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THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF ROANOKE VALLEY

VOLUME 3 NUMBER 1 T H E S TA R J L R V. ORG

MAGAZINE


Make it personal

419 at Colonial 540.342.2991 • Valley View Mall 540.362.3779 • www.finks.com



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 ␣ P O LY VORE


NANCY HOWELL AGEE KICKS OFF 2017-18 JLRV YEAR BY: REAGAN DEPOE The kickoff to this year’s first General Membership Meeting (GMM) was nothing short of motivational. It was a packed house for keynote speaker Nancy Howell Agee, and every ear was listening intently to the female President and CEO of Carilion Clinic. Agee began her career as a nurse in the 70’s, and over time progressively assumed more leadership roles. She has received numerous accolades throughout her career. “You are all CEO’s,” Agee asserted while looking around the room, hinting to the fact that we are all leaders, striving to better our surrounding community through membership with JLRV. She had wonderful things to say about the philanthropy the Junior League of Roanoke Valley has been involved in, including its contributions to Carilion Clinic, as she reflected on her own time as a member. Even though Agee is no longer an active member of JLRV, she is still doing her part for the community through her work. Carilion Clinic’s ongoing mission is to improve the health of the communities it serves, and Agee is helping to accomplish this through building a strong affiliate medical school program, new research facilities, and an innovative program providing prescriptions for fresh food to low income residents.

AJLI 1901 Began in March

“Do you know why I have a turtle figurine sitting on my desk?” she asked us. “Because you don’t get anywhere without sticking your neck out.” These words resonated with the group, creating an energy and sense of enthusiasm which rippled throughout the room. What a great start to the new League year! With the closure of her speech, cheers erupted as Agee announced her decision to reinstate her Sustainer membership status with the Junior League of Roanoke Valley. Welcome back, Nancy Howell Agee, we are proud to have you!

DID YOU

KNOW?

JLRV 1926 Began in October

EDUCATION

CHILDREN

EMPLOYMENT

36% College Graduate 53% Completed Grad School 8% Some Grad School 2% Two Years of College

50% YES 50% NO

80% Full-Time 13% Homemaker 7% Part-Time

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Junior League of Roanoke Valley 541 Luck Avenue, Suite 317 Roanoke, VA 24016 Phone: 540.343.3663 Email: info@jlrv.org jlrv.org

The Star Staff 2017-2018

Board of Directors 2017-2018

Management Team 2017-2018

Publisher: Katie Jones Managing Editor: Jessica Beemer Assistant Editor: Reagan DePoe Account Executives: Jennifer Bise and Erica Musyt Writers: Jessica Beemer, Reagan DePoe, Ellie Hammer, Katie Jones, Allyson Lynch, Angela Mills, Anna Moncure, and Sarah Rath Wambe Photographer: Marissa Yi

President: Ginger Poole Avis President-Elect: Susan Stanley-Zahorchak Executive Vice President: Erika Lovegreen Secretary: Bridget Hamill Treasurer: Alicia DeMartini Nominating Director: Ashleigh Huggard Member-at-Large: Christy Pauley Sustaining Directors: Virginia “Ginny” Jarrett* and Mary Jean Levin**

Executive Vice President: Erika Lovegreen Executive Vice President-Elect: Anna Moncure Administrative Vice President: Lindsay Phipps Communications Vice President: Katie Jones Community Vice President: Jenna Zibton McFarland Finance Vice President: Lauren Maxwell

Fund Development Vice President: Sarah Baker Membership & Education Vice President: Kate Hailey *Past President of JLRV **Past President Norfolk/ Virginia Beach

published by

OUR MISSION The Junior League of Roanoke Valley is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. The Junior League of Roanoke Valley is an exclusively educational, charitable organization which reaches out to women of all races, religions, or national origins who demonstrate an interest in and commitment to voluntarism.

The STAR is published three times annually by the Junior League of Roanoke Valley. No reproductions in any form are allowed without written permission. Designed by Evolve Creative, Inc. and published by Wedding Planner Magazine ©2017

ADVERTISE IN

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For information, please call 540.343.3663 or e-mail info@jlrv.org 2

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LET’S CONNECT! fb.com/JuniorLeagueRoanokeValley @JLRoanokeValley jlrv.org

