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Karaka Point Julie Greenslade, Lauren vincent Sally Miedema


Contents Introduction

5 6 9

Executive Summary Context Prescedents

10 Hobsonville Point 11 Flat Bush

Research

16 18 20

Slope Hydrology Landcover Types


22 24 26 28 30

Vegetation

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Hydrology

Legend karaka River_extensions River_buffer Watershed

Native Vegetation Exotic Vegetation

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1,450

2,900

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Legend

Landuse Types

Native & Exotic Landcovers

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land-cover-database-versi LCDB2NAME Broadleaved Indigenous Hardwoods Deciduous Hardwoods Flaxland Indigenous Forest Mangrove Manuka and or Kanuka Mixed Exotic Shrubland Other Exotic Forest karaka

Existing Properties 0

1,450

2,900

5,800 Meters

Development

34 36 38 40 43

1:50,000

1:50,000

Immediate Development 1 Year 5 Years

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3,000 Meters

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10 Years Over View

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Introduction 4


Executive Summary Auckland City is expected to grow by a million by the year 2040 with the addition of 400,000 new homes. In order for Auckland to adapt to the rise in population, several strategies have been put in place to see through the goals of Aucklanders and ultimately achieve Auckland’s true dream of becoming the most liveable city in the world. Such strategies include: - Compact urban form which focuses on intensifying development within metropolitan areas, emphasising on town centers and major transport routes to create denser communities that provide a range of housing and mixed use activities that promote employment and recreation - Managed Greenfield development; that concentrates on expansion outside the Metropolitan Urban Limits (MUL). The development assesses environmental quality, accessibility and infrastructure, with respect to protection of the coast and surrounding environment.

Karaka provides potential and opportunity for land development located 30 minutes from the CBD. This coastal region is classified as Greenfield development as it is located outside of the Metropolitan Urban Limits (MUL), therefore presents opportunity for ecological and sustainable housing and community development. Majority of Karaka is privately owned, and caters mostly for thoroughbred breeding. There is also a large portion of residents willing to subdivide their properties, which has led us to consider Karaka further for development.

Proposed Southern Rural Boundary Map

Proposed RUB Constraints and Issues Map

Housing Growth Before and After

5


Context

Karaka is zoned as rural, and is located on the edge of the Manukau Harbour with neighbouring land currently under development, which includes Karaka Lakes and Karaka Harbourside. These developments provide a range of housing types from high density to low density, however proposed commercial development has been indicated that it will be established outside of the housing subdivision. Auckland

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National

Regional


Karaka

Local

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8


Prescedents

When considering an effective growth strategy for the area of Karaka, we looked at two prime examples, Flat Bush and Hobsonville Point. It was critical that we had projects to reference to in terms of expressing our particular vision for this area. These two models stood out to us in terms of their design philosophies, Hobsonville Point demonstrated sustainable high density housing and community environment. Flat Bush emphasised on building ecological corridors which boosted ecology to the area according to Forman’s patch – matrix – corridor model. Flat Bush also illustrated clustered low density housing to accommodate the ecological corridors, along with reducing medium density lots to provide more space for storm water management amnetities which strongly emphasises on Cues for Cares. 9


Hobsonville Point is approximately 24 minutes north west from Auckland City Center and is located on the point of Waitemata Harbour and Greenhithe Harbour. It is 167 hectares dedicated to development of a new suburb. Hobsonville Point’s vision is for it to be classifed as “a world class township and not just a ‘suburb’”. It strongly focuses on enhancing a better quality of life through cultural, social, environmental, and economical aspects.

- Cultural: retaining existing features such as historical homes and plantings, as well as the Air Force Memorial Site. Also involves consultation with the local Iwi and recreational facilities -Social: providing a range of mixed housing types from apartments to terraced and stand-alone homes, incorporating parks and playgrounds, community centers and schools, and a strong focus on a neighbourhood and community environment. -Environmental: establishing green corridors with native vegetation to increase native flora and fauna, sustainable and energy efficient homes, storm water amnetities, and public recycle systems. -Economical: 20 hectare marine industry to create employment opportunites, enhancing transportation and providing opportunites for local retail and businesses.

