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J . QUEZADA [2017-2019]


01

COHABIT [ 2019 ] Spring Semester 5th Year | Arteixo, Spain

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RECALL [ 2017 ] Fall Semester 4th Year | Florence, Italy

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DESIGN BUILD [ 2017 ] Spring Semester 3rd Year | Marywood University

contents

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CONNECT [ 2019 ] Spring Semester 5th Year | Renovo, PA

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TRANSITION [ 2015 ] Fall Semester 2nd Year | Scranton, PA

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NEWBURGH 2030 [ 2018 ] Fall Semester 5th Year | Newburgh, NY

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DUALITY [ 2018 ] Spring Semester 4th Year | New York, NY

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other work [ 2015-2019 ] Drawings [ 2017- 2019 ] Photography


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co• h a b i t

objective

PROJECT TYPE: Visitor Center + Business Incubator STUDIO: Professor Russell Roberts DATE: Spring 2019 LOCATION: Arteixo, Spain For this visitor center the goal is to connect the visitors of Artexio to the immediate site through an embodied experience of the senses. The site for the visitor center sits on a protected land that is slowly rejuvenating its ecosystem from the damage caused by the dam construction. Therefor, human interaction with this landscape is limited to only our vision of the site.

site plan

The design of the visitor center+ business incubator molds a continuous circular path throughout the site starting from the entrance of the building to the center of the reservoir and then back around. This gesture serves to allow a visitor to inhabit the site at various points on the land. This is for the purpose of re-senualising our experience within architecture through the connection of the man-made world and the environment. The design supports this idea of ‘nature connectedness’ while also delicately sitting on the terrain to avoid possible damage to the landscape. The path shifts one from above to below the water to fully embody the character of the site and create an embodied sensation within the viewer.

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a r c h ite c t u r e p o r t f oli o | juli ssa quez ada | 2 0 1 9


FLOOR PLANS

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level two level one 2 0 1 9 | j u l i s s a qu e z a d a | a rch i t e ct u re p ort fol i o

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RESEARCH

how do humans

site map

connect?

We are born to connect. The question is how? Our physical bodies physically interact with the third dimensional reality and it is our senses that communicate this reality to our inner dialogue. This duality of the body and mind is interdependent relationship. Our exterior world is a reflection of our interior world, and vis-versa. It is incorrect to assume we can objectively generate identical perceptions through the manipulation of our senses. We are subjective beings, but we can still formulate an objective environment where the senses are purposefully heightened or suppressed for the intentions of our subjective experience. Therefore, the power lies in the physicality our senses.

why does this relationship matter in the built environment? the relationship we have with our community is a reflection of the relationship we have with ourselves. if you can design a space that glorifies the connection between the mind and body then that space also strengthens the connection we have between the self and the community.

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a r c h ite c t u r e p o r t f oli o | juli ssa quez ada | 2 0 1 9


RENDERING

2 0 1 9 | j u l i s s a qu e z a d a | a rch i t e ct u re p ort fol i o

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sections + elevations

nor th section

nor th elevation

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a r c h ite c t u r e p o r t f oli o | juli ssa quez ada | 2 0 1 9


ENTRANCE RENDERING

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entance

Iterations iterations

first iterations of the concept of ‘cohabituating with the land’. carving the path for the visitors from the public into the reservoir. Although these first iterations are rigid, the core concept is communicated throughout the entirety of the project. 2 0 1 9 | j u l i s s a qu e z a d a | a rch i t e ct u re p ort fol i o

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PATHWAY RENDER

pathway

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PHYSICAL MODEL

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01

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ISOMETRIC

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recall MUSEUM FORTRESS PROJECT TYPE: Museum STUDIO: Professor Franco Pisani DATE: December 2017

introduction

LOCATION: Florence, Italy

The goal is to host the full 10’x8’ wooden model of Florence in a museum within the walls of Fort San Niccolo. This man-made fort stands tall and silent in reminiscence of a forgotten world. This is a sacred shape nested in a hidden face within the city of Florence. Our target is to transpose you into another state of mind, by bringing you not only a visual and historical experience but a censorial one too. Through this we can learn and develop a new respect for the historical city. We also learn that there were values of the past now faded away to

conceptual plan

make room for the principles of the new era.

