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Magazine

BRINGING YOU THE WORLD OF RASTAFARI and reggae

SUMMER 2020 | £4 ORDER AT

www.jusjahmagazine.com

Happy 128th Earthday

| Emperor HaileJus’Jahmagazine Selassie I Summer 2020

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Special Thank you’s Thank you All praises be to Jah Rastafari on the completion of the Summer issue of Jus’ Jah Magazine.

About the cover: This cover shows AWA(left) holding a welcoming speech as the president of the students union of the German school in Addis Ababa in May 1967, honouring H.I.M.’s visit. The picture was supplied to us by Prince Asfa-Wossen Asserate (AWA).

Notices Jus’ Jah Magazine is published four times a year in the UK. No content may be reproduced in any format without prior written consent from the owner. Jus’ Jah Magazine is committed to producing a culturally-rich, vibrant and representative publication. Our contributors offer a unique range of views. Their individual opinions are their own, and not necessarily shared by Jus’ Jah Magazine.

Thank you to Nicholas Dixon, Justice Dixon, Jahzarah Dixon, Jahfari Dixon, Glynis Mc Queen-Simon, GEMs Management Consulting, Teodora Nikolov, Prince Asfa-Wossen Asserate, the Imperial House of Ethiopia, Asha Heights, Righteous Youths Records, Ronnie Tomlinson, Destine Media, Chezidek, Mount Zinai, Euon Brown, Greatly Nurtured Development, Remi Butler-Najair, Diaspora Socks, Allyson Williams MBE, Sista Benji Uwimana, Liam Lindsey, Warren Belle, Ugly Headz Ltd, Buju Banton, Nu Flowah, Mandingo, Ras I-Maric, Richie Spice, VP Records, Natasha VonCastle, Wise Lockz, Livity Plant-Based Cuisine, Kareema and Kaleema Shakur Muhammad, Boogie and Blaze, and Jus’ Jah Kitchen. Also, the deepest gratitude to my parents for their support and love.

Our departments Greetings@jusjahmagazine.com General enquiries Sales@jusjahmagazine.com To advertise with us or collaborate Picth@jusjahmagazine.com If you have a story you want published. Subscriptions@jusjahmagazine.com For all enquiries about subscribing. Editor@jusjahmagazine.com All editorial enquires including interviews, features and corrections.

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Thank you to all our readers and supporters, because of you I can do my dream job. This edition of Jus’ Jah Magazine is dedicated to H.I.M. Haile Selassie I, H.I.M. Empress Menen Asfaw, Marcus Mosiah Garvey, Leonard Howell, Delroy Washington, the founders of the Notting Hill Carnival, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and George Floyd.

Jus’Jahmagazine | Summer 2020


Contents Page

2. Thank you’s 3. Contents Page 4. Advert 5. Letter From Publisher 6-7. The Rasta Calendar 8-9. Happy Earthday Marcus Garvey 10-13. Power of Giving Back with Euon Brown 14-16. Diaspora Socks 17. Chezidek’s New Single 18. Nyabinghi Chant 19. Advert 20-21. Meeting Royalty 22-25. Honouring Haile Selassie I 26-28. Ras I-Maric talks music and football 29. The First Rasta: Leonard Howell 30-33. Royal Empress Uwimana 36-39. Celebrating Carnival 40-45. Carnival Timeline 46-48. Inside The Music Business with Ugly Headz Ltd 49. Poetry Corner with Mount Zinai 50-51. Remembering Delroy Washington 52-54. Roots and Culture with Nu Flowah 55. 10 Famous Quotes from Marcus Garvey 56-57. Reggae Releases 58-60. Farming, Health and travel with Wise Lockz 61. Enkutatash 62. Jus’ Jah Kitchen 63. Ital Food the basics 64-67. Ital is Vital with Livity Plant-Based Cuisine 68-69. Goldfish Comic Strip By Justice Dixon 70. The Story Corner with Jahzarah Dixon 71. Rasta Search 72. Twelve Tribes Chart 73. His Majesty Says 74. About This Picture 75. Advert 76. Back Page www.jusjahmagazine.com

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14-16

20-21 26-28 22-25

30-33 40-45

36-39 46-48 64-67

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“INI Ah Reason” reggae podcast

A brand new podcast discussing all things related to Reggae and Dancehall music. We also highlight issues within the Rasta community, the Caribbean and Africa. INI Ah Reason is hosted by Journalist and Editor Sinai Fleary and Reggae artist and Songwriter Asha Heights. Join the discussion by using #INIpodcast

The podcast is available on

Spotify, Apple Podcasts, YouTube, Soundcloud and Colourfulradio.com

Instagram: @iniahreason

Twitter: @InIAhReason Facebook: @InIAhReason


Magazine

Letter from the Publisher Dear Reader, I hope this issue finds you well and healthy. Thank you for purchasing the Summer 2020 issue of Jus’ Jah Magazine. I hope this issue brings plenty of good summer vibes to you and all those around you. Due to the Coronavirus pandemic, the annual Notting Hill Carnival has been cancelled. It is the first time it will not take place in more than 50 years. But in this Summer issue, we will be celebrating Carnival and all its beauty, culture and history even if we cannot dance on the streets of Ladbroke Grove, west London. I was extremely overjoyed to interview Ms Allyson Williams. She has been at the forefront of Carnival with her family from the very beginning. Their captivating story is included in this special issue. Recently, I decided to offer Jus’ Jah Magazine as a digital publication for the very first time. This has been proven popular with more of us consuming news and content on our phones, tablets and laptops. Jus’ Jah Magazine will continue to publish our magazine in digital and print formats, serving the needs of all our readers. Also, it was only right we honour His Imperial Majesty Emperor Haile Selassie I on his 128th Earthday. I was able secure an exclusive interview with a Senior Royal from the Imperial House of Ethiopia for this issue. Prince Asfa-Wosssen Asserate spoke openly about growing up as a prince in Ethiopia’s most famous family. I can’t tell you how elated I am about this and hope you indulge and share this rich Ethiopian history. I would like to thank Prince Asserate for his time and contribution to this special tribute edition to the King of Kings of Ethiopia, His Imperial Majesty Emperor Haile Selassie I the First. The horrific and brutal murder of George Floyd in America has sent shock-waves around the globe and rightfully so. Racism, police brutality and injustice has plagued our Black communities for too long and it is time for it all end once and for all. Black people deserve to live in peace. Our lives should be unhindered and free from racial inequality, abuse and prejudice. After an uncertain start to the year, I hope you have found some harmony, structure and enlightenment for the summer months. However, you spend the next few months, I hope you have a great time and don’t forget to take Jus’ Jah Magazine with you on your travels. Give thanks for your support and love. Jah guidance and blessings always.

Sinai Fleary Editor and Founder Jus’Jahmagazine | Summer 2020

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calendar

The Rasta Calendar

There are several key events that are of historical and cultural significance to Rastafarians. These special dates are celebrated throughout the year. Here are some of those important dates in the Rasta calendar.

Gena or Genna

The Battle of Adwa

January 7th (Annually)

March 1st (Annually)

Gena is the Ethiopian Orthodox Church celebration of Christmas. Often called Rasmas by Rasta communities.

On this date in 1896, the first war was fought between Ethiopia and Italy, in the town of Adwa. Menelik II lead Ethiopia’s 100,000 army to victory against the Italians, who wanted to colonise Ethiopia.

Robert Nesta Marley Earthday February 6th (Annually) The Reggae legend, Bob Marley, was born on this day in 1945, in Nine Miles, Jamaica. His earthday is celebrated by Reggae fans and members of the Rasta community in Jamaica. Celebrations usually take place across the island, but also at Marley’s home, which is now the famous Bob Marley Museum on Hope Road, Kingston. 6

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Empress Menen I Earthday April 3rd (Annually) Rasta’s honour the earthday of Empress Menen Asfaw, who was the wife of Emperor Haile Selassie I. According to the Ethiopian calendar she was born on 26 Magabit 1881, which translates to April 3rd, 1891 in the Gregorian calendar. She founded the Empress Menen School for girls and did extensive charity work in her homeland.


calendar Africa Day

Marcus Mosiah Garvey Earthday

May 25th (Annually)

August 17th (Annually)

(Previously known as African Liberation Day)

Is the annual celebration of the establishment of the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) now known as the African Union. The OAU was set up on May 25th, 1963, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Two of the founding fathers were Emperor Haile Selassie I and Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana.

Leonard Howell Earthday June 16th (Annually) Leonard Howell is regarded as the ‘First Rasta’, and was born 1898. He began preaching about the crowning of Ras TafarI Makonnen in 1933. Howell formed one of the earliest Rasta communities called Pinnacle, in St. Catherine, Jamaica.

Haile Selassie I Earthday July 23rd (Annually) Haile Selassie I’s earthday is one of the key dates in the Rasta calendar. He was born in 1892. His name at birth was Tafari Makonnen. His father was Makonnen Wolde Mikael and his mother was named Yeshimebet Ali. His earthday is acknowledged in the Rastafari community with traditional Nyabinghi celebrations.

Marcus Mosiah Garvey Jr. ONH is revered as a prophet for the RastafarI movement. His earthday (birthday) is celebrated annually, by both Pan-Africanists and Rastas.

Ethiopian New Year September 11th (Annually) The Ethiopian calendar is seven years behind the Gregorian calendar. Enkutatash is the word for Ethiopian New Year in Amharic, the official language of Ethiopia.

Peter Tosh, Earthday October 19 (Annually) Peter Tosh was born on October 19, 1944 and was a founding member of The Wailers. He was fondly known as the ‘Stepping Razor’ or the ‘Bush Doctor’. Many use his earthday to remember his life, activism and music.

Royal Ethiopian Coronation November 2nd (Annually) The Rastafari movement commemorate the anniversary of the Coronation of Haile Selassie I and Empress Menen Asfaw, which took place on this date in 1930.

Jus’Jahmagazine | Summer 2020

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history

Happy Earthday

Marcus Garvey by Sinai Fleary

T

he honourable prophet, Marcus Mosiah Garvey, was born on August 17, 1887, in St Ann’s Bay, Jamaica. As a teenager he was an apprentice in the printing industry. He lived briefly in Panama, England and Costa Rica, before returning to Jamaica in 1914. Upon his return to the island, he founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA). Garvey was determined to help liberate Black people around the world, who were facing racial oppression. He hoped to instil a sense of pride, dignity and selfknowlegde, amongst Black communities globally. In 1916, he headed stateside and set up the first branch of the UNIA in New York City’s Harlem district. By 1919, the UNIA had grown in popularity and had around 30 international branches and millions of members. Garvey and the UNIA emphasised the importance of wealth and economic power in the Black community. The association published newspapers and the popular Negro World journal. He also founded many businesses in the US, including Negro Factories Corporation and he became President of the Black Star Line shipping and passenger company. The main aim of the Black Star Line was to create a link between North America 8

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and Africa and help repatriate AfricanAmericans to Liberia. The company did purchase some ships. The very first ones were called, the SS Yarmouth, the SS Shady Side and the SS Antonio Maceo. In 1920, Garvey and his wife, Amy, published the first volume of his groundbreaking biography. Entitled The


history Philosophies and Opinions of Marcus Garvey, the book was well-received and is still considered a mustread amongst those in the African diaspora. When Garvey spoke, he commanded the crowd with his robust and authoritative voice. His passion, delivery and message has made him one of the greatest orators of all-time. At the height of his career Garvey and the UNIA had 12 million followers internationally, making him one of our most victorious leaders. He was invited to lecture in various countries around the world about his ideologies. While in the US, his popularity grew. His aim to have a united Africa and his promotion of Black Nationalism divided opinions. Other African-American leaders such as W.E.B Du Bois, who promoted racial integration, couldn’t agree with his messages. Some questioned Garvey’s intentions and rumours began to circulate. For Garveyites, they felt this was an attempt to rid the Black community of a leader it so desperately needed. In January 1922, Garvey was arrested and charged with fraud. He was sentenced to five years; which he served half of before being deported back to his birthplace. In Jamaica, he got back to work and published a newspaper called The Blackman and even formed his own political party. The aim of getting into politics on the island, was to stand up for the Black majority who were under minority white rule by the British at the time. Garvey’s influence spread far and wide, helping to ignite many Back-to-Africa

