders and squeeze the ball over Greenwood and into the goal. The goal was his fourth of the season and sealed the 2-0 victory. Brandeis faced another undefeated team in WPI on Wednesday and dispatched the visitors 1-0. WPI entered the game on a five-

See MSOCCER, 13 ☛

placed fourth overall out of 272 runners at the UMass Dartmouth Invitational. By Avi Gold JUSTICE editor

The men’s and women’s cross country teams took on regional competition from all three NCAA divisions at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Invitational and capped a solid weekend with a pair of top-five finishes overall and strong individual races. Both squads sent seven runners to North Dartmouth, Mass. for the meets, where the men placed third out of 34 sides and the women took home a fifth-place finish out of the 38 competing teams. Seven out of the eight racers for the men placed within the top 50 competitors, and three placed within the top-25—out of 255 overall—and the team averaged a 25 minute, 59.67 second finish in the eight-kilometer race. “Cross country is an individual sport, but it’s just as much a team sport as well. We ran together; our pack was phenomenal,” said Liam Garvey ’18. “It comes down to the team in the long run. We had some individuals who did well, but at the end it was the team who did really well.” The men’s third-place finish was the squad’s best finish since the 2011 campaign when the squad took second overall. The Brandeis squad was led by Jarret Harrigan ’15, who covered the course in 25:26.66, good for an 11th-place finish, and finished with 105 points, just five behind the second-place runner from Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Harrigan was six seconds behind a top-10 finish but only one second off the average mile of the 10th place finisher and finished a full 55 seconds faster than he did at last year’s race. Harrigan’s 11th place finish was

a 10-place improvement on his result from last year. “Jarret is one of the team’s best leaders,” remarked Garvey. “He leads by example. “He’s probably our best guy out there and up there with the pack, but in practice he’s giving us pointers, it’s great to have someone like him on the team.” Quinton Hoey ’17 placed 15th overall with a time of 25:46.72, nearly half a minute faster than he ran last year and a seven-place improvement, while Ryan Stender ’18 closely followed him at the 25:49.85 mark to grab 19th place. Matt Doran ’17 continued his season with a 27th place finish in 25:58.65, while Grady Ward ’16 took 33rd place in 26:06.44. Garvey rounded out the Judges in the top-50 with a 47th place finish, stopping the timer at 26:20.90. Brian Sheppard ’18 crossed the finish line at the 27:08.84 mark, giving him a 78th place finish. Garvey said he was happy with his race and remarked that the adjustment to the longer eight kilomter race takes time. “In high school, we race [five kilometer races], and it is a big adjustment because you’re adding almost two miles to the race, but I think as freshmen we’re handling it pretty well,” Garvey explained. Ward set a personal record in the five-mile run on Saturday, shaving nearly 20 seconds off his previous best time. Greg Bray ’15 won the men’s subvarsity race in 26:20.50, more than two seconds ahead of the secondplace finisher. The women’s squad raced to a fifth place finish and placed third overall of all competing Division III schools at the meet. The squad finished the meet with 180 points, 37 points behind thirdplace Connecticut College and 14 behind College of the Holy Cross, the highest-finishing Division I school at the meet. Maddie Dolins ’17 improved on her result from last year with a

See XC, 13 ☛


JustArts Volume LXVII, Number 5

Your weekly guide to arts, movies, music and everything cultural at Brandeis and beyond

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Waltham, Mass.

Fall Concert Series: Mike Posner » 20

U2 Album review: ‘Songs of Innocence’ hearkens back to the sounds of the band in its early years » 23

INSIDE

“Light of Reason” Talk Profs. Gordon Fellman (SOC) and Chris Abrams (FA) lead a discussion on the Rose’s new, permanent installation » 19

WSRC Lecture Prof. Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow speaks about women’s health practices in ancient Rome and Pompeii » 19

Museum of Fine Arts Exhibit features fashion from the Golden Age of Hollywood glamour » 21


18

justARTS

TUESDAY, september 23, 2014 | THE JUSTICE

CALENDAR

INTERVIEW

$

What’s happening in Arts on and off campus this week

ON-CAMPUS EVENTS

Case Prep and Info Session: Fashion Scholarship Fund

This workshop is for undergraduate students who intend to apply to the YMA Fashion Scholarship. Seniors graduating in December 2014 or May 2015 are not eligible to apply. The information session will be led by Profs. Grace Zimmerman (IBS) and Ebert (IBS) to help potential application for the 2015 YMA Fashion Scholarship Fund. The application deadline is Monday, Oct. 27 at 11:59 p.m. Today from 4 to 5 p.m. in the Lemberg Dean’s Conference Room. This event is free and open to the public.

Mark Your Art Brandeis

It’s your chance to leave your artistic mark on one of the biggest canvases at Brandeis. The Department of Student Activities is looking for creative, enthusiastic artists to create a wall mural in the Usdan Game Room. Artists must have sketching and painting skills and be able to complete large-scale artwork. This can be completed individually or in groups. The content should reflect your vision of the Brandeis community that incorporates the playful atmosphere of the game room Drafted submissions are due Sunday, Sept. 28 by 11:59 p.m. Please deposit a sketch of your idea as well as some clips from your portfolio at the Shapiro Campus Center Infobooth. Final decisions will be made the following week and painting starts Oct. 5th.

D’Andre Young ’15 and Heleena Mathew ’15 Students Spearhead Mural Project GRACE KWON/the Justice

This week, justArts spoke with Heleena Mathew ’15 and D’Andre Young ’15, representatives from the Campus Center Team. The two are spearheading the Campus Center Team’s mural designing contest, seeking a mural for the right wall in the Game Room of the Usdan Student Center. Submissions are due by Monday, Sept. 29. JustArts: Can you tell me a little about the mural project? Heleena Mathew: The game room in Usdan [Student Center] is a great space. And our boss Darryl [David ’09] and our team of supervisors had been working on ways to improve the space, make it better, make it more inclusive and make it a happier environment for everybody. And one of the things we were thinking about it was to make a mural on the wall, and initially we just wanted to make it livelier space.

