__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

P

Selected Works

JUNHUI LI

O I

R

2014 - 2018

T

O

F L

jli151@syr.edu | 315-5603744

O


CONTENT

01

CHESTER TERRACE London, UK

02

MEGA- MODULER Syracuse, NY

03

TOWARDS A HEALING ARCHITECTURE Syracuse, NY

04

BIOME ARCHITECTURE Syracuse, NY


CHESTER TERRACE Professor: Davide Sacconi, Michael Hadjistyllis, Jad Semaan Companion: Andi Li

The very idea of inhabiting a space has been increasing abstract from the conventional notion of the housing. We’re experiencing the ambiguous boundary between a private and public space, which, we work at home and play in the office. In this studio, we are asked to investigate the urban fabrics in the contemporary London including its political changes, economical shifts and social problems in times of its history. Obviously, it’s a city which gives us an incredibly rich urban contexts, and it is currently suffering from one of the severe housing crisis. Under this scenario, we imagined an alternative form of life to refine our understanding of the notion of housing within a multilayered environment like London and its previous history. The Chester Terrace, as one of the most typical English housing, representing its material elements as well as the conceptual meaning way beyond physical structure.

It locates on the edge of the Regent’s Park, which both designed by John Nash. His use of pictur esque in architecture and urban planning is direct and clear in the project of Chester Terrace. It later becomes the boundary of social classes, economical differences and the rituals of the royal park and the residence. The iconic unbroken façade, of about 920 feet gives us the start point to read. Further on, to transform them into an alternative form of dwelling, an embodiment of contemporary discourse of housing. In this project, rather than dealing with a transformation of an existing built form, it is more about tracing the shifts in the history, appreciating its material elements and let the role of architecture be highly engaged into the conversation of contemporary notions of housing, urban renewal and city regenerations.

Fall 2016 | London, UK


A combination of gradient colors indicates that the street contains a fair proportion of each of the classes. The darker the color, the poorer, and vice versa. As this map above realves, the Chester Terrace locates right on the boundary between the royal parkthe Regent’s park and its behind residential areas. Actually, we read the ChesterTerrace as the boundary visually and conceptually. We read the unbroken facade of Chester Terrace in a gestural way and its conceptual meaning relative to the discourse of housing in contemporary London.


Upper-middle and Upper classes. Wealthy

Poor than a moderate family

Middle class. Well-to-do

Very poor. Casual. Chronic want

Fairly comfortable. Good ordinary earnings.

Lowest class. Vicious, semi-criminal

Mixed. Some comfortable others poor


0

5 10

25


West Elevation

East Elevation

Long plan


“ INHABIT AN ARTIFACT � The Chester Terrace itself is an artifact regarding historical London Housing. Terraced houses have been widespread and were built as desirable properties in the 19th century London. Nowadays, many of them have been demolished, but the remained ones have regained its appreciations. The right image clearly shows the identical structure of a terraced house and its relationship with the ground.


“ THE SECOND FACADE ” The first(original) facade of the chester represents not merely a typical structure of terraced house but more importantly a social, economic and class separation. The action of split half the house, leading it to a “second facade.” This project intends to reveal our confusion and critical thoughts about the relationship between a social and private life in nowadays society without demolishing the original physical structure and its behind meanings.


MEGA-MODULER Professor: David Shanks, Bess Kriet emeyer Companion: Hui Sheng, Zhe Wang

This comprehensive studio is about a discourse of modularity in architecture and the massing assembly. This project shows about our understanding of architectural modularity and our the possibilities of contemporary housing strategy. As for a modular architecture, it has obvious advantages in prefabrications and onsite building progress. In this project, we further designed our own frame system and core-unit, pre-fabrication strategies in order to better serve the big picture of “Mega-Moduler.” Conceptual narratives are a start point for us imaging the scenario and needs for the inhabitants. Which, we created four characters of residents, evening taxi drivers, architecture students, single office workers and families with children. By especially focusing on the requirements of

daylight, it then leading us to several alternatives of apartment layouts, which we called them as, 4a (the basic one), 4a plus one and 4a plus two. The “a” represents a quater of the basic unit space, which is the maxium space we can do regarding to the pre-fabrication. The modular strategy relates to the scale of the buidling tower and be a support for our conceptual narratives. Moreover, the information of site context, environmental performances, building structures, circulations and services are all crucial elements in this comprehensive studio and the prioritization of this project.

