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THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF ROANOKE VALLEY

MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN THE LIVES OF FOSTER CHILDREN IN ROANOKE page 12

STOCKED MARKET: LEGACY OF SUCCESS page 18

Photo Credit: William Drew Photography

VOLUME 3 NUMBER 2 T H E S TA R J L R V. ORG

MAGAZINE

VIRGINIA LEADERSHIP SUMMIT

Stafford’s

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MEMBER MARCHES ON AS SON BATTLES PKU


T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E 419 at Colonial 540.342.2991 • Valley View Mall 540.362.3779 • www.finks.com


JLRV MEMBERS HONORED WITH

WOMEN OF ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS Junior League members Jenna Zibton McFarland and Susan Still were among seven women honored at the 15th annual Women of Achievement Awards. DePaul Community Resources holds the annual luncheon every fall recognizing women who have given generously of themselves to ensure safer, stronger communities through their professional and volunteer endeavors. JENNA ZIBTON MCFARLAND Jenna was recognized with the Alison Parker Young Professional Award. She is an Emmy award winning journalist at WSLS 10 News. Her in-depth reporting on human trafficking raised awareness across Virginia about the need for stronger laws, which led to changes in Virginia law. Jenna’s investigations into the Salem VA Medical Center found $1.7 million worth of equipment reported missing and a $200,000 security oversight. These stories launched an investigation under the Office of Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, leading to changes in policies at the medical center. Recently, Jenna brought awareness to the growing need for foster and adoptive families through “30 Days of Hope,” each day highlighting a child or set of siblings who can be adopted right now. More than 5,000 children are in foster care across Virginia and nearly 900 are available for adoption and need permanent, loving families. She has also been part of the team at WSLS 10 News recognized with regional Edward R. Murrow awards and Associated Press awards for outstanding news coverage. “We can all be champions for making our communities better, and I’m fortunate that it’s something I’m able to do in my career and through volunteer work in the Junior League,” Jenna said. “The women recognized over the last 15 years with Women of Achievement Awards are an amazing testament to our community and what we can do when we work to make our neighborhoods stronger together.”

Jenna Zibton McFarland (left) at the awards ceremony

SUSAN STILL Susan was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award. With over 40 years of banking experience, Susan Still, President and Chief Executive Officer of HomeTown Bank, is actively involved with initiatives both in and out of the bank and brings a sound perspective and commitment to everything she does. Susan has blended her years of experience in commercial lending with the realities of today’s economy and has become a very well-respected leader in the banking community on a state and national level. In 2015, Susan was elected to serve on the Board of Directors for the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. Susan is a strong proponent of financial literacy in our community. Through the bank, she has championed various events and services focused on educating the general public on financial literacy. Born and raised in Southwest Virginia, Susan understands the needs of our community and has utilized a great deal of her spare time helping to lead organizations such as the Roanoke Regional Chamber of Commerce, Foundation for Roanoke Valley, Roanoke Regional Partnership, Junior League of Roanoke Valley, Roanoke College Community Advisory Group, Virginia Association of Community Banks, and American Bankers Association Community Bankers Council, among others. Susan is a strong, highly intelligent, approachable, and graceful woman who is an impeccable example of leadership and lifetime achievement.

OTHER JLRV MEMBERS WHO HAVE WON WOMEN OF ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS: Margaret Beazley (2005) | Ginny Jarrett (2008) | Ginger Poole Avis (2013) T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

Susan Still giving her acceptance speech


THE

STAR

Junior League of Roanoke Valley 541 Luck Avenue, Suite 317 Roanoke, VA 24016 Phone: 540.343.3663 Email: info@jlrv.org jlrv.org

The Star Staff 2017-2018

Board of Directors 2017-2018

Management Team 2017-2018

Publisher: Katie Jones Managing Editor: Jessica Beemer Assistant Editor: Reagan DePoe Writers: Ginger Poole Avis, Jessica Beemer, Sarah Boxley Beck, Reagan DePoe, Ellie Hammer, Summer Harper, Katie Jones, Erika Lovegreen, Allyson Lynch, Annah Sullivan, Margaret Hunter Wade, Sarah Rath Wambe Photographer: Marissa Yi

President: Ginger Poole Avis President-Elect: Susan Stanley-Zahorchak Executive Vice President: Erika Lovegreen Secretary: Bridget Hamill Treasurer: Alicia DeMartini Nominating Director: Ashleigh Huggard Member-at-Large: Shannon Shaffer Sustaining Directors: Virginia “Ginny” Jarrett* and Mary Jean Levin**

Executive Vice President: Erika Lovegreen Executive Vice President-Elect: Anna Moncure Administrative Vice President: Lindsay Phipps Communications Vice President: Katie Jones Community Vice President: Jenna Zibton McFarland Finance Vice President: Lauren Maxwell

Fund Development Vice President: Sarah Baker Membership & Education Vice President: Kate Hailey *Past President of JLRV **Past President Norfolk/ Virginia Beach

published by

OUR MISSION The Junior League of Roanoke Valley is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. The Junior League of Roanoke Valley is an exclusively educational, charitable organization which reaches out to women of all races, religions, or national origins who demonstrate an interest in and commitment to voluntarism.