Movements and a new-found interest in Pan-Africanism. For the Rastafari community, Garvey is regarded as a prophet. In 1920, when Garvey said, “Look to Africa, when a Black King shall be crowned, for the day of deliverance is at hand,” many believe this was prophecy. In 1930, when Ras Tafari Makonnen was crowned Emperor Haile Selassie I many saw this as Garvey’s vision being fufilled. The Emperor’s ancestral links to the Queen of Sheba (Makeda) and King Solomon are also regarded as crucial to the movement and their belief he is the returned Messiah. Garvey’s blueprint for Black Nationalism and civil rights helped to influence Malcolm X and his parents, Nelson Mandela, Martin Luther King, Jr. and many other Black leaders. He passed away on June 10th, 1940, in West Kensington, London. However, it would take 24 years for his body to be returned to Jamaica, where he was named a National Hero. He was eventually reburied in Kingston’s National Heroes Park. It has been 80 years since his untimely passing, but Marcus Garvey still remains one of the most influential figures in Black History. Happy Earthday Marcus Mosiah Garvey!

Jus’Jahmagazine | Summer 2020

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Giving Back

The power of

giving back with Greatly Nurtured Development (GND)

ell us a little bit about yourself. My name is Euon Brown and I am the Founder and CEO of Greatly Nurtured Development (GND). When I left secondary school in 2003, I signed for QPR on a professional youth football contract. I was also offered an England U16s school boys trial, but injury halted my opportunity. Following this and after my recovery, I was offered a Grenada U17s youth international level trial. After a successful trial, I went on to represent Grenada as an international youth from U17 through to U20 level. At a professional senior level, I had stints in Sweden, Finland and Denmark before ultimately being called to represent Grenada at senior international level in 2009 at the CONCACAF Gold Cup. Shortly after that tournament, I was hit with a number of injuries and was forced to retire from football. Since retiring, I have developed skills and qualifications in football coaching, personal training, mentoring, life coaching, counselling and sports psychology. I also have a career in programme management with a background in data analysis. If I were to be asked to describe my sports development hub in a few words, I would say we provide sports development and in return are provided with legacies. You played professional football for the Grenada national team, which is an incredible achievement that many people dream of. What was that experience like? 10

Jus’Jahmagazine | Summer 2020

All photo’s supplied by Euon Brown

T

Interview By Sinai Fleary


Giving Back

Euon Brown playing for Grenada at International level. wellbeing and conversation. We are an elite It gives me an extreme sense of pride to know that through football, I am one of a few team of coaches and specialists and we are the best at what we deliver. The services we that has represented a nation and a family provide are: heritage. Thinking back to those days, it was Football Academy exciting knowing that you have the weight of Football Coaching a nation resting on your shoulders. Fitness Coaching Player Representation Why did you stop playing? Sports Mentoring Unfortunately, regular injuries were my Life Coaching downfall, and after succumbing to a number Sports Counselling of injuries at a young age, I became injury Workshops, presentations and parties. prone. I consequently decided to retire from professional football in the 2012/13 season at Talk us through your Football academy. the age of 24. Our football academy provides intense football training sessions using high-quality You are the Founder and CEO of Greatly training drills, reward systems and data Nurtured Development. What services to monitor and drive performance. Our does your company provide? academy is for 6-15-year-olds and is based in Greatly Nurtured Development (GND) is south east London. a sports development hub. GND provides Our training is built on integrity, a platform to learn a range of diverse skills discipline, and tempo - that is at the heart catered for children, young people and of everything that we do. Our main aim is adults in a safe, interactive and relaxed to ensure that players can play to the best environment through football, fitness,

Jus’Jahmagazine | Summer 2020

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Giving Back of their abilities unhampered by on or off-field concerns. We support to develop mental resilience, but also want them to be empowered. Our football training sessions focus on hand to eye coordination, ball control, ball manipulation, game awareness, intelligence and understanding, and fitness, strength and conditioning methods. Within our programme, we train weekly and play internal exhibition matches every month at Harris Academy Greenwich in Eltham, south east London. Our players are rewarded with medals for everyone who takes part and trophies for those who have displayed footballing excellence within those matches. Our GND Football Academy sessions will improve concentration and coordination, technical ability, footballing intelligence, strength, stamina, speed and build confidence. We have an end of year presentation to recognise and celebrate achievement and to motivate players to continue achieving. We also have an end of season GND Football Academy away day. Team away days are one of the most popular and powerful things on the GND Football Academy

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calendar. It provides coaches, staff and players means of building off field teamwork, which has an impact on field. As well as sports services you also offer mentoring and life coaching for young people. Why did you add this element to the business? I am passionate about the development of children and young people and as I developed my studies and research, I realised that the mental aspect of sport is a key component to progress and achievement. Therefore, including these services made absolute sense.


Giving Back How important is it for you to give back to the children and young people in south east London? I was born and partly raised in south east London and so there is that personal connection to providing a platform for those around me. South London in general is notoriously known for high rates of gun and knife crime and so this gives my ambition a deeper meaning. Additionally, when you speak to children and young people about their hopes and dreams, the message that often comes back is they can’t or don’t know how to move forward in a positive direction. I believe the limitation of their mind causes them to accept the way things are or not take a positive action. GND is here to alter that mindset and hopefully change that paradigm where we can. What has been the response from the local community and parents? The parents and local community are pleased that there is an alternative to regular Sunday football with additional services to develop their children. Through our programmes, we place a strong focus on individual and team development which has provided stronger results for GND and ultimately the children. With children and young people spending more time on electrical devices, sport and fitness have become so important. Have you noticed a decrease in the overall fitness levels of young people? Of course, not at GND, but in general yes. Obesity in the UK is on the rise according to government statistics and this is due to many factors including the rise of technology, which can keep you physically and sometimes mentally inactive if overused.

What tips and advice would you give to parents/carers to keep their children and relatives fit and healthy? The return of day to day physical and mental activity is key to stay fit and healthy. GND’s three key life principles are healthy eating, achieving the recommended hours of sleep per night and exercising regularly. I would recommend following those guidelines in order to achieve a balance. If there is a lack of any of these three things at any one point in time, the body will be imbalanced, whether physically or mentally. What is next for GND for the rest of 2020? More dedicated sports development and growth. We want to create as many legacies as we can – its what we live for. Where can people get in touch with you online? Website: www.gndhub.com Twitter: @gndsportshub Facebook: @gndsportshub

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Fashion

Diaspora Socks Interview By Sinai Fleary

All pictures supplied by Diaspora Socks

I

ntroduce yourself to our readers. Hello, my name is Remi, I’m 35, born and raised in west London, England, to Jamaican parents but now living in Birmingham UK.

would buy fabric in Brixton and Goldhawk Road and make one off pieces. I’ve still got some bomber jackets she made and they always get compliments whenever I wear them.

What/who inspired you to get into clothing design? My partner Cyrena (@freakdeluxe) is the one who inspired me with clothing design. She was heavily into fashion due to work and we used to attend London Fashion Week, Press Days and things like that. She can design, pattern cut and sew so we

Tell us about Diaspora Socks and how did you come up with your company name? I came up with the name “Diaspora Socks” because my vision was to cater for the whole African Diaspora and involve everyone. I am a firm believer that unity is love.

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Jus’Jahmagazine | Summer 2020


Fashion

Diaspora Socks is a brand that showcases the African Diaspora through sock designs. Each sock is named\ titled to teach us something about our history or something within a specific culture in the diaspora. I hope through this, we will be able to understand each other better. I feel like foundations such as knowledge, love and understanding are key to moving forward in society together as a unit. Where does your inspiration for your designs come from? My inspirations for my designs come from anything and anywhere, sometimes they come in my sleep. I keep my eyes and ears open. Talk us through the process of creating a pair of Diaspora socks, from concept to finish. The process is simple for me to be honest, the ideas can be organic or stem from an outside influence. I draw the design up and send it to the manufacturer who then produce the digital image. The next stage

is, I proof it and make any last-minute changes (if necessary) and then it goes to the machines. After that, I begin the process of deciding what to name the design and the message I want send. What sizes do your socks come in? My socks only come in one size which is large. This size will fit anyone size 6-11 UK or 7-12 US. Although, I have previous clients who are size 5 UK and said they fit perfect. More sizes will become available it’s very early days and the whole project is funded by myself, there are no investors or bank loans. How does your cultural background influence your designs? My cultural background influences my designs A LOT! I love culture and history especially growing up in west London. I have friends from all over the world which has allowed me to experience different cultures firsthand on a personal level. My love for travel has also helped and influenced the design of some of the socks.

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Fashion

A percentage of the sales you receive go back to charitable causes. Why was this important to add and what are some of the projects you have already donated to? Having a percentage of my sales going back into grass roots projects for the diaspora was very important to add. It was the reason the brand was created in the first place. The inspiration came from me supporting my friends (@coupe_dc), which is a Ghanaian orphanage in Tarkwa. In terms of a monetary donation it’s still very early stages, that’s the goal though hopefully this interview/exposure will help with that. I have done partnered product giveaways, for charities, to help raise funds and am conducting a list of charities to support in the future with monetary gifts. Who is your favourite clothing designer (can be an independent/established) and why? I don’t have a favourite designer. I just like what I see when I see it. Lately, I’ve bought a lot from “@Rare Culture London” and I like the stuff “@Erenti” are doing. Where can people purchase your products? People can purchase my product via my 16

Jus’Jahmagazine | Summer 2020

website www.diasporasocks.com only. You may catch me with a stall at some cultural events in the future. Are there any plans for any other clothing items? Yes, I have plans to do kids sizes as people are asking for those. I am also looking into producing my designs on sport socks. What is next for Diaspora Socks? I’m not sure yet. I don’t want to get to ahead of myself, for now I just want to grow the brand and have it established worldwide. I want to continue to plant seeds to encourage the future generation to learn about our culture and history. I hope to use the money to help create/build a business that will benefit us economically. What are your social media handles? Instagram: @diasporasocks Otherwise feel free to email me. Website: www.diasporasocks.com £10 per pair or customers can save when they purchase collections


Reggae

Chezidek calls out injustice

on new single R oots and culture artist Chezidek is calling out police brutality on his new single entitled “Because I’m Black.” The inspiration behind the song was to highlight the increase of police brutality against African Americans. The timely track is taken from his forthcoming album which will be distributed by Tads Records. “Because I’m Black” comes at a time when the Black community is hurting after seeing Ahmaud Arbery, an innocent Black man murdered in America, while jogging and the barbaric murder of George Floyd. Chezidek has been unapologetic with his music and visuals since he burst onto the scene in the early 2000s. He had his first number one hit single with “Leave the Trees”. His album Inna Di Road was distributed by Greensleeves Records in 2007. The album had breakout hits like “Call Pon Dem” and “Mi Nah Run.” Chezidek also had his music featured in popular computer game Grand Theft Auto IV. Chezidek’s new single promises to be a rallying cry for Black people, with its

powerful lyrics which wail out: The want to crucify I because I’m black They want to persecute I because I’m black You want to execute I because I’m black You want to scrutinize I because I’m black The hard-hitting track has been produced on his own imprint label, Cheziberry Records. Chezidek’s new video “Because I’m Black” is out now on YouTube

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Nyabinghi Chant JAH got the whole world in His hands

JAH got the Golden Sceptre in His hands

JAH got the whole world in His hands

JAH got the Golden Sceptre in His hands

JAH got the whole world in His hands

JAH got the whole world in His hands

JAH got the whole world in His hands

JAH got the Sword of Solomon in His hands

JAH got the tiny little baby in His hands

JAH got the Sword of Solomon in His hands

JAH got the tiny little baby in His hands

JAH got the Sword of Solomon in His hands

JAH got the tiny little baby in His hands

JAH got the whole world in His hands

JAH got the whole world in His hands

JAH got the lightening and the thunder in His hands

JAH got the Ark of the Covenant in His hands JAH got the lightening and the thunder in JAH got the Ark of the Covenant in His hands

His hands

JAH got the Ark of the Covenant in His hands

JAH got the lightening and the thunder in His hands

JAH got the whole world in His hands JAH got the whole world in His hands JAH got the Golden Sceptre in His hands

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Jus’Jahmagazine | Summer 2020


Magazine Never miss an issue of Jus’ Jah Magazine! You can now subscribe, order single print or digital issues all at www.jusjahmagazine.com/shop

We ship our publication worldwide.