The Gentle Art of Musical Forgery: Reconstructing and Re-inventing Lost Music by 17th-Century Women

And we realized this is a great opportunity for a Brandeis student—somebody can make that mural and use it to bolster their portfolio and develop themselves as an artist. And if we can help them do that then, why not? So we made it a contest. Any Brandesian can apply with a sketch and a portfolio. D’Andre Young: I think it was just really important for this to happen, one because there have been a lot of physical changes on campus as far as the library and some of our buildings have been changed. And I think every year there’s something new going on on our campus. And then from a student standpoint, we hadn’t been as involved with the changes. So it was a cool idea to get more student involvement and to bring this idea to the students. And it will make the Game Room way livelier. And it’s a place where a lot of students spend their days when they’re not in classes. So, why not make this about them, and why not make the project about them? JA: Have you done anything like this before? HM: For the most part, no. This is a new thing. We just thought this would be a great idea, and this is a great project for the team to work on. DY: It’s such a live space. Every year, we’re looking for new ideas for something to do with the game room. We’re always looking for posters. Last year, a chalkboard was put up on one of the walls in the Game Room. So there’s always something new going into the space. But I think it was most important that we got other student involvement. And we’ve always been encouraging of having art, some type of art being put on the wall. JA: What prompted you to do a campus improvement project rather than a typical event? HM: I think in the past our events have been kind of like a one-way type of thing—from the Campus Center Team to the campus. And we kind of wanted to do something different like a two-way communication. And if we can all work together to make the game room better, which, in the past, we’ve tried to do that on our own, why shouldn’t we? JA: What kind of mural are you looking for? DY: I don’t really have a vision of what mural I want right now because artists are involved, and they could bring us anything. But I think whatever has the most Brandeis involvement… whatever is the most uniquely Brandeis. So that includes things we see everyday at Brandeis but also things that we don’t necessarily recognize within our community that are character traits within our community. HM: We want it to paint an interesting picture, a complex picture of Brandeis. But also, it’s a game room. We want it to stay fun. We want it to be lively. We want it to add to the atmosphere we worked so hard to make there. JA: What do you hope the mural accomplishes? HM: The Game Room has changed over the past couple years. When I was a freshman, it was kind of this blue room that people would hang out in, but really nobody really knew what was going on in there. But in the past couple of years it’s totally done a 180, and we want that momentum to keep going. And we really want the Game Room to be recognized as a space that is really for Brandeis students and managed by Brandeis students. We want it to be a unifying space for everybody. —Emily Wishingrad

In this lecture and recital, special guests Pamela Murray, soprano, and lutanist Catherine Liddell will join 17th-century specialist, violinist and resident scholar Dana Maiben to

present Maiben’s reconstructions of missing music of the prolific Chiara Margarita Cozzolani, a cloistered nun and the fascinating Mary Sidney, Lady Wroth, who was anything but. Thursday, Oct. 2 at 12:30 p.m. in the Epstein Building of the Women’s Studies Research Center. This event is free and open to the public.

Bingo

Prizes include Brandeis Pride gifts including blankets, water bottles, bags and more. Thursday, Oct. 2 at 9:30 to 11:30 p.m. at the Stein. This event is sponsored by Student Events and is free and open to the public.

OFF-CAMPUS EVENTS Berklee BeanTown Jazz Festival

On September 27, music lovers of all ages will gather for the 14th annual Berklee BeanTown Jazz Festival in Boston’s historic South End—home to several legendary clubs during Boston’s jazz heyday. The all-day, free outdoor event will offer contemporary jazz, funk, Latin, pop and soul acts on three stages. Saturday from noon to 6 p.m. on Columbus Ave. between Mass. Ave. and Burke Street in Boston’s South End.

Lena Dunham: “Not That Kind of Girl”

From the creator of HBO’s Girls comes Not That Kind of Girl, a collection of personal essays that David Sedaris calls “subversive” and Judy Blume hails as “always funny.” In the words of Lena Dunham herself: “No, I am not a sexpert, a psychologist, or a dietician. I am not a mother of three or the owner of a successful hosiery franchise. But I am a girl with a keen interest in having it all, and what follows are hopeful dispatches from the frontlines of that struggle.” Dunham will be in conversation with Mary Karr. Thursday, Oct. 2 from 7 to 9 p.m. at

the Wilbur Theatre on Tremont Street in Boston. Tickets are $38 and include a copy of Dunham’s new book.

SnarkyPuppy/Kneebody

With the release of its live, twodisc album/DVD tell your friends; Snarky Puppy has gone from an underground secret to one of the most internationally respected names in instrumental music, a reputation solidified with its 2014 Grammy win for Best Rhythm and Blues Performance. The band topped the iTunes jazz charts with both its Grammy-winning 2013 release, Family Dinner: Volume One and with the 2014 release of We Like It Here. Sunday from 8 to 11 p.m. at the Berklee Performance Center at 136 Mass. Ave in Boston. Tickets range from $32 to $35.

Playing with Paper: Japanese Toy Prints

By the middle of the 19th century, color woodblock printing in Japan was so widespread and inexpensive that it could profitably be used to make toys for children—which were no doubt enjoyed by many adults as well. This exhibition (one of the first of its kind outside Japan) will feature “toy prints” (asobi-e or omocha-e) such as colorful board games, paper dolls, cutout dioramas and pictorial riddles, as well as scenes showing how the toys and games were enjoyed. Thanks largely to the eclectic taste of William Sturgis Bigelow, the donor of over half of the Museum’s collection, the Museum of Fine Arts has a fine assortment of these intriguing and unusual materials. In particular, a group of large paper board games by major 19th-century artists will be presented in pristine condition. On view through July 19 at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in Gallery 278A. General admission is $25; admission for seniors is $23, and admission is free with a Brandeis ID.

Pop Culture n !

ww Various “challenges” have been circulating Facebook, including one for which I was recently nominated: list 10 books that have impacted me. Not much of a challenge, in my opinion, although choosing which books to include did take some serious consideration. After making my list, I realized that it was mostly old favorites, from S.E. Hinton’s The Outsiders to the Shakespeare-inspired Eyes Like Stars by Lisa Mantchev. All of the novels are also young adult fiction. Maybe it’s time to try some new genres? My bookshelf needs an upgrade. Luckily, there are a slew of upcoming and new releases this fall to help anyone discover some new favorites. Five Days Left by Julie Lawson Timmer, released on Sept. 9, explores the parallel lives of Scott, who along, with his wife, has been taking care of a young foster boy, and Mara, a wife and adoptive mother who is dying from Huntington’s disease. The novel takes place in the final five days before Scott has to decide if he is willing to risk his marriage to keep his foster son or return him to his mother who is being released from jail, while Mara is planning on ending her life before her disease progresses any further. While some of this sounds melodramatic, I am interested in seeing how the two narratives connect and what choices Timmer has her characters make. Two historical novels have caught my attention: We Are Not Ourselves by Matthew Thomas, released in August and The Paying Guests, by Sarah Waters, released on Sept. 16. The former follows the life of Eileen, the daughter of an Irish immigrant family in New York and her family— husband Ed and son Connell. The novel spans decades, beginning with Eileen’s childhood in the 1940s and ’50s and then progressing with her marriage. The family tries to deal with Eileen’s

By Ilana Kruger

CREATIVE COMMONS

READING ROOM: Sarah Walters’ new novel, The Paying Guests, is set in 1920s London. long-held American Dream and Ed’s early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease. In The Paying Guests, a novel set in 1920s London, a widow and her daughter take in a young married couple as lodgers so they can still afford to pay for their villa. An illicit romance, accidental murder and investigation ensue. Both novels have dark themes, but the character development and peeks into bygone eras make me want to read them. World literature has always seemed like an obscure genre to me, but it really just encompasses any book written in another country, usually in another language. The Lives of Others by Neel Mukherjee, which will be released

in the U.S. in October, takes place in Calcutta in 1967. The Ghoshes are a wealthy family, but it is revealed that one of their sons’ political choices might bring down their precariously held social standing. I haven’t read any Indian or South Asian literature, so this multigenerational tale seems to be a good starting point. All of these books have now been added to my Good Reads “virtual bookshelf” for when I have time to read them. Maybe these will be my new favorite novels along with classics like The Outsiders. Give them a chance when you have a free moment, and maybe they’ll become some of your favorites, too.

