Workshop Girls Process Book

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COPYRIGHT @ 2018 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED ALL RIGHTS RESERVED No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the permission of Juliana Serejo Galeotti.

DESIGN CONTACT Juliana Serejo Galeotti E-mail address: juliana.s.galeotti@hotmail.com Personal Website: www.julianagaleotti.com Project Website: www.joinworkshopgirls.com



>> Welcome to the Maker Movement

01

Exploring the Maker Movement


02

Creating Workshop Girls

03 Design Deliverables

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The Future of Workshop Girls




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>> Welcome to the Maker Movement What's It All About 10_11 The Big Issue 12_13

WELCOME TO THE MAKER MOVEMENT

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What It’s All About

The Maker Movement refers to a recent wave of DIY (do-it-yourself) activities. The United States has always been a nation of self-made inventors, entrepreneurs, and tinkerers. With the growing number of Americans gaining access to technologies once restricted only to big manufacturers and companies (like 3D printers, laser cutters, design software, as well as desktop machine tools) as well as more access to information, designing and building almost anything has become easier. So it comes with no surprise to see that the US housed the creation and “boom” of the Maker Movement. Anyone can be a maker now that tools, skills, data and money are more accessible. The Movement itself emphasizes and encourages a “learning through doing” peer shared environment of appliying new technologies and exploring intersections between traditionally separated areas and ways of working. For example, making products that intersect with knitting, metal-working, computer programming, filmmaking, etc. It has empowered mostly students to create and innovate, as well as providing them with the tools and space needed so they can learn, explore, interact socially, and basically make. The White House itself has been caught into the trend and hosted their first-ever White House Maker Faire back in 2014.

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The Big Issue

The Maker Movement continues to emphasizes that anyone can be a maker now that tools, materials, and information are more accessible. This discourse implies that anyone regardless of race, age, gender or class can participate. However, things aren't as utopian as they seem. The figure of the maker is understood and represented as predominant white and male.

their younger peers. Which leads us to the main problem this thesis project hopes to solve, how to raise awareness to the gender as well as the age gap in the Maker Movement and encourage older teenage girls (13-19 years old) to engage in making, building, being hands-on.

Female makers experience many challenges including gender norms and stereotypes that negatively affect their involvement and even access to maker spaces. According to Intel's MakeHers Report:Engaging Girls and Women in Technology through Making, Creating, and Inventing (2015), 11% face cultural views of inappropriateness, 12% don't feel safe in a maker environment and 17% have been excluded for being a woman. Generaly these obstacles that interfere with female participation are lack of money, mentorship, information and access to these tools and materials the Maker Movement stated "everyone" could tap into to. Luckily, efforts have already been made from organizations and nonprofits to decrease this gender gap and they are working. Yet, there are still issues to be addressed regarding older girls, who are not being catered and motivated as much as

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01 Exploring the Maker Movement Word Association 18_21 First Exploration Posters 22_25 Asking Questions 26_27 Making Connections 28_29 First Connections Insights 30_43 Audience 44_49 Focus Group 50_55 Video Project Proposal 56_65

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Word Association

The first part of the research involved a search for specific keywords that could be associated to making and handmade. This exercise helped in collecting a number of potential concepts, or words, that could be explored for the development of the thesis. The objective of the keyword search exercise was to come up with as many different words as possible that could be related to the chosen topic. In this way helping to step out of the “obvious� and avoiding overlooking options that one wouldn't normally consider. Basically it was an exercise to help us think outside the box and come up with an unique concept for the project. After brainstorming and collecting as many words as possible for the keyword search, the following steps consisted in chosing five that would be the most appropriate to further explore and find insights that could help start to shape the main concept of the project. This exploration started with a semiotic exercise consisting of making cards of the 5 chosen words and placing these cards in spaces or places were the context was appropriate. This ideas was to find locations around the city of San Francisco that could relate to the 5 words. Once found, photos were taken of the word cards while in those locations. It was important to be open-minded and not think too much while doing this creative exercise, as you never know when an unexpected idea could show itself and in the end be the main theme that guides your entire project.

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Unique

Makers

Skills

COMFORT

Industry

Craft

Wellness

Homemade

AWARENESS

Well-being

Education

Different

Unique objects

Sharing

Change

Documentation

Electronics

CONNECTION

IDENTITY

Construction

Creativity

Flea Markets

EXPERIENCE

Handmade

Collection

Empowerment

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Comfort

Identity

AWARENESS

Connection

Experience

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First Exploration Posters

The topic for this thesis project was chosen not only because of my own personal connection to the said topic but also due to its importance. Certain aspects of the topic need to be addressed as well as explored so to better understand it. By expressing this aspects into words and images, one creates a more tangible perception of the topic and that can lead to more valuable insights. For that purpose, 3 posters were designed in order to depict an opinion of the topic itself.

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Asking Questions

Using the Socratic Question Method we were encouraged to dive deeper into our research to encounter more insights and be able to establish parameters for the project. The objective was to focus on the conceptual part of the project by generating questions that were relevant. This method can help shape new directions that bring light on the issue. The first round of Socratic Questions brought the following results:

*What do you mean by We Are All Makers? *Do you mean that we are all capable of doing things? *What type of things does that imply? 4. Do you mean that we are all creative? *It's pretty clear that humans can make things, can you use other words to describe what you mean? *You mention both handmade and makers, what is your main point? *Can you expand on that? *What do you think is the problem? *Could you do it alone or would you need the help of other people? Organizations? *Does personal awareness fit here? *How does this relate to Graphic Design? *How does this relate to you? *Are you focusing on the ability to make handmade products, like soap, candy, business in general? *Who is your target audience? How and where they live? What do they do? *Is there really a problem?