Spring 2020

Summer 2020


Honouring

Meeting Royalty by Sinai Fleary

D

uring the 1990s, we would attend Nyabinghi every Sunday afternoon in a popular community space called Simba, in Shepherd’s Bush, west London. Every week, we would gather with other Rasta families to experience a true sense of togetherness. We would recite passages from the Bible, learn Psalms and debate the current state of our communities and Africa. I was always happy to see other Rasta children like me. I was fond of Simba, as many were. It provided a safe space for the Black community to dwell, bond and just be. There is a large Rasta community in London and the celebrations whether they were in Bridge Park, Stonebridge or St. Agnes Place, Kennington, were always triumphant. Emerging outside at 6am the next morning after a night of Nyabinghi always left a sense 20

Jus’Jahmagazine | Summer 2020

of calmness and renewed energy and focus for me, even as a young child. These places and gatherings shaped us and strengthened us. It wasn’t until I got into my teens that I began to research more into the Rastafari movement. I was inspired to see how many people were touched by its teachings. As a young woman, I rediscovered the music my parents had played years before. I listened to the music and I studied it, the verses and choruses of artists like Bob Marley, Dennis Brown, Sizzla and Luciano echoed through my bedroom daily. I searched for documentaries, radio stations that could quech my thirst for knowledge about InI (us). When I asked Rasta elders about the faith, I was left in awe at how much Rastafari lit up people’s lives. Every day, my own mother was a great example of what was required to be a Rasta Empress. I also


Honouring done alot of looking within and by doing so, I found the most ravishing feeling. I found the presence of Jah and he ignited my soul. From those days until now, I have never felt alone because I know Jah Rastafari dwells in me and walks with I (me) every day. What I didn’t know is my journalism career would bring me closer to Jah more than ever before. In 2016, I would be blessed with a unique opportunity to interview a member of the Ethiopian Royal Family. I was nervous, I couldn’t believe me, a young Rasta woman from Shepherd’s Bush had been given the momentous task by the editor of a national newspaper. I called Prince Asserate and we spoke and spoke. In fact, we went over our designated 30 minute slot. He was warm and welcoming, to be honest it was like speaking to a long-lost relative. But in the back of my mind, I wanted to get the interview right, after all he was a relative of Emperor Haile Selassie I. A few months later, I was invited to his official book launch in London. I was excited to be in his presence. After the launch, there was a chance to meet him. I introduced myself and I told him who I was and to my surprise he remembered me. That night was a huge moment in my journalism career but also on a spiritual and cultural level. I left the venue clutching a signed copy of his book and completely exhilarated. This year, I reached out to Prince Asserate and asked him if he would be part of Jus’ Jah Magazine to honour the Emperor. To be honest, I wasn’t sure what he would say, as so much had been written about his great-uncle already. But again, to my surprise the answer was “Sinai, my dear, of course I will, I would love to.” I spent a sunny Saturday afternoon in April, speaking to the Prince having the most fascinating conversation. He spoke about his relationship with the Emperor, Empress

Menen, African history and so much more. I learnt so much from this conversation about the Ethiopian Empire and African history. I was getting first-hand detailed accounts of life in Ethiopia’s most famous family. I am incredibly grateful to Prince Asserate for his time. But also in his dedication in helping me put together this tribute. Even the cover wouldn’t have been possible without him. In a world that is focused on dividing us, we are stronger together even if we do not always agree. Everyone should be free to practice their own religion or spiritual beliefs in peace. But for many Rasta people and communities, injustice and abuse is still common. With many nations still discriminating against those who choose to hail King Selassie I. I took great pride in putting this entire issue together to ensure that we honoured Emperor Haile Selassie I in the right way. To Prince Asserate, he was his great-uncle, the Emperor of Ethiopia and the father of Africa. For Rastafarians around the world, he is Jah, the Almighty, the Black Messiah and is ever living, ever faithful and ever sure. To have relative of Emperor Haile Selassie I give his input to my publication, means the world to me and it is an experience I will cherish forever. Please enjoy our conversation together on the next few pages, which the Prince has granted me permission to share. Happy 128th Earthday to Emperor Haile Selassie I on July 23rd 2020.

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honouring

Honouring Emperor

All pictures supplied by Prince Asfa-Wossen Asserate

Haile Selassie I

This picture shows AWA (left) holding a welcoming speech as the President of the Students Union of the German School in Addis Ababa in May 1967, honouring H.I.M.’s visit. Prince Asfa-Wossen Asserate (AWA), is a grand-nephew of Emperor Haile Selassie and a great-grandson of Empress Menen. He lives in Germany and is a best-selling Author and Consultant for African and Middle Eastern Affairs. Our Editor, Sinai Fleary, had the honour of speaking to him exclusively for Jus’ Jah Magazine.

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e last spoke in 2016, when I met you at your book launch in London. What was the reaction from readers to your book, King of Kings the Triumph and Tragedy of Emperor Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia? 22

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The reaction has been overwhelming. I am glad to say the critics from The Spectator to The Guardian were incredibly favourable. My main reason for writing this biography of the late Emperor was to give him a fair deal because I did not feel he was given that.


honouring Whoever wrote about him ever since his demise was either politically biased or it was a hagiography. I wanted to write something that is more objective. Did you feel a sense of pressure writing the book? Of course, no human being is always 100 percent objective and we are all subjective in one way or another. And the critics would have smothered me and said that this is another attempt to aggrandize the late Emperor. I sincerely hope that the book proved them wrong. You dedicated the book to your great-grandmother Her Imperial Majesty Empress Menen. How important was it that you shine a light on her (the Mother of All Ethiopians)? I consider the late Empress to have been something of a Saint. She was indeed a magnificent human being - a warm-hearted and considerate person. Unfortunately, very few persons attempted to write even articles about her. A lot of the focus on her was just Prince Asfa-Wossen Asserate’s book is out now! simply stating that she accompanied Whenever she saw something done that wasn’t the Emperor into exile, with very little else. Empress Menen was a role model for the according to the laws of God she reacted. She emancipation of the Ethiopian women. Before was such a kind-hearted and a God-fearing woman, that every citizen who felt they were the war, she was the one who built the first wrongly treated by the government, went to school for girls out of her private funds and founded the Ethiopian Women’ s Association. her to ask her intervention with the Emperor. She was a devout Christian and built many After the war she founded the Empress churches across Ethiopia and the Holy Land. Menen Handicraft School. She will always To me as a child she was the epitome of be remembered as the first president of the everything that is associated with kindness. Ethiopian Red Cross. She also played a major role in the preparation of the war in 1935, by A statue of the Emperor was unveiled mobilising Ethiopian women to manufacture outside the African Union Headquarters bandages and other supplies. Apart from in Addis Ababa in 2019. Do you feel that everything else, she was the closest and the enough is being done to preserve his legacy? most humane counsellor to her husband.

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honouring To be honest with you, I don’t think so. Regarding the erection of the statue I question its timing. Why wasn’t this honour given to him when they unveiled the statue of Kwame Nkrumah years ago? I can’t blame the African Union as it was the fault of the former Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, who constantly denied him this honour. Everybody knows that in 1963, the first OAU meeting in Addis Ababa would not have been such a success without the Emperor’s diplomatic moderation. It is to his intervention that the leaders of the Casablanca and Monrovia Group were appeased. As the first President of the OAU, he played a vital role in solving the border dispute between Morocco and Algeria. That is one of many reasons why later he was being referred to as: “The Father of Africa!” What do you make of the statue, do you think it is a fitting tribute to the Emperor? No, I don’t think the right material and the right artist was chosen. And I believe a much better statue could have been done. Furthermore, the placement of the statue is not appropriate. The unveiling ceremony was not befitting the necessary protocol due to a man of his achievement and status. Do you think a lot of the accomplishments of Emperor Haile Selassie has been forgotten? As you know, Ethiopia has a population today of 110 million inhabitants, out of which 25% are under the age of 25 years. Since the last two regimes did everything in their power to dismantle what the Emperor had done, an entire generation of Ethiopians grew up being taught that Emperor Haile Selassie was a dictator. Therefore, a lot has to be done to present the true image of the last Ethiopian Emperor, as a man of vision and a Pan-Africanist. 24

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There is no doubt Haile Selassie was an important figure in African history and was often called “the Father of Africa” and Nelson Mandela called him the “African Giant”. How important is the Emperor to Africa in 2020? The vision of Emperor Haile Selassie to unite Africa is still not fulfilled and the new generation of Africans has the duty to fulfill the dream of the founding fathers of the AU. The Rastafarian community have helped to keep the name, word and work of Haile Selassie at the forefront of their movement. How do you feel about how the Rasta movement are honouring His Majesty? When we talk about Pan-Africanism, the only real Pan-Africanist movement today that I know is the Rastafarian movement. I am incredibly proud and very grateful for what all that Rastafarians are doing for African unity and African Identity. I am also most grateful for the way they have kept the Imperial Ethiopian flag flying high wherever they are. Indeed, it is the only place in the world where you will see the green, yellow and red flag with the Ethiopian Lion of Judah in the middle. Do you have any criticisms of the Rastafarian movement?


honouring The only criticism I have is that related to the deity of the late Emperor. Whereas, every human being has the right to choose his religion, I, as an Ethiopian Christian, cannot accept that the late Emperor of Ethiopia is a God - for any Ethiopian belonging of the three Abrahamic Religions: Christianity, Judaism and Islam, this would be the greatest form of blasphemy! My suggestion to our Rastafarian brothers and sisters would be to send an official delegation to the Ethiopian Orthodox Church pleading that the Holy Synod should consider making the last Emperor a Saint. It should draw the attention to the Russian Orthodox Church which has already canonized the last Tsar and his family. In your book you give a very balanced view of your great-uncle and highlight his achievements and some areas where he could have improved. One of them being that he didn’t abdicate (renounce his throne). Do you feel this was a mistake on his part and that he should have done more to preserve the Ethiopian Imperial Families 3000 years of history, which ended abruptly? There is no doubt that Emperor Haile Selassie continued the great work of the father of modern Ethiopia, our great Emperor Menelik II, and transformed Ethiopia to a state befitting the 20th century. Unfortunately, he did not learn from the lesson taught to us by the 1960 coup d`état, where the first officials of the Imperial Government were summarily executed. There was a desperate need for reform from above, which did not come for the next 14 years. I am convinced that the 3.000 years of Ethiopian Monarchy would have survived, if only the Emperor would have retired on the occasion of this 80th birthday in 1972 and passed the throne

to his son, Crown Prince Asfa-Wossen Haile Selassie. Tell us about your new book, African Exodus: Migration and the Future of Europe. My book is about the crisis facing African refugees leaving the continent. By 2050, the African population is projected to

have doubled. Already the UN is reporting 20% year-on-year growth in the number of refugees within Africa. For many of Africa’s economically strained nations the consequences could be catastrophic. The failure of the European nations to confront this seismic demographic shift will result in greater instability, widespread unemployment and the enrichment of poverty across the continent. Migration to Europe across the Mediterranean Sea will dramatically increase over time. We have to stop this brain-drain from Africa, as all young people are needed in their own countries to develop their economies and serve their people. Prince Asserate’s books are published by Haus Publishing Ltd.