The STAR is published three times annually by the Junior League of Roanoke Valley. No reproductions in any form are allowed without written permission. Designed by Evolve Creative, Inc. and published by Wedding Planner Magazine ©2018

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For information, please call 540.343.3663 or e-mail info@jlrv.org 2

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN THE LIVES OF FOSTER CHILDREN IN ROANOKE

LETTER FROM PRESIDENT

SECOND STOP: LONDON

VIRGINIA LEADERSHIP SUMMIT

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NEW MEMBER CLASS

MEMBERS ON THE MOVE

OUT OF THE MAILBOX

PAST GRANT RECIPIENTS

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STAFFORD’S SOLDIERS SUSTAINER SPOTLIGHT: JACKIE KINDER

T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

STOCKED MARKET RECAP

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VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 2

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Country Bear Day School What a Difference! INFANT ñ TODDLER ñ PRESCHOOL ñ PRE-K ñ AFTER SCHOOL ñ SUMMER CAMP

Join Girl Scouts of Virginia Skyline and pledge to advance the G.I.R.L. Agenda and lead positive change through civic action! Get involved with a Civic Action Toolkit for girls & adults: girlscouts.org/GIRLagenda INFANT ñ TODDLER ñ PRESCHOOL ñ PRE-K ñ AFTER SCHOOL ñ SUMMER CAMP

Call our Admissions Office or Visit our website: (540) 774-2547 5220 Starkey Road, SW Roanoke, VA 24018 CountryBearDaySchool.com

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Celebration painting by Eric Fitzpatrick


FROM THE PRESIDENT We are all at that point in the League year where we can have the perspective to look back at what has been accomplished, and to look ahead to the final goals we would like to accomplish before our League year comes to a close in May. Knowing that, with the exciting turnover of leadership, the continued planning, and the many committees that function with a smooth transition from League year to League year, the service never really comes to a complete end. I continue to appreciate and respect your commitment, and all that you do for The Junior League of Roanoke Valley. This commitment is what we do best. This is the passion that drives our service to our organization and to our community. This is what will drive us forward for the future. We may not do things as they have always been done, but let us embrace those changes and the momentum it brings. Be willing to hear a different perspective. Be willing to have the discussions. Be willing to ‘Disrupt Convention.’ We are seeing great things happen this year, all the while continuing to respect our incredible ninety plus year history. YOU are making this happen. WE are accomplishing this together. I wanted to share with you some important advice that I received from Carol Scott, the President of the Association of Junior Leagues International. As you continue the hard and important work you do, I wish for you... • Time to relax, think and dream • The ability to listen and really seek to hear and understand • Courage to take risks and try new things • Confidence and trust in yourself to achieve great things • Respect of family and friends • The ability to laugh and see humor in situations Be proud of the work that we are accomplishing with this amazing organization. Look around and notice all the strong and amazing women that we get to serve with. Continue to learn from each other, share with each other and lift each other up as we go. Find those teachable moments and be willing to find new things that you can gain from what others have to give you. We are so very strong together.

“YOU are making this happen. WE are accomplishing this together.”

Here’s to another year of amazing service!

GINGER POOLE AVIS PRESIDENT OF JLRV 2017-2018 T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

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MEET THE EDITOR BOARD FROM Here we are, a little over a month into 2018. Can you believe it? What do you think of when a new year comes around? A new beginning? A fresh start? New resolutions? ...broken resolutions? Does a new year stress you out? Does it give you hope? Each of us approach our new year in various ways. For me, the new year is a time of celebration, but also one of reflection. It is rewarding to take a glance back at all of the celebration-worthy events that marked the previous year. However, it is also a time for me to reflect on challenges that were presented and to recall how they were overcome. What new surprises, events, or challenges will come your way in 2018? While thinking of the struggle of juggling a new, unknown year, I came across a quote by Penelope Leach, a British psychologist who specializes in parenting, that hit home for me personally. She says “The more you give the more you get and the more you get the more you feel like giving.” In this quote, Penelope is referring to loving and raising a child; however, in my mind this quote can be applicable in multiple situations, including our membership in the Junior League of Roanoke Valley. As you will see throughout this issue, countless volunteer hours are given by Junior League women each month. However, the volunteer opportunities highlighted in this issue are only a tiny spotlight of the true time that is put in by Junior League women in our community. We have a great group of women who give their time and their talents to make our community a better place. Many women give their time to the community not only through the Junior League, but also in their careers and through involvement with other organizations. Based on Leach’s quote, the more time we give to our community, the more satisfaction we will get from our efforts. On the flip side, if supporting our community continues to give us satisfaction, we will continue to volunteer our time.

“The more you give the more you get and the more you get the more you feel like giving.” - PEN EL OPE L EAC H

I challenge you all to find something this year that fulfills your heart. Something that will give you as much satisfaction as you get from it, so that you and your community can grow and thrive together.

JESSICA BEEMER EDITOR, STAR MAGAZINE T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

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JUNIOR LEAGUES OF VIRGINIA’S SECOND

Leadership Summit TOGETHER IS BETTER

BY: SUMMER HARPER

The Junior Leagues of Virginia continued to build momentum and shape their community awareness during the 2nd Annual Leadership Summit this past October in Roanoke. The idea for the Virginia Leagues to become better acquainted and combine resources to offer firstrate training came to fruition in November of 2016. The Junior League of Richmond hosted the inaugural Leadership Summit with the sole purpose of uniting the eight individual Leagues throughout the state to determine ways to better serve each other while impacting our own communities. The overwhelming attendance, the enthusiasm to share experiences, and the realization of such a powerful network with the potential to make an impact proved that a gathering of this nature was long overdue in Virginia. There are few experiences that are greater to a volunteer leader than having an idea that results in the empowerment of others. The discussions that began in Richmond, regarding next steps and ways to continue the conversations, offered me great pride as I recalled just how important one question had become, “Why aren’t we working together if we’re all facing the same issues?” 8