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*Are you assuming that we are all capable of making things with our hands (handmade), but we just don't know where to begin? *Are you assuming that we are all capable of making things, but we just don't want to?

*If you find a solution to the problem, what would happen as a result? *If you solve the problem will there then be an oversaturation on the handmade market? *If that happens will handmade loose it's value?

*Are you assuming that we are all capable of making things, but we just aren't aware of this? *Is this always the case? There seems to be a big Maker/DIY movement taking place already, people are making things? *What could we assume instead? *You seem to be assuming that everyone has the potential to make things/produce things, correct? *You seem to be assuming that the reason people aren't making things is because they don't have the time, correct? *If you are assuming people don't have the time to explore themselves, how are you gonna help them find that time? *Is not having the time the problem, or are you referring to the fear of beginning, o continuing, of getting shit done? *What is the probability of you actually solving this problem? *How many people will be affected by your project?

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*If this happens, will it have a long-term duration? Can the project survive on its own? *Is there room for the project to grow into other areas? *Do you think people in the field (makers) could help you out? How? *What are your feelings concerning the question? *Do you personally believe there is a solution? *What do you envision for this problem/solution? *To answer this question, are there other things/ issues/problems that need to be addressed? *Why is this important? So what? *Where did you get this idea from? *Do you think people in the field (makers) could help you out? How?

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Making Connections

After some research had been done, more information surfaced that needed to be processed. A useful way to do that was to find connections between different aspects of the topic. Finding these relationships brought new insights that helped guide the next steps of the project. However, the first thing needed was to set some limitations to the research by finding certain camps in which the topics fit best. In the case of my chosen topic “We Are Makers” the most relevant areas I found were:

PERSONAL IMPACT COMMUNICATIONS IMPACT CULTURAL IMPACT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ECONOMIC IMPACT POLITICAL IMPACT

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Personal Impact

Economic Impact

Cultural Impact

We Are All Makers

Aspects Political Impact

Environmental Impact

Communications Impact

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First Connections Insights

After all the research already made, there was a substantial amount of information that needed to be processed. Where to begin? The first logical step was to identify connections between each piece of information and by displaying them on a map-new paths became visible. The map brought new and more refined insights, from which the most relevant ones were chosen and explored even further. The second part involved designing eighteen 5x8 cards that visually represented the most intriguing connections highlighted from that mind map. The intent of the cards was also to explore different graphic opportunities and visuals for the project. All cards consisted of having on one side an image and a word that represented each of the eighteen connections, and on the back of each a brief statement that explained why this particular discovery was important to my thesis topic. Some connections were very evident and easy to figure out. There are many things that easily jump to peoples minds when talking about making and The Maker Movement. The most common one is that it has to do with being hands on and building things, the DIY esthetics is deeply tied into it, and now more than ever we are seeing a boom of available technology and tools that once were only accessible to big companies (ex:3D printing, laser cutting, etc). These conclusions are almost immediate with no background needed to confirm it, but there were other connections made that were rather a little surprising to say the least.

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The Maker Movement's mission is to make data, tools, and opportunity available for all. However, after further research on the topic, I found data that disputed this by saying that the figure of the Maker is understood and represented as predominant white and male. This was the turning point of the whole research, finally thanks to all the data and research made, I had found an important issue that needed to be addressed. While talking to people about my project and its findings, I got mixed feelings. Some, mostly male, argued with me saying that I should go back to my research and actually find a problem for lack of female participants in The Maker Movement was not a thing. While obviously, when talking to women about this, they were thrilled and happily supported my project, stating that lack of female participation was definitely an issue. At this point I was getting two different opinions. One was supportive of the project, saying that I had definitely stumbled upon a current issue that needed to be solved, while the other said the problem was not a problem since they themselves saw and knew females that participated in the Maker Movement. Back to the drawing board I went. I needed either more information and reliable data that stated that lack of female participation was a real issue. This was a bit heartbreaking, for I saw all my

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fellow classmates advance in their projects, while I got stuck. I seriously considered even changing my topic if I didn't find any imperative information to back it up. Maybe I could go around and gather personal statements of these female makers themselves? If I did, how many would I need for it to be considered reliable information? What happened next actually aided in the continuation of this project. While still researching and reading on-line articles, I found a report put together by Intel called MakeHers: Engaging Girls and Women in Technology through Making, Creating, and Inventing. In this extensive and well put together report, I discovered that lack of female participation is a problem in the Maker Movement. However, many organizations, schools, workshops and initiatives have already been created to address this issue. How could I come up with an innovative solution or better approach compared to those already being made? Instead of considering this an obstacle and going back to the drawing board to start again, I continued to read the report believing that I could find something there. Thanks to my persistance, I did. Intel had recovered data that stated that the big issue wasn't the gender gap in Maker Movement, but an age gap. More precisely an age gap regarding the female participants. The Movement itself, along with other ONGS and intiatives were catering to girls. The twist was they were only focusing on young girls, the ones having their first connection to making at an early age. Older girls, more precisely teens, weren't being catered and encouraged as much as their younger peers to engage in making and building.

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There, I had found my problem. A current issue that was relatively unknown, despite Intel's report, and that not many solutions were being deployed to fix it. It's not a gender gap, it's an age gap! Lack of engagement, encouragement towards girls in the Maker Movement is a real issue and is something that needs to be addressed Although now there's a valid point that we can see, engage and hear more about female makers than before, there still is a big gap when regarding teenage girls. Specially teenage girls that aren't being encouraged to eventually become that amazing female maker friend of ours that runs her own workshop and can bend metal pipes. We need to cater to the young audiences and groups that are not being addressed so that they can have the same opportunities or even better ones than the those being presented. We must offer opportunities that can improve their lives.

