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Van Snick of Belgium defeated Laborde CUB by ippon

Kelmendi KOS leaps with joy after winning the final by ippon

Miryam Roper of Germany wildly celebrates defeating Automne Pavia of France to win the u57kgs bronze

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40

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Ebinuma JPN screams with joy after winning u66kg gold

Shohei Ono of Japan, adjusts his judogi after winning the semi-final against Van Tichelt BEL

CONTENTS 4

Page Forward

6

Individual championships

6

Day1:Wu48&Mu60kg

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19 Day2:Wu52&Mu66kg 32 Day3:Wu57&Mu73kg 44 Day4:Wu63&Mu81kg 56 Day 5: W u70, u78 M u90kg 72 Day 6: W +78 M u100, +100kg

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Naohisa Takato of Japan (blue), defends against an attack by Amartuvshin Dashdavaa of Mongolia in the u60kgs final


Summary and statistics for the individuals 88 World Championships by numbers 94 World Team Championships - Day 7 96 Rio Hall of Fame Presentations 104 IAJR 8th International Judo Research 124 Symposium and PDF Poster downloads page 129 Acknowledgements 130

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Olympic silver medallist, Gemma Gibbons GBR, lost her second contest to Viktoria Turks UKR by ippon

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Brazillian fans cheer on Maranda of Brazil during the u52kgs final

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships -Forward

After a successful edition of the Olympic Games in London 2012, where Judo marked its prominent place in the family of Olympic Sports, the 2013 Rio World Championships proved to be another featuring of our sport’s values. With some adjusted rules on testing during the entire year, with some familiar faces of well established champions but also with new, outstanding young athletes exploding on the tatami, the Rio Judo World Championships were a success, for competitors, as well as spectators attending. The competition was broadcasted live in over 150 countries. 21 countries won medals and 11 new world champions were crowned. Only three judokas succeeded in keeping their title. The team event enjoyed a lot of audience and media attention, ending the championships in style, with the Rio 2016 Coordination Commission honoring us with their presence in the stands and witnessing unforgettable moments that our sport offers. I would like to congratulate all those who were part of the Rio 2013 Judo World Championships: competitors, coaches, National Federation Presidents, organizing committee, the IJF Executive Committee and the IJF Staff. The new Olympic cycle started well for Judo and I am sure that it will continue even better providing an exciting qualification period. Judo will return to Rio in 2016 and we will ensure to have a high level, unique competition. Marius L. Vizer IJF President

IJF and SportAccord President, Marius Vizer of Romania, addresses the audience at the Hall of Fame dinner

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2013 Rio World Individual Judo Championships by Oon Yeoh

The 2013 Rio De Janeiro World Judo Championships,

their opponents or beat them on the ground rather than

previously held in the same city in 1965 and 2007,

engage in fierce grip fighting and tactical play. The fact

featured some new rules – a refinement of the rules

that there were very few instances of hansoku-make as

used in the 2011 Paris World Judo Championships.

a result of leg grabbing meant that many players had

Also, the International Judo Federation intended

adapted to the new rules.

that the combined individual and team format of the

Rio’s 2013 World Championships were significantly

championships would positively affect the sport’s future

different to those hosted in 1965. Then, the

Olympic status.

championship was solely for men and consisted of just

The three most notable rule changes were:

three weight categories and an Open category. Now it

* Shido no longer results in a score for the other player

was for men and women with seven weight categories

* Heavy grip-fighting is forbidden and breaking the

for each gender in this event and the earlier 2007

grip with two hands is a penalty * Golden Score would

championships.

continue until someone scores or a shido is given

For the second time in the history of the World

The new shido rule meant that a positive score always

Championships a team event was combined with the

outweighs the penalty. So, even if a player just has a

individuals at the Rio Worlds. While the previous dual

yuko, even if he incurs up to three shidos, he would still

event was in Paris in 2011 this combined event was

win. This made it harder for tactical players to win by

intended by the IJF to put a team event back on the

shido and thus discouraged negative play. The surer

agenda for inclusion in the Olympics reflecting the

way to win is to score against your opponent rather than

same seven day timetable. Never before had a World

to try to get your opponent penalized.

Championships lasted for seven days.

The prohibition against heavy gripping had the effect

Accordingly, five members of the International Olympic

of getting both players to come to grips faster. The few

Committee, Ching-Kuo Wu, Richard Carrion, Sergey

who still insisted on grip fighting got penalized very

Bubka, Patrick Hickey, and Tsunekazu Takeda were

quickly and at least one former world champion got

present during the championships. Three of the guests,

disqualified for being overly tactical in his play. Most

Wu, Carrion and Bubka were candidates for the IOC

players, however, fought according to the new rules and

Presidential Election at

spent their time trying to throw with both hands on their

Buenos Aires , Argentina that started a week later and

opponent rather than trying to break their grips.

where the host city for the 2020 Olympic Games was to

On paper, the new Golden Score rule meant that there

be decided. Takeda was also President of the Japanese

was a danger that many matches could go on and on

Olympic Committee that was bidding to host the 2020

for a long time. As it turned out, the exact opposite to

Olympics.

that happened. Very few matches went into Golden

A week later IJF President Marius Vizer attended the IOC

Score, and those that did ended quite fast.