Index to Advertisers Fink’s

Grand Home Furnishings

Bella Muse

The Happy Housekeepers

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southwest Virginia

HoneyTree Early Learning Centers

Blue Ridge Towers

Glam House

Country Bear Day School

Kevin Hurley Photography

Girl Scouts of Virginia Skyline

Roanoke Valley Orthodontics Mill Mountain Theatre


TABLE OF CONTENTS

4 7 12 24 28

LETTER FROM PRESIDENT

PAST PRESIDENTS’ LUNCHEON

BEING ALL IN FOR A CURE

PAST GRANT RECIPIENTS

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MEMBERS ON THE MOVE

OUT OF THE MAILBOX

AROUND THE WORLD

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A JLRV LEGACY

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10

CATHERINE TURNER WARREN

SAVING SHELL

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The Happy Housekeepers

Mar-Ja Enterprises, Inc. www.thehappyhousekeepers.com (540) 774-4299


FROM THE PRESIDENT As we all gear up for the holidays, family and of course Stocked Market, it is a great time to look back on all of the amazing work that is happening with new placements, new leadership and new initiatives with the Junior League of Roanoke Valley. I am always amazed and proud at the amount of passion, dedication and boots on the ground work that happens in these early months of a new League year. And this work and commitment does not wain, but continues year after year. We are digging deeper this year and challenging ourselves as we ‘Disrupt Convention.’ The Governance Board and Management Team have all been meeting for six months at this point, the Stocked Market Committee has continued their work since we closed the doors on the event at last years Stocked Market, the new Community Impact Model Roll-Out committee has been digging deep into a new initiative for us since June and we have hosted the Second Virginia League’s Summit last month right here in the Star City. There are many other components, committees, partnerships and commitments that have taken place to continue the amazing work of our organization. Keep asking the questions, keep embracing our 90 year history and keep pushing the envelope to power our future. For this passion, dedication and hard work, I want to thank each of YOU for making the choice to keep our League as strong as our FULL membership. It takes every new member, active member and sustaining member to keep our League as healthy and successful as we have become. Not only our strong operations, but our membership experience and the impact we have in our community connects us and keeps us moving forward. Enjoy the work that is happening, laugh with the amazing women you are connecting with and be proud for the mark you are making on our community as a member of the Junior League of the Roanoke Valley. Disrupting Convention and proud of it,

GINGER POOLE AVIS PRESIDENT OF JLRV 2017-2018

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“Keep asking the questions, keep embracing our 90 year history and keep pushing the envelope to power our future.”

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MEET THE EDITOR BOARD FROM Disrupting Convention. You will hear these two words emphasized repeatedly throughout our League year. But what, exactly, do they mean? At our first STAR Magazine Volume 3 meeting, we discussed disrupting convention in detail, but I still left the room with questions about what it might mean for me. You see, before I started working on this issue, I was convinced that I welcomed change with open arms. I love new, streamlined processes, welcoming new members into the League, changing paint colors, rearranging furniture, etc. These all make me a change-accepting, volatile individual, right?! After reading this issue, I hope that you realize that the above examples I have given are NOT what is meant when we talk about “disrupting convention.” In fact, compiling this issue has given me a new meaning of what it entails to enact change as a whole. Disrupting convention is taking a fresh look at the long standing issues around our community and developing innovative solutions to solve them. Actions speak louder than words, and becoming a “disruptor” can help our community expand in new, all-encompassing directions. Don’t get me wrong, we don’t need to reinvent the wheel. History is just as important as the future. We cannot walk with blinders, but we must take what we have learned, examine our remaining “puzzle,” and find a new way to solve it! Using this mindset we can—and will—leave our community better than we found it. I’m excited to see where our League year will take us. Our General Membership Kickoff Meeting was full of excitement and empowerment, and I foresee our future as a League being filled with this same excitement and empowerment indefinitely. We are such a strong group of amazing women. Let’s welcome diversity, new ideas, and become the change we want to see in our community.

JESSICA BEEMER EDITOR, STAR MAGAZINE

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“Actions speak louder than words, and becoming a “disruptor” can help our community expand in new, all-encompassing directions.”


PAST PRESIDENTS’ LUNCHEON

BY: JESSICA BEEMER

On September 6, twenty-five former Junior League Presidents convened on the Shenandoah Club in downtown Roanoke to attend the Annual Past Presidents’ Luncheon. These women represent over 25 years of the Junior League of Roanoke Valley’s history and achievements. Each year this luncheon is a chance for past Presidents to reconnect, exchange memories, and listen to a brief update about the direction the League is headed for the upcoming year. Ginger Poole Avis (current President) gave a synopsis of the goals and focus for the 201718 League year, which included disrupting convention, establishing a strong external brand, and strengthening personal relationships.

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Sitting amongst all these JLRV past Presidents felt as if the room was full of best friends. The women spoke so highly of each other and the League, and connected in a way that expressed empowerment and friendship. They told stories of how their League years interconnected and what challenges they had to overcome. Each woman had at least one milestone that stood out in her mind to mark her Presidential year. Above all, it was obvious that these women were proud of the impact they made during their time as President of the Junior League of Roanoke Valley. Looking forward, these women are ongoing mentors for JLRV as a whole, and we continue to remember their history as we surge forward each year.

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WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

JLRV Past Grant Recipients BY: REAGAN DEPOE

Every year the Junior League of Roanoke Valley (JLRV) awards grants to a multitude of programs in our community. This year will be different. This year the League is “disrupting convention.” JLRV has unanimously decided NOT to give out any grants this year. Why? Because we want to think BIG. We plan to dedicate a substantial amount of time researching what the greatest needs of our local community are. This will help us to focus our time, efforts, and funding so we can make an even bigger impact in the years to come. In the upcoming issues we will be looking back at some of the previous grant recipients to see where they are now and how they used the resources we provided to benefit their programs.