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Audience

The next step now was to define an audience, those who care and are affected by the project? Who is involved? This step dealt with recognizing and defining specific audiences, people who have something to do with the project. This specific group are called the target audience. From my research I was able to identify 3 different kinds of individuals that make up my target audience. The main target audience obviously is the teen girls themselves. Their ages are between 13-19 years old, who have had short experiences or none at all with making, building things and being hands-on and would like to engage more in these activities.

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The second group is made up of the teen girl's parents. In this group we have the parent's that are over-protective and don't want their children to get hurt engaging in building activities. We also have the parents that have no strong opinion about the matter, and are not aware of the Maker Movement. The last subgroup of this second target audience are parents that know about the Maker Movement, support it, and believe there should be more opportunities for teenage girls. The last group that makes up the target audience are teachers, instructors, and educators in general. These individuals are actively engaged in education and have daily interaction with teenage girls. They are always looking for new ways to teach and inspire their students.

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Teenage girl

Primary Target Audience

Teenage girls, 13-19 years old

Teen girls who are 13-19 year old, who have had short experiences or none at all with making, building things and being hands-on and would like to engage more in these activities.

EXPLORING THE MAKER MOVEMENT

“I guess making and building could be fun, but I don't know how I could get into it.�

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The over-protective mom

Secondary Target Audience

The over-protective parent

A over-protective mother who supports the Maker Movement but doesn't feel safe with her children engaging in building activities, especially holding power tools, being close to big machinery, fire and other workshop equipment.

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“I don’t think it’s safe for my girls to engage in maker activities.”

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The uninformed parent

Secondary Target Audience

The uninformed parent

A parent that is not aware and never heard of The Maker Movement. Therefore, they have no strong opinions regarding the Movement or teenage girls engaging in Making.

EXPLORING THE MAKER MOVEMENT

“I've never heard of this Maker Movement. I guess it could be a good initiative for girls to learn how to make.�

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Passionate advocate parent

Secondary Target Audience

The passionate advocate parent

Parent that is very aware, knows and avidly participates in the Movement. Strongly believes that there should be more opportunities for teenage girls inside the Movement.

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“I'm a supporter and contributor of the Maker Movement. It will change the world!�

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The enthusiastic educator

Tertiary Target Audience Teachers and educators

Individuals actively engaged in education and have daily interaction with children and young adults. They are always looking for new ways to teach and inspire their students.

EXPLORING THE MAKER MOVEMENT

“I'm always looking for new ways to inspire and empower our girls!�

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Focus Group

Once a designer is in the midst of their research and project, they can forget that there are other people out in the world that are not familiar with the topic they are exploring. In order to stay on track and get fresh perspective, some feedback is needed. These opinions help give an idea of how the project is being understood and how people are interpreteing it. This project was then put to a test in front of an audience that ranged from individuals who either knew The Maker Movement or had never heard of it. The setting for this meeting was an informal gathering, like an event, and 11 guests were invited to attend. The event started with the guests filling a small questionnaire about the theme being presented and their opinions and experiences. After that all guests watched two introductory videos about 2 distinct themes, one was about the Maker Movement and the other talked about the Riot Grrrls and all the Riot Grrrl Movement. The Riot Grrrl Movement was a major underground feminist punk movement back in the early 1990s that started in Washington state. The Movement was chosen to be linked to this project because it had a tremendous social and cultural impact on feminism, women empowerment, and equal gender rights. They made use of punk aesthetics, music, art, and attitude to bring light to feminist consciousness and female empowering. It was an obvious inspiration to this project.

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Questions and Answers

What did people say during the event

THE QUESTIONS ASKED • Prior to this event, had you ever heard about the Maker Movement? • Were you aware that there might be a gender inequality issue inside the Movement? • Were you aware that there might be an age gap problem within girls in the Movement? • What are your thoughts on how this could be solved? • Prior to this event, had you ever heard of the Riot Grrrl Movement or anything related to it? • What are your thoughts regarding the Riot Grrrl Movement? • Do you support the Riot Grrrl Movement? • Do you believe in gender equality? • What are your thoughts on female empowerment? • Do you think there's a difference between craft and making? • What are your thoughts on how this issue of this project could be solved?

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“Awareness is what makes a movement, but it’s not that interesting because it is purely awareness instead of change.”

— Kylee Keller / 30 / Architect

“It has a lot to do with parenting and

education. How your parents think and how they raise you.”

— Oscar Singh / 26 / Student

“It’s crazy when you make something. You’re like: I did that! It’s rewarding.”

— Mariah Latham / 22 / Student

“It’s like an old boys club in America

and even from the school and the education, it’s teaching the kids to keep certain jobs to certain select groups of people.”

— Eugene Monaghan / 37 / Engineer

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Insights

DISCOVERIES • Ponder the possibility that maybe there isn’t a direct and one time solution for this issue. Maybe just making people aware isn’t the solution. It might be better to connect this need for awareness to something else: a product or social study, an event, etc. • Think of what is the purpose of a Mini Maker Faire and a Maker Fair (main event). • Think about why is it that when both genders are showcasing the things they make they are viewed as equal and when they try to sell that thing there's a gender disparity related to importance, recognition and value. • Why are there people who don’t see this gender inequality? Could mainly be because they don’t experience it, because they are part of the main white male group. • How to fix it: You need an inspirational woman inside the movement so girls could look up to her and see it’s possible. Some positive female role-models that are Makers and are making. • Strongly consider the monetary issue in gender inequality in the Movement, there might be something there.