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Interview

Ras I-Maric

Talks Music and Football

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Interview by Sinai Fleary

ell us a little bit about yourself. My real name is Phillip Dunkley and I was born and raised in the heart of Kingston 11, Jamaica. I am a musician but also a semi-professional football coach and referee.

Why did you decide to pursue a career in music? As a young boy, I loved music and would always be singing. I was in the school choir as a child. But I didn’t take it seriously until 2007. One of my co-workers at the time told me I should persue a music career because he thought I was a good song-writer and artist. I then started performing in clubs and built my confidence. Tell us about your new single State of Emergency. When I got the riddim from Jamaica a lot of negative stuff was happening in the country. I was getting sent videos of different situations in Jamaica where people were filming victims instead of helping them and that inspired me to write the song. You had a lot of success with

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How did you get the name Ras I-Maric and does it have a special meaning? The first name I had was Ras Amharic. Amharic is the official language spoken in Ethiopia. I got that name when I was in Jamaica, as people would say I look like an Ethiopian. When I started my music career I sang more righteous songs so people began calling me Ras I-Maric.

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Interview your song Who Feels It Knows it in Jamaica and you did a lot of press. What was that experience like for you? It was an unforgettable moment for me and helped to boost my career. It showed me what it is like to be recognised at an international level. It helped

my career as I was getting approached from various promoters overseas in Africa, Jamaica and parts of Europe. In Jamaica, I was invited to open shows for Errol Dunkley who is my grand-uncle. I was also invited onto Hype TV, TVJ, CVM and Irie FM. All the promotion helped generate awareness of Ras I-Maric as a musician. I would describe that song as my breakthrough track. We are currently in lock down because of Coronavirus. How are you coping with social distancing and are you currently writing any new music during quarantine? I am coping well, I go to work and go straight home. I am writing songs now and I am writing one about the pandemic. I have a new song that I am getting ready to release called Don’t Worry. The song is to uplift the people during this uncertain time. Last year, you went on the Dancehall Independent Tour in The Gambia. What was the experience like? Well (laughs), it was a great experience. To perform in the motherland was incredible and to be able to travel with my brother and friend, Asha Heights, made it special. When we arrived at the airport we received a lot of love and a warm welcome. We performed at several venues and the Gambian music fans just love reggae and dancehall music. The fans were embrasing us like we were icons.

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Interview DJ Spytal organised the tour and it was a great success. Which album changed for life and why? Til’ Shiloh by Buju Banton changed my life. It encouraged me to seek a more positive approach to life. What has been your biggest musical career highlight so far? Performing in Gambia is my biggest career highlight as it showed my growth as an artist. Going to Gambia helped to propel me into the eyes of other promoters. I am currently I talks with promoters in Zimbabwe and Kenya. What is next for Ras I-Maric for the rest of 2020? I will be putting out more singles. My team would like me to drop an EP, as I have enough music. Quarantine or not I will be releasing my music. We are working on a lot of things and once lockdown is over I can get back to doing what I love.

I have completed building my own studio in London with Real Askel and have one in Jamaica. What happened with your football career? I was playing professional football in Jamaica and I was on one of the top teams which was the Tivoli Gardens team. I came to the UK to persue my football career and had trials at several teams, but I suffered an injury to my foot and never fully recovered. But my coach encouraged me to train for a coaching badge. I coach any age, I am a level 2 qualified coach. I have a player who got spotted and signed to Arsenal and is now playing for England. I then went on to do my refereeing course and am now a qualified referee. Which football team do you support? Arsenal Who in your opinion is the greatest footballer of all time? Pele! He has the skills and the knowledge for the game. Diego Maradona comes close, but I give Pele the edge. Who is your favourite Arsenal player of all time? Thierry Henry

Battlefield the new single by Ras I-Maric is out now! 28

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Where can people get in touch with you online? Instagram: @RealRasImaric Twitter: @RealRasImaric Facebook: facebook.com/real.imaric.9 YouTube: Ras I-Maric1


History

The First Rasta:

Leonard Howell L eonard Percival Howell was born on June 16, 1898, to parents Thomas and Clementina Howell. His parents were independent farmers and business owners. In the 1920s he left Jamaica for America to study. It was here he would become aware of the racial discrimination, oppression and racism that African Americans were receiving. Howell himself had been a victim of hatred and found it difficult to stand aside and do nothing. He decided it was his destiny to stand up for people who were facing inequality. He travelled to many countries and began preaching about the mistreatment of Black people. Howell’s determination and commitment to his cause was noticed by many African heads of state including Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana, Jomo Kenyatta of Kenya and Benito Sylvian of Ethiopia. His spiritual and political development took an important turn when he began to study the work of Marcus Mosiah Garvey and the UNIA. Understanding Garvey’s philosophy, Howell began preaching about the divine Kingship of Ethiopia and the divinity of Emperor Haile Selassie I. His beliefs would capture the hearts of many who felt disenfranchised and socially excluded, from the island which was a British colony at the time. He wrote a book called The Promise Key, which was published under his pen name G.G. (Gong Guru) Maragh.

Howell is considered one of the first preachers of the Rastafari faith and is fondly referred to as ‘the First Rasta’. In the early 1930s, Joseph Hibbert and Archibald Dunkley were also instrumental in the development of the Rastafari movement in Jamaica. For many years Howell was regarded a trouble maker, going against the establishment with his preaching of a Black Messiah and he was arrested more than 50 times. Howell is the founder of Pinnacle in St. Catherine, which is considered one of the very first Rastafari communities. The Pinnacle community worked together growing crops, making and selling crafts, raising livestock and became economically independent. But on May 22, 1954, police officers descended on Pinnacle ans destroyed the settlement. Over a hundred people were arrested, farms were burnt down, money was confiscated and families destroyed. Many of the Rasta families had to move to other areas of Jamaica to start their lives over. Despite the harassment Howell faced, the Rastafari faith spread from Pinnacle throughout Jamaica and to neighbouring Caribbean islands. Howell passed away on February 25th, 1981, in Kingston. Today, large Rastafari communities can still be found in Jamaica and around the world. For more information on Leonard Howell please visit www.lphfoudation.org

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Interview

Royal Empress Uwimana Interview by Sinai Fleary

Tell us about your early years finding the Rastafari movement. During 1973, I became aware of Rastafari and Black consciousness. The teachings of self-love and positiveness about being black were very powerful especially in a society that only promoted people of lighter skin shade. It was a special time in Jamaica, as a period of enlightenment was upon the country. Youngsters in school started to show signs of change and in their way of thinking but society hated the Rastas. It was considered a disgrace to get involved with or become Rasta especially if you came from respectable families. My mother was advised to get me into the UK before “mi turn Rasta!” How did you adapt to life in the UK? 30

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Uwimana (photo by Ras Sherby Ayre)

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ell us a little bit about yourself. I was born and grew up in Jamaica with my older sister. My mother and father left for the UK when I was two years old. My dad passed away a year after he arrived in the UK, so I never knew him. We were raised by our grandmother and uncle, who provided us with everything we needed, love, discipline, manners and respect and a strong focus on learning. I attended John Mills Primary School and later went on to Ardenne High School in Kingston.

In March 1975, I arrived in the UK two days before my 16th birthday. It was a traumatic period for me trying to adjust. Everything was cold, from the weather to the people. My mum worked long hours, so I was often on my own in the flat which was hard to deal with. What was school life like for you in the UK? I attended Willesden High School which was near to our home.


Interview Attending school in London was a shock at first, the students were rude and disrespectful to the teachers-which I never saw back in Jamaica. At first everyone said I spoke too fast and had to repeat things slowly to be understood. In London, I still became interested in the Rastafari Movement. In school, I became known for always reasoning about Rastafari and black consciousness. I was always ready to give the teachers a good debate but was never rude. When I started wearing a headscarf to school most girls started to do the same. The Headteacher issued us a warning and we had to have a signed permission letter from our parents. My mum had no idea what was going on at school. Until one girl went home to tell her mum about the new girl from Jamaica who preaching about Rastafari in the park! That woman happened to be one of my mother’s friends. You have been at the forefront of the Rastafari Community in the UK for decades. Can you tell us about your work within the movement? North west London and Ladbroke Grove were community hubs of cultural awakening. These areas were places where people would not be afraid to stand up against racism and discrimination. Some of the places that helped to shape me as a young Rasta woman in London were, Grassroots Bookstore, in Ladbroke Grove. The shop was our local meeting spot for books relating to the liberation of our physical, mental and spiritual consciousness. House of Dread was a popular local meeting place. Aklam Hall, Yaa Asantewaa and The Tabernacle were our regular community venues. Other projects I was involved in were The Rasta HQ in St. Agnes place, Rastafari

Ras Angels (photo by Ras Kimani Langa) Centenary Committee/Shashamane Tabernacle Project, Rasta Youth Collective, I N I Families of Rastafari, EWF Youth Programmes, Simba Project and the Church of Haile Selassie 1st. Tell us about the Ras Angels. The Ras Angels was a group of friends with a strong bond. We would sing/chant acapella style accompanied by drums and percussion instruments.We wrote our own songs and performed throughout the UK and Europe supporting many fund-raising events for the freedom fighters and liberation groups. The group played a significant role towards the empowerment and upliftment of sistrens in a time when the role of the Rasta woman was not seen as important as that of the man. We travelled all over the UK and Europe with The Ras Messengers. What other projects have you featured in? I featured in the films Burning Illusion by Menelik Shabazz and Omega Rising-Women of

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Interview Rastafari by Elmina Davis. I have also been a radio presenter on Traffic Jam Radio, alongside Sista Marva and presented Ras Story on Omega Radio with Ras Kwadwo Zebulun. During the 1980s, the marches, demonstrations and uprisings kept us very active. What has been your key achievements working within the Rastafari movement? Some of the key achievements have been to be a part of a legacy that has helped to strengthen the Rastafari movement. To be able to contribute to the movement which has continued to grow and flourish from the days of Pinnacle, the Coral Gardens Massacre, discrimination and persecution to what we have now is a proof that Rastafari prevails. Also, being able to travel to Africa is something I will never forget. My travels included, The Gambia, Ethiopia and Ghana, which has been an essential part of my journey. I give thanks to those who laid the foundations for INI (us) and have joined the ancestral realm. The struggle continues for sure, the work is never done! What are some of the biggest misconceptions about the Rastafari movement that you have heard over the years? One of the biggest misconception is that the Rastafari movement doesn’t value the role of women. When at the foundation of the movement is the balance of man and woman. It is regarded as sacred, as seen in the union between HIM Emperor Haile Selassie and HRH Empress Menen. 32