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Ginger Poole Avis, who was President-Elect at the time of the inaugural Leadership Summit, immediately recognized the importance of forming a team to bring the Virginia Junior Leagues together again in the Star City. The team was made up of members with varied League experience and included members from the Junior League of Norfolk-Virginia Beach (JLNVB).They were tasked with creating a Summit that would reiterate our initial purpose and transition from asking “why” to determining how we could work together. Vicki Clark, an expert in inspiring community and business leaders, played a vital role in continuing the vision that became the 2nd Annual Leadership Summit. The morning began on the top floor of Center in the Square with a celebration of the combined 526 years the Junior Leagues of Virginia have been bettering their communities. The commonalities across the Virginia Leagues were undeniable as was the goal to remain relevant in our communities and to our members. The passion, commitment and expertise amongst the seven leagues in attendance surrounded issues including literacy, domestic violence, healthy eating, and food insecurities. Ashley Marshall, JLRV Grants Co-Chair, expressed her appreciation in attending the Leadership Summit and in being surrounded


WE ARE BETTER TOGETHER. BY OURSELVES WE CANNOT LIFT HEAVY WEIGHTS OR SOLVE COMPLEX PROBLEMS, BUT TOGETHER WE ARE REMARKABLE.” - SIM ON SINEK

by so many other League members from around the Commonwealth. “It was an opportunity to learn more about the issues across the entire state, and dive deep into how our League and others can have a profound impact and disrupt convention,” shared Ashley. I can confidently describe the sixty-two women that filled the room as optimists, leaders and advocates. The women of the Junior League lead and advocate to promote voluntarism, develop the potential of women and improve communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers nearly every day. Vicki reminded us that “Advocacy is volunteer power!” Junior League members have been trailblazers throughout the decades in developing strategies to improve communities. Janine Le Sueur, Director of Programs with Association of Junior League International (AJLI), and

Mary Jean Levin, JLRV’s Sustaining Director, spent the afternoon sharing some of the ways Junior League women of Virginia can unite to make a greater impact. This open discussion included what to expect when building a state-wide coalition and forming a State Public Affairs Committee (SPAC). The Junior Leagues of Virginia have a history of successfully working together on issues such as welfare of children, health, the environment, the arts and many other topics in years past. The purpose and understanding that advocacy is collaborative among those in the room was riveting. “As a member of the Community Impact team, participating in the Leadership Summit highlighted for me the increasing importance of coalition building among Virginia leagues as we all work towards a common aim to ‘move the needle’ in our respective communities,”

said Laura Conte. Laura serves as the Assistant Community Vice President and shared, “Being in the presence of so many smart empowered women was exhilarating and it made me even more excited for the future of the Junior League!” Simon Sinek, an author who believes in a brighter future for humanity, says, “We are better together. By ourselves we cannot lift heavy weights or solve complex problems, but together we are remarkable.” Plans are already underway for more leadership training, networking, and potentially re-forming a Virginia SPAC. The Junior League of Norfolk/Virginia Beach will carry the torch, and host the next Leadership Summit. We came together, learned together, and look forward to continuing the pursuit to collaborate and conquer in the Commonwealth at the 3rd Leadership Summit scheduled for this fall.

Photo Credit: Ryan Anderson Media

Alicia DeMartini, Erika Lovegreen, Susan Stanley-Zahorchak, Ginger Poole Avis, Mary Jean Levin, April Mann,Tiffany Williams, Lindsay Phipps, Heather Cohen

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VOLUME 2 | 3

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WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

JLRV Past Grant Recipients

BY: REAGAN DEPOE

Every year the Junior League of Roanoke Valley (JLRV) awards grants to a multitude of programs in our community. This year will be different. This year the JLRV is “disrupting convention.” The JLRV has collectively decided NOT to give out any grants this year. Why? Because we want to think BIG. We are going to dedicate some time researching what the greatest needs of our community are. That way we can come back stronger than ever and make an even bigger impact in the years to come. So, in the upcoming issues we will be looking back at some of the previous grant recipients to see where they are now.

Grant Recipient: Blue Ridge Literacy 2014-15 Community Project Grant Recipient Amount Received: $25,000.00 The 2014-2015 Community Project Grant to Blue Ridge Literacy’s ENFOLD program is unique because not only did the JLRV fund the program, but they also helped run the program. ENFOLD, Engaging Families From Other Lands, was created to focus on the education and empowerment of immigrant mothers. The program offers weekly 90-minute English literacy classes, weekly 90-minute cultural assimilation classes and a one-on-one mentorship. The latter is where the JLRV members most contributed. The JLRV committee members completed a training, led by Blue Ridge Literacy (BRL), in mentorship and English tutoring skills. They were then matched to a “learner” with whom they would work. The learners usually had a goal in mind, such as improving listening skills, perfecting their accent, 10

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“Learner” with her “Mentor”

or improving writing skills. Sometimes they had more focused goals such as preparing for interviews or completing school applications.