Spring 2016 | Syracuse, NY.


CORE POSITION

restaurant, convenient store, shop, bar......

N

TER WIN D WIN

PROJECT BUILDING

PROJECT BUILDING

active the garden space here

GABL E direct ion

GABL E direct ion

triangle = GABLE direction

south-north direction

recall the shape and direction of the church’s gables, in order to seek for the harmony.

GABL E direct ion

east-west direction GABLE direction

GABL E direct ion

CONTEXTUAL RECALL

e us

ff

di t

gh

li

the target space to be operated

(residential) direct sunlight (“dooryard space” )diffus light(spiritial)

the section-line of the “dooryard” can be building’s volume seen as the extension of the church, a grey can provide space.

line become the frame

frame follows the units

units after shifting


NATURAL VENTILATION CONTEXTS’ MICRO-ENVIRONMENT

use the space between the church and the 5-floor residential building on the west

all units get natural ventilation (south-north direction) in summer

WEST

EAST

give the breathing space (daylighting/ventilation) to the residential building on the left(west)

touch the church make shading to the “dooryard space”, make the building and the church together as well

WEST

EAST

reduce the windload above, make the building volume closer to the core at top

WEST

EAST

PROJECT LAYOUT co

slender beam

re

FRAME STRUCTURE 0.3ft beam

0.5ft beam 1ft beam

6a unit (two bedroom)

5a unit (one bedroom)

4a unit (basic) + bathroom and kitchen

frame more slender while rising up

bold beam

1.5ft beam 2ft beam


PROJECT LAYOUT(4a unit)

Living Room

Bathroom

Kitchen

Dinning

Sleeping

Studying

N 0

5

10

20


Step One: Four modules delivered in the truck seperately.

Step Five: Add the top beam.

Step Two: Bottom beams constructed on site.

Step Three: Four modules combined together on the bottom beams.

Step Four: Triangle Frame constructed.

Step Six: Lift the whole unit.

Step Seven: Connected two units together.

Connected two units together laterally.


ALL UNITS LAYOUT 4a_Sudio

4a+a_One Bedroom_Type 1

4a+a_One Bedroom_Type 2

4a+a_One bedroom_Type 2’ Storage

Dining Living Room

Kitchen

Bathroom

Exercise

Exercise

Dining

Bathroom

Kitchen

Bathroom

Exercise

Kitchen

Bathroom

Kitchen

Studing

Dining

Dining Living Room

Bedroom

Living Room

Living Room

Studing

Bedroom Studing Bedroom

4a+2a_Two Bedrooms_Type 2 Studing

Bathroom

Dining

4a+2a_Two Bedrooms_Type 1

Dining Kitchen

Living Room

Bathroom

Exercise

Kitchen

Studing

Exercise Living Room

Bedroom

Storage

Bedroom

Bedroom

Bedroom

Bedroom


ONE BEDROOM APT. (5a unit) Construction Bottom beams constructed on site.

Four modules combined together.

Triangle Frame constructed.

Add “1a” unit.

Add the top beam.

TWO BEDROOM APT. (6a unit) Construction Bottom beams constructed on site.

Four modules combined together.

Triangle Frame constructed.

Add “2a” unit.

Add the top beam.


There are thirty floors in the whole building, including the first three lower floors of public for community’s activities, outdoor space for holding events, residential areas and other service space, such as, circulations, electricities and water, etc. The eighth floorplan represents as a typical residential floorplan since it covers most options of various layouts of unit apartments. It clearly shows about the connection of the residential areas, its backside corridors and circulation bridge that leading to the concrete core (elevator).