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Video Project Proposal

After gathering all the data and useful insights of the event and research, now it was time to distill everything in a coherent manner. By considering all the connections already been made, the target audience, the visual explorations and influences, as well as the feedback from the attendees of the event, a formal proposal was needed in order to best carry the message of this project across and out into the world. The medium chosen to portray this message was a short video animation. A set of cards was designed to visualize how the narrative was going to be directed. To best explain the thesis proposal, the content was displayed in a storytelling format and formulating direct questions to the viewer. This set of cards eventually set the pace of the video narrative. It included all the parts previously mentioned and after few refinements it established the format of the final video proposal.

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02 Creating Workshop Girls Refined Insights

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Project Goals 76_77 Design Deliverables 78_79 Visual System 80_83 Logo Concept 84_87 Moodboard 88_91 Typography 92_93 Illustrations Color Palette

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94_105 106_109

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Refined Insights

Now armed with a substantial amount of information about the issue and possible design solutions to address it, the next level was to take the project out into the real world and interact with individuals both inside the Maker Movement and outside. For this, a more focused research was conducted with interviews, conversations, and surveys. The main objective of this new data gathering was to not only test the design solutions I was proposing, but also to find new strategic design opportunities. From the collection of this data, 18 potential insights were chosen for future design solutions and put together as a Research Deck. Quotes, photography, infographics and details of the information were used to visually present these insights.

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• How to keep them interested? This seems to be a struggle many instructors and teachers are going through right now. • You can’t become what you can’t see. How could we encourage teenage girls to participate more? Gear your visuals it towards girls. • Giving back to others. Encouragment = Giving Back to the Community Intersecting other areas of their lives with the possibilities of making apparently stimulates girls to continue to make. • Women like to work in groups. When it comes to making, female makers rely on connections as a resource. For them collaboration is an essential part of the process. • Providing meaningful First Experiences to Making. The first experience to making has to be significant, it should be a Starter Kit, the complete opposite of a doll-house. That's very important! • Women makers = Women mentors. Another relevant issue that kept constantly showing up during my research, was that of lack of mentorship. According to Intel’s Report MakeHers, it’s actually the third top challenge female makers face when it comes to making. • Top 3 Design Solutions. Starter Kits, Website and Mentorship Program. • Bottom 3 Design Solution Poster Series, Toys & Action Figures and Survival Field Guide. • Everyone seems to know Girls Who Code Girls Who Code is the most known organization that focuses on supporting girls.

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• Gender exclusion still seen as the main problem around the topic. Gender exclusion continues to be seen as the main issue as to why teenage girls are not engaging in making. • Free cultural events to raise more awareness. Provide the audience with a free event to talk about the problem. • Visual representation of Female Makers is scarce. • Stronger connection to Making = amount of time spent Making. Time is essential when it comes to Making. • Information content is mostly directed to a male audience. Most of the information and course material are geared towards engineering, mechanics and electronics, the audience they’re mostly addressing are males. When females try to engage they lack content that inspires them. • The Radical Divide = Girlie Making vs Physical Making Gender Making Activities • We need to show them that these activities are empowering. • Making improves the girl’s self-esteem. One of the most important benefits the girls get with making is of personal, social and emotional development. • How to engage the minorities? Making can be an effective way to attract and engage underrepresented groups, especially in the fields of computer science and engineering.

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Project Goals

In order to have a clear strategy that aided in the creation of the design deliverables, a strategy chart was put together. The chart was organized by choosing 3 insights from the Research Deck that were deemed having the greatest potential for this project. These 3 main observations were followed by potential outcomes and design deliverables that could help reach each specific goal.

Target Audience Primary Audience: Teenage girls, between the age of 13-19, who have had short experiences or none at all with making, building things and being hands-on and would like to engage more in these activities. Secondary Audience: The teen girls parents Tertiary Audience: Teachers, instructors, and educators in general

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1

2

3

INSIGHT 1 Girls need more visual representation of female makers

INSIGHT 2 Girls connect better when they work in groups

INSIGHT 3 Girls lose interest in making as they get older

STRATEGY 1 Provide credible visual representation of female makers

STRATEGY 2 Make accessible workspaces to encourage female friendship and partnership

STRATEGY 3 Allow girls to discover maker projects and show them they can use tools to create things

DELIVERABLE 1 "Real Female Makers” A poster series depicting female makers in the fields of building & making to help inspire the girls and promote the Workshop Girls brand.

DELIVERABLE 2 “Workshop Girls Maker Truck” Provide short length activities and maker projects using the Maker Truck.

DELIVERABLE 3 “Project Guide for Teen Girls” A book of maker projects called Make It Yourself. Quick step-bystep projects directed at girls to help spark their curiosity in the world of building & making.

KEYWORD 1

KEYWORD 2

KEYWORD 3

EMPOWER

ENGAGE

CHANGE

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Design Deliverables

After choosing the three significant insights to carry forward, now it was time to establish the design deliverables based on those exact insights. These were strategically formulated in order to help the project gain visibility, raise awareness to the problem and eventually help solve it.

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POSTER SERIES Girls need more visual representation of female makers

MAKER TRUCK Girls need more visual representation of female makers

VIDEO Girls need more visual representation of female makers

WORKSHEET Girls need more visual representation of female makers

TOOL-BELT Girls need more visual representation of female makers

APPAREL Girls need more visual representation of female makers

PROJECT GUIDE Girls need more visual representation of female makers

www.

WEBSITE Girls need more visual representation of female makers CREATING WORKSHOP GIRLS

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Visual System

A variation of visual explorations was required to help shape the design of the Workshop Girls brand. Not only it was essential to try and capture the “feminine” aspect of the project, but also to be able to portray “empowerment” and “attitude”. inside the workshop and building aesthetics of power tools, dust, and machinery. Another important aspect was to be aware of the type of imagery and message was being displayed, since the target audience were teenage girls and the parents of these girls. The visual system had to be appropriate so it didn't offend, exclude, encourage inappropriate behavior or misconstrued interpretations. The best way to begin is to establish brand guidelines and tackle the design of the logo first. Since Workshop Girls changed its name halfway through the project's development, a lot of sketches and visuals explorations took place before deciding on a final logo.