Buenos Aires meeting to promote the Tokyo bid for the

Overall, the six day individual event was a very positive

2020 Games. A successful strategy that is now expected

competition with many players trying their best to throw

to see a judo team event included in the Tokyo Olympics.

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Individuals Day 1

Women’s 48kg

The top favourites in this category had to be Brazil’s 2012 London Olympics Champion Sarah Menezes, who was in Pool A and Japan’s 2011 Paris World Champion Haruna Asami, who was in Pool C. However, in Pool B was the 6th-ranked Mongolian Urantsetseg Munkhbat, who had recently beaten Menezes at the 2012 Paris Grand Slam. She could potentially ruin the Brazilian’s plans to reach the final. Meanwhile in Pool D was the 3rdranked Belgian Charline Van Snick who could get in Asami’s way.

Pool A (Sarah Menezes - BRA)

Menezes managed to top Pool A as expected but her first fight, against Kazakhstan’s Aigul Baikuleva, was not an easy one. Although Baikuleva had picked up two shidos with one minute left in the match, there was still no score on the board. It was only in the last minute that Menezes was able to score a waza-ari with a sharp kouchi-makikomi. It was a tough opening match. Her second bout, against Belgium’s Amelie Rosseneu, was relatively smoother. She first scored with an uchimata- makikomi for waza-ari and then with an impressive sasae-tsuri-komi-ashi that whirled her opponent over for a clean ippon. She used the same technique in her next match, against Turkey’s Ebru Sahin, which also scored ippon. This brought her to the top of Pool A.

Pool B (Urantsetseg Munkhbat - MGL) Menezes BRA beat Bakuleva KAZ

Mongolia’s Munkhbat won her first match against Ukraine’s Maryna Krot with a standard sankakugatame for ippon. Her second match, against Colombia’s Eblin Lucumi, was also won with a variation of the sangaku gatame that had her tying up Lucumi’s arm and ending up with Munkhbat faced down on the mat. She won her third match, against Cuba’s Maria Celia Laborde, again with a technique that started out with a sankaku entry but ended up with a clever forward roll into a hold down. She had managed to get to the top of Pool B with three different variations of sankaku.

Pool C (Haruna Asami – JPN)

Double world champion Asami cruised through Pool C quite easily, winning her first bout, against Kazakhstan’s Alexandra Podryadova, with a well-time uchimata sukashi. Next, she caught Romania’s Carmen Bogdan with a very low tai-otoshi for waza-ari followed by a hold down for waza-ari awasete-ippon. This brought her up against Cuba’s Dayaris Miestre Alvarez whom Asami beat by first countering an ouchi-gari for waza-ari, and then following up with a hold down for waza-ari- awasete-ippon. It was an impressive ride to the top of her pool. Menezes BRA beat Bakuleva KAZ

Pool D (Charline Van Snick – BEL)

Van Snick won her first match, against Dominican Republic’s Isandrina Sanchez, rather easily with a low koshi-guruma in the first 15 seconds for yuko, followed by a pin for ippon. In her next match, against Guinea-Bissau’s Taciana Lima, she again demonstrated her proficiency in transitioning to newaza by first scoring with an ouchi-gari for waza-ari and following up with an armlock for ippon. After two easy fights, she faced a tougher opponent in the form of North Korea’s Kim Sol Mi. It was a scrappy match with Van Snick winning through a hold down for ippon, which took her to the top of her pool. Like Mongolia’s Munkhbat, she had won every one of her matches by newaza. Asami JPN (white) defeated Bogdan ROU 6

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Brazilian Japanese fans celebrate Asami reaching the final

Semi-finals

In her semi-final match Menezes, who had won her last two matches with sasae-tsuri-komi-ashi, got thrown by Munkhbat with that very same technique for yuko. Menezes then ramped up the attacks but got countered for another yuko. A flurry of attacks by the Brazilian followed but time ran out on her. Munkhbat was through to the final. The other semi-final match, between Asami and Van Snick, went the full five minutes. However, Asami had managed to get a yuko with a low tai-otoshi and that was enough to win her the match.

Munkhbat MGL (blue) defeated Menezes BRA

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Maria Celia Laborde CUB (blue) defeated Ebru Sahin TUR by a wazari to win the u48kg repechage

Day 1

Women’s 48kg Bronze In her bronze medal fight, Van Snick was prepared for Laborde’s drop sode-tsuri-komigoshi, a staple amongst Cuban female players, and straight away applied an armlock for an ippon. It was an impressive win. Menezes didn’t seem particularly interested in her bronze medal fight against Kim and the match seemed headed for Golden Score when, with just two seconds left in the match, a poorly-executed drop

Van Snick of Belgium defeated Laborde CUB by ippon

seoi-nage by the North Korean allowed Menezes to counter for a spectacular ippon.