ARTS COVER IMAGES: HANNAH CHIDEKEL and GRACE KWON/the Justice, COURTESY OF ANN OLGA KOLOSKI-OSTROW and THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON. DESIGN: GRACE KWON and JEREMY PERLMAN/the Justice.


ON CAMPUS

THE JUSTICE | TUESDAY, september 23, 2014

19

lecture

Prof lectures on Roman women’s health By Emily Wishingrad justice editor

Who knew that gynecologist appointments in ancient Rome resembled much of what they do today? Doctors used specula to examine the cervix, prescribed cures for ailments such as breast cancer and menstrual cramps and advised women about sexual health and abstinence. Women’s health in the ancient world was a surprisingly open and advanced field of study and practice. Tuesday afternoon, Prof. Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow (CLAS) gave a lecture at the Women’s Studies

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANN OLGA KOLOSKI-OSTROW

INSIDE LOOK: Romans used specula like the one pictured above to examine women during a gynecological exam.

Research Center, focusing on this incredibly advanced knowledge of women’s issues in the ancient world. Koloski-Ostrow was clearly more than qualified to give the lecture—she told the attendees that she worked in Rome and Pompeii, Italy for most of her adult life and spent this summer in the libraries of these ancient Italian cities studying these exact issues. Prof. Shulamit Reinharz Ph.D. ’77 (SOC), founder and director of the WSRC, introduced Koloski-Ostrow as the first lecturer of the year— marking the beginning of a new expansion of the WSRC lecture series. In the past, lectures were limited to the scholars who happen to be inresidence at the time. But Reinharz said that this year, the center plans on expanding the lecture series to include University professors as well. Koloski-Ostrow started off her lecture, “Women’s Lives and Women’s Health in First Century CE Rome and Pompeii,” by relating it to the exhibit currently on view in the WSRC’s Kniznick Gallery, Juanita McNeely: Indomitable Spirit. She spoke about how McNeely, through her graphic and intimate portrayals of the female body, “seeks to create disquiet or discomfort.” But in Roman times, Koloski-Ostrow said, McNeely’s work would not have caused such discomfort. This sentiment was reiterated later on in the lecture when the images on the slides of Romans proved to be even more graphic in some senses than McNeely’s paintings. Starting off her discussion of women’s health in ancient Rome, KoloskiOstrow noted the relative openness of being a woman doctor, or what the was called a medici. Midwifery was one of the few professions open to women and was not limited to any social class. Koloski-Ostrow discussed various writers who talk about women’s issues in ancient times. Women’s health was already seen as being

distinctly different from a general practice of medicine and thus it was practiced separately. There were also texts dedicated specifically to the issues facing the female population. and the writers of these works were both male and female. KoloskiOstrow described that these ancient texts were “resasonable” in the sencse that they denounced superstitions that had prevailed in the world of medicine, such as dispelling the commonly held notion of the movable womb. These scholars actually looked inside women’s bodies both through autopsies and in physical exams, and were therefore able to scientifically prove new, anatomically substantiated ideas about female anatomy. In the second portion of her lecture, Koloski-Ostrow discussed brothels in ancient Rome—their prevalence, aesthetics and practices. She noted that there were probably at least 30 institutions of prostitution in ancient Rome and Pompeii and that they somewhat resembled what they do today. Clients would be escorted to one of the multiple rooms in the house where a prostitute would entertain the guest. Paintings on the walls of the brothels, depicting the rooms, suggest that the beds were luxurious—made up with soft blankets and wools. The graffiti on the walls of the rooms tell us even more information about the sexual encounters of these people—both men and women would graffiti their experiences onto the walls. Paintings of graphic sexual encounters were not limited to the brothels, however. They appeared in private homes as well as in bathhouses. After the fall of Rome, practices of contraception, the sexually explicit paintings and many of the written works on women’s health were destroyed as a new era of piousness took over Europe. But today, the remains, cast in the dust of Mount Vesuvius, endure for us to study in awe.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANN OLGA KOLOSKI-OSTROW

DO NOT DISTURB: Prof. Koloski-Ostrow (CLAS) took this photo of a painting of an erotic scene displayed in a home in Pompeii, Italy.

ROSE ART MUSEUM

Scholars lead discussion on “Light of Reason” By brooke granovsky justice contributing writer

If you can identify the message or moral of the Rose Art Museum’s newest sculpture, Prof. Chris Abrams (FA) asks that you not tell him. On Wednesday, Abrams and Prof. Gordon Fellman (SOC) led a discussion about the newly installed sculpture, “Light of Reason,” in front of the museum. The sculpture, created by artist Chris Burden, consists of repurposed lampposts set into concrete blocks. The blocks are set in three rows, with the outer two rows pointing diagonally to the middle row, and the middle row drawing a path straight into the museum. The lights turn on at about six pm, or earlier if it gets dark, and the sculpture’s light makes the otherwise cool, grey cement blocks look welcoming. Abrams started the discussion by noting that as Burden’s career progressed, his installations grew in scope and size. So-called “historical” Burden art was extreme performance art, including a performance titled “Shoot” where Burden had an assistant shoot him in the arm with a .22 caliber rifle. In another piece, “Trans-Fixed” (1974), Burden nailed his hands into a Volkswagen Bug and lay face up in a pose reminiscent of crucifixion. The Bug was parked on a street in California for two minutes before it was returned to the garage and Burden’s assistants helped him down. Evidently, Burden was not one to shy away from danger. Following this theme, in a 1975 installation called “Doomed,” Burden resolved to lie under a leaned sheet of glass at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago until the public

interfered with the glass or the clock beside it. A museum employee eventually brought Burden some water, after which time Burden moved from under the glass and used a hammer to break the clock, ending the installation. Burden gradually moved from more shocking and moralistic pieces to larger and more open installations. By the 1990s, Burden was creating pieces like “Metropolis 2,” which modeled a traffic jam in Los Angeles, and “Mexican Bridge,” a piece from Burden’s installation series of steel bridges. The Rose hosted both of these works in the past, so it is fitting that Burden’s most expansive piece, “The Light of Reason,” would also make its way to campus. One attendee mentioned that the structure’s columns reminded her of a Greco-Roman forum, and that the professors standing amidst the lampposts were reminiscent of philosophers debating and teaching their students. In response, Fellman commented that the sculpture’s Victorian style is in clear contrast with the modern art and architecture of the museum and around campus. Various participants noted that the structure made them pay more attention to everyday objects, while Fellman pointed out that the lamppost above the Park Street subway stop bears resemblance to those used in the sculpture. A May 2007 review in the New Yorker argued that Burden’s art had a conceptual slackness, and that it had grown less provocative over the years. But Abrams argues that as Burden’s career progressed, he made art that left the observer with an opportunity to define the sculpture’s meaning—a choice that is more arguably provocative than the extreme art that the article’s author, Peter Schjeldahl, had hailed.