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Logo Concept

The Workshop Girls final logo is straight forward. Its use of the square shape symbolizes the physical space of a workshop or working area. However, by breaking the square and not permiting it to outline the shape as it should, the logo expresses the idea of “thinking outside the box� and of breaking norms and parameters. The different use of typefaces that make up the logo were chosen for particular reasons. The slab serif Museo was picked to visually portray the physical, machine, bold and rough characteristics of a workshop. While the modified script font Cuisine OT Pro was chosen so it could act as a counter opposite but at the same time balanced partner to the rough workshop visual, the empowered feminine. The one that lives both in and outside the workshop physical space and that has the ability to transform it into something new.

Boxes and tool shaped visual explorations led to the choosing of the traditional rectangle as the main shape of the logo.

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MAIN LOGO

Museo Slab 700

Line width 7pt

Modified CuisineOPt Pro

girls CREATING WORKSHOP GIRLS

The typographic comparison illustrates the modifications made on the typeface Cuisine OPT Pro. The original design of the font is represented here in the color red and the modifications are in black.

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LOGO USAGE The Workshop Girls logo is appropriate for use in any type of media and media extension. Since this is a new project and the public is not mainly aware of it's existence, for the time being the logo will be used to represent the brand itself and raise the brand's recognition. There are however a few brand guideliens to follow when using the Workshop Girls logo. For legibility purposes, there are five different ways to use the logo.

86

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CREATING WORKSHOP GIRLS

87


Moodboard

When it came time to establish a moodboard, a collection of visual elements meant to inspire both the “soul� of Workshop Girls and all the visual components of the brand, the possibilities were endless. Many moodboards were put together througouht the course of this thesis project, all with the objective of setting the tone of voice for the brand, establishing a photographic style, as well as choosing the right graphic elements and visual representations of Workshop Girls. After many moodboard iterations, two were chosen. A visual moodboard with a collection of diverse images and a typographic moodboard. The final visual elements of Workshop Girls all derived from these two moodboards.

88

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CREATING WORKSHOP GIRLS

89


90

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“We need to help girls explore new kinds of personal development experiences.” — Linda Lobato (CEO & Co-Founder of Machina)

CREATING WORKSHOP GIRLS

91


Typography

Type is an important part of the Workshop Girl's brand identity. Slab serif font, like Rockwell, worked when talking about construction, building, and handmade. However, other more refined slab serif fonts like Caecilia, Bree, and Adelle worked best when addressing workshops and making with a more feminine touch. The defined visual systems for Workshop girlst makes use of both a slab serif and a sans serif typeface. Caecilia Lt Std is mainly used for titles, headlines, and quotes. While Avenir was chosen for subtitles, body text, safety and step-by-step information on the project guide design deliverable. For the secondary typefaces, two different set of fonts were used. One is my very own handwriting which is used on the poster series and the second is the script font Rollerscript, used only as a reminder alert in the project guide layout.

Aa 92

Aa WORKSHOP GIRLS PROCESS BOOK

MFA THESIS


PRIMARY TYPEFACE

Caecilia LT Std

Avenir

55 ROMAN

BOOK

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R ST UVW XY Z

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

abcdefghijklmn

abcdefghijklmn

opqrstuvwxyz

opqrstuvwxyz

1234567890

1234567890

.,:;-_—‘“/ 75 BOLD A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R ST UVW XY Z abcdefghijklmn opqrstuvwxyz 1234567890 .,:;-_—‘“/ 85 HEAVEY A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R ST UVW XY Z abcdefghijklmn opqrstuvwxyz 1234567890 .,:;-_—‘“/

.,:;-_—‘“/ MEDIUM

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmn opqrstuvwxyz

1234567890 .,:;-_—‘“/

BLACK

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmn

opqrstuvwxyz

1234567890 .,:;-_—‘“/

SECONDARY TYPEFACES

Rollerscript

Personal Handwriting

BOOK A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R ST U V W X Y Z abcdefghijklmn opqrstuvwxyz 1234567890 .,:;-_—‘“/

CREATING WORKSHOP GIRLS

93


Illustrations

Another big part of the visual system was the use of vector illustrations. These were assigned three distinct categories, each one to be used in certain deliverables, and with different visual hierarchies.

• First set of Illustrations In the beginning, edgy and empowering illustrations were used that depicted girl hands holding power tools. The sense of “attitude” and “empowerment” were very important early on. When depicting female figures, the decision of not showing faces or specific physical characteristics, along with “fantasy-like” skin colors, aided in representing figures that wouldn't be tied down to a certain race. This was thought initially to be of great positive value to the audience, since it didn't portray any specific type of female and encouraged the interpretation of it being any type of woman regardless of race, color, or cultural background.

94

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CREATING WORKSHOP GIRLS

95


User Testing

Feedback from the Mini-Maker Faire On October 22nd of 2017, this thesis project had the chance to be displayed at the Mini-Maker Faire in Oakland, California. A small booth was set up and all the insights discovered up to that time, along with prints of the design deliverables and illustrations were displayed. The objective was to gather user feedback on the design system, the design strategy and individual perspectives. This feedback led to a refinement of the illustrations.