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julissa quezada | architecture portfolio | 2019


02

pathway entrance 2 meters deep

12 meters deep

18 meters deep

p2 2019 | julissa quezada | architecture portfolio


[problem]: Florence is

becoming a “disneyland”; there is a fear that the culture will be

[intent]:

design a scared space that invokes a renewed respect and appreciation of the city’s entirety. to change the audience’s perspective about the values of florence.

Florence, Italy Site Map

design intent

0 2 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

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julissa quezada | architecture portfolio | 2019

W HAT DEFIN ES A SPACE AS ‘SACRED’?

a space that is the host of an object or an ideology that is perceived as sacred. These spaces inhibit characteristics such as focal point and controlled lighting.


N SA

02 [2 meters deep]

ENTRY

SA

N

GI

OR

GI

O

the inconspicuous entrance to the museum is mimicking the same entrance that was once used when the fort was active

BEL

VED

ERE

SCALE 1:500

N

GI

OR G

IO

[12 meters deep]

SA

site plan

FLOOR PLANS

BEL

VED

ERE

SCALE 1:500

[18 meters deep]

EXIT the exit from the museum is through the base of the tower which would empty through the public gardens on the face of the fort

BEL

VED

ERE

SCALE 1:500

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DESIGN DEVELOPMENT [concrete]

[north elevation]

[east elevation] 12 meters deep

materials

• the use of smooth and polished concrete within the indentation of the handrail and the interior walls of the octagon

18 meters deep

• the use of rough and thick concrete along the walls of a dark pathway with the artificial creation of condensation

[handrail]

02

[translucent concrete] [west elevation] 2 meters deep

[northeast axon]

pathway exit

• the use of translucent concrete to allow for some light to gleam through the dark gloomy pathway surrounding the model room • this material is only used where the pathway’s floor and ceiling touch the walls of the octagon • this material enhances the element of sight within the pathway and also within the model room. 2 0 1 9 | j u l i s s a qu e z a d a | a rch i t e ct u re p ort fol i o

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0 3 DESIGN BUILD PROJECT TYPE: Design Build [Library] STUDIO: Professor Patrick Martin DATE: May 2017 LOCATION: Marywood School of Architecture Library | Scranton, PA

introduction

[design build studio wide: 14 students] [graphically collab with Anthony Matsell]

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Marywood University School of Architecture was unveiled in 2007 as Northeastern Pennsylvania’s first school of architecture. The building itself is an outstanding example of sustainable design, a nod to the principles associated with the goals of its b.arch program. The building is also an example of adaptive reuse, as the school is housed in the former gymnasium. The structure was modified to be centered around a continuous skylight that brings in natural light throughout the day to the multilevel studio spaces on each end of the building. The area beneath the space hosts numerous pin up walls to draw students and faculty together to congregate for group discussions, displays, and critiques. More pin up and discussion space is located at the poolside of the building, where a glass curtain wall spanning the height of the structure is located. In the pool area is the library of architectural and design references, private to the school of architecture. This area hosts private discussion space, and is frequently used as such.

julissa quezada | architecture portfolio | 2019


A

03

4 1

[library floor plan]

1

4 1

1

2

A

3

1

3

RESOURCE STORAGE • Accommodates up 100% more books • 125 lineal footage • Located along the center column axis of the library • Can store both additional books and magazines • Creates openings for other program needs: workstudy and checkout/return

2

• Located next to the checkout/return area in order for ease of access for the worker •Situated at the front corner of the site at the intersection of circulation so it can accommodate all occupants easily • Returned book placement will occur in the shelves under the search computer