Grant Recipient: The Youth Advocate Program 2016-17 Community Project Grant

ships for secondary education and vocational training. Their focus is on youth and their families; providing the resources and support needed to prevent out of home placement, such as foster care, or to reunite these children with their families after stabilizing their home life. Another goal is to provide education and mentorship to youth who may be at risk for involvement in the system or who are transitioning back into the community after system involvement while continuing to ensure community safety.

Amount Received: $30,857.00 Valerie Koeppel brought The Youth Advocate Program to Roanoke in 2009 and received the Community Project Grant just last year to create a service to educate and empower elementary aged children. Many children in our community have seemingly insurmountable obstacles–little things that we take for granted every day–preventing their ability to succeed. The grant allowed for funding to identify at-risk children in the very early stages, promoting healthy habits from the start. The Youth Advocate Program is an organization, now with an international presence, which was founded in 1975 after the release of 400 juveniles from Camp Hill State Prison 8

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in Pennsylvania to be a productive alternative to detention. This organization provides services such as job skills training, child welfare, behavioral health programs, and scholar-

Valerie needed a means of identifying at-risk youth, so she chose to partner with Park Hurt Elementary School, the lowest performing school in our community with the highest truancy rates. Koeppel paraphrased a study which showed that 9th grade students who were regularly truant were also much


more likely to drop out of school before graduating. Ten or more missed days of school in a year was used as the benchmark for which at-risk children were identified. Valerie noted that truancy is usually perceived to occur because the child doesn’t want to go to school, but in reality it can be a symptom of a larger underlying issue of unmet social or basic needs. Abuse, neglect, witnessing domestic violence, and poverty are the prominent issues that youth in the Roanoke Valley are facing. Excessive truancy is termed educational neglect. “As a community, we can respond more effectively than just punitively,” Koeppel says. With the help of the Community Project Grant, Valerie purchased a curriculum called “Peaceful Alternatives to Tough Situations” for grades 3-5 and hired advocates (paid mentors) to work with at-risk children and their families. This grant also provided assistance and resources to individual families to remedy any underlying needs that were unmet and to help families overcome any obstacles that were preventing them from being productive. Often, these underlying issues put the chil-

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dren at risk for being removed from their homes. With the grant funding, Valerie’s team is able to step in and provide the means necessary to stabilize the home situation, ultimately allowing the families to remain together. The program uses a systematic approach that allows the advocate to determine the greatest challenges the family faces in many different facets of life including finances, secure residences, medical obligations, education, employment, safety, or any other area a family is struggling. The advocate then breaks down each challenge bit by bit to get to the underlying issue. They are available for mentoring, transportation, resources for employment and education, financial planning, and even cleaning and helping with regular daily responsibilities. The advocate assists with anything that will help meet the family’s needs and get them to the point of self-sufficiency. As I sat talking with Valerie, I could see in her expression the passion she has for the Youth Advocate Program. In some ways, she confided, she feels limited because there are

boundaries to what she can legally do, although she feels she has already made great strides in identifying and reaching out to the children and families who need it most. Last year, the program succeeded in keeping three children from being placed in foster care and successfully conducted a full class of at-risk students in the curriculum she purchased for the program. With the remaining grant funds, Valerie aspires to expand her reach by involving more at-risk schools in the community and by partnering with the court system and Department of Social Services. She hopes that her service can become part of an intervention team allowing for more families to be made aware of the program and the services that are available. Challenges aside, Valerie states that the best part of the program is the strength of the therapeutic relationships that are formed between the kids and their advocates. The Youth Advocate Program accepts volunteers of all backgrounds and education levels. For more information about the Youth Advocate Program visit www.yapinc.org/roanoke.

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INFLUENTIAL WOMEN IN THE JLRV

Catherine Turner Warren BY: ANNA MONCURE

One of the things I value the most through my membership in the Junior League of Roanoke Valley is the opportunity to be surrounded by a plethora of both inspiring and influential women. Not only are they well-regarded members of the JLRV, but they have gone above and beyond and are recognized as movers and shakers (and disrupters of convention!) in the wider Roanoke Valley community. I had the privilege to interview one of these influential women: Catherine Turner Warren. Catherine was willing to share with me her involvement in the community and the League through her work as the Executive Director of the Virginia Blue Ridge Affiliate of Susan G. Komen.

The journey to Executive Director of the Virginia Blue Ridge Affiliate of Susan G. Komen: Catherine graduated from Washington and Lee University with a degree in Business Administration. While a typical business major might pursue a career in finance or management, Catherine was led to the nonprofit sector through her extracurricular event planning activities in college. Catherine’s first job post college was with the National MS Society (NMSS) in Charlotte, North Carolina. She worked her way up the ladder and became the Senior Manager of Leadership Events. Catherine was so successful with the NMSS that the organization created a position for her in Roanoke. After 7 years with NMSS, Catherine was ready for a change, and served as the Resource Developer Officer for Jefferson College of Health Sciences. Catherine was approached by Susan G. Komen in August 2013 to apply for the Executive Director position and has been with Komen ever since! 10

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The Junior League of Roanoke Valley strengthening and empowering community leaders:

Under the leadership of Catherine, the Virginia Blue Ridge Affiliate of Susan G. Komen is saving lives and making a difference in the Roanoke Valley and southwest Virginia. She feels her work is very meaningful and when asked at her first press conference for Komen “Why Komen?” she stated that this work allows her to pay it forward. With the statistic that 1 in 8 women develop breast cancer, she knows that someone close to her will be affected.