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Many felt that the movement was useless, but the emergence of Rastafari made the Black community more aware about Africa and the relevance of our own history. Conscious Reggae music helped to spread the message of self-love, empowerment and black pride. Our influence and importance cannot be denied. The stone that builder refuses shall become the head corner stone! You are a talented singer also and go by the name Uwimana. Can you tell us what the name means and how you got it? Uwimana, was the name I was given in 1992 following baptism in the Church of Haile


Interview Selassie 1st. It means Daughter of Jah. What made you decide to persue a musical career? A musical career was never planned, as sistrens we used to meet up regularly to reason and strengthen our minds. Ras Angels developed from these gatherings and went on to become deeply rooted in community events. The group was part of the militant stand against racism. My next musical endeavour is to complete more solo projects. What are some of the musical Ras Angels Original group members Sister Judah - Sister projects you have released or been Benji - Sister Simeon - Sister Ehete a part of over the years? my journey. I started it long ago but after trying * Ras Angels-Babylon Burning (Rockers to fit so much into this interview I will have to label) get it done. * Save the Children – Debut LP (Jah Youth/ Where can people get in touch with you Jerry Lyons) online? * Work Harder (Roots Hitek Sick be Facebook: Uwimana Benji Nourished Project) Email: uwimana211@hotmail.co.uk * Travel on (Emperor Fari Music) * Mama Africa Awaits (CBM Records) * No Peace (CBM Records) What has been your biggest musical career highlight? Being a part of the Ras Angels and seeing the immense positive impact the group had on empowering and uplifting the Rastafari daughters was priceless. What is next for Uwimana/ Sista Benji for the rest of 2020? Continue with Jah works! I am writing a book about

2014 Uwimana in Ethiopia

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Justice for George Floyd Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery 34

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End Racism Now Jus’Jahmagazine | Summer 2020

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Carnival

Celebrating

Carnival with Allyson Williams MBE

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written by Sinai Fleary

ell the Jus’ Jah readers a little bit about yourself. My name is Allyson Williams and I came here from Trinidad and Tobago in 1969, to study Nursing and Midwifery. I was experienced in all aspects of clinical care and managerial practice in midwifery until my retirement in 2002, when I was awarded Membership of the British Empire (MBE) for my ‘outstanding contribution to the development of midwifery in London’.

You have been involved in the Notting Hill Carnival for several years. Tell us how and why the Carnival began? I have been involved with the carnival since 1975 through my late husband. Its roots are in Notting Hill where the majority of West Indian immigrants from the Windrush era settled and lived in poverty and slum housing. In 1958, the race riots occurred between Black and White people. The Black residents who were accused of taking away the jobs, homes and women from the White locals. They were regularly attacked and assaulted. In1959, journalist Claudia Jones attempted to heal the rifts and unite the communities by starting to hold indoor carnivals at St. Pancras Town Hall. Then Rhaune Laslett started the Notting Hill Festival in 1964, primarily for 36

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children through the streets of Ladbroke Grove. She invited a group of musicians who left the Colherne Pub in Earl’s Court and played music in the streets into Ladbroke Grove. This was considered the first street parade of the Notting Hill Carnival, and these musicians are acknowledged as the founding members of the Notting Hill Carnival.


Carnival Why was it important for you to get involved with the NHC? I got involved with Notting Hill Carnival because of my husband and because it was an opportunity to share my culture. My husband Vernon ‘Fellows’ Williams was already involved in helping his cousin, Larry Ford, who had an established carnival band called Sukuya. It was also a great opportunity for him to showcase his knowledge as he was a successful band leader back in Trinidad. As Trinidadians we we are passionate about celebrating Trinidadian culture and heritage. Tell me about your band. We started our own band in 1980 and called it the Genesis Mas Band. My husband was the principle costume designer and maker. He always researched his themes as he was passionate about portraying history. Most of the costumes remained in his head, but he would always make prototypes for us to replicate. Since my husband passed away, my children and I have continued his legacy. This year, we celebrate 40 years of participation at Notting Hill Carnival. Did the founding members of the Carnival ever anticipate that it would grow to become Europe’s largest street party? I think they hoped that it would grow and become as well established and popular as the carnival in Trinidad, which was always spectacular. In the beginning, most of the band leaders were Trinidadians, who were determined to replicate the splendour of the costumes and traditions that they knew back home. The founding members of carnival expected that everyone would work to ensure that all the traditional disciplines of the carnival celebration were equally developed and established.

There are many elements that make up the Carnival, including Steel bands which is an integral part of NHC. What can you tell us about the history of Steel bands and how they made their way to the UK from Trinidad? The history of the Steel band is long and varied. The Steel pan was establised in Trinidad and Tobago, when the use of oil drums was discovered in the 1930s. Eventually the whole country was learning how to make music from these oil drums. The pioneers created different Steel pans to replicate the sound of an orchestra. e.g. we have tenor, double tenor, guitar and base pans. The Steel pan has been recognised as the only musical instrument that was created in the 20th century. In 1951, Trinidad was invited to take part in the Festival of Britain in London and they sent a Steel band called TASPO (Trinidad All Stars Percussion Orchestra). It was made up of the very best players from across the island and that is how the steel band was first introduced to Britain. Many of the players of TASPO stayed in London and continued to play across the UK. There is an annual Steel band competition called Panorama which happens the Saturday night before Carnival which still draws a massive audience. Are you surprised that the interest in Steel bands has lasted so long and spread from generation to generation? I am not surprised that the interest is still there. The Steel pan is a beautiful instrument with a rich history. Panorama is a chance for bands to showcase their

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Carnival musical skills of interpretation and arrangement of music, with a form of friendly rivalry. Many players, like my own children have learnt and performed with the experts during the Trinidad carnival. Since 1969, Steel pan playing has been taught in schools in England, so that has helped to maintain the interest from generation to generation. Mas bands and costumes bring the Carnival altogether. Talk us through the changes in the costumes over the last 50 years. The costumes have changed dramatically! When I remembered carnival in Trinidad and in the early days of NHC, the costumes were more thematic and multi-layered and represented a significant time in history. Since the mid 90s the themes seemed to have been lost. Now, we have extravagant head pieces and very minuscule costumes and hundreds of feathers. Even though they are beautiful, I feel that something has been lost, as there is no interpretation of a theme or concept. In my opinion, the costumes look the same except in different colours. What has been your most memorable costume? My most memorable costume was in 2004, when we celebrated 40 years of the carnival. My band Genesis’ theme was “Sailors in this time”. We recreated the different sailor characters for men, women and children. The king of our band was an 18 foot puppet as the character called the King Sailor, whose face was of my late husband. We commissioned a sculptor who created his face out of clay and it was air brushed in colour. The sculpture was so special and dramatic and caused a sensation on the road. Upon request, we agreed it could be put into the Victoria and Albert Museum as part of their Black History 38

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Month exhibition to celebrate 40 years of Notting Hill Carnival. If you had to describe Carnival in 3 words, how would you describe it? Artistic, Spectacular and International How long does it take to make one adult costume? There are costumes of different sizes and dimensions and complexity which can impact the time scale. It can vary from a few hours up to several weeks, depending also on the availability of materials and trimmings. The costumes are categorised as frontline, backline and individual characters and the King and Queen. Notting Hill Carnival introduced Jamaican Sound Systems in 1973, these are hugely popular with Carnival goers. Why was it important to include Sound Systems to the Carnival line-up? From my knowledge, in 1973, the organisers needed to develop the Carnival and increase the public interest and attendance. By definition, the Sound Systems attracted people to the area, as Reggae music was extremely popular at the time, more than any other genre. The Sound Systems have grown from about 6-8 to up to over 35 of them now. I think many people that come to carnival are unaware of the other traditional aspects of carnival like the Mas Bands and the Steel pans. Some recent online debates have suggested that NHC has lost its Trinidadian roots by playing music that is not of Caribbean heritage, like Afrobeats. What do you think about these criticisms? I think this criticism is quite true to some extent. I believe that the idea of


Carnival

Sound Systems at a carnival is a very British perspective. The founders expected the carnival to develop with an emphasis on costumes and Mas bands, Calypso music, DJs, and Steelbands. Having said this, I accept that the carnival has to evolve and be more inclusive of other aspects of culture and tradition from other BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) communities. Every year in the run-up to Carnival there is negative press reports about Carnival, or that it should be a ticketed event or moved to Hyde Park. Why do you think this is? I think the negative press is expected, as carnival is not indigenous to London or Britain. It is not a whole country celebration like in Trinidad, with its roots in the emancipation of slavery and freedom of our forefathers. I think the British people are not educated enough about the origins and traditions, so this generates fear and mistrust. This is reason for their suggestion

about containing the carnival in Hyde Park. Where do you see Carnival in the next 5-10 years? I am confident that the carnival will continue to evolve but remain a vibrant and extraordinary spectacle of cultural carnival arts. I think the carnival needs to be redefined and more visionary, as we must continue to think outside the box, to ensure the best cultural traditions can flourish. We need corporate involvement and public recognition for the carnival arts, through support and funding for exhibitions, arts galas, appearance fees and prize money for the participants. I am very pleased that the press is becoming more supportive and are aware of the outstanding financial contribution that the carnival makes to the respective boroughs’ economies. This article is dedicated to Vernon ‘Fellows’ Williams and all the Notting Hill Carnival Founders.

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Carnival Timeline

1975

All pictures supplied by Genesis Mas Band

ya in 1974. ams in the band Suku illi W ’ ws llo ‘Fe on rn Ve

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Carnival Timeline

1980s

All pictures supplied by Genesis Mas Band

Mr and Mrs Williams from their band Beyond 2000 in 1987.

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Carnival Timeline

All pictures supplied by Genesis Mas Band

1980s

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Carnival Timeline

All pictures supplied by Genesis Mas Band

1990s

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Carnival Timeline

All pictures supplied by Genesis Mas Band

2000s

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All pictures taken by Jus’ Jah Magazine of Carnival goers in the 2000s.

Carnival Timeline

2000s

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Music Business

Inside

the Music Business With Ugly Headz Ltd Interview by Sinai Fleary

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Warren Belle and Liam Lindsey run music business Ugly Headz Ltd

ntroduce yourselves for our readers. My name is Liam Lindsey, but people know me as B or Bigger. My name is Warren Belle otherwise known as WAR Engineer. Through-out the rest of the interview, answers given by Liam Lindsey will start with LL and answers given by Warren Belle will start with WB. What/who inspired you to get into the music business? LL: I started MCing at the age of 12/13 at a club called Sulgrave in Shepherds Bush, west London. We would go there on a Tuesday and a Thursday and that is what got me into messing around with music. WB: It has been a long journey in terms of music, but my first initial memory of music is being around Simba Youth Centre and 46

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hearing a lot of old school Reggae music. It was here, I saw a lot of people MCing and people congregating around Sound Systems. This influenced me to become an artist and to explore the production and engineering side. Tell us about Ugly Headz and how did you come up with your company name and what does it mean? LL: I have always liked the name ugly, but I have always wanted to flip it on its head and use it in a different way. My cousin Rico and I were discussing the word ugly and he said, “cuz you gotta love yourself.” That is when it just came to me that we are going to change the meaning of the word and not go off its traditional meaning. We added Headz because there is a couple of us in the business. Your company logo is very interesting, talk us through what it represents. LL: The company logo is a man and woman.