Many aspects of the sculpture remain ambiguous. Why is it positioned in diagonal lines that slope toward the museum entrance? Is there supposed to be symbolism in the overarching lampposts towering above the observers’ heads? Fellman wondered if the three rows symbolize Boston’s characteristic three-tier hills, the three letters in the Hebrew word for “truth,”emmet, (a core tenant of Brandeis’ motto) or the three parts of the Brandeis crest.

He also noted that the large, almost intruding sculpture helps mark a resurrection in the Rose’s power after years of battling financing issues and facing threats of closure. Both professors mentioned that the way the public informs the sculpture’s meaning is incredibly significant in light of recent on-campus events. The sexual assault protest at the opening of “the Light of Reason” was one example of how students could find

meaning in the sculpture’s ambiguity. Many of the protesters interpreted the sculpture and its title as a plea for revealing the truth. As Fellman said, “secrets and lies thrive in the dark.” Regardless of public opinion, Abrams says that one of the most important components of the sculpture is this very quality—the idea that it can mean anything. So take the opportunity to walk by and sculpture and see how you perceive it.

HANNAH CHIDEKEL/the Justice

CONTEMPLATING ART: Profs. Gordon Fellman (SOC) (left) and Chris Abrams (FA) (right) lead a discussion on “Light of Reason.”


ON CAMPUS

THE JUSTICE | TUESDAY, september 23, 2014

19

lecture

Prof lectures on Roman women’s health By Emily Wishingrad justice editor

Who knew that gynecologist appointments in ancient Rome resembled much of what they do today? Doctors used specula to examine the cervix, prescribed cures for ailments such as breast cancer and menstrual cramps and advised women about sexual health and abstinence. Women’s health in the ancient world was a surprisingly open and advanced field of study and practice. Tuesday afternoon, Prof. Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow (CLAS) gave a lecture at the Women’s Studies

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANN OLGA KOLOSKI-OSTROW

INSIDE LOOK: Romans used specula like the one pictured above to examine women during a gynecological exam.

Research Center, focusing on this incredibly advanced knowledge of women’s issues in the ancient world. Koloski-Ostrow was clearly more than qualified to give the lecture—she told the attendees that she worked in Rome and Pompeii, Italy for most of her adult life and spent this summer in the libraries of these ancient Italian cities studying these exact issues. Prof. Shulamit Reinharz Ph.D. ’77 (SOC), founder and director of the WSRC, introduced Koloski-Ostrow as the first lecturer of the year— marking the beginning of a new expansion of the WSRC lecture series. In the past, lectures were limited to the scholars who happen to be inresidence at the time. But Reinharz said that this year, the center plans on expanding the lecture series to include University professors as well. Koloski-Ostrow started off her lecture, “Women’s Lives and Women’s Health in First Century CE Rome and Pompeii,” by relating it to the exhibit currently on view in the WSRC’s Kniznick Gallery, Juanita McNeely: Indomitable Spirit. She spoke about how McNeely, through her graphic and intimate portrayals of the female body, “seeks to create disquiet or discomfort.” But in Roman times, Koloski-Ostrow said, McNeely’s work would not have caused such discomfort. This sentiment was reiterated later on in the lecture when the images on the slides of Romans proved to be even more graphic in some senses than McNeely’s paintings. Starting off her discussion of women’s health in ancient Rome, KoloskiOstrow noted the relative openness of being a woman doctor, or what the was called a medici. Midwifery was one of the few professions open to women and was not limited to any social class. Koloski-Ostrow discussed various writers who talk about women’s issues in ancient times. Women’s health was already seen as being

distinctly different from a general practice of medicine and thus it was practiced separately. There were also texts dedicated specifically to the issues facing the female population. and the writers of these works were both male and female. KoloskiOstrow described that these ancient texts were “resasonable” in the sencse that they denounced superstitions that had prevailed in the world of medicine, such as dispelling the commonly held notion of the movable womb. These scholars actually looked inside women’s bodies both through autopsies and in physical exams, and were therefore able to scientifically prove new, anatomically substantiated ideas about female anatomy. In the second portion of her lecture, Koloski-Ostrow discussed brothels in ancient Rome—their prevalence, aesthetics and practices. She noted that there were probably at least 30 institutions of prostitution in ancient Rome and Pompeii and that they somewhat resembled what they do today. Clients would be escorted to one of the multiple rooms in the house where a prostitute would entertain the guest. Paintings on the walls of the brothels, depicting the rooms, suggest that the beds were luxurious—made up with soft blankets and wools. The graffiti on the walls of the rooms tell us even more information about the sexual encounters of these people—both men and women would graffiti their experiences onto the walls. Paintings of graphic sexual encounters were not limited to the brothels, however. They appeared in private homes as well as in bathhouses. After the fall of Rome, practices of contraception, the sexually explicit paintings and many of the written works on women’s health were destroyed as a new era of piousness took over Europe. But today, the remains, cast in the dust of Mount Vesuvius, endure for us to study in awe.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANN OLGA KOLOSKI-OSTROW

DO NOT DISTURB: Prof. Koloski-Ostrow (CLAS) took this photo of a painting of an erotic scene displayed in a home in Pompeii, Italy.

ROSE ART MUSEUM

Scholars lead discussion on “Light of Reason” By brooke granovsky justice contributing writer

If you can identify the message or moral of the Rose Art Museum’s newest sculpture, Prof. Chris Abrams (FA) asks that you not tell him. On Wednesday, Abrams and Prof. Gordon Fellman (SOC) led a discussion about the newly installed sculpture, “Light of Reason,” in front of the museum. The sculpture, created by artist Chris Burden, consists of repurposed lampposts set into concrete blocks. The blocks are set in three rows, with the outer two rows pointing diagonally to the middle row, and the middle row drawing a path straight into the museum. The lights turn on at about six pm, or earlier if it gets dark, and the sculpture’s light makes the otherwise cool, grey cement blocks look welcoming. Abrams started the discussion by noting that as Burden’s career progressed, his installations grew in scope and size. So-called “historical” Burden art was extreme performance art, including a performance titled “Shoot” where Burden had an assistant shoot him in the arm with a .22 caliber rifle. In another piece, “Trans-Fixed” (1974), Burden nailed his hands into a Volkswagen Bug and lay face up in a pose reminiscent of crucifixion. The Bug was parked on a street in California for two minutes before it was returned to the garage and Burden’s assistants helped him down. Evidently, Burden was not one to shy away from danger. Following this theme, in a 1975 installation called “Doomed,” Burden resolved to lie under a leaned sheet of glass at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago until the public