N

Circulation Ventilation 0

5

H=86’ 8F

10

20


CONSTRUCTION FLOW

Step One: Foundation

Step Two: Core

StepThree: Pre-Structure

Step Four: Parking

Step Five: Parish Hall Frame


Step Six: Frame System

Step Seven: Add “2a”

Step Eight: Corridor

Step Nine: Envolope For Corridor

Step Ten: Canopy


0

5

10

20 ft


Wall Section Unit


t 6a

cornor angle cover aluminum-alloy coating plywood board 1/2” rigid insulation 4” plywood board 1/2” gymsum board 1/2” I-beam 6”×6“ zinc-alloy roof cover rigid insulation 3” metal deck empty (for electric pipes) ceiling framing gymsum board 1/2”

louver between glasses (for sun-shade)

cherry wood 1/2” plywood board 1/2” I-beam 6”×6“ gypsum mass 3 1/2” empty gap 2 1/2” lumber frame 2 1/2” plywood board 1/2” rigid insulation 3” metal deck slab

0 scale = 1” = 1’

0.5ft

1ft

2ft

Unit Section


Three-floored Section


Call-Outs


Towards a healing architecture Professor: Ivan Bernal

“Architecture is a multi-sensory experience.” Our own body served as a medium, with the engagement of our own body, we feel the space through experience. I present the concerns about people’s stress in daily life, especially in urban cities where people are getting overwhelming information. This aims to discuss what architectural intervention can help with the urban stress in daily routine and creating sensory and therapeutic spaces in the city. The fast speed lifestyle and the neglect of our sensory feelings within a space made our surrounding environment less intimate and grew with alienation and detachment. According to Pallasmaa’s book “the eyes of the skin,” he points out that “The inhumanity of contemporary architecture an1hi d cities can be understood as the consequence of the negligence of the body and the senses, and an imbalance in our sensory system.” This study is in response to this concern in the scope of urban context and aims to evoke both designers and participants to care

more about the sensory evaluation of a space. The first part of the document explores sensory characteristics in the existing site and how do they work. It defines their importance in allowing humans to navigate complex environments. The second part of the thesis looks directly at environmental stimuli. It seeks to qualify and associate physical variables with sensory responses. The goal of the research is to create a set of standards by which architecture can design “for the senses.” The design project will put to the test the principles organized from research through a series of architectural installations that harness both natural and human-made stimuli. Furthermore, to implement the use of sensory design, and by proposing a “Park” as a therapeutic setting, to offer an alternative reality, towards a healing architecture.

Spring 2018 2016 | Syracuse, NY.


Definition of Senses “The significance of the sense is both philosophically and regarding experiencing, making and teaching architecture‌ the role of the body as the locus of perception thought and consciousness, and of the significance of the senses in articulating, storing and processing sensory responses and thoughts, have been strengthened and confirmed.â€? J, J.Gibson was an environment psychologist who has contributed an inventory of the senses. He focusses on the types of environmental information the body dealt with, rather than on the variety of sensory organ of the body. Thus, the list the senses as

the visual system, the auditory system, the taste-smell system, the basic orienting system, and the haptic system. In this project, the study of senses in space is not merely about sensory organs but the feeling regarding vision, hearing, touch, smell, and taste, the conversation between our self and the built information.


Site : Penn station, NYC The site is chosen, Penn station is one type of space which people would daily pass by and must stay for a short amount of time. It becomes a part of people’s daily routine but continuing to be ignored regarding sensory experience. A waiting-time and area are underestimated.


Data collection The data collection and recordings were chosen to follow with the main circulation that I mapped it out and after then by choosing more especially in four areas of space, which I called room 1,2, 3 and 4, all along the main circulations. A set of standards especially directs the design for each room, to test the principles organized from the research through a series of architectural installations. Each of the rooms has a more directional focus on decisions of priority in design.


SENSES

VARIARIES

VISUAL

Dark

SENSORY EVALUATION

Bright Perspectival/Flat Intimate/Vast

A representational system of sensory notions

Solid/Void

“The significance of the sense is both philosophically and concerning experiencing, making and teaching architecture… the role of the body as the locus of perception thought and consciousness, and of the significance of the senses in articulating, storing and processing sensory responses and thoughts, have been strengthened and confirmed.”