Music Business It represents the balance of the two genders. But also, it symbolises the new life which is created between a man and a woman. I also took a lot of influence from Africa, the Aztecs and the Mayan cultures and incorporated it into the design. On your website you describe your company as multi-faceted. Tell us about some of different services that you offer at Ugly Headz. WB: We provide a range of services including recording music and having your music professionally mixed and mastered. We have worked with artists whose music is classified as Indie, Rap, Drill, Soca and Reggae. We have a recording studio to cater to your music production needs. We also have a photography studio in which we can provide portfolio’s, photo and video shoots. For the music videos, we can host them or film them ourselves. We also offer design services for clothing companies, branding and artists. What does it take to be a successful artist? WB: There is a blueprint which I would say they need to follow. First, they need a product and need to get into a good studio and work on their craft. Having good music is the fundamental part of having a music career. They need to then create some energy or buzz around what they are doing. They need to utilise social media platforms to build an audience. You need to engage with your audience and get them aware of your sound. The other advice is to know what your niche is and where you are marketing your music. But most importantly, enjoy yourself. This will allow you to come up with the best product to take to market. What does being an artist manager involve? LL: It involves taking artists to the next stage of their career. It can involve organising sponsorship through clothing or connecting them with DJ’s to play their music on radio stations. Also, we handle the booking of performances and shows. We are helping artists

to make money from their music. WB: We want the artist to just focus on their craft, so the managers take away a lot of the donkey work. This is all the components that surround the artist apart from actually making music. A manager is responsibile for the promotion, the marketing, arranging studio time and uploading music to online distributors. The aim is to let artists focus on what they do best, which is music. Ultimately, you want a team around you, with people who do the job well. You also have beats for sale, which famous or up and coming artists have used your instrumentals? WB: We are not a production house as such, but we give a platform to producers who wish to sell or license their instrumentals. The producers who use our platforms have worked with a range of artists including S1, Nines and CGM. The Black UK music scene has experienced substantial growth and commercial success in the past five years. What is it like running Ugly Headz at such an exciting time in UK music? WB: It’s like you say exciting because there is so much money being poured into the scene. But also, there is opportunities there for young people from disadvantaged backgrounds to make a career for themselves and change their life. LL: It is easier to make it happen nowadays than before. One of my biggest career highlights is being a part of a journey where someone has come from nothing to now being financially

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Music Business secure. It is like growing a flower and watching it turn into a tree and giving them real roots. You are both very passionate about your business, where does all that enthusiasm come from? LL: We are passionate because we want to see our artists win! We want the young people we work with to know that we have their back. We are trying to be those big brothers who can guide you to making better decisions. You have a blog on your site called Ugly Opinions, which tackles a several current affairs topics. Why was this important to add this component to your business? LL: I know a lot of brilliant writers and I decided to create the blog, so people can share their valued opinions. Also, I wanted to get As music execs, I want to know about your musical tastes and influences.

people to read more as a lot of people do not read these days. Tell me about the Everyday BS podcast and the Ageless podcast. LL: Everyday BS gets a group of people together to discuss things that have happened in the news. LL: Ageless is a way to bridge the gap between the generation and build the connection back in the community.

What has been your biggest career highlight so far? LL: My career highlight is working with LL: The album that changed your life my business partner, Warren. We have Hell on Earth- Mobb Deep accomplished a lot. WB: I am loving being a part of Ugly Headz The artist whose music you have listened to since you were a child and still listen to today? and working with youngsters and watching Bob Marley them blossom. In the earlier part of my career, I worked on The UK artist you would most like to work with? projects that have gone on to have over 150 Mahalia million streams and worked with Ed Sheeran and The Saturdays for a short time. UK’s most underrated artist Akala What is next for Ugly Headz? WB: We have more shows and artist WB: The album that changed your life? releases. We are also keen to get more It’s Dark and Hell is Hot-DMX youngsters in to learn about what goes on behind the scenes. The artist whose music you have listened to LL: The kids are the future and being able since you were a child and still listen to today? to show them they can own something and Dennis Brown be successful is a big part of the future of the The UK artist you would most like to work with? company. What are your social media handles and Adele website. Website: www.uglyheadz.com Music’s most underrated artist IG: @Ugly._.head Mahalia

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poetry

Poetry Corner Sunshine will come again By Mount Zinai

S

unshine will come again, These times will not remain, Hugs will resume and it will help to ease our pain, Families will reunite, Children will run through parks and fly their kites, Friends will meet, Colleagues will face to face greet, Dogs and their walkers, will line our streets, This will not defeat, Our community, Stay well and healthy, COVID-19 cannot break our humanity, Hold on to your faith and spirituality, But be aware of this new 2020 reality.

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Remembering

Delroy

Washington By Mandingo

D

elroy Washington was a Reggae artist and activist, whose career began in the 1970s and lasted until 2020. Keith Burnett aka Delroy Washington was from Grange Hill, Westmoreland like Peter Tosh. He came to England in the early 1960s as a young child. He lived in Neasden in north west London and attended John Kelly Boys’, a secondary school. He was well known and was a huge part of the community. He loved the NW10 community and never travelled much outside of Brent. The school was attended by many who went on to become popular in music including, singer-songwriter Junior English, Locksley Gichie the founder and guitarist of The Cimarons band, Brinsley Forde of Aswad, singer-songwriter, Tony Douglas and trumpeter George Dawkins. Delroy and I met in 1972, when I played and deejayed on Musical Prince Sound System at Beit Berl Hall, Dudden Hill Lane, Willesden, London. At the time I was a Jamaica Government Scholarship student studying Civil Engineering. I would also play the sound and sell pre-released Reggae records, which I got my mother to send to me. 50 Jus’Jahmagazine | Summer 2020

Michael Campbell also played Musical Prince and years later did some productions with Aswad. The weekly dances at Beit Berl Hall were popular with musicians, Gichie and Carl Levy of Cimarons, producer Keith Hudson, Carly and Familyman Barrett of the Wailers band, Jimmy Stratdan, Tappa Zukie, Brinsley Ford, George Dawkins and many others would attend. In 1973, using the name Delroy Washington he wrote and sang his debut ‘Lonely Street’ for producer and sound owner Count Shelley from Stoke Newington. In the same year, he wrote and sang ‘Jah Man A Come’ produced by Clem Bushay and released on Lord Koos label. Delroy wrote, sang and produced ‘Freedom Fighters’ and released it on his Axum label in 1976. Delroy who was also a guitarist got a major deal with Virgin Records owned by Richard Branson. The deal was brokered by my colleague Michael Campbell. The albums ‘I Sus’ in 1976 and ‘Rasta’ in 1977 were released but did not sell well. Unfortunately, afterwards Delroy was dropped by Virgin. But getting signed by a major label was the highlight of his recording career.


Remembering He was highly respected and loved in the community. He actively supported and encouraged other artists’ careers like Aswad and Carol Thompson. Tony Williams the Radio London DJ had an organisation named the Federation of Reggae Music (FORM) which folded. As a result of this Delroy formed his own FORM and put on a lot of Reggae seminars and other events in Brent, which were enabled by generous financial grants from Brent Council. Delroy was instrumental in having plaques erected to commemorate where Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Bunny Wailers and the Wailers band lived in Neasden. He also helped to get Dennis Brown a This picture is of Mandingo, Journalist, Reggae historian blue plaque in Harlesden. and friend of Delroy Washington The blue plaque for Liz In 2019 he told me he wanted me to do a Mitchell of Boney M in project with him to present the true history Kensal Rise happened because of Delroy. of Reggae in Brent. In 2020, Brent was I will miss him and our lively talks about declared the Borough of Culture and sadly the music business. Delroy died on Friday 27th March, 2020, in Delroy continued promoting Reggae St. Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, London. through FORM of which he was the CEO. He was 67 years old and will be deeply Over the years his health suffered as he missed by those who knew him. had diabetes. He should be remembered LONG LIVE THE MEMORY OF as a person who was totally devoted to the DELROY WASHINGTON! promotion of Reggae music and its artists.

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interview

Roots and Culture with

Nu Flowah Interview by Sinai Fleary

T

ell us a little bit about yourself and how did you get the name Nu Flowah? I was born Richard Wallace in England but grew up in Jamaica and was birthed in Ethiopia. I wonder if the readers can work out da one yah (laughs). Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa, was founded in 1887, by Empress Taitu and means “New Flower” when translated from Amharic. I found the name when I was reading a book called Haile Selassie’s War.

Where are your family from in Jamaica? My family are from Kingston, Jamaica. My mother was born in Chancery Lane and my father was born in Orange Street. My grandmother moved to Old Market Street, Spanish Town, between the 1930s and 1940s. My family settled in the area and made a life for themselves. My parents came to England in the early 1960s. Many successful reggae artists have come from Spanish Town. What is it like being from that area and how has that impacted you as a musician? 52

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It has had a big impact because Jamaica is the root of Reggae music and to be from an area known for Reggae encourages you also. Being around nature is a massive advantage for a musician. Reggae music is embedded within every aspect of Jamaica, so the songs write themselves. I was born into Reggae music as my older brother Patrick (R.I.E.P) had a sound called Kingatone Roots, which helped to spark my interest at a young age. When you’re in these concrete jungle places, it can become much more difficult to write as a lot of the energy and inspiration we need is being blocked out by buildings and other things. We are currently in lockdown in the UK, because of the Coronavirus. How are you coping and what sort of things are you doing to keep well? Are you working on any music during quarantine? I am a self-isolated person anyway and usually take a lot of time out from a lot of things. You haffi have a routine fi di quarantine! I live a regimental life. I give thanks everyday as I rise, drink my lemon extract tea, exercise


interview and stretch, then I go for a jog. I eat plant-based food and fruits. I stay hydrated by drinking plenty water. I also fast and meditate which helps I man (me) to stay focused. I also ensure I look after my children and grandchildren. I am currently working on my fifth album. I feel this global pandemic is a wake-up call for everyone to reflect and reset. It is time for people to examine and discover who they really are and what they really stand for. All Faiths will be tested. No matter how much of a righteous person you think you are there is always room for improvement. We cannot come out of this pandemic the same way as we went in. I’m currently working on a track called Lockdown Plandemic which is about the situation we’re all in. Why did you decide to pursue a career in music? I’ve been recording professionally from 1998. When I came forward (back) from Ethiopia in 2003, it inspired I (me) to pursue my musical career. A few months later, I got a booking for my first stage show. The line-up was huge! The show was at Oceans in London and had Luciano, Mikey General, Mykal Rose, The Rasites, The Abyssinians and I (me) performing in one night. You released your first album in 2008 entitled Black Liberation. What do you remember about anticipation of this release? Were you nervous or excited to be finally releasing your first project? I felt proud that I could manifest the album and I was able to complete the entire process from writing, recording, mastering, the business side and distribution of an album. It was the catalyst for everything that came after. I was able to launch my own record label, Kings Highway Records and release my albums independently. There is a level of confidence which comes with being in control of your music career. Where do you get inspiration for your

songs and album titles and what is the process like to complete a Nu Flowah album? Haile Selassie I, Empress Menen, my biological parents, family, nature, world affairs and everyday activities, all inspire the lyrical content of my music. The process can take time especially when it comes to things like writing up the credits of musicians who have composed the track. But it’s an important part to ensure every person gets their royalties and dues for their contribution to the track or album. Once the music is completed, you must register your work. Make sure you sort out your publishing, as well as the manufacturing of your CD/records if you are going to have these. Then there is all the social media management and submitting your music for digital distribution. What advice would you give to up and coming artists? The first thing you must have is determination and believe in yourself because confidence will carry you a long way. Work hard and learn the process of the music business. Also, have your own YouTube channel and build your audience and fanbase on all social media platforms. You are building a legacy which will be there in years to come. When you are writing your songs do you still use a pen and paper? I do still use pen and paper but it depends because some songs write themselves. I also have a recorder (voice demo) on my phone. This makes it easier to record the hook, or verse and then write the rest of the song. I’ve got my