interfered with the glass or the clock beside it. A museum employee eventually brought Burden some water, after which time Burden moved from under the glass and used a hammer to break the clock, ending the installation. Burden gradually moved from more shocking and moralistic pieces to larger and more open installations. By the 1990s, Burden was creating pieces like “Metropolis 2,” which modeled a traffic jam in Los Angeles, and “Mexican Bridge,” a piece from Burden’s installation series of steel bridges. The Rose hosted both of these works in the past, so it is fitting that Burden’s most expansive piece, “The Light of Reason,” would also make its way to campus. One attendee mentioned that the structure’s columns reminded her of a Greco-Roman forum, and that the professors standing amidst the lampposts were reminiscent of philosophers debating and teaching their students. In response, Fellman commented that the sculpture’s Victorian style is in clear contrast with the modern art and architecture of the museum and around campus. Various participants noted that the structure made them pay more attention to everyday objects, while Fellman pointed out that the lamppost above the Park Street subway stop bears resemblance to those used in the sculpture. A May 2007 review in the New Yorker argued that Burden’s art had a conceptual slackness, and that it had grown less provocative over the years. But Abrams argues that as Burden’s career progressed, he made art that left the observer with an opportunity to define the sculpture’s meaning—a choice that is more arguably provocative than the extreme art that the article’s author, Peter Schjeldahl, had hailed.

Many aspects of the sculpture remain ambiguous. Why is it positioned in diagonal lines that slope toward the museum entrance? Is there supposed to be symbolism in the overarching lampposts towering above the observers’ heads? Fellman wondered if the three rows symbolize Boston’s characteristic three-tier hills, the three letters in the Hebrew word for “truth,”emmet, (a core tenant of Brandeis’ motto) or the three parts of the Brandeis crest.

He also noted that the large, almost intruding sculpture helps mark a resurrection in the Rose’s power after years of battling financing issues and facing threats of closure. Both professors mentioned that the way the public informs the sculpture’s meaning is incredibly significant in light of recent on-campus events. The sexual assault protest at the opening of “the Light of Reason” was one example of how students could find

meaning in the sculpture’s ambiguity. Many of the protesters interpreted the sculpture and its title as a plea for revealing the truth. As Fellman said, “secrets and lies thrive in the dark.” Regardless of public opinion, Abrams says that one of the most important components of the sculpture is this very quality—the idea that it can mean anything. So take the opportunity to walk by and sculpture and see how you perceive it.

HANNAH CHIDEKEL/the Justice

CONTEMPLATING ART: Profs. Gordon Fellman (SOC) (left) and Chris Abrams (FA) (right) lead a discussion on “Light of Reason.”


20

TUESDAY, september 23, 2014 | THE JUSTICE

concert

Mike Posner kicks off the Fall Concert Series By jessie miller and Rachel hughes justice editors

Saturday night, students streamed into Levin Ballroom in anticipation for the first show of the Student Events Fall Concert Series, featuring pop/hip-hop singer Mike Posner. The show actually marked the second time Posner performed at Brandeis— he was last here to perform in 2010. Posner, who is famous for his 2010 Billboard Hot 100 single “Cooler Than Me,” performed an energetic 50-minute set to an energetic crowd. The stage in Levin Ballroom opened up that night with a shorter set by DC, an emerging local hip-hop artist. DC has “played at several reputable venues in the Boston area” and was accompanied by “other artists from his independent ‘STR’ label,” wrote Student Events Director of Concerts Benji Bernstein ’15 in an email interview with the Justice. Though the doors opened at 7 p.m., Posner’s set didn’t actually start until about 9:30 p.m. The crowd was beginning to grow restless by the time he walked onstage and started his show with the song “My Light” off his 2014 album Pages. Posner was all smiles, and didn’t look too un-

BLUE JEANS: Posner was relaxed on the stage, dancing along while he performed.

like the students in the crowd. Wearing a white T-shirt, jeans, a button-down shirt tied around his waist and a Boston Red Sox baseball cap, his stage presence felt very relaxed. He went on to play 14 songs in total, ranging from his first single, 2009’s “Drug Dealer Girl” to hits off his first album, 31 Minutes to Takeoff (2010) to his new songs from Pages. At the concert’s peak, Levin Ballroom was filled to capacity with 750 students in attendance, according to Bernstein. Concert tickets actually sold out by Friday, Sept. 12—just over a week prior to the show. Traditionally, the fall concert has been a single event; Bernstein described Student Events’ motivation for separating the fall concerts into a series this year. They wanted to “turn it up a notch this year, and bring even more popular live music to campus,” he wrote. Posner was chosen to perform first in the series, followed by the emerging band MAGIC!, who will come to campus in November. Bernstein explained that Student Events booked MAGIC! first, just after hearing their now-hit song “Rude” on the radio. When booking on a budget for concerts like this one, Bernstein wrote, Student Events has to “decide early

on about whether we think an artist is going to get big or not,” and it seems that they made the right choice. Posner was actually voted to the top of an “artists you would like to see” category in a survey Student Events sent out to students earlier in the semester, Bernstein wrote. Bernstein further expanded on the concert’s planning process, describing it as exciting but “filled with logistical challenges.” One of the main obstacles is actually booking an artist, whose schedule can change in a single day; “an artist could be available for our predetermined concert date one day, but then when we attempt to book him the next day he is all of a sudden booked for the entire fall on tour,” explained Bernstein. As Posner ended his set with debatably his two biggest hits, the 2010 tracks “Please Don’t Go” and “Cooler Than Me”—U.S. platinum and double-platinum songs, respectively—the crowd sung along and bounced around, seeming to really enjoy songs that were more familiar to them. Tickets will be on sale for MAGIC!’s November show at the Brandeis Ticket Booth soon— keep an eye out for the second part of the first-ever fall concert series.

BABY, PLEASE DON’T GO: Concertgoers moved in close to Posner and took plenty of pictures while he performed.

PHOTOS BY GRACE KWON/the Justice

MAGICAL NIGHT: Mike Posner performed several songs, ranging from his earliest releases in 2009 to his latest 2014 album, at Saturday night’s concert.


THE JUSTICE | TUESDAY, september 23, 2014

21

museum EXHIBIT

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON

GLAMOROUS GLITZ: These dresses, worn by Hollywood stars during the 1930s and ’40s, are on view at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston as part of the new exhibit Hollywood Glamour: Fashion and Jewelry from the Silver Screen.