When looking at the master plan of Hobsonville Point, we focused on the recent development of Buckley Precint, which integrates not only high density housing, but a sustainable community and a sense of place. This intrigued us in terms of what we envisioned for Karaka.

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Hobsonville Point 11


Flat Bush is located 20 minutes south of Auckland CBD and is known for its ecological structured

planning for subdivision development and was awarded a gold medal in the sustainable built projects category at the International Awards for Liveable Communitites, London in 2007. Flat Bush puts a strong emphasis on people and the environment and has achieved this through higher quality designed homes, as well as revegetation of native bush and natural creek systems to the area. Flat Bush feels that “realm is the essence of any great city or town and consists of the streets, parks, and spaces between buildings that shape how people view, use, and experience it on a daily basis.� Initiatives that have been taken into consideration to achieve Flat Bush’s goal of providing high quality urban design and a greater public realm are: -Cues for Care; one sided roads will overlook green fingers creating a feeling of open space, certan design codes for intensive housing developments and making sure parks and streetscapes are of a high aesthetic standard. -Rules and Restrictions; limitation on front fences and garaging to promote informal surveillance of the street by residents and create attractive street environments. -Connections; proposing a large network of shared footpaths and cycleways to encourage community envolvement and provide connections throughout the subdivision.

Whilst exploring Flat Bush our attention was focused on the medium and low density developments. The ecological structure these ares were developed around not only service the environment but create sense of community and place along with lively neighbourhood suburbs.

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Flat Bush 13


Research 14


Karaka has the potential and opportunity for future subdivision development, before any of the such begins, carefull consideration needs to be applied when investigating the land. Whilst studying Karaka there were several aspects that caught our attention, those being: -Slope -Drainage and Hydrology -Landcover Types -Vegetation: Native and Exotic -Landuse Types -Existing Properties willing to subdivide In order to deepen our understanding of Karaka, we investigated into each of these aspects to help survey the land for probable subdivision development. Through the use of GIS (Geographic Information System), we mapped out the region according to each aspect to illustrate if there are any patterns of the landscape or any potential threats to the landscape that could hinder future development of the area.

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ÂŻ

Slope & River Legend karaka

slope <VALUE> 0 - 15 15.00000001 - 83.99060059 River_buffer

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Slope

Within the Karaka area we were investigating slope (mainly steep slopes of 15m or greater in height) to provide us with a basic pattern of the landscape. From there we included the river buffers to see if there was any correlation between the two variables. From this investigation weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;rve seen that there is a postive relationship between slope and rivers. This not only displays a landscape pattern but also provides us with an understanding of the constraints within our site.

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Hydrology

Legend karaka River_extensions River_buffer Watershed

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Hydrology

When studying the hydrology within the area, we mapped out the rivers and buffered them 15m to accommodate for surrounding fluvial depositions. We also mapped out the watershed for the region to locate the nearby drainage basins. This information indicates the local drainage patterns and helps further our understanding of the Karaka area.

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Legend karaka land-cover-database-versi

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Landcover Types

LCDB2NAME Broadleaved Indigenous Hardwoods Built-up Area Deciduous Hardwoods High Producing Exotic Grassland Indigenous Forest Lake and Pond Mangrove Orchard and Other Perennial Crops Other Exotic Forest Urban Parkland/ Open Space

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Landcover types This maps outlines all the landcover types, both ecological and urban within the region. It helped deepen our knowledge about Karaka in terms of its context, displaying the surrounding area and identifying what it is.