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interview studio at home so sometimes I just voice as I feel a vibe. But the pen and paper will always be an integral part of the writing process for me. Your new album is called Melanin, talk us through the thoughts behind the title choice and the project. Melanin is a topic which is not taught in the schools or the universities. The Melanin derives from the pineal gland which is located at the centre of the brain. It enhances InI (us) in so many ways. It is the pigmentation of our skin, but it also has many other uses. Black people are blessed with this in their DNA and a lot of them is unaware of it because it’s never been taught to them. Melanin is track number seven on the album. I want my people to go and do some research, hence why I called the album Melanin. You have been very visual and present within the Rastafari Community in London for several years. Can you tell us why it is important for you to attend Marches, Nyabinghi’s and other celebrations? These gatherings keep InI (us) grounded. The drum sound is the first instrument of creation and Nyahbinghi is the root of Rastafari. It is the “blood and fire of our warriors and warioress” this is where I mans (my) journey started on the hills of Jamaica. I always will attend the reparations marches and the Pan-African celebrations because unity is strength and united we stand divided we fall. What are some of the misconceptions about Nu Flowah? I’m a straight forward person and I tell it like it is and that doesn’t sit well with a lot of people. I keep a very small circle, so a lot of people don’t really know I (me), hence why I feel they interpret I man (me) wrongfully. Many people also stereotype Rastafari and feel that InI (we) must not have nice things or dress nice. I always present I-self clean and dress well. So, I feel people may misinterpret that and try and style I man (me) as a fashion Ras. But they are forgetting or not knowing that “papa”, Haile Selassie I the First, was voted best dressed man 54

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of the 20th Century by Time Magazine. What has been your biggest musical career highlight? I Went to The Gambia with Mad Professor on the Back to Africa tour in Batakunku 2012. There was a massive line up, which included: Frankie Paul, The Congos, Earl Sixteen, Mafia & Fluxy, Macka B, Tippa Ire, Sandra Cross and many more. After I performed my set, all of the crowd followed me back to my transport (while the dance was still going on) and left the venue empty. I was very emotional because I’ve never experienced this kind of love and gratitude before. After the show Mad Professor called me the “Pied Piper”. What is next for Nu Flowah for the rest of 2020? Well, with this Coronavirus and the social distancing, I’ll be focusing on my videos and my YouTube channel. I have my fifth album, which is a Dancehall project to released sometime this year. I have a video from that album called Mussi Mad, it’s coming out on 23rd June. I have my one drop video called Happy Days to release. That’s the pre (vision) for 2020. Where can people get in touch with you online? Twitter/Instagram/Facebook: @Nuflowah YouTube: nuflowahh Website: nuflowah.com

Melanin the latest album by nu flowah is out now!


10

Famous

Marcus Garvey

Quotes

1. “Africa for Africans, at home and abroad.” 2. “A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots.” 3. “Up you mighty race accomplish what you will.” 4. “With confidence you have won before you have started.” 5. “Look for me in the whirlwind or storm.” 6. “The Black skin is not a badge of shame, but rather a glorious symbol of national greatness.” 7. “A reading man and woman is a ready man and woman, but a writing man and woman is exact.” 8. “If you have no confidence in self, you are twice defeated in the race of life.” 9. “Look to Africa for there, a King will be crowned.” 10. “Liberate the minds of men and ultimately you will liberate the bodies of men.”

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Reggae

Buju Banton’s Long-Awaited Album

“Upside Down 2020” Out June 26

G

rammy winner, cultural hero and Reggae icon Buju Banton has announced his highly-anticipated album, “Upside Down 2020” will be released on June 26th. The full-length studio album is Banton’s first album in a decade and promises to be worth the wait. Banton is known for quality musical projects that deliver powerful messages. But also when we talk about Dancehall, he is equally gifted in that genre. Banton is a versatile artist who can master classic Jamaican Dancehall Riddims with his eyes closed. The album promises to have plenty to reflect on too, which will be pleasing to those who admire Banton’s social commentary on current affairs. 56

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The album has some guest appearances too, with Stephen Marley, Stefflon Don, John Legend and Pharrell all lending their musical talents to the project. The momentum around Banton has been continuous since his historic Long Walk to Freedom concert last year in Kingston. Banton has nothing to prove on this album as we know he is one of the best to ever come out of Jamaica. But we are sure this album will sit nicely among his already outstanding collection. The Reggae and Dancehall industry has missed Banton dearly and we are looking forward to “Upside Down 2020” being the soundtrack to the rest of the year and for many years to come. Upside Down 2020 by Buju Banton is released June 26th 2020.


Reggae

Richie Spice Releases New Album “Together We Stand”

Reggae artist Richie Spice has just released his 10th studio album entitled “Together We Stand.” Spice is known for delivering music with a message and has a stellar back catalogue to prove it. His songs “Earth A Run Red”, “Youth Dem Cold” and “The Plane Land” are just some of his hits which are still played regularly on radio and in clubs. His new album is already mobilising support with his popular single “Valley of Jehoshaphat” which was released earlier this year. The opening to the album is powerful, with

Spice blessing the project with some Psalms and prayers. The title track “Together We Stand” is soothing with the incorporation of a traditional Nyabinghi drum rhythm. There are guest appearances from Chronixx, Dre Island and Kathryn Aria. The album is jam-packed with conscious lyrics and catchy choruses that stay with you. With this album Spice once again proves that he is one of the most consistent Reggae artists and never fails to bring us roots and integrity. Together We Stand by Richie Spice is out now!

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interview

Farming, Health and Travel With Wise Lockz Interview by Sinai Fleary

I

ntroduce yourself for our readers.

My name is Wise Lockz, that’s what I go by on Instagram. My personal name is Azad. I am a world traveller and my passions are agriculture and farming. I am also a published author who is passionate about Pan-Africanism. Anything to uplift the African race at home or abroad, I am with it! You have been a Youtuber for over 10 years. Why did you decide to set up a YouTube Channel and what sort of content do you have on your channel? The YouTube channel came from an innocent thought to document my progress growing my hair in locks. Now it has grown into people all over the world recognising me from my channel. I almost have 100, 000 subscribers now. The content is basically anything to do with spirituality, consciousness, plant-based eating livity and teaching Black African history to our people. Anything dealing with the Most High, the creator and the universe is my favourite subject. You are a published author, tell us about the two books you have written. My first book is called The Elevation of Consciousness. In this book I am breaking down the American School system and assessing why African people and people of African descent don’t get taught their true history. We just get taught slavery, slavery and more slavery. The second book (Elevation of

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interview

What did your family think when you began to do your own self-study on PanAfricanism? My mum was understanding I think that’s beacuse she is a very spiritual woman. I have a lot of friends around me that are like-minded. I have a good circle around me which includes Rasta’s and Hebrew Israelites. You describe yourself a world traveller, tell us about some of the amazing places you have been to. Which country has been your favourite and why? I have been to Ghana, Ethiopia and Togo and lived in the Virgin Islands. I have visited St.

Lucia. Ghana is in my top two destinations. The people were so friendly and I saw my roots and my culture reflected in the spirit of the people. I went to the Cape Coast Castle where they held a lot of enslaved Africans before they were shipped to the Caribbean, South America and America. My second favourite destination is St. Lucia. I have never been on such a friendly

All pictures supplied by Wise Lockz

Consciousness: Ancient Roots and Spiriruality) is 179 pages and it has 13 chapters. The number 13 symbolises high vibrations when you study numerology. This book dives deeper into the foods you should be eating and it goes into details about Pan-Africanism. At the end of the book, I highlight different African figures that we don’t hear about, like Mansa Musa and Queen Nyabinghi. I’ve read a lot of books which helped to make me a natural writer. People like to hear me speak on camera, so I decided to document the things I was saying in a book. Is there a book that you read which changed your life and if so why? The first book that changed my life for ever is called Breaking the Chains of Psychological Slavery by Na ‘im Akbar. I was 19 when I read that book and it made me cut my hair and start growing my free-form locks that I have now. I will never forget that book! That is the book which started everything for me with my spiritual and consciousness journey. The book really outlines the miseducation of the African mindset and shows the indoctrination which has happened to the African psyche. The book breaks down how our minds as Black people have been captivated by the wrong things. It was the catalyst for everything that I became interested in now. But also, I would say I am a Rastafarian and a Garveyite so the Philosophy and Opinions of Marcus Garvey that is my second go-to book.

island and there was a certain vibration on the island that moved me. I met this Bobo Shanti bredrin called Priest Kailash and he is like the Dr Sebi of St. Lucia. He has his own TV show, a rejuvenation centre and his own restaurant. It was very inspiring to be around him and his family. With Coronavirus and quarantine how are you coping not being able to travel? I’m keeping my hands in the soil and I

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interview am still attending university and studying for my History degree. I had plans to travel to Africa for the whole summer but that got cancelled because of COVID-19. I have been doing a lot of agriculture, where I live in Atlanta, Georgia. The community where I live, has a lot of people interested in Afrocentrism and Pan-Africanism. I been keeping myself busy farming every single day. What tips would you give to people who want to grow their own food? I have been gardening for about six years and the number one tip is you must have good soil. You need to have the right soil and make sure you have the right nutrients in there. You need Calcium and Magnesium to help make your soil rich. You must make sure you aerate it as well. The darker your soil is, the more nutrient rich it is. What got you into farming? The more I read and gained more knowledge it was the natural path to take. We don’t know where the food comes from in our supermarkets. Growing your own food gives you so much satisfaction. The food that grows in your environment is acclimated for your body. The honourable Marcus Mosiah Garvey said we must be self-reliant and do for self and I am happy to be doing that. Right now, we are growing Watermelon, Tomatoes, Egg plant (Aubergine), Lettuce, Kale, Basil, Okra and we also have Moringa trees. Tell us about your business My Natural Roots. My website www.mynaturalroots.org is a holistic plant-based website that exists with the intention of healing African People— Physically, Mentally, and Spiritually. I have Shea Butter, Black Seed Oil, my two books and many other new products coming. I have herbal soaps on my website too. My website has everything to do with the 60

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elevation of consciousness of our people. I hope to promote the way of our ancestors through my business so that we hold on to our culture. We ship our products internationally also. You come across as someone who is truly grounded and happy. What are your top tips for staying healthy, spiritually, physically and finding inner peace? The best thing you can do to be internally healthy is to really get in tune with yourself and master yourself. Your outer world reflects what takes place inside. Also, don’t hold onto negative thoughts and be in the present moment. Your peace is being in the present moment. But being in tune with the Most High and nature will give you the deepest level of peace. What types of foods should we be eating as people of African descent? We should be eating plant-based foods that are electrical. The human body is earth and has all the minerals and elements which the earth has. Plant-based foods are alive, so they will add more life to your body. When you consume meat or foods which have died, you may also consume the trauma and stress which the animal had before it was slaughtered. People can eat what they want, but it is best they consume foods which are alive as our bodies are a living vessel. How would you describe Wise Lockz in 3 words? Peace, insight and wisdom. Which three songs are you listening to the most right now? 1) Saviour More than Life to Me (which is a Bobo Shanti chant) 2) Dennis Brown-Here I Come 3) Tekno-Yawa Instagram:@wiselockz YouTube: zayloc23 Website: www.mynaturalroots.org


Enkutatash

Enkutatash:

Ethiopia’s New Year

E

nkutatash (Ge’ez: እንቁጣጣሽ) is the first day of the New Year in Ethiopia and Eritrea. Annually it occurs on Meskerem 1 on the Ethiopian calendar. This translates to September 11th, according to the Gregorian calendar which is used by most countries in the west. Ethiopian New Year would fall on September 12th in a leap year. The date also marks the approximate end of the rainy season.