Exhibit showcases Hollywood glamour By KIRAN GILL justice Staff writer

Upon entering Hollywood Glamour: Fashion and Jewelry from the Silver Screen at the Museum of Fine Arts, one is immediately transported to the luxurious, opulent world of 1930s and ’40s Hollywood. The exhibition turns the spotlight on the dresses and jewels worn in Old Hollywood. Before the ’30s, actresses would utilize their own wardrobe for films but the emergence of the costume designer altered the landscape of Hollywood. In addition to the dresses and jewels, a small collection of photographs, by Edward Steichen, are exhibited. The images capture the bold, captivating and magical presence of some of Hollywood’s finest actresses of the time. The exhibit highlights over 10 dresses on an ascending podium that pronounces the glamour of

each dress. The garments are primarily neutrals with an occasional pop of color. The purple Elsa Schiaperelli floor length gown, worn by Mae West in Every Day’s a Holiday (1937), is a bright addition to the selection of dresses. Shades of cream, silvery grays and black are most prominent in the exhibition. During this era, neutrals reigned supreme; white is shockingly absent. The wall text informs the viewer that crisp white and flashy jewels were difficult to capture for the black-and-white cinematographs of the time. Frequently, the stones of the flashy film jewelry were lightly coated with cold cream in order to be shot for the films. The atmosphere of the exhibition—from somber, dark grey walls to romantic, chandelier lighting— creates an ambience akin to entering a movie theater. The cinematic quality of the exhibition is intensi-

fied by a ten minute long compilation video, created by the exhibit’s curators and shown on loop, which portrays some of the exhibited dresses as they first appeared to American audiences on the big screen. By watching the video on the furthest wall in the room, one is able to appreciate the way the dresses and gowns gracefully followed the curves and lines of the actresses’ bodies as they flirted, seduced and enchanted not just the film’s cast, but also the audience. The exhibit enables the viewer to discern the relationship between European and American fashion in this pivotal time right before World War II. There was an undeniable relationship between European— particularly French—couturiers, and the American designers of Los Angeles. Many designers trained with the leading couturiers of Paris but upon returning to the States

and creating for the starlets of Hollywood, they had to adapt to the American spirit. The fissure between the Parisian and Hollywood design world is exemplified by the working relationship of Coco Chanel and the PolishAmerican film director Samuel Goldwyn. The wall text reveals that the duo worked together for three films, including The Greeks Had a Word for Them (1932) and Tonight or Never (1931). However, the working relationship quickly fizzled, as Chanel’s designs were considered far too subdued for the opulent, glitzy world of 1930s and 40s Hollywood. As a complement to the dresses, the jewels and baubles of the time are also displayed in a dazzling assortment of sparkling diamonds, shining silver and brightly jeweled gems. The jewelry reveals the era’s indulgence in excess. However, the opulent jewelry and accessories

did have a utilitarian side. Many of the necklaces were versatile as they could be taken apart to create separate stand-alone pieces such as bracelets, brooches, dress clips and rings. Actresses were also fond of rings with large star sapphires. The largest documented was 181.82 carats and belonged to Mary Pickford, although the one exhibited is smaller in size—at only 50 carats—and was worn by Myrna Loy. The jewelry of the exhibition belies the industry’s need for decoration and ornamentation. Hollywood Glamour turns back the wheels of time and recreates a world once lived. This is a world where luxury “existed before the era of budgets and economy,” as described the legendary costume designer Edith Head. The exhibition will be on view until March 8.

THEATER

Play skillfully explores Holocaust experiences By RIVER heisler

justice contributing writer

Love is often the last thing one would have expected to find in the Dachau Concentration Camp. But in Martin Sherman’s Bent, directed by David Miller, it is exactly what Max, the protagonist played by Victor L. Shopov, stumbles upon in his lover Horst, played by Brooks Reeves. On Saturday evening, Bent was performed by the Zeitgeist Theater Company at the Boston Center for the Arts’ Plaza Theatre. The story of Bent focuses on a gay man, Max, who is living in Berlin when the play opens. The show masterfully portrays the Nazis’ persecution of gay men by chronicling Max’s ordeals,

first in Berlin, then as a fugitive and then finally in Dachau. The show additionally follows the horrors that Horst, another gay inmate of Dachau, faces. The two end up in a relationship that is as close to love as anything that happened in the camps could be called. The theatre provided a small, intimate venue for the show. This intimacy drew the audience into the show and made them feel as if they truly are in the camp with the actors. During the play, Max struggles to reconcile his view of the world and of himself with the intense self-loathing that is brought out in the camp. Equally hard to reconcile with his self-loathing is the love he finds for Horst. Yet despite their struggles, the lovers manage to find love for each other, even

when tragedy strikes them. Shopov and Reeves gave a phenomenal performance. The audience could feel the terror at many points in the show, notably when Max opens the door to find the Schutzstaffel standing there rather than his landlord. The terror is equally present in the scene when Max is taking the train to Dachau. On the train, we see the violence of the SS guards and their hatred of those on it. We also see Max’s fear, as he has no idea what is in store for him. Max’s attitude is juxtaposed against Horst’s resignation (he is being returned to Dachau after having been given a different assignment for a short time). Yet, despite the terror, the show still manages to maintain a sense of normalcy and humanity. Despite

the unimaginable horror of Dachau, we still see humanity in the guards, in the prisoners and in the people of Berlin. The guards show it when they give Max medicine (which he gives to Horst). Max’s landlord shows some of it by asking Max for rent when they see each other in the barracks. It is shown by Max’s kindness toward Horst and by Greta, a drag queen played by Brandeis’ own Ben Lewin ’16, turning a blind eye when Max and Rudy, Max’s original lover, flee Berlin. Greta, a character who appeared in drag any time he appeared onstage, provided a bleak view into how the clubs in Berlin were run. One could draw parallels between Bent and Cabaret, as both feature a drag queen and nightclub scenes.

CREATIVE COMMONS

SOMBER SITUATION: This press material from Bent depicts Horst (Brooks Reeves), on the left, and Max (Victor L. Shopov), on the right, who play lovers during the Holocaust.

Chillingly, when the audience returns from intermission and when they leave after the show, the stage is set with barbed wire fences, as found in the camps. The audience is forced to interact with the fences because they are close enough to the seats as to necessitate the audience’s walking around them to get to their seats. The audience is forced by these interactions to imagine what the whole situation would have been like in a very personal way. There are many props that are left onstage, forcing the audience to contemplate being in the setting itself. The lighting design was very successful in portraying the mood of the show, as well as being helpful to set the stage for many of the scenes in the play. The scene with Max on the train to Dachau uses a combination of sound effects including the bone-chilling screams of the passengers, a sheet with lighting effects behind it to evoke a sense of movement and very dreary and dark lighting design. The lighting transforms the stage to represent a variety of settings—among them a forest, Berlin, Germany and the concentration camp. The whole production helps to draw the audience member in and make them feel as if they are witnessing the play themselves as participants rather than passive audience members. In the scenes set in Dachau, the guard, played by a member of the ensemble, stands in the aisle, making the audience feel as though they have themselves been brought into the camp. Overall, Bent was a powerful play that brought out many deep emotions in the audience members—many were crying after the show. Every aspect of the performance served to convey the emotion and power intended by the playwright and helped bring home the important issues being addressed.