4

CHECKOUT/RETURN • Books can be checked in/out at this location • 2 computers will be positioned adjacent to each other • Will be next to workstudy area for ease of access between occupant and worker • Located along the partition wall to keep the programs separate in order to maximize the space needed for resource storage

WORKSTUDY DESK

OVERHEAD CONDITION • Integrated within the shelving unit in the back of the site • Splits the shelf in half with the inner side facing the books to be book shelves in order to keep all resource storage in one area • Positioning the seating nook adjacent to circulation promotes occupant activity

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design intent

objective

0 3 DESIGN DEVELOPMENT 1

resource storage

2

checkout/return

3

workstudy desk

4

overhead condition

Build additional shelves in the existing library to accommodate 100% more books and magazines

Create a multi-purpose adaptable library space that can accommodate an expanding collection of books that respects main existing site circulation. Minimize the ambiguity of existing site conditions to define the library as its own entity for storage and resource gathering

design strategy

[section a-a]

[1] position program location based on existing circulation [2] organizing all resource storage along the center column in e in relation to site’s main lines of foot traffic [3] aggregating all additional shelving into cubby components to allow for future site expansion if necessary [4] enclosing the space adjacent to bleachers to provide more resource storage and a private atmosphere for library occupants [nor thwest axonometric]

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SHELF SPACERS +ASSEMBLY shelf spacers

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[elements within existing library]

• two different spacers: T +L • 1/2” HDPE Plastic [detail axon]

• 3 lineal feet per module •12 modules total [36 lineal feet] • used as main shelving component

T- module lobby area rendering

spacers create a gap between the shelves for the purpose of not only adding a visual lightness to the solidity of the double sided bookshelves but to respond to the surrounding context of the existing library

[detail axon]

module

[elevation]

• 4 lineal feet per module • 12 modules total [48 lineal feet] • used underneath the human cubbies and along partition wall shelving

L- module

• 2 1/3 lineal feet per module • 34 modules total [~79 lineal feet] • secondary shelving component used at corners of the wall [photos taken during construction phase] 2 0 1 9 | j u l i s s a qu e z a d a | a rch i t e ct u re p ort fol i o

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par tition wall shelving

0 3 SECONDARY PROGRAMS

[model 1/2 scale]

2 checkout/return 1 workstudy desk

overhead condition

[model 1/2 scale]

3 seating nook

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DESIGN ITERATIONS + CONSTRUCTION [5]

[2]

[6]

[3]

[FINAL]

design iteration 2

construction phase

design iteration 1

[1]

03

design iteration 3

due to time constraints, the corner bookshelf was unable to be constructed. White finishes within the seating nooks are awaiting to be completed as well.

design iteration 4

[4]

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0 4 CONNECT PROJECT TYPE: Design Competition STUDIO: Professor Russell Roberts DATE: Winter 2019 LOCATION: Renovo, PA

The objective of the competition was to create a new library typology that offers new solutions and like at so many junctures in history this library should reinvents itself for the future of the typology. Renovo is a small town in a valley in western PA, although it is far from major cities this area attracts a large amount of visitors to its mountainous terrain. The concept of ‘Connect’ is to break from the standard rectilinear form of bookshelves, rooms and library buildings to create a new atmosphere of learning and reading that resembles the hilly landscape of Renovo. Blending both the site and the concept into one homogeneous form. The goal is to not only to host a library but also a space where community gatherings and events can take place through the utilization of the multi-use spaces. A form of connection with the community, visitors and landscape is the drive for this building.

isometric

concept

118th John Stewardson Memorial 10-Day Competition in Architecture

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site plan west elevation section perspective 2 0 1 9 | j u l i s s a qu e z a d a | a rch i t e ct u re p ort fol i o

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05

TRANSITION PROJECT TYPE: Commercial [individual] STUDIO: Professor Margret DATE: December 2015

introduction

LOCATION: Scranton, PA

This project began by modeling a physical space of different programs with the use of pro-active words. Midway through the semester this physical model was transformed into a digital model. For the final iteration we were given a site to place this model in along with new programmtic needs. [exploded axonometric]

the intent for this space is to create a pathway from the sidewalk of the city to the elevated green-park on Lackawanna Ave. the stairway that currently stands to commute people is hidden and small. This ‘ramp’ not only acts as a pathway but also interacts with the city and community together.