Van Snick of Belgium armlocked Laborde CUB for ippon

Van Snick of Belgium defeated Laborde CUB by ippon 8

Menezes BRA counters Kim PRK for ippon and bronze

Menezes BRA (blue) defeated Kim PRK for bronze

Van Snick of Belgium celebrates winning the bronze medal

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Final In the final match, between Asami and Munkhbat, the Japanese player looked the more assured of the two. She was, after all, a double world champion and she had beaten Munkhbat in the 2013 Paris Grand Slam. But Munkhbat surprised the crowd by executing a tomoe-nage into armlock attack, a move made famous by Brazil’s Flavio Canto, which had Asami quickly tapping. In doing so, Munkhbat became the first ever female world champion from Mongolia.

1. MUNKHBAT, Urantsetseg (MGL) 2. ASAMI, Haruna (JPN) 3. VAN SNICK, Charline (BEL) 3. MENEZES, Sarah (BRA) 5. LABORDE, Maria Celia (CUB) 5. KIM, Sol Mi (PRK)

Munkhbata MGL armlocks Haruna Asami JPN for gold medal

Urantsetseg Munkhbata MGL celebrates gold victory

Haruna Asami of Japan during the final

u48kgs category (L-R) Silver: Haruna Asami JPN, Gold: Urantsetseg Munkhbat MGL, Bronzes: Charline Van Snick BEL and Sarah Menezes BRA

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Medal Winners

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Charline Van Snick BEL 48kgs bronze

Silver: Haruna Asami JPN

Olympic gold medallist, Sarah Menezes BRA, won bronze

Gold medallist Urantsetseg Munkhbat MGL

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Individuals Day 1

Men’s 60kg

Irina Nicolae, wife of Marius Vizer, sings during the Opening Ceremony

There was a time when the lightest weight class had become more like freestyle wrestling, with most of the players diving for the legs. But due to the new rules, which forbade leg grabs, the -60kg division had grown to become one of the most exciting weight classes to watch, with some of the biggest throwers in judo belonging to that division. Yet, in Rio, four of the most dynamic -60kg players were not here. Both Uzbekhistan’s Rishod Sobirov and the Ukraine’s Georgii Zantaraia had moved up to -66kg. Russia’s Arsen Galstyan, the Olympic champion, was also missing, apparently due to injury. Olympic and double world silver medallist Hiroaki Hiraoka, the Japanese player who always seemed to be on the cusp of greatness, was not in Rio either. Their absence however didn’t make the competition any less exciting as there was plenty of action from the ones who were there.

Can Li CHN celebrates throwing Janeiro Chan Ling MAD for ippon-

Can Li CHN celebrates throwing Janeiro Chan Ling MAD for ippon

Brazilian singer “Anitta” performs at the Opening Ceremony

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Tobias Englemaier GER (blue) defeated Vae Tutkhalian BLR by ippon

Day 1

Men’s 60kg Pool A (Amiran Papinashvili - GEO) The situation left the field wide open for the Number 1 seed, Georgia’s Amiran Papinashvili, who was the top favourite in Pool A. Previously in the shadow of his rivals like Sobirov and Zantaraia, he has come out on his own winning this year’s European Championships and Moscow Grand Slam. In his first match, Papinashvili scored a wazaari by countering Turkey’s Ahmet Sahin Kaba but he had difficulty finishing off his awkward opponent who twice twisted out of Papinashvili’s hip throws. The Georgian ended up relying on groundwork, pinning his opponent for ippon. Papinashvili managed to contain Germany’s energetic Tobias Englmaier, in his next bout, defeating the German with a pair of yukos, from a hip throw and a counter.

Amiran Papinashvili GEO beat Ahmet Sahin Kaba TUR by ippon

His next opponent Kazakhstan’s Askhat Telmanov, gave him a hard time though it was clear who was the superior player. Telmanov scored first by throwing Papinashvili with an ura-nage for yuko. Papinashvili struck back with a low kosoto-gari for yuko. He followed that up with a hip throw for waza-ari an a hold-down for yuko before Telmanov managed to escape. Papinashvili then ended the match decisively with massive hip throw for ippon.

Tobias Englmaier GER beat UROZBOEV, Diyorbek Urozboev UZB by ipoon 12

Askhat Telmanov KAZ armlocks Tom Pappas AUS

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Opening Ceremony

.

Pool B (Amartuvshin Dashdavaa - MGL)

Pool B’s favourite was Mongolia’s 4th-ranked Amartuvshin Dashdavaa who made quick work of his first opponent, North Korea’s Jang Hyok Chol, by scoring a waza-ari with a counter in the first 30 seconds and then throwing Jang with a tomoe-nage for waza-ari-awasatte ippon. Next up, he beat Morocco’s Yassine Moudatir with a dramatic hadaka jime for ippon. This is a technique seldom seen in top competition. That placed Dashdavaa up against Austria’s 2008 Beijing Olympic Silver Medallist Ludwig Paischer, whom he managed to beat surprisingly easily, first side- stepping the Austrian for waza-ari and then using a hand movement to rotate him for ippon. This meant he would be meeting his teammate, the 5th-ranked Boldbataar Ganbat (ranked 5th) for top position in Pool B. They knew each other too well and had difficulty scoring against each other. In the end, Dashdavaa won by two shidos against three. Amartuvshin Dasdavaa MGL, here defending, defeated Yassine Moudatir MAR by an ippon.