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CREATIVE COMMONS


23

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2014 | THE JUSTICE

album REVIEW

U2 album hearkens back to familiar sounds By catherine rosch justice editorial assistant

To be a fan of a long-running music group or artist is to live with perpetual disappointment. The newest album will never match up to that first hit that made you fall in love. The band will break up. Or, worst of all, they will sell out, only playing music that will earn money. However, the band U2 has come back in full force with their newest release, Songs of Innocence. Any iTunes or Apple product user has surely discovered that a U2 album they had not purchased has mysteriously appeared on their Apple devices. U2, in partnership with Apple for the release of the iPhone 6, gave a free download of the new album to anyone who uses iTunes, an iPhone, an iPod or the iCloud. At first, I was skeptical. Surely U2 was just pulling a publicity stunt to make up for the much-maligned 2009 album No Line on the Horizon. There was no way that the album would actually be fun to listen to. I downloaded it as a fan, out of duty more than passion, and because I wouldn’t be wasting my money on it. If you are looking for a return to Joshua Tree or Achtung Baby, arguably the two best U2 ablums and emblematic of their late ‘80s style, you will probably be disappointed. That’s not to say that Songs of Innocence is not a good album. Rather, it is a remarkable set of music that harkens back to some of U2’s earliest sounds, updated for the 21st

century. The album combines the religious lyricism of the band’s Catholic faith (commentary on how spirituality can be both a blessing and a curse) with an arena concert feel. It’s like listening to rock in a cathedral, wild and sacred all at the same time. No song gives the listener the sensation of listening to stadium rock in a church quite like “Cedarwood Road,” an autobiographical piece about Bono’s childhood in Ireland. Bono, the product of a CatholicAnglican marriage, sings about the struggle of navigating a bi-religious identity, especially given that Ireland “was a warzone in my teens,” he sings on the track. “Cedarwood Road,” with its themes of faith, youth and violence, harkens back to U2’s 1983 hit “Sunday Bloody Sunday,” successfully tying together the violence of Irish history to reflection on youth. The sound is overwhelming, with the The Edge’s signature guitar effects, but it is also intimate. One of my favorite songs on the album, “California (There Is No End To Love)” has echoes to some of U2’s most famous ballads. “California (There Is No End To Love),” like many of their other songs, opens with chords and a haunting repetition, of, in this case, the lyrics “Barbara/Santa Barbara.” The build in the middle and drive of the chorus to U2’s signature bridge signals that the song is not quite over. It follows the same structure that has made so many U2 songs memorable hits. Even the lyrics, with references to

love and searching for identity, are reminiscent of 1987’s “Where The Streets Have No Name,” one of U2’s greatest songs. Perhaps the catchiest and oddest song on the album is “The Miracle (Of Joey Ramone).” The chords and guitar riffs are upbeat, and the repetition of the chorus and rhythmic “ohs” in background give the song a very pop feel. However, the lyrics are intense and deeply religious, referencing pilgrimages and the search for a miracle in life. That is in sharp contrast to the title, a reference to punk rock god Joey Ramone. The dissonance of the song—its sound, its lyrics and its references—is what makes it so great. To one listener,

Bono and the rest of the band is paying tribute to an artist from a completely different genre; someone else can interpret the album to be yet another ode to God. Songs of Innocence appropriately ends with a song titled “The Troubles,” a direct reference to Na Trioblóidí, a three-decade period from the 1960s to 1998 when the ethnoreligious tensions in Ireland and Northern Ireland were at their peak. The song is slow and haunting, with a woman, Lykke Li, a Swedish pop singer, singing the eerie refrain of “Somebody stepped inside your soul/somebody stepped inside your soul/little by little they robbed and stole/till someone else was in con-

trol.” “The Troubles” is both about Na Trioblóidí and the internal struggle to fight one’s demons. The lyrics can be interpreted either as historic references or as being meaningful in the contemporary world, and that is what makes it so powerful. Songs of Innocence is not a mid’80s hit LP, and that is a good thing. If U2 had been a band that formed in the early 2000s in the era of the European Union and the Celtic Tiger rather than the late 1970s in an era of confusion and violence, Songs of Innocence would have been their first album instead of Boy. Songs of Innocence is nothing innovative, but it is a call back to U2’s youth, and that is what makes it so satisfying.

CREATIVE COMMONS

OLD WITH A TWIST: U2’s new album, Songs of Innocence, was released for free on iTunes and automatically put on iCloud for any owner of an Apple-made music device. The album sounds like much of the band’s older music, updated for the 21st century.

CONCERT

Black Keys performance exhilarates TD Garden By jessie miller and jennie Bromberg

justice Editor and staff writer

Walking into TD Garden on Sunday night, crowds rambled up the escalators, tickets in hand, eagerly awaiting the start of the performance. All this excitement was for the Black Keys, who would be accompanied by opening act Cage the Elephant. The concert fulfilled this the audience with two exemplary, yet different performances. The Black Keys’ lead singer Dan Auerbach mostly remained standing at the microphone at the front of the stage, while Cage the Elephant’s lead singer Matthew Shultz moved around while performing. The two groups embodied two very different types of rock music. Cage the Elephant started playing

promptly at 8 p.m. (the stated start time of the concert) and played for 45 minutes—a substantially-long performance for an opening act. The band opened with “Spiderhead” off of their third studio album Melophobia, released in 2013. Though “Spiderhead” is less well known than some of their other songs, it was still a great way to start off the show. Immediately, the audience was introduced to Shultz’s energetic performance style—running, leaping and jumping around the stage while maintaining the vocal integrity of the music. The set continued with “In One Ear” from their 2008 self-titled album, followed by “Aberdeen” from Thank You, Happy Birthday (2011). Both songs produced an excited response from the audience, as much of Cage the Elephant’s recognition is based in their first two albums.

Of the 11 songs Cage the Elephant played, five were from their latest album: “Spiderhead,” “Take It or Leave It,” “Cigarette Dreams,” “It’s Just Forever” and “Teeth.” During “Teeth,” toward the end of their set, Shultz stepped off the stage and attempted some crowd surfing. The rest of the set consisted of older favorites, such as “Ain’t No Rest For The Wicked,” “Shake Me Down” and “Back Against The Wall,” but the show ended with another new song, “Come a Little Closer.” Cage the Elephant’s set was a perfect balance of old and new and excellently preceded the main act of the night. After the Cage the Elephant cleared the stage, there was a thirtyminute set change during which the audience eagerly anticipated the next band. The Black Keys, a rock band from Akron, Ohio, started off their set with “Dead and Gone”

from their 2011 album El Camino. A few songs into the performance, the curtain backdrop fell to reveal video screens and bright lights. Everyone stood up to dance for “Gold on the Ceiling,” as well as most of the set. Most of the songs that they played were from their second and third most recent albums, El Camino and Brothers (2010), which was great since their new album, Turning Blue (2014) is so recent, and many people aren’t as familiar with it. Overall, the performance was more relaxed than Cage the Elephant, but it still had people up from their seats, dancing. “Tighten Up” was a crowd favorite, and they ended the set with “Lonely Boy,” a song that left the audience wanting more. After they exited the stage, everyone in the stadium was up on their feet clapping and yelling and flashing their phones to get an encore. This dragged on for a

few minutes longer than would have been preferable, but soon enough the band came back on the stage to play three more songs. The first two songs of the encore were off their newest album, which was both a little surprising and disappointing since they weren’t the most well-known songs of the album. Throughout the encore, everyone remained sitting down, and the songs had a slow and mellow vibe. The highlight of the performance was the very last song, “Little Black Submarines from El Camino.” The first half of the song was performed acoustically. There was then a pause and the song ended with an energetic bang. The concert was worth staying out super late on a Sunday night. Both bands gave strong, lively performances that held true to their recorded sound and shows why they are both so popular.