Mentors would help their learners work on their goals and provide emotional support. The mentors were available to teach their learners about idioms, cultural nuances, as well as to give grocery shopping, money saving and childcare tips. They were required to meet monthly on their own schedules and attend monthly events put on by BRL. The most popular event was their yoga social. The grant funds went towards training, sponsored events, marketing and outreach. Blue Ridge Literacy has been offering English classes and tutoring since 1985. Classes focus on reading, writing, spoken language, and civics in preparation for obtaining citizenship. Other classes are offered at progressively higher levels to improve literacy skills. There are three class levels that learners can test into, and courses are offered in 8-week sessions. Registration is $25, but after this fee all classes are free. The program serves about 450 learners per year; ninety percent of


Mentors and Learners enjoying the Yoga Social

whom are immigrants from 51 different countries, and ten percent of whom are American born citizens needing to improve their literacy. The biggest challenge that BLR faced with the ENFOLD program actually ended up being its biggest success. Program Director, Stephanie Holladay, explained that “mentorship” was a difficult concept to convey, so literacy was used as an access point where “tutor” becomes “mentor.” Specific goals were identified by each learner that the mentor could focus on, while also functioning as a community support and friend. They found that the em-

pathy piece was really something that was needed across the board. Ultimately, the ENFOLD program was used as a model and enveloped into all of the programs that BLR offers. Holladay reports that there is always a wait list for one-onone tutors, which are made up solely of volunteers. More flexible volunteer options are also available, such as assisting with just one daytime or evening class on your own, or in groups of two to four. For more information on BLR’s programs and volunteer opportunities, visit their website at www.blueridgeliteracy.org.

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T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 2

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MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN THE LIVES OF

Foster Children in Roanoke BY: ANNAH SULLIVAN

The Christmas season is an exciting and family-centered time for a lot of people, but have you ever wondered how the season impacts the foster children in our community? For many foster children, Christmas is a time when they are reminded that they are not with their own families while living in a foster home. They may miss their own family traditions that have been established over the years. Often children feel guilty because they think it is their fault that they had to leave their family and move into a stranger’s home. If a child forms a bond with his or her foster family, he or she might feel conflicted because of a divided sense of loyalty toward the biological and foster families. The Department of Social Services (DSS) of Roanoke County, along with sponsors in the

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community, try to make the holidays as “normal” as possible for these foster children.

A child is placed into a foster home when his or her home environment becomes unsafe. This may occur because of physical abuse, drug abuse, or neglect by a caregiver. Occasionally, a caregiver has mental health issues preventing him or her from adequately taking care of the child. Although some foster children are adopted by their foster families, it is always the goal of DSS to reunite foster children with their biological families. Knowing that the holiday season is a difficult time for many foster youth, DSS works with the biological families of foster children to schedule extended visitation time. Sometimes the biological families present gifts to their children or even save enough money for a special

evening out with them.

The Department of Social Services starts to plan for the holidays early. In October, each foster child in Roanoke County is asked to create a wish list. Wish lists usually include sized clothing and other necessities, but the children are also asked to list fun gifts that they hope to receive. While compiling the wish lists, DSS distributes flyers to past sponsors to solicit their help in the current year. This year, DSS had many return sponsors as well as several new sponsors. Sponsors ranged from office departments providing gifts for several children to individuals sponsoring a child or two. As in past years, the Junior League of Roanoke Valley (JLRV) once again collaborated with DSS to help make this year’s Foster Care Christmas pro-

JLRV members wrap an estimated 400-500 Christmas gifts for foster children in Roanoke County.

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gram a success. In the months leading up to Christmas, JLRV volunteers worked closely with DSS to orient sponsors as they expressed interest in the program. Each sponsor was matched with a foster child and was provided with the child’s wish list. Sponsors were not given spending guidelines for their children but were appreciative of the wish lists as they started to shop for gifts. JLRV member and first-time Christmas program sponsor Katie Jones says, “I sponsored a young girl close to my daughter’s age who loves animals and coloring. I’ve seen what joy similar gifts bring to my daughter, and believe that every child deserves to experience that.” This year, 100% of the 82 foster children who responded with a wish list were sponsored! Amber Tiller of DSS says, “Our successful partnership with the Junior League has saved time and alleviated stress on our workers.” DSS has been providing the Christmas sponsorship program for as long as anyone can remember, but until DSS started teaming up with JLRV a few years ago, DSS caseworkers had to communicate with sponsors as well as wrap and distribute the gifts—all while still attending to their regular caseload.

JLRV again wrapped the gifts for the sponsored foster children this year. Seventeen eager JLRV wrappers came together on an evening in early December equipped with scissors, smiles, and Christmas music. They set to work wrapping an estimated 400 to 500 gifts at the DSS offices in Salem in just under 3 hours. “It feels really rewarding!” says Laura Conte, a JLRV member, who was there and who has attended every wrapping event since joining the League. After the gifts were wrapped, the caseworkers distributed the gifts to the foster families during a weekly check-in visit before Christmas. The foster parents presented the gifts to the children on Christmas morning. Even though next October is still many months away, consider becoming the Christmas sponsor for a foster child in 2018! Think of the difference you will make for one or more of these children! You won’t be able to see their reactions as they gaze upon the gifts under the tree on Christmas morning, but you will certainly be able to imagine the joy on their faces that comes from the realization that they are special and have not been left behind in the magic of the holiday season.

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T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 2

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Stafford’s

SOLDIERS

MEMBER MARCHES ON AS SON BATTLES PKU 14

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Margaret-Hunter Wade with her husband Clark Wade and their two sons, Spencer (8) and Stafford (5)

BY: JESSICA BEEMER

On the morning of December 2nd, 2017, family and friends of the Wade family, calling themselves “Stafford’s Soldiers,” gathered at Fishburn Park in Southwest Roanoke to participate in a 2-mile fundraising and awareness hike. As the participants arrived, the boy-of-honor, Stafford Wade, could be seen running around the playground with friends, an inflatable candy cane in hand, looking as happy and healthy as any 5-year old boy could be. When Stafford was an infant, however, he was diagnosed with Phenylketonuria (PKU), a rare, inherited metabolic disease in which the body does not have the enzyme to process Phenylalanine (Phe), an essential amino acid found in all protein sources.This missing enzyme means that Stafford’s body is not able to process protein correctly and it actually becomes a toxin to his body. The consumption of too much Phe can lead to intellectual disabilities and permanent brain damage for an individual with PKU. IMPORTANCE OF NEWBORN SCREENING