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Legend

Native & Exotic Landcovers

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land-cover-database-versi LCDB2NAME Broadleaved Indigenous Hardwoods Deciduous Hardwoods Flaxland Indigenous Forest Mangrove Manuka and or Kanuka Mixed Exotic Shrubland Other Exotic Forest karaka

0

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Vegetation

Vegetation was an important aspect to investigate for us as we wanted to have strong emphasis on the environment and local ecology. Like Flat Bush, ecological structured planning was what we envisioned for Karaka in terms of medium and low density housing. Whist analysing vegetation, we took a landscape ecology approach to our investigation, by which we narrowed our research to focus on Native and Exotix forests, as these two variables are the most ecologically benefical to the native fauna (tui, silver eye and bellbird). When mapping out the Native and exotic forests, there was a strong decline in any forest/ substantial bush in the surrounding area.

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Native Landcovers

Legend

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Native_Landcover LCDB2NAME Broadleaved Indigenous Hardwoods Flaxland Indigenous Forest Mangrove Manuka and or Kanuka karaka

0

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Vegetation- Native

Narrowing our research more, we looked at Native and Exotic forests on their own as independent variables. To deepen our understanding of what native forests there were, we mapped out several landcover types within the native category: -Broadleaf Indegenous Hardwoods -Flaxland -Indegenous Forest -Mangrove -Manuka and/or Kanuka Native forests showed little/if any existence within the Karaka area, but was substantial in size to the east of Karaka.

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Exotic Landcovers Legend

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land-cover-database-versi LCDB2NAME Deciduous Hardwoods Mixed Exotic Shrubland Other Exotic Forest karaka

0

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Vegetation- Exotic

When mapping out Exotic forests, we focused on a few landcover types that were of ecological importance: -Deciduous Hardwoods -Mixed Exotic Shrubland -Other Exotic Forest Exotic forest illustrated very little amounts of existence, therefore is not of any ecological benefits due to its poor existence.

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ÂŻ

Landuse Types

Legend karaka

land-cover-database-versi LCDB2NAME Built-up Area High Producing Exotic Grassland Orchard and Other Perennial Crops Short-rotation Cropland

0

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Landuse Types

Landuse types was the study of the land in terms of its productivity, whether it was being used for residential purposes, horticultural/farmland purposes or not being used at all. We formed this research based on estimations and judgements we made from the information we gathered i.e where land is categorised as High Producing Exotic Grasslands, we assumed the land was of either farmland/ grazing use or of no use at all. Majority of Karaka is zoned High Producing Exotic Grasslands, this indicates to us that Karaka is either of no use or is being used for farming purposes.

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Collective Karaka Ownership

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Legend Existing_Properties

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Existing Properties

The map demonstrates all of the existing properties within Karaka that are willing to subdivide immediately. This research is important when it comes to the development phase as it plays a cruical role in the constraints, due to Karaka being currently under private ownerships.

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Development 32


Karaka provides potenial and opportunity for subdivision development. After research and analysis of the area, we stategised a sustainable development plan that not only meets the criteria of our models but is also influenced by the wants and needs of the local community. It is important to the local people for Karaka to obtain its identity and not be lost in development that merely mimics Northern Hemisphere Models. The Karaka Collective emphasis on the development of the land to protect and enhance the natural and physical resources in a sustainable way that effectively creates over all resilience and sense of place. In order to provide a sustainable, resilient subdivison development, we have drafted out a 10 year growth strategy plan that sees Karaka develop and evolve efficiently and sustainably.

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Legend: New Propsed Two-lane Road Proposed Motorway Town Center Retired Areas High Density Housing Medium Density Housing Low Density Housing

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Immediate Development This stage of our growth strategy development plan is the immediate development phase. We developed these areas first as these were the existing properties that were willing to subdivide their land immediately. The red road is the new propsed motorway, that we have then developed a secondary road branching off that goes through our town centre for better access. We buffered all the rivers in the area with a 50 meter buffer that is then retired along with all the other green patches on our plan. We also retired parts of the coast and buffered the remaining coastling 80m to protect and enhace the coastal flora and fauna. These areas of retirement seemed suitable as these were the areas where the slope was grater than 15m and would have been inappropriate to develop.