Askhat Telmanov KAZ beat Can Li CHN by ippon

Yanislav Gerchev BUL throws Juho Reinvall FIN for an ippon

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Pool C (Naohisa Takato - JPN) This pool featured the up-and-coming Naohisa Takato from Japan. Ranked Men’s 2nd in the world, Takato is a former 60kg World Junior and World U17 (Cadet) Champion. He recently had a string of victories, winning gold at this year’s Tyumen World Masters and Paris Grand Slam as well as last year’s Tokyo Grand Slam, Tashkent World Cup and Moscow Grand Slam. His first match was against Hungary’s Laszlo Burjan whom he whirled over with a quick uchimata for waza-ari followed by an extended groundwork attack that allowed him to pin Burjan for ippon. Next up was Venezuela’s Javier Guedez whom he threw with kouchi for yuko followed by another pin for ippon. His first serious competition of the day came in his third bout, against Kazakhstan’s Yeldos Smetov who nearly threw him with a low, twisting morote-seoi-nage. Takato responded with a hip throw that scored yuko. It was the only score on the board at the end of a hard-fought five minutes. He was through to the semi-finals. Pool D (Kim Won-Jin - KOR) This pool featured the home favourite, Brazil’s Olympic bronze medallist Felipe Kitadai, who was ranked third. Although known for his spirited fighting style, Kitdai was clearly overwhelmed by South Korea’s Kim Won-Jin, who played a very tactical game, dominating with his left arm and leaving the Brazilian in a defensive position throughout the match. Kitadai collected two shidos before being thrown with a counter for wazaari. Kim’s next match was against Canada’s Sergio Pessoa whom he dispatched with a drop seoi-nage for ippon. Kim nearly got upset by Azerbaijan’s Orkhan Safarov who first threw him with an unexpected ouchi-gari for waza-ari and very nearly scored with an ura-nage counter. After recovering from the initial flurry of attacks, Kim proceeded to demolish him with an osoto-gari for waza-ari, followed by a seoi-nage for yuko and finally with an armlock for ippon. It was an impressive victory.

Naohisa Takato JPN beat Yeldos Smetov KAZ by a yuko on his way to the gold medal

Day 1

Laszlo Burjan HUN throws Jacob Gnahoui SEN for ippon

Naohisa Takato JPN beat Javier Guidez VEN with this hold for ippon on his way to the gold medal

Naohisa Takato JPN beat Yeldos Smetov KAZ with this yuko score on his way to the gold medal

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Won Jin Kim KOR (blue) defeated Olympic bronze medallist Felipe Kitadai BRA

Pool D (Kim Won-Jin - KOR)

This pool featured the home favourite, Brazil’s Olympic bronze medallist Felipe Kitadai, who was ranked third. Although known for his spirited fighting style, Kitdai was clearly overwhelmed by South Korea’s Kim Won-Jin, who played a very tactical game, dominating with his left arm and leaving the Brazilian in a defensive position throughout the match. Kitadai collected two shidos before being thrown with a counter for wazaari. Kim’s next match was against Canada’s Sergio Pessoa whom he dispatched with a drop seoi-nage for ippon. Kim nearly got upset by Azerbaijan’s Orkhan Safarov who first threw him with an unexpected ouchi-gari for waza-ari and very nearly scored with an ura-nage counter. After recovering from the initial flurry of attacks, Kim proceeded to demolish him with an osoto-gari for waza-ari, followed by a seoi-nage for yuko and finally with an armlock for ippon. It was an impressive victory.

Eventual bronze medallist Orkhan Safarov AZE (blue) defeated Beslan Mudranov RUS by ippon

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Day 1

NAskhat Telmanov KAZ (white) lost the u60 repercharge to Boldbaatar Ganbat MGL

Men’s 60kg Semi-finals

The semi-final match between Papinashvili and Dashdavaa was a conservative one with both players playing a tactical game. With 30 seconds left, it looked like it was going to be a match decided by penalties, with Mongolian down by three shidos against one, when the Dashdavaa pulled off a do- or-die hugging kosoto-gari that sent Papinashvili flying through the air for ppon! In the other semi-final match, Takato outclassed Kim, whom he had beaten in the 2013 Paris Grand Slam earlier, by first throwing him for waza-ari with a yoko-sutemi technique commonly associated with European players; and then ending the match with a stunning hip throw for waza-ari-awasatte ippon.

Amartuvshin Dashdavaa MGL throws Amiran Papinashvili GEO for ippon

Won Jin Kim of Korea (blue) throws Boldbaatar Ganbat of Mongolia for a wazari to win bronze

Bronze

The bronze medal match between Ganbat and Kim was a tough one filled with penalties. However, with just a minute left in the match, Kim launched Ganbat with a crowd-pleasing koshiguruma for waza-ari. In the other bronze medal match, underdog Safarov (ranked 71st) pulled off a major upset with a deftly executed uchimata into ouchi-gari combination at the edge of the mat to smash Papinashvili for a massive ippon.