CREATIVE COMMONS

UNLOCKING ROCK: On Sunday night, the Black Keys, pictured here, accompanied by Cage the Elephant, performed at TD Garden in Boston.


24 “

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 2014 | THE JUSTICE

TOPof the

ARTS ON VIEW

Brandeis TALKS

CHARTS

Quote of the week

for the week ending September 21

“As a department, we were upset that it was taking a long time. It’s necessary, and it’s unfortunate for the community, but it’s the only way to make sure the code is good for our community.”

BOX OFFICE

1. The Maze Runner 2. A Walk Among the Tombstones 3. This Is Where I Leave You 4. No Good Deed 5. Dolphin Tale 2 6. Guardians of the Galaxy 7. Let’s Be Cops 8. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (2014) 9. The Drop 10. If I Stay

—Chairman of Student Conduct Board Matthew Chernick ’16 (News, p. 1)

What do you think about the Sodexo Protest?

NYT BESTSELLERS

Hirvelt Megie ’15 “I feel like the students have every right to protest against the hours because we’re up at 2 a.m. and when we’re hungry or want something to drink, the only place to go is the [Hoot Market].”

GUILLERMO NARVAEZ/the Justice

PLAYIN’ ON THE OLD BANJO: Justice photographer Guillermo Narvaez ’18 took this film photo of a man, who did not know he was being photographed, playing a banjo in San Francisco in July.

the justice wants to see your original artwork! Send works to photos@thejustice.org for a chance to be featured in next week’s issue.

iTUNES

CROSSWORD

Brandon Odze ’16

“I don’t think it was really that necessary.”

Lawrence Ma ’16 “I’m fine with it.”

Tova Weinberger ’18 “I personally think that it was a good thing to do because I’m not going to be done eating at 7 [p.m.]”

ACROSS 1 Strategy rarely involving a power hitter 12 Class fig. 15 1959 Fabian hit 16 Art of MGM? 17 Oil field workers 18 1909 ballet “__ Sylphides” 19 Portuguese is its official lang. 20 Scotland’s __ Awe 21 Static, e.g. 23 Not surprising 26 Personal question? 27 Gulf sight 28 ’60s Navy project 30 Sharp turn 32 Riga native 33 Touch screen accessory 34 Liability-limiting order 36 Cheater’s tool 38 “J’accuse” writer 39 Ios and Naxos are in them 43 Fast ballroom dances 47 Second 48 American __ 49 Home of the 3M Company 50 “SportsCenter” brief 52 USSR successor 54 Extend an invitation for 55 Santa __ 56 7, for N 58 Latin is often heard in it 59 Pitches 60 Vision 64 Holy mlle. 65 “Mission: Impossible” actor 66 Desperate letters 67 “It’s about time they all left!” DOWN 1 “Salome” composer 2 __ hut 3 First FIFAWorld Cup winner 4 Inning trio? 5 CPR provider 6 Fire 7 Pasta shape 8 Hounds 9 Longtime college football coach who is now an ESPN analyst 10 Bermuda hrs. 11 Offering only two choices 12 First spacecraft to orbit Jupiter 13 Radio buttons 14 Claims 22 Light sources 24 Safety announcement 25 Preminger noir classic 29 Surprise hit, maybe 31 They have shuttles and treadles 35 Montana motto word

Fiction 1. Personal—Lee Child 2. Somewhere Safe with Somebody Good—Jan Karon 3. Festive in Death—J.D. Robb 4. The Children Act—Ian McEwan 5. The Witch with No Name—Kim Harrison Nonfiction 1. What If?—Randall Munroe 2. 13 Hours— Mitchell Zuckoff with members of the Annex Security Team 3. Waking Up— Sam Harris 4. World Order—Henry Kissinger 5. Diary of a Mad Diva—Joan Rivers 1. Taylor Swift—“Shake it Off” 2. Meghan Trainor—“All About That Bass” 3. Jason Aldean—“Gonna Know We Were Here” 4. Jessie J, Ariana Grande and Nicki Minaj—“Bang Bang” 5. Florida Georgia Line—“Sun Daze”

BILLBOARD

1. Lecrae—Anomaly 2. Maroon 5—V 3. Jhene Aiko—Souled Out 4. Ryan Adams—Ryan Adams 5. Lee Brice—I Don’t Dance 6. Jeezy—Seen It All: The Autobiography 7. Interpol—El Pintor 8. Dustin Lynch—Where It’s At 9. Soundtrack—Guardians Of The Galaxy: Awesome Mix Vol. 1 10. Robert Plant—Lullaby And... The Ceaseless Roar Top of the Charts information provided by Fandango, the New York Times, Billboard. com and Apple.com.

37 Singing style in Rossini operas 39 Lifeless form 40 Accept 41 Jewel boxes 42 In love 44 Filo pastry dessert 45 Storm consequences 46 Last to finish 51 Argentine grassland 53 Bag 57 First name in Russian gymnastics 61 Sushi choice 62 Lexington Ave. line 63 Practice leader?

STAFF’S Top Ten

Solution to last issue’s crossword Crossword Copyright 2014 MCT Campus, Inc.

THINGS TO DRINK INSTEAD OF PSLs By rachel hughes justice editor

SUDOKU Ricky Miller ’17 “I was walking through Usdan at, like, 4:30 [p.m.], and I saw they made some nice signs, but I didn’t really see anyone there, so I don’t really know to what extent the event actually took place despite the hubbub that engendered a week ago.”

INSTRUCTIONS: Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each small 9-box square contains all of the numbers from one to nine.

—Compiled and photographed by Grace Kwon/the Justice. Editor’s note: Ricky Miller ’17 is a Justice Layout staff member.

Solution to last issue’s sudoku

Sudoku Copyright 2014 MCT Campus, Inc.

Hey man, I’m just as jazzed by pumpkin spice and Pinterest as the next suburbanite transplant 20-something, but fall is so much more than its Starbucks-centric signature drink. Here are 10 other delicious drinks to swap for your pumpkin spice latte. 1. Green tea latte 2. Yerba mate 3. Americano 4. Hot cocoa 5. Lemon ginger tea 6. Coconut water 7. Kale smoothie 8. Monster 9. Water 10. A regular cup of coffee, perhaps?

The Justice, Sept. 23, 2014  

The independent student newspaper of Brandeis University since 1949.

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