Catherine proclaimed that she wouldn’t be where she is today without the JLRV. The League has connected her to mentors, volunteers, and the community. Her work feeds directly into the League’s mission of empowering women. One of the tangible skills she has taken from her service in the League is working on a board. Her membership on the Governance Board of the League has been invaluable for her work with Komen, where she reports directly to a board. Catherine has made some of her closest friends through the League. She is still friends with many women from her new member class. She feels the League has given her a path to additional opportunities to give back to the community. Catherine, like many members, views the League as an integral part of the community; she was quick to point out that we can better our area and that many organizations need the help of and depend on the JLRV. She


has enjoyed the evolution of the grants process and is excited for the future of the League once the Community Impact Model is implemented. Issues in our community: Through her lenses of representing Komen, being a native of Roanoke, and a member of the League, Catherine is very aware of the issues facing the Roanoke Valley community. She noted that two of the largest challenges facing Southwest Virginia are the working poor and health equity. Catherine shared with me some examples she has seen of difficult choices made every day by individuals who use services provided by Komen: women having to choose between a mammogram and paying the rent, women without means to get to a hospital or the doctor’s office, or women lacking access to health care because there is not a hospital within close proximity. Catherine is also concerned about the success of all of the non-profits in the region. Each serves a valuable mission, but how might these organizations collaborate to ensure that the needs in the community are met and their success continues? Catherine shared that Komen partners with several organizations in the community. The 2018 Race for the Cure will team up with Girls on the Run to advance the mission of both programs. Race for the Cure will also feature dogs “for rent” from a local shelter. In the fall, Komen and American Cancer Society join together for an event called Sisters Night Out and of course there are powerful ways that members of the Junior League can partner with Komen. Komen has volunteer opportunities for everyone. They train breast health educators to speak to groups and women can represent Komen and the League at an education table. Individuals can volunteer to help with the Race for the Cure or the Pink Promise Luncheon, or may wish to explore the option of serving on the board or a committee. In the words of Catherine, all of these opportunities are “life-saving volunteer jobs.” The impact of the Virginia Blue Ridge Affiliate of Susan G. Komen and how League members can be proactive: Catherine is proud of the work done by the Virginia Blue Ridge Affiliate of Susan G. Komen. Komen is the number one non-government funder of breast cancer research in the United States. 75% of funds raised by Komen Virginia Blue Ridge stay in the community and are awarded to different organizations through a competitive grants process. The Affiliate uses a community profile to review needs in the area and direct funding. The Virginia Blue

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Ridge Affiliate recently awarded $360,000 to nine organizations committed to saving lives by increasing access to breast screenings and mammograms, educating women and men about breast cancer, and advancing research in the field. Since 2008, the Blue Ridge Affiliate has put $2.5 million in the community through local grants and contributed $869,000 to national breast cancer research. The two biggest risk factors for contracting breast cancer are being a woman and getting older. Catherine encouraged members to “know your normal” – if something in your breast feels or looks different, talk to your doctor. If a woman has a family history of breast cancer, she should start getting her annual mammogram at the age of 35; the age increases to 40 if there is not a family history of breast cancer. I was so pleased to get to know Catherine a little better through this interview. Thank you for your time and all you do for the Roanoke and Southwest Virginia community and the Junior League of Roanoke Valley! You are an influential woman!

Hi! I’m Ya’shenna, and I’m here with my Big Sister, Sue! I enjoy cooking, painting nails, crafting, taking walks and exploring the Roanoke Valley, so do my friends! Are You someone, like Sue, that can be a friend and a positive role model? Will You ask me about my day, spend time listening to me and encourage me to do my best at home and at school? If You are a caring adult, call BBBS of Southwest Virginia at 540-345-9604 or go to www.bigslittles.org to sign up, and make a difference in a child’s life forever. All I need from You is one hour a week to be a friend!

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BEING ALL IN FOR A CURE FOR

Breast Cancer BY: ANGELA MILLS

Being ALL IN is about taking a leap of faith and sticking through all the challenges while recognizing the beauty and opportunities that come from the journey. One might say that the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure does just this through their funding of breast cancer research. Each spring JLRV members volunteer for and participate in the Roanoke Valley’s Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure, and the most recent event took place on May 27. Making the connection even more special is that a number of our active and sustaining members are currently fighting or have overcome breast cancer. The partnership between the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure and the JLRV is an incredible opportunity to support and empower women.