Head to head; Orkhan Safarov AZE (white) defeated Amiran Papinashvili GEO for bronze

Orkhan Safarov AZE celebrates winning the bronze medal by ippon 16

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Final

The final was a scoreless match but that doesn’t mean it wasn’t exciting. Nor did it mean there were no throws involved. In fact, halfway through the match, Takato attacked with a very European-styled yokosutemi that was awarded an ippon by the referee. However, the line judges overruled it upon video playback that showed that it was in fact an overthrow. The Mongolian was given a second lease of life but before he could spring any effective attacks, Takato struck again with the very same technique. And again, it resulted in an overthrow. No score. At the end of the match, Takato was ahead on penalties (one shido against two), which meant he had won Japan the first gold medal in the men’s competition.

Final Result

1. TAKATO, Naohisa (JPN) 2. DASHDAVAA, Amartuvshin (MGL) 3. KIM, Won Jin (KOR) 3. SAFAROV, Orkhan (AZE) 5. GANBAT, Boldbaatar (MGL) 5. PAPINASHVILI, Amiran (GEO)

Naohisa Takato of Japan (blue), defends against an attack by Amartuvshin Dashdavaa of Mongolia in the u60kgs final

Naohisa Takato JPN steadily looks at his opponent before the final

Naohisa Takato (blue) defeated Amartuvshin Dashdavaa of Mongolia by a shido to win the u60kgs gold medal

u60kgs medal ceremony (L-R): Silver: Amartuvshin Dashdavaa MGL, Gold; Naoshisa Takato JPN, Bronzes: Won Jin Kim KO Orkhan Safarov AZE

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Medal Winners

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Orkhan Safarov AZE 60kgs bronze

Won Jin Kim KOR 60kgs bronze

Amartuvshin Dashdavaa MGL 60 silver medallist

Gold medallist, Naohisa Takato of Japan, weeps after receiving his u60kg gold medal

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Individuals Day 2

Women’s 52kg

The judo scene had changed considerably in the two years since the last world championships and of the medallists in the -52kg division at the 2011 Paris World Championships, only Romania’s Andreea Chitu was still ranked in the Top 5.

Pool A (Majlinda Kelmendi – KOS)

Under 52kgs eliminations: Mareen Kraeh GER (white) throws Andreea Ionas ROU for ippon

Kosovo’s Majlinda Kelmendi, the top seed and overall favourite to win the gold, was in this pool. She handily threw her first opponent, Portugal’s Joana Ramos, with her favourite uchimata for ippon. Her next match was harder and she had to rely on penalties to defeat France’s Pricilla Gneto. She was back in form for her third fight, which was won in quick fashion, countering Germany’s Mareen Kraeh with a hand throw for ippon.

52kgs eliminations: Mareen Kraeh GER holds Bundmaa Munkhbaatar MGL for wazari and eventually winning by han-soku-make (disqualifica-

Pool B (Yuki Hashimoto – JPN)

52kgs eliminations: Bundmaa Munkhbaatar MGL (blue) lost to Mareen Kraeh GER by 110 / 011 [4:55] due to hansoku-make (disqualification)

This pool had two top ranking players, Japan’s Yuki Hashimoto (4th) and Cuba’s Yanet Bermoy Acosta (5th). In her first fight, Hashimoto applied an armlock on Brazil’s Eleudis Valentim forcing her to roll onto her back, which allowed Hashimoto to then switch to a pin for ippon. In her match against Russia’s Yulia Ryzhova, Hashimoto first threw with an osoto-gari and then followed up with an osaekomi for ippon. Predictably, her next match, against Acosta, was a tough one. Acosta scored first, throwing Hashimoto with a very low seoi nage for yuko. When the Cuban attempted another drop seoi-nage, Hashimoto made full use of the attack to transition into groundwork and proceeded to pin Acosta for ippon. Hashimoto won all her preliminary round matches via newaza.

52kgsBogdan qtr-final:ROU Yanet Bermoy Acosta CUB (blue) lost to Yuki Hashimoto JPN by ippon Asami JPN (white)Under defeated

220013 LD JJUDO 13 RRIIO OW WO ORRLD UDO CCH HAAMP MPIIO ON NSSH HIIPPSS

Menezes BRA beat Bakuleva KAZ

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Pool C (Andreea Chitu – ROU) In her first match in Pool C, Romania’s Chitu threw Women’s Ukraine’s Inna Cherniak with 52kg a tai-otoshi for ippon. Both fighters were outside the mat area at the time but under the new rules, since the movement began inside the mat, the score was counted. She countered her second opponent, Italy’s Odette Giuffrida, with a well-timed tani-otoshi for ippon. She scored a yuko against Marie Muller of Luxembourg with a low seoi-nage followed by a counter against Muller’s uchimata for waza-ari. An ouchi-gari gave her another yuko before time ran out. This placed her at the top of her pool. Day 2