Due to the initiation of newborn screening in the mid1960’s, the early identification and diagnosis of PKU has allowed these children to grow up leading normal lives after being placed on a PKU-approved diet. T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

Margaret-Hunter Wade, current JLRV member and mother of Stafford Wade, remembers receiving the phone call from the nurse at Stafford’s pediatrician’s office asking her to bring him in to repeat his newborn screening. She recalls many “what ifs” running rampant through her and her husband’s mind while awaiting the secondary test results. When Stafford was only ten days old, the testing confirmed that he had PKU. It was then that they realized the breast milk that was being provided to him was actually hindering his ability to develop under this new diagnosis. Margaret-Hunter shared, “As I looked at this beautiful, healthy child in my arms, I kept wondering how it was possible that the only thing between him and brain damage was protein.” PKU APPROVED DIET

Stafford’s diet was immediately modified to consist predominantly of a medical formula. Margaret-Hunter states, “Without an extremely restricted diet with limited protein consumption, baby Stafford would experience irreversible damage to his brain.” This medical formula would ensure that he did not get too much Phe in his diet. VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 2

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STAFFORD’S SOLDIERS Stafford, and others with PKU, cannot eat high protein foods, such as meat, eggs, milk, and beans. In order to grow and thrive, Stafford receives 80-90% of his daily nutritional content from the medical formula in addition to approximately 6 grams of protein a day (the equivalent of 2 pieces of bread) from low-protein foods such as fruits and vegetables. Management of PKU through diet is treatment for life; he will not outgrow the disease. Margaret-Hunter says she is “thankful that her son’s disease is manageable not through medicine, but through a diet.” She further states, “No, he will most likely never enjoy an ice cream sundae or a steak, but he will be able to graduate high school and college and hold a steady job and be a productive member of society just like you and me.” NATIONAL PKU ALLIANCE

Since the diagnosis, Margaret-Hunter and her family have become advocates for the National PKU Alliance (NPKUA), raising funds and awareness for PKU. The NPKUA’s mission is to improve the lives of individuals with PKU and pursue a cure. They estimate there are currently 16,500 people living with PKU in the United States, with several hundred babies being diagnosed each year worldwide.

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STATE LEGISLATURE AND AWARENESS

Even though there are required newborn screenings nationwide, only 39 states have passed legislation that allows insurance coverage of the special medical formula that PKU patients need. Virginia happens to be one of the 11 states that does not provide insurance coverage for the medical formula. Margaret-Hunter shared that “on average it costs $15,000 per person per year for treatment of PKU while the cost of care for an untreated PKU patient is about $200,000 per year.” As with any rare disease, awareness is critical to ensure challenges associated with such diagnoses are recognized, particularly by the government. The Wade Family hosts a Stafford’s Soldiers event each year to help raise awareness, to provide funding for a cure and to ensure that all children diagnosed receive the care they need and deserve. This past December, they completed their 6th annual event, raising over $5,000 for the National PKU Alliance. Throughout the history of the event, Stafford’s Soldiers has raised more than $25,000. You can visit www.npkua.org to learn more about PKU and how you can make a difference in the rare disease community.

T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N EMargaret-Hunter Wade with husband Clark Wade and a young Stafford


Scenes from Stafford’s Soldiers events

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VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 2

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THE 29TH ANNUAL STOCKED MARKET

Tradition of Success

BY: SARAH BOXLEY BECK AND MARGARET-HUNTER WADE

What is the key to success for an event that has been going strong for 29 years? Keeping the event fresh and interesting for attendees, while honoring the past contributions and commitment of JLRV members. This is an important balance to strike to ensure the Stocked Market remains the Roanoke Valley’s official kick-off to the holiday shopping season. The Stocked Market has undergone many iterations in its 29 year history, but one thing endures: the vision of the event’s founders, which was to showcase the JLRV’s talents through the effective leadership of trained volunteers in support of our community. The 29th Annual Stocked Market continued this tradition. Junior League members came together to put on a successful event, raising significant funds to further the mission of the JLRV, while delighting shoppers with a great range of merchants, a festive kick-off

with the Preview Coffee, and unique, local finds at the HomeGrown Market. Held November 10-12 at the Berglund Center, nearly 9,000 shoppers attended the 3-day event to cross items of their holiday shopping list. With more than 125 merchants to choose from, shoppers were pleased with the variety of offerings from new merchants in addition to their tried and true returning favorites. Back for its second year, the HomeGrown Market was held on Saturday and provided regional artisans the opportunity to showcase their homemade goods in a farmers’ market style setting. One of the major highlights of this year’s event was the revamp of Preview Coffee. This sold-out event featured a “Taste of Roanoke” and

welcomed a record-breaking 565 attendees. Local restaurants generously donated the food to provide a gourmet breakfast for the kick-off event on Friday morning. Participating restaurants included Roanoke Country Club, Breadcraft, Dunkin Donuts and Hotel Roanoke. Shoppers enjoyed coffee from Dunkin Donuts and a champagne cocktail from Wine Gourmet’s “Bubbly Bar.” Shoppers were also encouraged to shop during Preview Coffee with the “Punch for Purchase” incentive program that provided a raffle entry for every purchase made during the morning’s event. Raffle winners chose one of seven high-end raffle packages donated by regional businesses, which were well-received by shoppers and merchants alike. The Preview Coffee “Bubbly Bar” was such a popular addition that it remained open all weekend, raising more than $2,000. Not only did shoppers enjoy the festive cocktails, but it was a fun and popular volunteer position for JLRV members as well.