THE INSIGHTS GATHERED • Most of the teen girls that were interviewed responded positively to the colorful illustrations and visual system. • The teen girls were excited to see the illustrations of female hands holding power tools. Mostly importantly, they were responding to the attitude of these illustrations. • A few number of parents and instructors were concerned with the illustrations of the hands holding power tools. Some pointed out that the way the hands and tools were portrayed resembled phallic imagery and even considered a bit violent since certain tools resembled guns. • Certain adult individuals didn't respond well to the illustrations of the girls, pointing out that their lack of faces or facial characteristics was a bit scary and even unrelatable. • A small number of parents, teachers, and female makers were thrilled with the hands holding power tools illustration. They were happy to see a visual representation of a female figure holding tools.

96

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CREATING WORKSHOP GIRLS

97


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CREATING WORKSHOP GIRLS

99


Final Illustrations

Vector illustration hierarchy & usage Primary vector illustrations Maker Girls Usage Make It Yourself Project Guide, Workshop Girls Maker Truck and website

Workshop Girl “attitude� elements. Used as wearables on the images of the girls, either on their hair or as temporary tattoos on their skin.

100

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CREATING WORKSHOP GIRLS

101


102

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CREATING WORKSHOP GIRLS

103


Secondary vector illustrations Step-by-step illustrations Usage Make It Yourself Project Guide

1st line 2nd line

Tertiary vector illustrations Small Female Makers Icons Usage Poster Series and website

104

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MFA THESIS


Quaternary vector illustrations Quotes Icons Usage Make It Yourself Project Guide, Process Book, and website

Tertiary vector illustrations Small Female Makers Icons Usage Poster Series and website

CREATING WORKSHOP GIRLS

105


Color Palette

Our brand colors represent our brand values and brand story. By separating our brand colors into different categories and usage we can broaden our brand's impact and attract a larger audience in the future. Color Groups By designating color groups it's possible to convey a more cohesive message and have more opportunities to intrigue and engage viewers. Each design deliverable and the graphic elements used within each one have their own color group. Sometimes it happens that the same colors are used in other deliverables.