Detailed/Blank AURAL

High/Low Pitch Quiet/Loud Clear/Reverberant Natural/Artifical

TACTILE

Static/Mobile Rough/Smooth Hard/Soft Warm/Cold

KINETIC

Free/Bound

J, J.Gibson was an environment psychologist who has contributed an inventory of the senses. He focusses on the types of environmental information the body dealt with, rather than on the variety of sensory organ of the body. Thus, the list the senses as the visual system, the auditory system, the taste-smell system, the basic orienting system, and the haptic system.,”

Indirect/Direct Level/Graded Crowded/Empty THERMAL

Hot/Cold Dry/Wet Natural/Artificial Ambient/Source

CHEMICAL

Weak/Intense Stagnant/Fresh Natural/Artificial possitive neutral

negative

In this project, the study of senses in space is not merely about sensory organs but the feeling concerning vision, hearing, touch, smell, and taste, the conversation between our self and the built information.


ROOM ONE

ROOM TWO

VISUAL

VISUAL

dark

perspectival

Existing

saturated blank

intimate solid

void

detailed

vast

neutral

bright dark

perspectival

Healing

perspectival

void

solid

perspectival

blank

intimate

solid

void

solid

bright

strong

Existing

indirect

cold

direct

empty

light strong

quick graded direct bound

light

sustained crowded

flat

detailed

porous

smooth

free

soft indirect

resistant

level

heavy

sustained crowded

cold

hard

dark

saturated blank

solid

natural

porous

smooth hard

weak artificial

stagnant

fresh

natural

void

detailed

vast

empty

intense

flat

strong

free indirect

quick graded

level

direct bound

empty

rough

warm

fresh intense

intimate

static

light

mobile

stagnant

flat

KINETIC

light

warm

vast

perspectival

static

resistant

artificial

void

bright

rough

mobile

blank

solid

neutral

level

bound

Healing

soft

weak

saturated

intimate

TACTILE

free

graded

saturated

vast bright

CHEMICAL

bright

blank

neutral

flat

quick

dark

dark

neutral

void

KINETIC empty

bright

perspectival

flat

detailed

vast

neutral

vast

detailed

intimate detailed

saturated blank

neutral

ROOM FOUR

VISUAL

intimate

flat

saturated

dark

ROOM THREE

sustained light strong

free indirect

quick graded direct bound

crowded

level sustained light

crowded


METHODOLOGY To document and evaluate the existing sensory varies in the site, I used a representational system for understanding and recording sensory data of urban space towards the design process itself. The first-hand documentation of recording later then be used to demonstrate the sensory qualities of space and further to develop as a representational way of mapping. The channels of sense are not subject to modification by learning, but the data of the sensor could be evaluated by definition. By using the common description of the feeling concerning each sensory experience in the site, I mapped out the reading of the existing sensory experience in Penn station. For example, dark and bright, perspectival and flat, intimate and vast, solid and void, detailed and blank, regarding describing a visual sensory experience, and the same for the aural, tactile, kinetic, thermal and chemical descriptions.


According to the data (the descriptive words about people’s sensory experience in Penn station ), I analyzed them regarding four selected rooms and then developed the Sensory Notation System to make the data representational to do further design. Furthermore, this sensory map

could be compared with before and after architectural intervention easily on deciding whether this project is helpful or not. Moreover, what points should people think regarding the critics and evaluations?


The design project is not to design a whole new architecture to replace the Penn station but to improve the sensory qualities of the existing space through and after the architectural intervention. The methodology with which stimuli are engaged with highlight point, providing a setting,

and then the experience would be added by the participation and their activities.


My intention is not just to engage and architectural intervention but also to test a possible tool for sensory concerns that should be highlighted in the design process. It is, fiÂŹnally, possible to design sound or other context-based sensory environments through experimentation and physical manipulation of stimuli in space.


However, the sensory perception or the sensory experience is highly depending on the difference of the participants. It is not possible to define a space which has one single description of the experienced sensory entity. Every individual’s psychological and cognitive processes influence the information. Though architects

aren’t charged with dealing the surrounding environment and the psychological condition of humans, we are responsible for addressing the ignorance of our sensory experience in the design and the bias for the vision-based built environment, and therefore, be more careful and sympathetic to the psychophysiological response

that occur as a reaction towards our environments.