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nor th+ east elevation

RENDERINGS


0 6 NEWBUGH

2030

AIA COTE Top Ten for Students Design Competition

WATER STREET

PROJECT TYPE: Cultural / Urban STUDIO: Professor Miguel Salve 3RD STR EET DATE: Fall 2018 LOCATION: Newburgh, NY [project partner Anthony Matsell]

[MEASURES]

As a team we chose to prioritize three measures to guide the focus of our design.

R I V E R

S Q U A R E C L I N T O N

The Competition required the submitting project to fulfill ten categories of sustainability called ‘Measures’. Each Measure had to be documented and supported by the design of the project.

M.01 INTEGRATION M.02 COMMUNITY

H U D S O N

A master plan on this land that has been destroyed BROADW AY STREET drives us to implement a pedistrian driven system that captures the hidden history of the pre-existing waterfront city through ANN theSTRcontinuity of walkways EET and the interaction of programs with eachother. We want to celebrate the character and identity of Newburgh through the experience of the pedistrian WASHINGTON STREET within these new revived programs.

M.03 ECOLOGY WATER STREET

Newburgh has lost the heritage of its past through 1ST EET devastating urban renewalSTRprograms that removed approximately 1,000 buildings and approximately 300 families during the 1950s and 1960s. The people of Newburgh are still facing the consequences of those actions today. An improved community relationship and connectivity between programs on an urban scale is needed.

LIBERTY STREET

introduction

Newburgh Waterfront Master Plan

M.04 WATER M.05 ECONOMY M.06 ENERGY M.07 WELLNESS M.08 RESOURCES M.09 CHANGE

WILLIAM STREET

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M.10 DISCOVERY

SCALE=1”=128’ 0’

128’

384’

768’


(

' I L

I

MASTER PLAN

06

PROGRAM After intensive research and analysis of the city of Newburgh we concluded four main programs that would benefit the livelihood of its citizens, the economy, and the environment. Each Measure was fullfilled in the Master Plan.

Circulation / Parks this included: bike trail, boardwalk, wetland + recreational parks,

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I

!

Cultural

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Plaza

gardens, and ferry transportation to Beacon Metro Station

this included: art gallery/exhibition space, educational spaces, cafe, administration, pedestrian bridge, and amphitheater this included: restaurants, commercial markets/stores

Low-Income Housing [SQUARE FOOTAGE] total site square footage.......................................435,600 sqft total built square footage......................................229,050 sqft [diagrammatic plan]

---�D.<,\\

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[plan iteration]

[final plan]

Ii'

!��

�� [diagrammatic perspective]

[perspective iteration] 2 0 1 9 | j u l i s s a qu e z a d a | a rch i t e ct u re p ort fol i o

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0 6 PHASE ONE: CULTURE CENTER

objective

PHASE ONE: After three months of master planning the waterfront we divided the plan into 4 different phases and focused our attention to the first phase which was the Culture Center and the man-made Wetlands that would later support the construction of phases 2-4.

[a] Pedistrian Bridge connecting Broadway Street to the Hudson River

For Phase One we intent to connect community and place by restoring life back to the water. We intend to create a clean and healthy environment for inhabitants; both human and wildlife. This ecologically sustainable urban model would assume a new form of resilient urbanism that generates an amenity-rich and diverse landscape, self-restored ecology, and an economically viable sustaining community atmosphere.