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Call our Admissions Office or Visit our website: (540) 774-2547 5220 Starkey Road, SW Roanoke, VA 24018 CountryBearDaySchool.com 12

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Celebration painting by Eric Fitzpatrick


Roanoke - Valley View 1945 Valley View Blvd NW

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Roanoke - Tanglewood 4235 Electric Rd SW

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SAVING SHELL

Journey A PARENT’S

Shelly (Shell) Channing Fisher was a part of this world for almost twenty years. The son of JLRV member Monique Fisher, he was the youngest in his group of friends and was constantly striving to be accepted by his peers. Shell was a people pleaser and would go to great lengths to make people happy and do anything for the approval of others. Shell became involved with drugs at a young age and struggled with addiction for several years. His addiction began due to multiple narcotic prescriptions issued for sports related injuries, and soon he was purchasing and reportedly selling drugs to others as well.

BY: ALLYSON LYNCH AND JESSICA BEEMER

Each decision that we make in our lives has an impact. Moving to Roanoke was intended to be a fresh start. Shell began working, and he enrolled in college. He discovered that he was expecting a child and was ecstatic at the news. On Christmas Eve 2013, Shell made a decision 14

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that would leave a lasting impression on his family and his spiritual life. He chose to give and devote his life to Christ. On the afternoon of his death, his mother came home to find him in a jovial state of mind. Shell shared that he felt blessed‌blessed with how his life was going. He was finally on a positive path.


You have already read the most joyous piece of this story. Whether or not you are a religious or spiritual person, we can all appreciate when something positive comes out of tragic circumstances. Shell’s mother and family hope that sharing their story and experiences will change the lives of others. Shell learned that he was going to require another knee surgery, which would necessitate the need for pain medication. He expressed concerns to his mother, and they decided that they would take precautions. Monique hugged her son for the last time after that conversation. Dinner that same evening was supposed to be with family, but Shell called to say that he would not be able to keep the plans. His parents arrived home to find him in the bathroom, which was still no reason for alarm. After 30-45 minutes had passed, his dad knocked on the door in an attempt to check in. No response came. The next several minutes and days to follow would be permanently etched into Shell’s parents’ memories. Shell was discovered unresponsive with a glazed look in his eyes. Monique initiated CPR, and his dad proceeded to contact emergency medical personnel. Soon their home was filled with police and medical teams, as well as additional family members, including seventeen year old sister, Becca. Shell’s parents knew that it was too late as officials continued to work on their son and question the events of the scene. Autopsy confirmed a drug overdose as the cause of death. Shell had purchased heroin that was found to be laced with a lethal amount of fentanyl; the combination stopped his heart. The family was devastated. “No parent should ever have to bury a child…that is not the natural progression of life that we expect,” voiced Monique. “It is a hurt and pain that aches inside of your heart every day. The sadness and loss never goes away...you only learn how to get up each morning and live through it.” Shell’s decisions in life cost him everything. He missed the birth of his son. He missed experiencing the joys of love and marriage. He missed going through life with his brother and sister. He missed a lifetime of memories

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with family and friends. Monique and her family plan to compile a book of Shell’s experiences, including the ways he would use and hide drugs, as well as his attempts at rehab and counseling. Shell’s story is also being told to students in local schools through presentations by the family. “Prevention is key,” says Fisher, “We pray that his life will touch at least one soul... remove them from drugs and lead them to the Cross of Jesus.” One year after Shell’s death, Monique Fisher decided to become an advocate for drug abuse prevention. She is currently working with many organizations to spread awareness of the Opioid Crisis throughout the Roanoke Valley and surrounding areas. Below, she answers a few questions regarding her current role as a drug prevention advocate and how it has impacted her life: How did you move from grieving your son’s death to starting your advocacy? While sitting in the front row of his funeral, I looked to my left and saw hundreds of teenagers who were crying uncontrollably… I knew that it was too late to save my own son’s life, but I had to do something to save someone else’s. I struggled with this calling for one year. On the one year anniversary [of Shell’s death], I traveled five hours to my hometown where we had buried him. Many of his friends also traveled several hours to support us and honor him. We provided many light blue balloons and sharpie markers for everyone present. I knew that it was time to let go of the bitterness and anger [and] start directing that energy towards helping others. I asked everyone to write a final message to Shell and all at once, we let our balloons travel through the clear blue skies. It was at that moment my advocacy began. During the last one hour of the trip back to Roanoke, I typed his story, “Saving Shell, A Parent’s Journey.” In less than three days, it had reached over 100,000 people [through social media]. Did the reaction to your story further confirm your decision to become an drug abuse prevention advocate?