Marie Muller of Luxemburg (blue) throws Gill Cohen of Israel for ippon

Pool D (Erika Miranda – BRA)

This pool had two favourites, Finland’s Jaana Sundberg and Brazil’s Erika Miranda. The Finnish player ranked higher (3rd compared to Miranda’s 6th) but home ground advantage gave the Brazilian player the edge she needed to top her pool. Miranda thrilled the crowd by throwing Netherland’s Birgit Ente with a massive hip throw for ippon. Her next match, against Russia’s Natalia Kuziutina, was less exciting and was won by penalties. Miranda didn’t disappoint in her next match though, when she threw Sundberg with a crowd-pleasing koshi-guruma for ippon.

Marie Muller LUX defeated Gill Cohen ISR to reach the u52kg quarter-final

Under 52kgs quarter-final: Andreea Chitu ROU (w), here avoiding a throw, defeated Marie Muller LUX

Natalia Kuziutina RUS, here complaining about the strangle attempt that was on her mouth, lost to Erika Miranda BRA

Natalia Kuziutina RUS, here complaining about the strangle attempt that was on her mouth, lost to

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Erika Miranda BRA won the u52kg silver medal

Erika Miranda BRA won the u52kg silver medal

Yanet Bermoy Acosta of Cuba (blue) lost to Mareen Kraeh of Germany

Yanet Bermoy Acosta of Cuba (blue) lost to Mareen Kraeh of Germany

Semi-Finals

The Kelmendi vs Hashimoto semi-final was a closely fought one with both players effectively negating each other’s moves. In the end, Kelmendi edged out Hashimoto through penalties (one shido against two). The semi-final fight between Chitu and Miranda was the one the audience wanted to see. With the home crowd rooting for her, Miranda did not disappoint, attacking her Romanian opponent first with a direct-attack ura-nage which did not score and then a koshi-guruma which did. The waza-ari score for Miranda was enough for her to sail through to the final.

52kgs semi-final: Majlinda Kelmendi KOS defeated Yuki Hashimoto JPN by a penalty win.

Majlinda Kelmendi KOS, here weeping on reaching the final, defeated Yuki Hashimoto JPN by a shido

Mareen Kraeh GER happily leaves the mat followed by her coach Michael Bazinski after winning the 52kgs bronze

Bronze

It took Kraeh a little more than a minute to throw Chitu with an uchimata for ippon in the first bronze medal match. The other bronze medal fight, between Sundberg and Hashimoto, did not produce any big throws and in the end, the Japanese player won by penalties.

Mareen Kraeh of Germany (white) throws Andreaa Chitu of Romania for ippon to win the u52kgs bronze

Yanet Bermoy Acosta of Cuba (blue) lost to Mareen Kraeh of Germany

Mareen Kraeh of Germany defeated Andreea Chitu of Romania for the u52kgs bronze

Yanet Bermoy Acosta of Cuba (blue) lost to Mareen Kraeh of Germany

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Kelmendi KOS throws Maranda BRA for ippon to win the final

Final

Kelmendi and Miranda had fought three times before but the in their last two encounters (at the 2012 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix and 2011 Dusseldorf Grand Prix), it was Kelmendi who won. Miranda was in good form but even with the support of the home crowd, she could not resist Kelmendi’s sharp uchimata which took her down for waza-ari. This was followed up immediately with a tight hold that scored Kelmendi a waza-ari-awaseteippon. The home crowd showed its partisanship by booing Kelmendi who had leapt into the air following her win, the first ever World champion in any sport for Kosovo, but Miranda’s good sportsmanship in embracing Kelmendi after the bow quietened the disappointed crowd. In return, Kelmendi lifted Miranda’s arm, boxer style.

Final Results 1. KELMENDI, Majlinda (KOS) 2. MIRANDA, Erika (BRA)

Kelmendi KOS leaps with joy after winning the final by ippon

3. KRAEH, Mareen (GER) 3. HASHIMOTO, Yuki (JPN) 5. CHITU, Andreea (ROU) 5. SUNDBERG, Jaana (FIN)

Kelmendi KOS leaps with joy after winning the final by ippon

Majlinda Kelmendi KOS pats her heart after winning the final

Majlinda Kelmendi of Kosovo (white) defeated Erika Maranda of Brazil by ippon to win the u52kgs gold medal

Kelmendi KOS and her coach Kuka enjoy the moment after winning the final

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Brazillian fans cheer on Maranda of Brazil during the u52kgs final

L-R: Sergey Soloveitchik EJU, Silver: Erika Miranda BRA, Gold: Majlinda Kelmendi KOS, Bronzes: Mareen Kraeh GER and Yuki Hashimoto JPN and Patrick Hickey IOC

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Medal Winners

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Under 52kgs bronze medallist Yuki Hashimoto of Japan

Under 52kgs bronze medallist, Mareen Kraeh of Germany

Under 52kgs gold medallist, Majlinda Kelmendi of Kosovo

Under 52kgs silver medallist Erika Miranda of Brazil

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Individuals

Day 2

Men’s 66kg Day 2: Men’s -66kg

The men’s -66kg division was probably the most hotly contested of all weight classes in the 2013 World Championships with the participation of many exciting players including two former -60kg World Champions Georgii Zantaraia of the Ukraine and Rishod Sobirov of Uzbekistan who had both decided to move up a weight. Also in the running were top contenders like World Champion Masashi Ebinuma of Japan, Olympic Champion Lasha Shavdatuashvili of Georgia, and first and second seeds Tumurkhuleg Davaadorj of Mongolia and David Larose of France, respectively.