[b] Culture Center: 1. Art Gallery/Exhibition 2. Education Facility 4. Administration 3. Cafe

[c] Gray Water Sanitary System: Wetlands + Riparian Buffer

81

walkscore

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06 COMMUNITY M.02

The Cultural Center programs aim to benefit community members through career services and life skills classes for adults. Child art education helps kids learn to interact with others while working to achieve a composition and to act as an extension of school.

section perspective plans 2 0 1 9 | j u l i s s a qu e z a d a | a rch i t e ct u re p ort fol i o

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06

PERSPECTIVE RENDER

WATER HARVEST M.04 Rainwater/greywater harvested from the immediate surrounding context to be filtered, stored and used on site for the Cultural Centers pottable water use. The rainwater is collected through natural slope runoff from Broadway and collected into rainwater collection pools then rain down the pedestrian bridge and filtered through rain gardens. The water is carried off of the bridge and is further filtered by wetlands adjacent to Front Street and then stored in four 20,000 gallon cisterns under the street and parking of the building.

30%

7%

SITE AREA BUILDING RUNOFF RAINWATER COLLECTION

SITE AREA EVAPORATION RAINWATER COLLECTION

62% SITE AREA INFILTRATION RAINWATER COLLECTION

WELLNESS M.07 Pedestrian Bridge Connecting the famous street of Newburgh, NY to the waterfront directly through this bridge. This promotes walking instead of driving which creates healthier habits and a sense of community.

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Utilizing adaptive re-use of on site pressure treated decking left by unused marina for new Ferry Port, Pedestrian Path amd Bridge.

$116,550 MONEY SAVED FROM REUSED PRESSURE TREATED DECKING $35 [PER SQFT PRESSURE TREATED DECKING] 3,300 SQFT [AREA OF FERRY PORT]


06 LIGHT & AIR M.07 Open floor plan allows for a majority of program to have ampel access to natural light. High cielings and tall windows allow for natural daylighting through interior. lobby area rendering

86%

6%

75%

floor area with direct views to the outdoors

floor area artifically lit during service hours

of the floor area is within 15â&#x20AC;&#x2122; of operable windows

92% of the floor area is daylit

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0 7 DUALITY

introduction

PROJECT: Crematorium + Research Center TYPE: Integrative Design Studio STUDIO: Professor Gabriel Fuentes + Professor Jayashree Shamanna DATE: Spring 2018 LOCATION: SE Corner of 10th Ave & 22nd Street New York, NY

The duality of human life can be realized through the relationship between the absolute and the relative. The absolute is defined as the true tangible reality that exists. The relative is defined as the reality that is perceived by each and every individual. The absolute and the relative are interdependent of one another meaning one does not exist without the presence of the other. There are certain biological truths about our existence that are defined as being absolute; death being one of them. But the manner of how each human responds to the occurrence of death is the reflection of their perspective, therefore it is also relative. The biological truths about our species is at the essence of our survival. These instincts such as taste, smell, sound and touch are absolute because they are a biological truth. Within the perceived realities lies the essence of what is absolute.

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design intent design strategies

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

how can architecture be absolute?

site plan

thesis question

07

To create a space that communicates ‘absoluteness’ through the universal structure of the human senses in order to superimpose a sense of being.

[1] Use of natural material and their raw characteristics to form the function of the space it occupies. [2] Engage human sense of sight by dimming light and shaping the manner in which sunlight enters a space. [3] Engage human sense of sound by voiding out sound waves in the specific spaces that deal with death. axonometric

[4] Engage human sense of touch through the use of rough/smooth material where ever the human touch is required

par ti diagrams

[5] Use contradictory elements such as ‘hot’ and ‘cold’ to superimpose a sense of being

[absolute]

[relative]

AXONOMETRIC scale: 1’=1/16”

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SECTION PERSPECTIVE

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07

FLOOR PLANS

basement floor plan

up

BB

22

down

21 up

21 22

memorial space building services up

E1

AA

BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN scale: 1/8=1’

0

8’

32’

E2

16’

BB

up

ground floor plan

4’

11

1

9

2

4

down

3 5

7 6 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

auditorium recieving room post-processing room cold storage retort chambers seminar room viewing hall lobby seminar room entrance loading dock

up

up

8

E1

AA

GROUND FLOOR PLAN scale: 1/8=1’

0

8’ 4’