Statistics: High density- 774,453 m² -2,581 lots -9,035 people Medium density- 692,800 m² -1,385 lots -6,235 people Low density- 660,938 m² -220 lots -1,101 people Low density- 902,251 m² -300 lots -1,503 people Total: 16,874 people

Estimated Figures: High density: 3.5 people per house- Lot Average= 300 m² Medium Density: 4.5 people per house- Lot Average= 500 m² Low Density: 5 people per house- Lot Average= 3000 m²

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Legend: New Propsed Two-lane Road Proposed Motorway Town Center Retired Areas High Density Housing Medium Density Housing Low Density Housing

36 0

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Year 1

This phase of our growth strategy plan shows development of Karaka one year later. Development is small and is concentrated more around the town centre, while also expanding out over to Karaka North. We forecasted that this growth would occur as there are properties willing to subdivide in Karaka North as well and would more than likely be near the town centre.

Statistics: High density- 262,731 m² -875 lots -3,065 people High density- 112,213 -374 lots -1,309 people Medium density- 175,185 m² -350 lots -1,576 people Total: 5,680 people

Estimated Figures: High density: 3.5 people per house- Lot Average= 300 m² Medium Density: 4.5 people per house- Lot Average= 500 m² Low Density: 5 people per house- Lot Average= 3000 m²

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Legend: New Propsed Two-lane Road Proposed Motorway Town Center Retired Areas High Density Housing Medium Density Housing Low Density Housing

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5 Years 5 Years later Karaka has expanded vigoursly. High, medium and low density housing has grown while the town centre is beginning to branch out over to Karaka North. Majority of the development is confined to the existing properties that were originally wanting to subdivide, although we feel that in 5 years time there will be more land up for development. Estimated Figures: High density: 3.5 people per house- Lot Average= 300 m² Medium Density: 4.5 people per house- Lot Average= 500 m² Low Density: 5 people per house- Lot Average= 3000 m²

Statistics: High density- 151,866 m² -506 lots -1,771 people High density- 269,110 m² -897 lots -2,182 people High density- 187,069 m² -623 lots -2,182 people Medium density- 352,973 m² -705 lots -3,176 people Medium density- 174,967 m² -349 lots -1,574 people Low density- 65,039 m² -21 lots -108 people Low density- 564,188 m² -188 lots -940 people Total: 12,890 people

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Legend: New Propsed Two-lane Road Proposed Motorway Town Center Retired Areas High Density Housing Medium Density Housing Low Density Housing

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10 Years Final stage of our growth strategy plan sees Karaka becoming a versatile suburb. High, medium and low density housing has broaden, while the town centre expandes more over in Karaka North. The areas that were orginally not wanting to develop, have been left undeveloped although there is opportunity for future growth and development, giving that these properties will eventually subdivide in the years to come.

Statistics: High density- 181,654 m² -605 lots -2,119 people Medium density- 529,259 m² -1,058 lots -4,763 people Medium density- 290,768 m² -581 lots -2,616 people Low density- 294,909 m² -98 lots -491 people Total: 9,989 people

Estimated Figures: High density: 3.5 people per house- Lot Average= 300 m² Medium Density: 4.5 people per house- Lot Average= 500 m² Low Density: 5 people per house- Lot Average= 3000 m²

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Over View 42


Rapid growth of Aucklands population and the pressure to accommodate another million people by the year 2040, raises issues over housing and development. Karaka, located just outside the Metropolitian Urban Limits (MUL), provides the perfect opportunity for development of a new suburb.

Through indepth anaylsis of Karaka and the wider context, we developed a ecologically, sustainable Growth Stategy Plan that protects and enhances the natural and physical resources and contributes to Aucklands wider ecology. By using models that are in fitting with Aucklands environment ( Flat Bush and Hobosonville Point), we are postive that the development at Karaka will not only be successful but will fullfill the desires of the local community. Karaka will be one of the largest ecologically sustainable developments within Auckland, that will not only service the community and the ecology but will be also resilient.

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Karaka Point