Gold medallist, Ebinuma (left) and bronze medallist Fukuoka

IJF staff L-R Elisabetta Fratini ITA, Lisa Allan GBR and Jo Crowley GBR

Georgii Zantaraia UKR during his u66kgs bronze medal match

Former World champions Daniel Lascau GER (L) and Jean Luc Rouge FRA

Professor Hosokawa of Japan, 1984 Olympic 60kgs champion

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Day 2

Men’s 66kg Pool A (Georgii Zantaraia – UKR)

Because he had just moved up a weight, Zantaraia was not highly ranked (26th) and was drawn against Davaadorj in the first round. It was a match worthy of a final but it also meant one of the two top players in the competition would be eliminated in the first round. Both men fought conservatively and mid-way through the match, the penalties were even at two shidos each. Then, the Mongolian made a mistake and carelessly stepped outside causing him to get his third shido. Zantaraia opted to ride the time out, attacking just enough to avoid getting his third shido. With just 10 seconds left on the clock, Davaadorj threw caution to the wind and rushed forward allowing Zantaraia to launch him with a hip throw for waza-ari. On paper, Zantaraia’s second fight, against Algeria’s Ahmed Mohammedi (ranked 49th) would have been a cakewalk compared to his previous match. With less than a minute to go the Algerian nearly upset Zantaraia when he threw him with a harai-goshi that was initially awarded a waza-ari before it was cancelled. Video playback showed that it was in fact an overthrow. In the end, Zantaraia won the match on penalties. Zantaraia also had a difficult time in his third match, against the unseeded Venezuelan Sergio Mattey (ranked 81st) who shocked the Ukrainian when he scored a yuko through a kosoto counter midway through the contest. That surprise score jolted Zantaraia out of his complacency and he proceeded to smash Mattey with an ura-nage for ippon. The Ukrainian’s fourth and final preliminary round match would prove to be his hardest. He was up against the tough Azerbaijani player Nijat Shikhalizada (ranked 10th). Zantaraia scored first when he countered a kosoto-gari to score waza-ari. Shikhalizada then used a hand technique to whirl Zantaraia over for a yuko. With less than a minute to go looking like he was headed for a defeat, Zantaraia came back with massive uchimata for ippon.

Seidl GER (blue) throws Soares POR for an ippon

Zantaraia UKR attacks Mohammedi ALG during their u66kg match

Outside in: Shikhalizada AZE throws Dragin FRA for an ippon

Zantaraia of Ukraine avoids a throw by Pulyaev of Russia

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Olympic champ Shavdatuashvili GEO (w) throws Choe PRK for ippon

Pool B

As tough as Pool A seemed to be, Pool B was even harder with fifth-ranked South Korean Cho Jun- Ho, Olympic Champion Shavdatuashvili and double World Champion Sobirov all vying for the top spot. In the end, it was unseeded Azamat Mukanov of Kazakhstan who came up top. Mukanov won his first fight after armlocking his Russian opponent Alim Gadanov tried a clumsy tomoe-nage. He easily defeated his next opponent, Singapore’s Joel Tseng, by throwing him with tomoe-nage for waza-ari, then sode-tsuri-komigoshi for yuko, and finally by an armlock for ippon, all within the first minute. His third fight should have been a hard one as he was up against Britain’s Colin Oates, who was having the day of his life, impressively beating Sobirov and Shavdatuashvili in earlier rounds. As it turned out, Mukanov was having an even better day, as he managed to whirl Oates over with a slick sasae-tsuri-komi-ashi for ippon within 20 seconds. That brought him up against Masaaki Fukuoka, Japan’s alternate in that division (the ranking Japanese player was Masashi Ebinuma who was in Pool C). Mukanov had lost to Fukuoka in the Asian Championships in Bangkok earlier in the year but this time around, he would prevail with another well-timed sasae-tsuri-komi-ashi for ippon. With that, the 30th-ranked Mukanov emerged as the surprise victor of Pool B.