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32’ 16’

E2

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FLOOR PLANS

07

BB up

second floor plan

dow

n

15

14

13

12

12 13 14 15 16

16

meeting room staff office executive director private gathering space[5] kitchenette + supply closet

up up

AA

scale: 1/8=1’

0

8’

E1

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 32’

4’

E2

16’

BB

third floor plan

up

20

up

18

19

17

pyschology lab large gathering space media+library pyschology lab

up up

AA

THIRD FLOOR PLAN scale: 1/8=1’

0

8’ 4’

E1

17 18 19 20

32’ 16’

E2

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ELEVATIONS

1/16” scale model

07

E2- south elevation scale: 1’=1/8”

0

8’ 4’

[E2] south elevation 32’

16’

E1- west elevation

[E1] west elevation

scale: 1’=1/8”

0

8’

4’

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32’

16’


07

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concept models

SECTIONS

[AA] longitudinal section AA- LONGITUDINAL SECTION scale: 1’=1/8”

0

8’

32’

4’

16’

[BB] transverse section BB- TRANSVERSE SECTION scale: 1’=1/8”

0

8’ 4’

32’ 16’


07

CURTAIN WALL + COPPER PANEL DETAIL

detailed facade elevation

W = 5’- 0”

[copper panel + curtain wall detail] MATERIAL: [COPPER]

D = 4’- 6”

• the inevitable change in color due to oxidation reflects the inevitable and inescapable death we must face as we age • this material is 1/2” thick with perforations at 1/2” wide with a 1 -1/4” separation that wraps the entire building

H = 10’- 0”

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CURTAIN WALL + COPPER PANEL

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[1/2” scale physical elevation model] • panels: plexi, brushed and spray painted with copper, was laser-cut • steel supports: spray-painted basswood sticks • floor: casted concrete 1/2” scale physical elevation model


LIGHT SHAFT

light shaft section perspective

07

WAFFLE SLAB: • corresponds to the 5’x5’ grid • allows for large span without the need for suppor t • provides suppor t for the light shaft • robust concrete contrasting the delicate glass LARGE GATHERING SPACE: • access only by ramp from the third floor • 20 foot ceiling height • low lighting both ar tificial and natural LIGHT SHAFT: • 60 feet total height • 15’x15’ opening through slabs • unifies the grieving through an element that is absolute through each core space CREMATORIUM / VIEWING HALL: • half of the light shaft is in the viewing hall and other half is in the crematorium •the space between the viewer and the furnaces is the element that represents ‘absoluteness’ •located on the ground floor • 20 foot ceiling height MEMORIAL SPACE: • located in the basement: 5,800 SF • 20 foot ceiling height • the only space where the viewer may stand under the light shaft • ver ticality of the shaft

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LOBBY AREA RENDERING

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0 8 DRAWINGS

[above] final project for the course ‘Figure Drawing’ taken in ISI in Florence, Italy | Novemeber 2017 [right] Personal Piece – was featured in Barryville Area Arts Gallery and Calender | July 2015 [right column] Figure drawings| Fall 2017

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PHOTOGRAPHY

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photography series VI

‘is it easy to live inside yourself?’ June 2019

the concept of this series is about questioning the authentic self – who are you when you’re in a room all alone? are you living a life that is aligned with your deepest passions or are you living under the external pressures of our reality? the lives we live, people we meet and places we live are all a reflection of the connection with oneself and following that, how do you begin to deconstruct the idea of who we are? and who are we when we live in our authentic nature. This is an exploration of this conversation.


0 8 PHOTOGRAPHY

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PHOTOGRAPHY

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[photos taken with a Nikon DSLR] 2 0 1 9 | j u l i s s a qu e z a d a | a rch i t e ct u re p ort fol i o

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J . QUEZADA

Profile for Julissa Quezada

Architecture Portfolio | Quezada  

Selected Undergraduate Work 2015-2019

Architecture Portfolio | Quezada  

Selected Undergraduate Work 2015-2019

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