Enkutatash can also trace its origins to biblical times. The actual word Enkutatash means gift of jewels. Many believe the celebration is associated traditionally with the return of Queen of Sheba (Makeda) to Ethiopia following her visit to King Solomon in Jerusalem. Ethiopians usually mark the new year with three days of celebrations. Festivities include gathering with family, praying and eating a feast with their native flatbread called Injera.

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ITAL

Kitchen bringing you Ital food information and recipes

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Ital food

Ital

the basics

I

By Jus’ Jah Magazine Staff

tal food is the diet or way of eating that was created and developed by the Rastafari movement. Ital is basically a plant-based diet when you just look at the ingredients. But the diet goes far beyond just the ingredients which are placed in your pots. Ital is about the cleanliness and spirituality of the person who is preparing the food. There is also great consideration for how the food has been cultivated and packaged. Rasta’s are very spiritual people and believe that everything you eat should serve a purpose in keeping your mind, body and soul operating at its highest degree. Ital food is usually prepared with the most natural ingredients as possible. Natural herbs and spices are preferred over artificial ones. When it comes to carbohydrates like bread, rice, flour and pasta, wholegrain varieties are considered much better for you than white ones. Ital food is delicious and healthy and has been around since the early days of the movement. Founding father, Leonard Howell, was key in promoting the benefits of an Ital diet to the Rasta’s who settled in Pinnacle, Jamaica. The Rasta community in Pinnacle grew their own crops and were totally reliant on them for income and food. Rasta’s also have an Ital diet because of their interpretation of Bible passages within Leviticus and Genesis. In recent years as vegan diets and plantbased diets have grown in marketability but

they are not the same as Ital. Many of the modern vegan diets are heavily focused on being plant-based versions of fast-foods. Ital food requires time, patience and the most important ingredient of all, love. So, when you see dishes called “Rasta Pasta” just know that it is not necessarily Ital. Many of these dishes popping up on social media are loaded with meat or artificial ingredients which go against the objective of Ital food and Rasta principles. For an authentic Ital experience please ensure, those you eat from or learn from are aware of the history and beliefs of the Rastafari movement, after all Ital food cannot be gentrified.

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Ital is vital

Ital is Vital with Livity Plant-Based Cuisine Interview By Sinai Fleary

T

Kareema Shakur Muhammad

ell us a little bit about yourselves. We are twin sisters from Croydon, south London, who are both trained chefs. We have been plant-based for almost four years. Before that, we were vegetarian. We have been running our business, Livity Plant-Based Cuisine for just over two years. You are both professionally trained chefs. When did you realise cooking was your passion? How did you begin your career? We have been cooking since we were young because we were the eldest, so we 64

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Kaleema Shakur Muhammad would cook to help our mum. We really fell in love with food when we turned vegetarian at 13 years old. We found with vegetarian food we had to be more adventurous, as our parents were still eating meat. We would get creative with ingredients and try to make our meals taste as delicious as possible. We went to catering college for three years after we left school.


All pictures supplied by Livity Plany-Based Cuisine

Ital is vital

What was catering college like? The training was full on and intense. But they had their own restaurant on site, so we knew we were getting valuable training and developing skills which we would need for our careers. What was your first catering job like? When we were at catering college we both took on jobs through a chef agency. We would do a variety of jobs, including working at Wembley Stadium in the VIP boxes. This gave us a lot of experience. Kareema worked in a restaurant in London and it was crazy. We thought we were talented, but it is another level when you are thrown into a big kitchen for your first job. We stayed for four years and learned so much.

It was very fast-paced and male-dominated, so we had to be resilient. What types of cuisines can you cook? At home we would cook Caribbean food as our parents are Jamaican. In catering college, we learnt French cuisine and from our work experience we have learnt to cook British dishes. All the different styles and techniques have helped us to master our craft and it has given us an advantage. Did you watch a lot of cooking TV shows growing up? Yes, we watched all of them. Even to this day we still watch Gordan Ramsay’s TV shows. Do you have a favourite celebrity chef? Yes, Gordon Ramsay. He is an actual reflection of what it is like being in a real professional kitchen. If you mess up, you do get shouted at just like how he is on TV.

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Ital is vital Have you ever had chefs shouting at you before? Yes, we have. Not everywhere, but a lot of time. Tell us about your own company, Livity Plant-Based Cuisine. How did you come up with the name Livity Plant-Based Cuisine and what does it mean? We wanted a name that represents not only food, but us and who we are. Livity is the essence of life and this is what we wanted people to think of when they ate our food. What are some of dishes you sell and what is your bestselling item on your menu? Most of our meals are stew-based and we also do Jerk Mushrooms. Customers love our Chick Peas and Plantain stew, Stew Peas and the Curried Jackfruit. People are always amazed by the flavours of our meals. We have sweet treats like apple crumble, carrot cakes and banana cakes. We also sell cakes by the slice. We also make drinks like Sorrel and Lime, Sorrel and Ginger and Pineapple Punch. We also make patties with a variety of fillings like curried Pumpkin, Jerk Lentils and Callaloo. All of our patties are served in a wholemeal Spelt flour crust. How often do you experiment with recipes? All the time! We are always working on our recipes to get the flavours perfect. That is what 66

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Livity is all about, great flavours and doing things right. Do you offer catering services for parties/ weddings? This is our hope going forward as we do get asked about this a lot. Your food always looks so delicious and you often refer to your menu as Ital plantbased food. Why was it important that you add the word Ital to your food descriptions? It was important because when we were growing up the only people which we knew that ate this way were Rastafarian. Once we cut out certain things from our diet and became plant-based we would describe our meals as Ital, as that is what we knew it as. We didn’t refer to our food as Vegan. But it’s only because of the nature of our business we will be labelled as a Vegan food business, but to us the food will always be Ital. We strongly believe you must be true to yourself. Very often when you post your images on Instagram, your food is in a calabash. Does using a calabash have any significance to you and your brand? It is a representation of us and our brand. Livity Plant-Based Cuisine is all about eating from the earth and a calabash is a natural bowl, so it works for us and our brand perfectly. The calabashes we serve our food in have all been hand-made in Jamaica. That it is our way


Ital is vital of supporting another business also. You are identical twins, what is it like to run a business alongside your sister? The best person to run a business with is someone who knows you, someone you trust and someone who sees the same end goal. As twin sisters we are in tune with each other, so it is a win win situation. But also, our skills complement each other. Vegan food is a new craze for some people, but for many communities including Rastafarians it has been a way of life for decades. Are your surprised at the amount of new in vegans in the UK and internationally? We are not surprised as people are becoming more health conscience and have concerns about animal rights. What has been your biggest career highlight so far? Our supper clubs have been the highlight because it felt like we had our own restaurant for the day. If you had to describe Livity PlantBased Cuisine in three words, what words would you choose? Authentic, wholesome and love. What is next for Livity Plant-Based Cuisine for the rest of 2020 and beyond? To keep on growing and to spread the Livity Plant-Based Cuisine all over London. Where can people get in touch with you online? Twitter: @Livityplantbasedcuisine Facebook: @livityplantbasedcuisine Instagram: @livityplantbasedcuisine

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comics

Goldfish By Justice Dixon

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comics

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storytime

The Story Corner With Jahzarah Dixon age 10

The Secrets of Aunt Eve Earlier today… The sun was beaming on the island Jamaica and everyone loved the heat. The tide was coming in on the golden sand. The parents were enjoying the sunshine and some of the children were playing football. The younger children were making sandcastles. The Rasta family, the Garvies, were on the beach when, “ding” a message popped up on the phone. It read, “Where are you, Sista?” Adailia, who was nearby saw the message on the phone and gasped, “Oh no! I have forgotten we are going to Aunt Eve’s house.” Adailia went to wake up Zaire, who was her older brother. But stopped in her tracks, when she noticed he was dribbling in the sand. “Ugghhhh,” screamed Adailia. “Wah de problem?” asked dad. “Um, dad remember we are meant to go to Aunt Eve’s house?” she replied. Dad scratched his head and said, “Oh yeah, I remember.” He then turned to wake up his wife. Just then, the youngest child, Fari, shouted “Wake up mum!” But mum continued to sleep in her sun hat. “Wake up sleeping beauty, we gotta go,” said dad as he gently shook mums shoulder. Mum eventually woke up. “Mum, Aunt Eve’s house? Does it ring a bell?” Said Zaire packing up his things. Mum jumped up and said, “Oh yeah, why didn’t you wake me? On your bikes let’s go.” The family cycled a short way on the quiet palm tree streets and arrived at a bright yellow house and knocked the door. Aunt Eve popped out of nowhere. “aaaaaaaaaaaahh!” screamed all of the children. “Oh, I didn’t mean to scare anybody,” replied 70

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Picture drawn by Justice Dixon

Aunt Eve shaking her head. “It is starting to rain we better head inside,” said mum. “Everyone inside!” Shouted Aunt Eve. They all headed into the front room, as the rain began to drip down the side of the house. Aunt Eve went to check the dinner while the Garvies went to put the shoes on the rack. Aunt Eve came back and decided to give them a tour of the house upstairs. The family went down the corridor and Adailia and Zaire spotted a door that had sign which read DO NOT ENTER. The notice caught the children’s eye and they instantly looked at each other and whispered, “We have to see what is in there.” Zaire looked at his sister and said, “Adailia let’s wait until they have all gone to bed.” Hours later, the children had snuck out of their beds and were opening the door which said do not enter in big red letters. Once they got inside, the room was dark, Zaire was leaning on a wall inside the room, when it began to glow. “What’s that bro?” said Adaila pointing to the wall behind him. Just as Zaire was about to answer, the wall pushed back and the floor opened. Zaire fell into the hole and vanished. TO BE CONTINUED IN THE NEXT ISSUE OF JUS’JAH MAGAZINE


Word Search

Rasta Word Search Rasta Word Search

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AFRICA AFRICA DRUMS IRIE GARVEY LION IRIE RASTAFARI

ITAL DRUMS JAH ITAL LION LOCKS LOCKS SELASSIEI

NYABINGHI GARVEY RASTAFARI JAH SELASSIEI NYABINGHIZION ZION

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Twelve

Tribes Chart T

here are three main branches in the Rastafari faith. They are Nyabinghi, Bobo Shanti and Twelve Tribes. These branches are often called houses or mansions. The Twelve Tribes of Israel was

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founded by Vernon Carrington who is fondly known as Prophet Gad, in Kingston, Jamaica. The Twelve Tribes of Israel chart is based on Jacob’s 12 sons. The chart corresponds with the ancient Israelite calendar.


HIS

Majesty Says “T

hroughout history, it has been the inaction of those who could have acted; the indifference of those who should have known better; the silence of the voice of justice when it mattered most; that has made it possible for evil to triumph.

- Haile Selassie I

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About

This Picture

This is a picture of Rasta twins, Blaze and Boogie. The brothers are talented musicians, producers and promoters of Soul, Jazz and Funk music events. The twins have also worked on Sound Systems and are known for being community champions in south London. This picture was taken at the annual Reparations March in London in 2015. 74

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In this edition of Jus' Jah Magazine, we honour Emperor Haile Selassie I, with an exclusive interview with Prince Asfa-Wossen Asserate. he i...

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