MASTERPLAN SENSES

DESCRIPTION

VISUAL

Dark Bright Perspectival/Flat Intimate/Vast Solid/Void Detailed/Blank

AURAL

High/Low Pitch Quiet/Loud Clear/Reverberant Natural/Artifical

TACTILE

Static/Mobile Rough/Smooth Hard/Soft Warm/Cold

KINETIC

Free/Bound Indirect/Direct Level/Graded Crowded/Empty

THERMAL

Hot/Cold Dry/Wet

SENSORY EVALUATION neutral

Natural/Artificial Ambient/Source CHEMICAL

Weak/Intense Stagnant/Fresh Natural/Artificial Recording Spot

Main Route


SENSORY MAPPING SENSES

VARIARIES

VISUAL

Dark Bright Perspectival/Flat Intimate/Vast Solid/Void Detailed/Blank High/Low Pitch Quiet/Loud Clear/Reverberant Natural/Artifical

AURAL

TACTILE

Static/Mobile Rough/Smooth Hard/Soft Warm/Cold

KINETIC

Free/Bound Indirect/Direct Level/Graded Crowded/Empty

THERMAL

Hot/Cold Dry/Wet Natural/Artificial

SENSORY EVALUATION

Ambient/Source

CHEMICAL

Weak/Intense Stagnant/Fresh Natural/Artificial possitive neutral negative


BIOME-ARCHitecture Professor: Lori Brown, Lydia Kallipoliti Companion: Hui Sheng(working as a group in the earlier research)

To imagine a different future where architecture highly engaged with and responded to the severe effects of climate changes. The first research of this studio is to research and analyze a “biome,” which is monsoon in this project. This first research should be presented as an own version of a contemporary Whole Earth Catalog 2.0, which becomes fundamental for the “biome-based architecture” after and specific to the biotic relationships. By selecting a biome that dramatically affected by climate change, we’re addressing attentions upon the relationship between built form and the physiological context of the biome and what’s the role of architecture in this process of climate change.

Spring 2015 | Syracuse, NY.


Agriculture takes a significant role in these regions, and farming relies upon climate very much. India and China have the most intense cropland, on which also distributes the densest people in the world. Monsoon is a very crucial fact that affect life in monsoon regions. It can be both beneficial and harmful. If the monsoon comes on the time and brings proper rainfall,

crops will grow by absorbing the rainwater. Otherwise, if the monsoon is later, crops will be dry to death. If the amount of water brought by the monsoon is lack, people in these areas will encounter drought.


Images on the left show about “the height above sea level,” “the population’s distribution worldly,” “the frequency of global flood” and “the cornland distribution.” In short, the monsoon areas are often located around a low height ground level, with a specific density of population, suffering flood problems seasonally and still the mainland of food globally.


Bangladesh There are distinct differences among seasons in Bangladesh which reveals as one of the most typical subtropical monsoon climate, high temperatures, humidity and seasonal variations in rainfall. Among time, the inhabitants here develope their climate-based structure of buildings — “Floating garden� in various types of buildings, mainly residential.


seating shelter infall infall outfall outfall

Layout

Front

Back


The critical point of the project is the idea of letting the biome structure the building. Under the analysis of early types of local monsoon house and the climate conditions, the schematic proposal is the “pipe system�. Which, the pipes, on the one hand, becomes the direct way of dealing with the black, grey water for the use of the house, on the other hand, it creates its unique form of architectural structure and furniture either.

seating infall shelter infall outfall outfall Right

Left

Perspective


Exploded Structure System

roof membrane

roof structure

membrane

main structure

“the outside pipe”

second floor

ramp

first floor

“the inside pipe”


Offices Offices

Restaurant Restaurant

Buffet Buffet Gentlemen’s Lady’sGentlemen’s Lady’s roomroom roomroom Conference Conference Room/ Theater Room/ Theater

Kitchen Kitchen Suitcase Suitcase Room Room

Entrance Entrance

Meeting point/ Meeting point/ Lobby Lobby

Reception Reception

Lobby Lobby

Entrance Entrance

Other Other LabsLabs Storage Storage HubHub

Storage SeedSeed Storage

Up

Library SeedSeed Library

Garage Garage Lab Lab

Up

Storage Storage HubHub Material Material Room Test Test Room

Hydroponic Hydroponic LabsLabs Exhibition Exhibition Lab Lab Room Room


Profile for Junhui Li

MArch I_Portfolio_Junhui_Li  

MArch I_Portfolio_Junhui_Li  

Profile for junhui_li
Advertisement