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SAVING SHELL: A PARENT’S JOURNEY After my short story was released on Facebook in 2015, the comments and private messages from friends and even strangers began pouring in. I knew that God was calling me to this purpose but the response was overwhelming. I would sit and tearfully read for hours. I prayed for direction and the opportunities to speak poured in. I had spent at least 3 years trying to save Shell from himself and his addiction. God had spared his life through several drug events and car accidents. “Saving Shell...A Parent’s Journey” actually began long before his death. The journey only refocused to a new challenge of trying to save others. As a drug abuse prevention advocate, what types of organizations do you speak to or work with? I presently work with the Prevention Council of Roanoke Valley and the Roanoke Valley Opioid and Heroin Prevention Task Force. Last year our group spoke to almost every Roanoke County and City Middle School and High School, and we are preparing to repeat that same venture for the upcoming year. We have also been targeting civic organizations and churches. Outside of the Virginia territory, I have been speaking at churches and schools in North Carolina and South Carolina as well. I never turn down any opportunity to share prevention and resources for all ages.

the conversation now because if they aren’t breathing, they won’t be talking with you at all. To a grieving parent: Take life one second at a time. Focus on the future but also on the memories. Allow your family and friends to love you and support you. It’s ok to cry and only shows that you are normal. Life is short. Live everyday to it’s fullest. “Tomorrow is promised to no one.” (Clint Eastwood) Currently you are in the process of writing a book about your family’s experience. What do you hope readers will take away from your book when they read it? I hope people will read my book and know that it was a real life situation. We often stereotype a true drug addict. We look for that person on the street who has no family, no home, no job. Drugs do not discriminate! I want the readers to know that help is available. Resources are available regardless of financial income. Here in the Roanoke Valley we have the Hope Initiative available 24/7. We are also blessed to have Terrence Engels, a former professional baseball player living here in Roanoke, who actively places those in need through his career at Addiction Centers of America. He lost his dream and professional baseball career due to addiction but found [a new calling through] his ability to use his past to save others.

What do you want to make sure your audience gains from your presentations? Drug addiction is real! It does not discriminate!! It affects all ages, races and socioeconomic groups. Not only does it destroy the user, but it also greatly hurts the friends and familes of all involved. Prevention is the key. Coping mechanisms are also vital! My son was drug-free for three months before he lost his life to an accidental overdose. He had experienced a difficult two or three days with real life situations and turned to the one avenue which was familiar for relief–drugs! Unfortunately, the drug that he purchased was laced with a lethal amount of fentanyl. What is one thing you would tell a person going through a similar situation? To a person dealing with an addict: sitting down to have a conversation may be difficult, however it is better to have

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Shelly Channing Fisher 09/08/94 - 03/13/14


DRUG OVERDOSE

facts & figures • Rural areas of Virginia have the highest mortality rates due to Rx opioid overdoses while urban areas have the highest mortality rates due to explicit opioids.

• The number of fatal cocaine overdoses began increasing in 2015. In 2016, 54% of fatal cocaine overdoses also had fentanyl causing death.

• Effective November 21, 2016, the State Health Commissioner declared a public health emergency for the Commonwealth resulting from opioid addiction which affects the health and safety of Virginians.

• Fatal fentanyl overdoses increased by 176.4% from 2015 to 2016 (225 and 622 deaths, respectively).

• Fatal drug overdose has been the leading method of unnatural death in Virginia since 2013 and the leading method of accidental death since 2014.

• In late 2013-early 2014, illicitly made fentanyl began showing up in Virginia and by 2016, most fatal fentanyl overdoses were of illicit production of the drug.

VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH OFFICE OF THE CHIEF MEDICAL EXAMINER “To promote and protect the health of all Virginians”

Fatal Drug Overdose Quarterly Report Edition 2017.1 T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

Publication Date: July 2017

VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 1

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Legacy A JLRV

BY: KATIE JONES Shannon Shaffer is not ready to become a Sustainer. A past President of the organization, Shannon has been involved with the Junior League for more than a decade and continues to remain passionate about the organization. This year she has a compelling reason to remain active with JLRV as her daughter Adair McCabe joins us as a New Member! “I had Adair when I was 18, and I tell people we grew up together,” Shannon said. “She and I have always been close and gotten along really well, and frankly, I find her quite funny. She shares a lot of my same passion for volunteering, too. So, it is quite exciting to have my best friend joining the Junior League with me!” Growing up in Cave Spring, Adair was inspired by her mother’s commitment to community service, whether through PTA or JLRV, but is ultimately joining for her own reasons. “I grew up volunteering and found a love for it at a young age,” she said. “I had the opportunity to volunteer with the Appalachian Service Project through my church for two summers in high school and spent 3 weeks volunteering in South Africa in college. However, now that I have graduated and am working in Roanoke, I wanted to find a way to give back to the local community.” Adair graduated a semester early from Penn State in Fall 2016 with a degree in Biology and minor in Human Development and Family Studies. She recently moved back home to Roanoke to take a scribe position with the Carilion Emergency Department, and is currently applying to medical school to continue her education in a pediatric specialty.

The Junior League pushed me out of my comfort zone over and over again, and I would encourage Adair and all of the new members to push themselves out of their comfort zone.