Stocked Market Committee members at the JLRV GMM, presenting a check from the funds raised at the 29th Annual Stocked Market

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Photo Credit: Todd Burrow

TRADITION OF SUCCESS

Shoppers enjoying the kick-off to the holiday shopping season

With all of these fun and exciting additions to the Stocked Market, one thing remains the same. It couldn’t be done without the support of all the JLRV Active Members, New Members and Sustainers. THANK YOU to all JLRV members who gave their time and talents to support the Stocked Market. When all was said and done, between the Stocked Market committee and volunteer

FOR THE 30

TH

spot jobs throughout the weekend, the JLRV collectively worked 1,223 hours over the 5 days of Stocked Market. Additionally, a huge thank you goes out to all the sponsors that support the event each year to ensure its continued success! With all the contributions, the 29th annual Stocked Market raised $155,424.88 to further the mission of the Junior League in the Roanoke Valley.

SAVE THE DATE

ANNUAL STOCKED MARKET • NOVEMBER 9-11, 2018

THE ROANOKE VALLEY RUNS ON DUNKIN’ #DUNKINVA T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

19


THE PRESIDENT & EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

An Evolving Relationship

BY GINGER POOLE AVIS AND ERIKA LOVEGREEN

There is a thin grey line between governance and management, but there is a line nonetheless. Three years ago, the Junior League of Roanoke Valley (JLRV) made the decision to split our traditional Board structure into a Governance Board and Management Team. Navigating the new structure has proven both rewarding and challenging. What have we learned to prove crucial to a successful year? A solid and respect driven relationship between both the President and the Executive Vice President. Governance is the process of providing strategic leadership to a nonprofit organization. It entails the functions of setting direction, making policy and strategy decisions, overseeing and monitoring organizational performance and ensuring overall accountability. JLRV President Ginger Poole Avis has been tasked with leading the Governance Board during the 2017-2018 year. Meanwhile, the Management Team, overseen by Executive Vice President (EVP) Erika Lovegreen, is the primary group of people entrusted with and accountable for the day-to-day operations and leadership of the organization.

2018 League year nearly ten months in advance and agreed on a common goal: everything is about the membership experience. Ginger provides mentorship to Erika, while at the same time supporting her decisions. Equal Partners Means a Healthy Organization

What Ginger and Erika want members of the JLRV to know about this important relationship is that one cannot work without the other. They are equal partners in leadership and in the organizational structure of our League. Ginger is working hard with the Governance Board to look at where we want to be in several years, and Erika is working now with the Management Team to make sure we do what it takes to get there. The League continues to grow each and every year. It is important that the knowledge and understanding of these important changes continues to grow throughout another 91 years. Let the education and communication continue to put the spotlight on our League with all that we are capable of doing for our community.

Finding Common Ground

Ginger served as the first EVP of the JLRV after the split. This is a job that takes a “roll up your sleeves� attitude. All communications, financial management, membership, administrative duties, General Membership Meeting planning and more fall under the EVP. What Ginger realized stepping into the president role is that it is a complete paradigm shift. Instead of event planning, approving spot job opportunities, approving advertising spending, etc., her role was to look at a bigger picture. She needed to step away from the operations and think more about long-term impact, what initiatives we could do to increase membership and make it sustainable, how we can establish partnerships with measurable results, etc. So how do the President and EVP work together for success? For Ginger and Erika it means communication, respect, and planning. The two began preparing for the 201720

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Ginger and Erika attending a Prince themed dinner at the annual AJLI conference in Minneapolis


AROUND THE WORLD WITH JLRV

Second Stop: London

BY: SARAH WAMBE

ners to truly make a difference.

Zena Martin has lived a global life that would make anyone envious. She was born and raised in Connecticut and attended Amherst College, where she was class president, and has spent the last 19 years living around the world. Zena has lived in major cities in the United States and Europe, as well as having worked in the Middle East as a board-level Marketing Communications Consultant. While living in London she served as a board member for many charities including The UK Scouts, The Royal Society of Arts and the Junior League of London (JLL).

During her 13 active years with the JLL, Zena was active in all facets of the League. One of her favorite memories was when she spent an entire year volunteering as a classroom assistant with the League’s longest-term Community Partner – Colville Primary School. Zena ended her final year with the League by serving as President from 20162017.

Zena’s Junior League story started in 2004 when she joined the Junior League of London at the encouragement of her sister-in-law who was a member of the Junior League of Atlanta. Having grown up in a philanthropic family she knew the League would give her the opportunity to volunteer and meet like-minded friends. From 20042017 Zena was an active member of the JLL where she gave her time and expertise to the organization. The focus of the JLL is helping to

T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

alleviate poverty in London. Their outreach programs are organized into four areas: Homelessness, Education & Literacy, Employability & Life Skills, and Holiday Hampers, which covers over 20 community partners. Being focused in these areas ensures that the League is able to make a significant impact. In addition to raising money, members roll up their sleeves and work alongside their Community Part-

Zena (center) with her fellow JLL members

After spending almost two decades living abroad, Zena decided to return to the United States and live a more relaxed life in St. Simons Island, Georgia. Before leaving London, Zena had already decided to transfer as a Sustainer into the JL of Savannah. She was even fortunate enough to be virtually introduced to JL of Savannah members through her friends and family in London. Being a part of the League has helped her to get acclimated to a new home and continue the mission of the Junior League at a grassroots level. Because of her hard work and dedication to the League, Zena has been Slated for the AJLI Board of Directors (20182021).

VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 1

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SUSTAINER SPOTLIGHT: JACKIE KINDER

STARTING A NEW

Career in Retirement BY: KATIE JONES

It’s never too late to pick up some new skills! Just ask Jackie Kinder. A dedicated member of the Junior League of Roanoke Valley (JLRV) for almost 30 years, Sustainer Jackie Kinder recently came out of retirement to start a new career in real estate. She had previously taught kindergarten and second grade in Roanoke County for 20 years and retired in the year 2000. After completing her training and accreditation, Jackie now works at Long & Foster Real Estate in Roanoke. Jackie credits her oldest son Clay, who is also a Realtor, for inspiring her to take the real estate classes and begin a new career. She and Clay are now a real estate team called the Kinder Team. She adds, “I like a challenge, and this has truly challenged me at my age. I like being active and meeting new people. I also enjoy looking at houses! Just to have a chance to try something different that is out of my comfort zone was important to me. And to prove to myself that at my age, it is possible to begin a new career and be successful. This is a good career for me!” Taking advantage of her volunteer background, Jackie was able to utilize skills gained through JLRV in her new job. “My Junior League experience has helped me to gain the confidence I needed,” she said. “My leadership roles in the League over the years have also helped me to gain experience and knowledge.” Over her years with JLRV, she has served in a variety of placements including the JLRV Secretary, Membership and Education Training (MET) Chair, Membership Vice President, committee member for the “Oh My Stars” Cookbook and Stocked Market Committees, and most recently, as Sustaining Director. In her spare time, Jackie enjoys painting and spending time with her family. Her daughter Meredith is also a League member. According to Jackie, “It was a personal challenge for me, at the age of 61, to enroll in the Real Estate classes, where I was probably one of the oldest--if not the oldest--person in the class. It was a wonderful feeling when I passed the class! I was especially proud of myself when I passed both the State and National exams to finally reach my goal to become a Realtor.” 22

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DISRUPT CONVENTION

An Ongoing Discussion BY: ALLYSON LYNCH

WHY? It is a question that many of us ask on a daily basis for numerous aspects of our lives. When tasked with this issue’s article, I found myself, instead, thinking about this year’s theme of “disrupting convention,” and exploring my own motivations a little more. Why did I join the JLRV? What motivates my participation? WHY? This loaded question is something that I have addressed both on a personal and professional level. Simon Sinek, renowned motivational speaker, author, and marketing consultant, personifies the idea of discovering your “why.” He contends that everyone knows what they do and how they do it, but few people know WHY they do it. What is the purpose and inspiration for what you do? Truly something to think about. So, where did my JLRV story begin, and what is my “why?” My mother and I enjoyed shopping at the Stocked Market together for several years prior to my joining the League. I had always been intrigued by the group of women that made the Stocked Market function year after year and did a little online research regarding JLRV, and the larger organization itself. In 2015, when I embarked on completing an endorsement for licensure to become a public school administrator, I was already a seasoned and confident teacher. However, I realized I was lacking in many communication and networking skills. I felt that joining a group of other women- many of whom were possibly in the same position as I was- would be a good way to improve on these skills, while also bringing a little more meaning into my life. This year marks my second active year in the League, with three years total, including the New Member year. Each year of my experience has been marked with some personal or professional issue that has changed my capacity for participation in the League; completing an advanced degree, having

my first child, and beginning a new job respectively describe some of the outside influences that have altered my “why,” so that it is always evolving. I think it is notable to mention that I do not live within the Roanoke City or Roanoke County lines. I live in Rocky Mount, about 25 minutes outside of Roanoke. I think, ultimately, my “why” really resonated with me when I found out that another of my fellow new members is from West Virginia, and Roanoke is the closet Junior League for her to join! In fact, members of our organization live all around the region, with folks coming in from Vinton, Salem, Botetourt County, Roanoke City, Franklin County, Roanoke County, Blacksburg, and even West Virginia. Learning this, I discovered that my “why” is to try and help expand the focus areas of the JLRV. Can we help others in the surrounding areas even more than we already do? Currently, I believe that the majority of our projects take place within the limits of Roanoke City. It has become my passion and purpose, as a member of JLRV, to look for opportunities in the surrounding area so we truly are impacting the wider Roanoke Valley region. It has been a difficult journey for me due to numerous personal and professional commitments, and due to living farther away, but I am persevering because I have a desire to help others in the community and to leave it better than I found it. This is what inspires me to remain a member of the league. We are a like-minded group of women, brought together by our shared goals of training female leaders and improving our community. What makes JLRV so amazing is that each of us has a unique story and purpose in the league, and it is those ongoing discussions and individual goals that have the potential of starting to effect real change. The Junior League provides us with the resources, opportunities, and know-how to come together as a team and truly make a difference - and to ‘disrupt convention’ together!

WHAT IS YOUR WHY?

and other JLRV members building a house for Habitat for Humanity T H E S TA R M A G A Z I NAllyson E VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 2

23 3


B e a LIFESAVER:

give blood!