Main Brand Colors

C: 0 M: 84 Y: 35 K: 0

C: 0 M: 36 Y: 98 K: 0

R: 240 G: 80 B: 117

R: 251 G: 173 B: 28

# f05075

# fbad1c

C: 47 M: 0 Y: 9 K: 0 R: 125 G: 209 B: 228 # 7dd1e4

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Poster Series Colors

C: 0 M: 84 Y: 35 K: 0

C: 0 M: 36 Y: 98 K: 0

R: 240 G: 80 B: 117

R: 251 G: 173 B: 28

# f05075

# fbad1c

C: 47 M: 0 Y: 9 K: 0

C: 80 M: 84 Y: 38 K: 30

R: 125 G: 209 B: 228

R: 65 G: 52 B: 89

# 7dd1e4

# 413459

Project Guide Maker It Yourself Colors

C: 0 M: 84 Y: 35 K: 0

C: 0 M: 36 Y: 98 K: 0

C: 0 M: 0 Y: 0 K: 0

R: 240 G: 80 B: 117

R: 251 G: 173 B: 28

R: 255 G: 255 B: 255

# f05075

# fbad1c

# ffffff

C: 47 M: 0 Y: 9 K: 0

C: 4 M: 5 Y: 3 K: 30

C: 100 M: 100 Y: 100 K: 100

R: 125 G: 209 B: 228

R: 241 G: 237 B: 238

R: 0 G: 0 B: 0

# 7dd1e4

# f1edee

# 000000

Maker Girls Illustration Colors: Skin

C: 0 M: 31 Y: 29 K: 0

C: 22 M: 73 Y: 51 K: 4

R: 250 G: 188 B: 168

R: 190 G: 97 B: 103

# fabca8

# be6167

C: 0 M: 583 Y: 30 K: 0

C: 33 M: 79 Y: 58 K: 20

R: 245 G: 146 B: 147

R: 148 G: 71 B: 80

# f59293

# 944750

CREATING WORKSHOP GIRLS

107


Maker Girls Illustration Colors: Hair

C: 10 M: 65 Y: 96 K: 1

C: 54 M: 86 Y: 58 K: 69

C: 42 M: 96 Y: 60 K: 56

R: 220 G: 116 B: 43

R: 58 G: 15 B: 33

R: 86 G: 9 B: 40

# dc742b

# 3a0f21

# 560928

C: 53 M: 78 Y: 71 K: 77

C: 31 M: 44 Y: 61 K: 5

C: 100 M: 100 Y: 100 K: 100

R: 47 G: 16 B: 16

R: 173 G: 138 B: 106

R: 0 G: 0 B: 0

# 2f1010

# ad8a6a

# 000000

Maker Girls Illustration Colors: Clothes

C: 79 M: 84 Y: 37 K: 29

C: 78 M: 73 Y: 59 K: 77

C: 79 M: 50 Y: 0 K: 0

R: 68 G: 53 B: 91

R: 20 G: 19 B: 28

R: 58 G: 119 B: 188

# 44355b

# 14131c

# 3a77bc

C: 59 M: 33 Y: 0 K: 0

C: 82 M: 70 Y: 0 K: 0

C: 68 M: 84 Y: 40 K: 32

R: 106 G: 150 B: 207

R: 69 G: 93 B: 170

R: 83 G: 51 B: 85

# 6a96cf

# 455daa

# 533355

C: 49 M: 75 Y: 0 K: 0 R: 143 G: 91 B: 165 # 8f5ba5

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Maker Truck Colors

C: 0 M: 84 Y: 35 K: 0

C: 0 M: 0 Y: 0 K: 0

R: 240 G: 80 B: 117

R: 255 G: 255 B: 255

# f05075

# ffffff

C: 57 M: 16 Y: 2 K: 0

C: 79 M: 67 Y: 64 K: 74

R: 101 G: 179 B: 221

R: 33 G: 29 B: 30

# 65b0dd

# 211d1e

Apparel & Tool-belt Colors

C: 0 M: 84 Y: 35 K: 0

C: 0 M: 36 Y: 98 K: 0

R: 240 G: 80 B: 117

R: 251 G: 173 B: 28

# f05075

# fbad1c

C: 47 M: 0 Y: 9 K: 0

C: 80 M: 84 Y: 38 K: 30

R: 125 G: 209 B: 228

R: 65 G: 52 B: 89

# 7dd1e4

# 413459

CREATING WORKSHOP GIRLS

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MFA THESIS


111


112

WORKSHOP GIRLS PROCESS BOOK

MFA THESIS


03 Design Deliverables

DESIGN DELIVERABLES

Development

114_115

Project Guide for Teen Girls

116_123

Real Female Makers

124_131

Maker Truck

132_141

Maker Truck Worksheet

142_143

Apparel

144_149

Workshop Girls Website

150_155

113


Development

Once the design deliverables were established, the next step involved making them. Having developed a visual system that was appropriate for the nature of this project, the development stage was used to implement the language, imagery and illustration in a cohesive way across the design deliverables. All the design solutions presented here were chosen as essential pieces to help solve primarily the age gap problem and secondarily the gender gap problem in the Maker Movement. The solutions presented are all based in the information gathered through the course of the research phase of the project. More importantly, they are all backed up by data and professional perspectives on how to tackle the big issue.

114

WORKSHOP GIRLS PROCESS BOOK

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DESIGN DELIVERABLES

115


Project Guide for Teen Girls

Make It Yourself is a curated collection of maker projects in the shape of a project guide. With quick step-by-step projects directed at girls, the main objective is to help spark the girl's curiosity in the world of building & making. The guide book is presented as a series with 3 Make It Yourself Project Guides that present different activities depending on different levels of knowledge of skills and making. The first is a Beginner's Project Guide with easy maker projects that can be done at home with common household materials and tools. It's objective is to get the girls introduce to making and feeling comfortable holding tools. The second is an Intermediate's Project Guide that offers more challenging activities and expands the type of tools to be used. Finally, the Advanced Project Guide presents activities for girls who are familiar with household tools but also power tools, workshop machinery and basic knowledge of engineering. In conclusion, all books that make up the Make It Yourself Project Guide series are meant to encourage and inspire teen girls.

116

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DESIGN DELIVERABLES

117


118

WORKSHOP GIRLS PROCESS BOOK

MFA THESIS


119


120

WORKSHOP GIRLS PROCESS BOOK

MFA THESIS


DESIGN DELIVERABLES

121


122

WORKSHOP GIRLS PROCESS BOOK

MFA THESIS


DESIGN DELIVERABLES

123


Real Female Makers

Emily Pilloton from the Girls Garage once said, “You can't become what you can't see.� This statement along with findings that corroborated it during the research phase of the project only made it clear that Workshop Girls needed to step up to the challenge. Naturally, a poster series as a design deliverable was put together. The main objective of the poster series was to depict real female makers and bad*$!@ out in the world. More precisely, in the fields of building and making. This aimed to help inspire more teen girls to engage in making and also to promote the Workshop Girls brand.

124

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DESIGN DELIVERABLES

125


126

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MFA THESIS


DESIGN DELIVERABLES

127


128

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DESIGN DELIVERABLES

129


Another deliverable was put together that could address and maybe help fix the lack of female representation in the Maker Movement. A video interview was created to be viewed as a video series, where every month a female maker would be portrayed. Each video consisted of a short interview followed by a real live demo of a project the maker was currently producing or just wanted to showcase. At the end, she gives some words of encouragement to the teen girls who are at the beginning of their path in the making and building world, as well as to girls who have already started their journey.

130

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MFA THESIS


DESIGN DELIVERABLES

131


Maker Truck

Another big obstacle that stood in the way of encouraging more girls to participate in making was the lack of workspaces they could use. Accessibility was also an issue, since most girls would need to rely on a parent or other adult figure to take them to these said places. In order to address this problem, the design deliverable of a Maker Truck was put together. The Workshop Girls Maker truck helps girls connect better with their making projects and with each other. The objective is to provide short length activities and maker projects using the truck as a makerspace. This would also attempt to solve the safety concern most girls and parents have, for the truck's quick projects would be offered by qualified instructors and makers. The truck's accessibility is also an important feature, it will be present at both public and private schools, weekend events, community spaces, and near parks as well as green areas.

132

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MFA THESIS


Maker Truck

DESIGN DELIVERABLES

133


Maker Truck @joinworkshopgirls #imaworkshopgirl

134

WORKSHOP GIRLS PROCESS BOOK

MFA THESIS


DESIGN DELIVERABLES

135


Worksho Maker T

LEA

+ We + Me

+ Gla

joinw

136

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MFA THESIS


joinworkshopgirls.com

op Girls Truck

ARN MAKER SKILLS

elding chanics

assmaking

+ Carpentry + Blacksmithing + Enginering

workshopgirls.com

DESIGN DELIVERABLES

137


138

WORKSHOP GIRLS PROCESS BOOK

MFA THESIS


DESIGN DELIVERABLES

139


joinworkshopgirls.com

Worksh Maker

LEARN MAKER SKILLS + Welding

+ Carpen

+ Mechanics

+ Blacks

+ Glassmaking

+ Engine

joinworkshopgirls.com

140

WORKSHOP GIRLS PROCESS BOOK

MFA THESIS


hop Girls Truck

S

ntry

smithing

ering

m

DESIGN DELIVERABLES

141


Maker Truck Worksheet

A project worskheet was designed to be delivered during the Workshop Girls Maker Truck activities. Before the start of every workshop, the attendees will be given a print out of this worksheet. They are encouraged to read it twice, especially the safety tips, and discuss among themselves what they think about the project. The worksheet presents the same layout as the step-by-step pages of the Maker It Yourself Project Guide.