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When asked what advice she would offer her daughter, Shannon responded, “I would offer her the same advice that I offer her in every venture in her life: ‘Make good choices.’ I honestly could not think of a better choice for her right now. The Junior League pushed me out of my comfort zone over and over again, and I would encourage Adair and all of the new members to push themselves out of their comfort zone. This is a volunteer organization, and the support network is SUPERB. If you are outside of your comfort zone and falter, there will always be someone to catch you, support you and help you. It is a beautiful thing.” Shannon would know! She joined the Junior League shortly after moving to Roanoke from Pennsylvania in 2003. Her first placement after her new member year was on the Stocked Market Arrangements committee. She “fell in love with everything Stocked Market [related] and spent the next handful of years working on this committee, ultimately chairing it twice.” She has found that the Junior League can be whatever you need it to be at all the different parts of your life. Her path to the presidency included a year as Administrative VP, two years on the Nominating committee, and chairing a community committee. Shannon cites the

implementation of the League’s new leadership structure in 2015-16 as her proudest accomplishment as President. She continues, “I always said I would stay in the JLRV until my daughter could join me, and I am so excited to be at this point. I am currently in my second year as a membership advisor and even though Adair is joining me this year, I am not ready to become a Sustainer just yet.” Adair shares her mother’s enthusiasm. “I am excited for the many volunteer opportunities that are ahead of me this upcoming year,” she said. “I am looking forward to learning more about our community and working with women with different views, ideas, and backgrounds. I think that the JLRV will push me outside of my comfort zone, and I am excited to become a better ‘me’ within an encouraging and welcoming group of women.” In addition to welcoming her daughter to JLRV, Shannon would like “to not only welcome all the new members to the JLRV, but also welcome back the rest of the members! We are almost 500 strong and the fact that you all choose to join the JLRV year after year is AWESOME. THANK YOU, each and every one of you!”

I always said I would stay in the JLRV until my daughter could join me, and I am so excited to be at this point.

T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 1

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Holiday Shopping Season

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THANKS TO OUR

Stocked Market SPONSORS DIAMOND SPONSOR

PLATINUM SPONSORS

GOLD SPONSORS

SILVER SPONSORS Woods Rogers PLC • Roanoke Valley Orthodontics • Avis Construction Harris Financial Group • Trust Company of Virginia • Grand Home Furnishings MemberOne Federal Credit Union • Kroger • Carilion • Virginia Varsity • Brandon Oaks T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 1

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AROUND THE WORLD WITH JLRV

First Stop: California BY: SARAH WAMBE

I owe a lot to Amy Jennings. She has been my best friend for more than 17 years and is the reason I joined the Junior League of Roanoke Valley. We first met in college attending California State University, Long Beach. Life eventually took us to different cities–Amy became an Assistant Professor of Psychology at San Bernardino Valley College and I went to Concord University in West Virginia – but we have always found time to keep in touch. When I first relocated across the country, Amy urged me to find a League to join. The Junior League of Long Beach had changed her life and she was certain it would help me start my new path. At first I was hesitant because I live in West Virginia and the closest League was almost a two hour drive from my home – but I decided that the cause and the people involved were worth the investment. I have not looked back since.

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T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

As I go into my third year of membership with JLRV, I have heard many stories from other members as to why they joined the League. I then realized that I had never heard Amy’s full story – why she joined Junior League, what leadership positions she has held, and why she still is a member almost 10 years down the line. So, I decided to call her up and ask! Amy joined the Junior League of Long Beach (JLLB) after being recruited for almost five years by teachers she met while volunteering at an elementary school. In 2007 she finally attended her first JLLB mixer. The minute she walked through the door she felt an instant connection with the League. As a member of JLLB, Amy held various leadership positions and had the opportunity to attend Junior League leadership trainings - both the Organizational Development Institute (ODI) and Southwest Exchange twice.


Amy has been most impressed with how the League truly makes changes in their community. While a member of JLLB, Amy was a part of “Kids in the Kitchen,” a community event which teaches families how to eat properly and encourages physical activity. The program became so popular that the JLLB turned it over to the city directly. The Junior League of Long Beach has also been responsible for working with the California legislature to lobby for laws to help improve the lives of Long Beach residents. Recently the League was able to pass a “Helmet Law” to ensure that anyone under the age of 18 is required to wear a helmet when riding outside. Two years ago, when Amy moved, she transferred to the Junior League of Riverside (JLR) in Riverside, CA. Amy quickly jumped into her new League and is currently the Membership Chair. She is working to grow their current membership from 45 members to 75 members in the next few years. She knows it is a large undertaking but is up to the challenge and has been very impressed with the League so far. While every League has a different focus depending on the needs of their individual communities, we are all a part of a larger network called the Association of Junior Leagues International. This year we are all following the same theme of “disrupting convention.” The JLR is “disrupting convention” by starting a new philanthropic endeavor that will bring a diaper bank to Riverside County. One in three families in America is not able to afford diapers and JLR is determined to do something about it. The goal is to become a part of the National Diaper Bank Network. After learning about this cause, I did some research and found out that there are only six diaper banks in the state of Virginia, none of which are in Roanoke. I am now inspired to take action in my own community. This is what being a League member is all about; recognizing a need and doing everything possible to make a change for the people in our communities. I am inspired by the work that Junior Leagues around the nation are doing and am proud that Amy urged me to become a part of such an amazing organization. Amy is an inspiration, and I can only hope 10 years into my membership I am still actively making a difference in our community.