Community Blood Drive March 24, 2018 The Junior League of Roanoke Valley Presents the 16th Annual Blood Drive Saturday, March 24 • 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. St. John’s Episcopal Church 1 Mountain Avenue, S.W., Roanoke, VA 24016 To register to donate visit RedCrossBlood.org

]One blood donation can save up to three lives ] 24

T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E


JLRV NEW MEMBER CLASS 2017- 2018 AGES RANGE FROM 25-35

25% HAVE CALLED ROANOKE HOME FOR

UNDER 1 YEAR

1-5 YEARS

10+ YEARS

LIFE

MOST LEARNED ABOUT THE JLRV THROUGH

A FRIEND OR COWORKER

PROFESSIONAL FIELDS

+ HUMAN RESOURCES

EDUCATION

ACCOUNTING

LEGAL

HEALTHCARE

NON-PROFIT MANAGEMENT

HOBBIES

GARDENING

COOKING

READING

PHOTOGRAPHY

RUNNING

TRAVEL

KAYAKING

FUN FACTS I’VE THRU HIKED THE JOHN MUIR AND ART LOEB TRAILS

I’M A TWIN

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I HAVE TWO DIFFERENT COLORED EYES

I’M MISSING A VERTBRA IN MY BACK

I ONCE BICYCLED ACROSS CALIFORNIA, NEVADA, AND ARIZONA

I LIVED IN CHINA FOR A YEAR

VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 2

3 25 25


MEMBERS ON THE MOVE Our members are constantly “ON THE MOVE” throughout the Roanoke Valley. Whether we are volunteering with community service, attending trainings, or hosting social gatherings, there is always a way for members to be engaged.

Members volunteer making blankets for Project Linus.

Community Impact Team members participate in a community food security roundtable. 26

T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

Photo Booth fun at the JLRV Holiday Party.


WANT TO BE PICTURED HERE? Send your picture and story to star@jlrv.org

Lydia Merritt volunteers at United Way by wrapping donated gifts for families coming out of homelessness.

T H E SNew TA R M A G A Z I N E volunteer Members

“Dear Young Person� cards were written with positive messages at JLRV cluster meetings.

V O L in U MDecember. E 3 | NUMBER to decorate the Ronald McDonald House

1

27


OUT OF THE MAILBOX

nc., lley, I a V e and anok Farm tant to of Ro e e g u d i g r ple R r Lea impo Junio to Apupport is today. r t a n e a r D our s th of the g iu for e serve. Yre the you o y erpriv e. d k i n n w p a u s n h T harg lping we in hildre in he p free of c ent and the c ission as e l o r l richm siding r cam our m a vita ying d summe ational en those re have a l p s y c aril ograms veedu atten gift i Your children o provide ldren, prim ur pr impro O i d t lege ontinue ties to ch unities. easurable ased We c oor activi ing comm s have m and incre outd blic hous r camper ormance tests. for in pu n that ouroom perfndardized k you n a show s in class wide sta h ift! T ment s on state this g f o e e scor iativ pprec port! a y r e p su re v We a continued r you rely, Since ewis F. L . R John tor Direc e v i t Execu

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Junio r Leag Than ue of Roan Roan k you for oke V alley, ciatedoke Valleyyour recen . . t gift Your t o c ontrib T The i ution he First Te year ompact The e is gre atly a of attrib n 7,000 First Tee pprey u o suppo ted in m oung peo f Roano ke Va rted o any w ple in lle a ur mi o The F ssion ys to peop ur region y has each i r s . le like ca helpi t Tee’s you w n be schoong young programs ho ha ve goal l, college people pr here in ou s e r a e p n t c a t d o i r n team mmu e for life b g, a action” team foppreciatin y teachin success innity are g g r s hav e con guidance diversity, life skills shigh On b cr a seque u e nces. nd unders eating a “ ch as you f half of Th t a nding goor yo ur inv e First Tee that estme o nt in f Roanok e our y Since oung Valley, th rely, ank peop le. Jenn ifer Blac kwoo Execu d tive D irecto r 28

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2017-2018

Calendar

Feb 6 Feb 20 Feb 23-25

New Member Meeting

March 6 March 14 March 20 March 24 April 3 April 17 May 1 May 15

New Member Meeting

General Membership Meeting AJLI Organizational Development Institute (ODI) Roanoke Valley Gives General Membership Meeting JLRV Community Blood Drive New Member Meeting General Membership Meeting

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New Member Meeting JLRV Annual Celebration

T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

VOLUME 3 | NUMBER 2

29


THE

STAR

Non-Profit Non-Profit Org. US Postage US Postage PAID PAID Permit No. 870 Permit No. 870 Lynchburg, VA Lynchburg, VA

Junior League of Roanoke Valley | 541 Luck Avenue, Suite 317 | Roanoke, VA 24016 | 540.343.3663 | jlrv.org

2 0 1 8

SEASON A CHORUS LINE A CHORUS LINE

TRINKLE MAINSTAGE SERIES

A CHORUS LINE A CHORUS LINE A CHORUS LINE A CHORUS LINE A CHORUS LINE A CHORUS LINE

THE MUSICAL THEATRE FOR YOUNG AUDIENCES VERSION

August 1-12

April 25-May 13

October 3-21

December 5-23

YOUNG AUDIENCES SERIES Write Stuff!

A Year With

New plays by young playwrights

2018

Tales of ose Mother Go

Write Stuff!

The Tempest

February 10

May 4-12

A Year With

Mother Goose Tales

THEATRE FOR YOUNG AUDIENCES VERSION

May 4-12

June 2-30

WALDRON FRINGE SERIES

CONSTELLATIONS February 22-March 11

SPECIAL EVENT

THE CHRIS IANS

May 18-19

June 21-30

MUSIC SERIES

Curtain Call

A Ta s t e o f

Nancy Ruth Patterson’s

A Simple Gift November 9-10

June 1-2

Country August 24-25

Tickets now available Call 540.342.5740 or visit www.millmountain.org

T H E S TA R M A G A Z I N E

Profile for Junior League of Roanoke Valley

Winter 2018 Vol 3 Issue 2  

Winter 2018 Vol 3 Issue 2  

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