142

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MFA THESIS


DESIGN DELIVERABLES

143


Apparel

Along with the project worksheet, the design of Workshop Girl's apparel seemed essential in order to expand the brand's visual system.

144

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DESIGN DELIVERABLES

145


146

WORKSHOP GIRLS PROCESS BOOK

MFA THESIS


DESIGN DELIVERABLES

147


148

WORKSHOP GIRLS GIRL PROCESS PROCESSBOOK BOOK

MFA THESIS


DESIGN DELIVERABLES

149


Workshop Girls Website

The Workshop Girls on-line presence is mainly represented by the website. It serves as a project container in that it contains all the necessary information about the project, the brand, and the design deliverbles. The website also carries forward the brand's mission and specific messages to the public and target audience. With the intent of spreading knoweldge and providing teenage girls with better liveihoods and opportunities, the users can find and download for free pdf versions of both the Project Guide and Poster Series. Another part of the on-line presence is the Instagram account under the same name as the website, where constant updates of the project were made for people to follow. This digitial and on-line presence of the project is very important, not only to be able to reach a wider audience, but also because it's a language the target audience (the teenage girls) know very well and use it to communicate.

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Website Navigation Map: Project Container

Header: Menu

HOMEPAGE

Project Call to Action

Our Mission

Promote Maker Truck

CHANGE

EMPOWER

ENGAGE

CONTACT

Maker Movement

Insight 1 (Visual Representation)

Insight 2 (Group connection)

Contact Form

The Problem (Age Gap)

Strategy Insight 1

Strategy Insight 2

Project Credits

Poster Series

Maker Truck

My Portfolio

Video

Maker Truck Locations

The Age Gap Facts

Who We Are

Our Mission

Insight 3 (Loss of interest)

Strategy Insight 3

Project Guide for Teen Girls

Website Footer Social Media Links

DESIGN DELIVERABLES

151


152

WORKSHOP GIRLS PROCESSBOOK BOOK GIRL PROCESS

MFA THESIS


DESIGN DELIVERABLES

153


154

WORKSHOP GIRLS PROCESS BOOK

MFA THESIS


DESIGN DELIVERABLES

155


156

WORKSHOP GIRLS PROCESS BOOK

MFA THESIS


04 The Future of Workshop Girls

THE FUTURE OF WORKSHOP GIRLS

Project Conclusions

158_159

Acknowledgments

160_161

157


Project Conclusions

Developing this project was a great pleasure and honor. I've always been drawn to social causes and projects that aim to improve human condition as well as livelihoods, especially when it comes to minorities. To have engaged in this endeavour and helped empower and inspire teenage girls was a wonderful opportunity. This project comes in a timely manner, where a wave a female voices are being heard and finally have a space to express themselves and demand changes. No contribution is considered small if it's done with the objective of helping other women and girls to grow, to be respected and feel safe. I'm extremely happy to have contributed to this change, even if it was mainly by the interviewes I made with the teenage girls here in the US and back in Brazil, as well as with their parent, teachers and instructors. May this project inspire many others like its kind in the future and changes be made to the Maker Movement and other areas.

158

For those who felt attacked by the topic of this thesis project, and especially for those who told me directly “There is no gender problems in the Maker Movement or in areas that deal with building and making�, more importantly for those who believe this issues have been solved, I ask you to step away from your daily lives and go talk to a female maker. Better yet, go talk to the underprivileged female makers. The ones that faced great adversity to be who they are now.

WORKSHOP GIRLS PROCESS BOOK

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THE FUTURE OF WORKSHOP GIRLS

159


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MFA THESIS


Acknowledgments

A SPECIAL THANKS Thank you to the following individuals and organizations, this project wouldn't have come this far if it wasn't for all your help, time and patience: Aino Horishma Autodesk Girls Garage and Emily Pilloton Suz Somersall Carla Hall The Crucible Janice Peacock Oakland Mini Maker Faire UnB - Universidade de Brasília e Vanessa Carvalho de Andrade (Graduação UnB) BSB Fab Lab Casa Thomas Jefferson Asa Norte, Brasília Juli Lopez David Hake Elan Santiago Cuan Zuo Siwen and Skylar John Nettleton, Carolina de Bartolo, Phil Hamlett Wioleta Kaminska INSTRUCTORS To my instructors thank you for always pushing me to be the best designer I can be. I have come a long way since the beginning of this masters degree mostly thanks to all your guidance.

FAMILY & FRIENDS A big thank you to all who have been by my side since the beginning of this masters degree. Pai e mãe novamente digo que palavras não são suficiente para expressar minha gratidão e amor por vocês. Obrigada por me ajudarem a embarcar nessa aventura que foi São Francisco. Amo vocês. To my Irishman, thank you love for helping me to not lose my mind during these 3 years. Love you.

THE FUTURE OF WORKSHOP GIRLS

161


DESIGN CONTACT Juliana Serejo Galeotti E-mail address: juliana.s.galeotti@hotmail.com Personal Website: www.julianagaleotti.com Project Website: www.joinworkshopgirls.com Title of Work: Workshop Girls Process Book Academy of Art University 79 New Montgomery, San Francisco, CA School of Graphic Design Class: MFA Thesis Instructors: Phil Hamlett, John Nettleton, Carolina de Bartolo SPECKS Paper Stock Matte, 100lb Printing and binding by Blurb.com Creative Commons Photos by Google Images, Pexels, and Unsplash Typefaces Avenir and Caecilia LT Std Software Adobe Creative Suite, Live Surface


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