T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 1

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MEMBERS ON THE MOVE Our members are constantly “on the move” throughout the Roanoke Valley.  Whether we are volunteering with community service, attending trainings, or hosting social gatherings, there is always a way for members to be engaged.

Administrative Council Kickoff Meeting

Heels for Healing Volunteers

Membership advisor group kicks off at The Green Goat

Volunteering at the Good Samaritan Hike for Hospice 24

T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

WANT TO BE PICTURED HERE?

Send your picture and story to star@jlrv.org


WANT TO BE PICTURED HERE? Send your picture and story to star@jlrv.org

Several JLRV members enjoy the eclipse on August 21, 2017

Members packing Halloween goody bags for the Presbyterian Community Center

Membership advisor group kicks off at Sweet Donkey

Board Members address the new member class at the annual New Member Kickoff

2017-18 New Member Committee T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 1

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WELCOME TO OUR

Member Transfers We are very excited to welcome two members to the Junior League of Roanoke Valley as transfer members from other Virginia chapters!

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Lydia Higgs

Laura Grace Kaufman

Junior League of Charlottesville

Junior League of Norfolk-Virginia Beach

“I’m transferring to JLRV because a new job opportunity brought me back to my hometown. I’m most looking forward to getting to know the ladies of the League and to jumping into our community partnerships.”

“My husband Konrad and I moved to the Roanoke area at the end of August with our two pets, and it’s the best decision we’ve made! In the coming League year I am looking forward to getting to know my fellow members of the JLRV and to participating in volunteer opportunities within the community (one of my favorite pastimes). I also hope to take part in a leadership position in the coming years as well!”

T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E


2017-2018 JLRV DONATION LEADERSHIP PAGE WE ARE PROUD TO BE LED BY THE FOLLOWING WOMEN: NOMINATING COMMITTEE

GOVERNANCE BOARD

President: Ginger Poole Avis

President-Elect: Susan Stanley-Zahorchak

Executive Vice President: Erika Lovegreen

Nominating Director: Ashleigh Huggard

Emily Fielder

Secretary: Bridget Hamill

Treasurer: Alicia DeMartini

Nominating Director: Ashleigh Huggard

Carter Hanna

Macel Janoschka*

Member-at-Large: Christy Pauley

Sustaining Director: Mary Jean Levin**

Sustaining Director: Virginia “Ginny” Jarrett*

Beth Kelley

Lindsay Seiler Murray

MANAGEMENT TEAM

Executive VP: Erika Lovegreen

Executive VP-Elect: Anna Moncure

Administrative VP: Lindsay Phipps

Communications VP: Katie Jones

*Past President of JLRV **Past President Norfolk/ Virginia Beach Community VP: Jenna Zibton McFarland

Finance VP: Lauren Maxwell

T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

Fund Development VP: Sarah Baker

Membership & Education VP: Kate Hailey

VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 1

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T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E


2017-2018

Calendar Nov 2-5

Nov 7 Nov 10-12 Nov 14 Dec 5 Dec 15 Jan 9 Jan 23

AJLI Organizational Development Institute (ODI) New Member Meeting 2017 Stocked Market Cluster Meetings New Member Meeting Holiday Party New Member Meeting

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General Membership Meeting

T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 1

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THE

STAR

Non-Profit Non-Profit Org. US Postage US Postage PAID PAID Permit No. 870 Permit No. 870 Lynchburg, VA Lynchburg, VA

Junior League of Roanoke Valley | 541 Luck Avenue, Suite 317 | Roanoke, VA 24016 | 540.343.3663 | jlrv.org

2 0 1 8

SEASON A CHORUS LINE A CHORUS LINE

TRINKLE MAINSTAGE SERIES

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THE MUSICAL THEATRE FOR YOUNG AUDIENCES VERSION

August 1-12

April 25-May 13

October 3-21

December 5-23

YOUNG AUDIENCES SERIES Write Stuff!

A Year With

New plays by young playwrights

2018

Tales of ose Mother Go

Write Stuff!

The Tempest

February 10

May 4-12

A Year With

Mother Goose Tales

THEATRE FOR YOUNG AUDIENCES VERSION

May 4-12

June 2-30

WALDRON FRINGE SERIES

CONSTELLATIONS February 22-March 11

SPECIAL EVENT

THE CHRIS IANS

May 18-19

June 21-30

MUSIC SERIES

Curtain Call

A Ta s t e o f

Nancy Ruth Patterson’s

A Simple Gift November 9-10

June 1-2

Country August 24-25

Tickets now available Call 540.342.5740 or visit www.millmountain.org

T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

Profile for Junior League of Roanoke Valley

STAR Magazine Vol. 3 No. 1  

The official magazine of the Junior League of Roanoke Valley

STAR Magazine Vol. 3 No. 1  

The official magazine of the Junior League of Roanoke Valley

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