Oates GBR defeated world champion Sobirov UZB by a yuko

Former World champion Sobirov UZB lost his first u66kg contest

Oates GBR defeated World champion Sobirov UZB by a yuko

IJF referee commisioner Juan Carlos Barcos waves no score for an Oates hold

Oates GBR defeated World champion Sobirov UZB by a yuko

Oates GBR defeated Olympic champion Shavdatuashvili GEO by an ippon

Bowles is unable to believe the ippon victory of Oates on Olympic champ. Shavdatuashvili

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Pool C

Although Pool C had France’s Larose and Mongolia’s Miyaragchaa Sanjaasuren, Japan’s Ebinuma was far and away the lead favourite. He lit up the scoreboard in his first match, against Portugal’s Sergiu Oleinic by throwing him for a yuko and a waza-ari before finishing him off with a rolling morote-seoi- nage for ippon. His second match, against Venezuela’s Ricardo Valderamma was also won with a morote-seoi-nage for ippon. Ebinuma’s third opponent, Pawel Zadgronik, was determined not to be scored upon but racked up three shidos in the process. Not content to win by penalties, Ebinuma threw Zadgronik with a driving ouchi-gari that scored ippon. His fourth match of the day was against Spain’s Sugoi Uriarte, whom he destroyed with a reverse-seoi-nage for waza-ari followed by a running uchimata for ippon. Ebinuma’s performance was definitely a crowd pleaser.

Ebinuma JPN throws Olieinc POR on his way to the u66kg gold medal

Fukuoka of Japan (white) throws Chibana of Brazil for ippon

David Larose FRA lost to Pawel Zagrodnik POL by wazari

Ebinuma JPN grips his opponent on his way to the gold medal

Pool D

The top contender in Pool D was Kazakhtan’s lead player Sergei Lim who was ranked 3rd (Mukanov was actually the alternate). However, he was eliminated in his first fight. The player who emerged top of this pool was Brazil’s Charles Chibana who was on a roll after winning the Moscow Grand Slam in July. Chibana’s first fight was against Ecuador’s Verdugo Israel, whom he defeated with a low morote- seoi-nage for ippon. That brought him up against Canada’s Patrick Gagne, whom he footswept for a waza-ari before countering with an ura-nage for ippon. Next up was Israel’s Tal Flicker whom he strangled for ippon. He impressed the crowd with his quick win against Russia’s Mikhail Pulyaev whom he threw with a deftly-executed hip-thrown into ura-nage combination that scored ippon. 28

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Mukanov KAZ tries to armlock Zantaraia UKR during the semi-final

Azamat Mukanov KAZ defeated Georgi Zantaraia UKR

Semi-finals

On paper, Zantaraia had the edge in his semi-final match against Mukanov. He was a former world champion and had far more experience in international competitions although he had just come up from a lighter weight. Mukanov proved to be the better player on that day though, nearly armlocking Zantaraia before executing a well-time uchimata-sukashi that scored waza-ari. It was enough to win him the match. Chibana had fought extremely well in the preliminary rounds and was on equally good form in his semi-final bout against Ebinuma. In fact, with the Japanese player down by a shido and only 20 seconds to go, Chibana seemed to be on his way to victory when Ebinuma attacked with a do-or-die kosoto-gari that scored waza-ari, followed by a pin for waza-ari-awasete-ippon. It was a spectacular win.

Zantaraia UKR (blue) throws Pulyaev RUS for ippon

Bronze

The crowd was in a frenzy during the first bronze medal match when it seemed like home favourite Chibana had scored an ippon against Fukuoka. Chibana had attacked with a sode-tsuri-komi-goshi which had the Japanese player falling backwards in defence. Although Fukuoka fell squarely on his back it was a soft fall and after video playback, it was decided that it merited a waza-ari. With his new lease of life Fukuoka wasted no time in attacking Chibana, first with an osoto-gari for waza-ari, followed by another osoto-gari which scored ippon. The other bronze medal match saw Pulyaev go up against Zantaraia, who had done extremely well so far given that this was a new weight class for him. With one minute left to go, it was the Russian who was ahead after nearly scoring with a seoi-nage that had Zantaraia flying through the air. Pulyaev was also leading with one shido against two when out of the blue Zantaraia launched into an uchimata that whirled the Russian over for ippon.

Zantaraia UKR leaps with joy after winning bronze medal

Zantaraia UKR throws Shikhalizada AZE for ippon

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Ebinuma of Japan attacks Mukanov of Kazakstan

Mukanov KAZ (white) attempts to armlock Ebinuma JPN

Day 2

Men’s 66kg Final

The final of the -66kg division was the stuff of drama where heroes are born. Firstly it featured an underdog in the form of Mukanov, who was previously unknown to most judo watchers. He was unseeded and had not won any major international competitions. But it was the way the match ended that had the whole stadium cheering wildly. Although he was going up against a world champion, Mukanov showed no fear and nearly scored with a counter against Ebinuma’s ouchi-gari attack. Then at the midway mark, he attacked Ebinuma with what looked like a waki-gatame throw. Ebinuma managed to slip out seemingly uninjured although he was seen nursing his left arm when the referee called matte. Mukanov followed up with the exact same technique. This time, he had Ebinuma’s right arm trapped. Ebinuma could be seen squirming in pain but he refused to submit. By the time the referee called them to stand up, Ebinuma was clearly injured. The match continued however and after a few moments of grip fighting, Mukanov struck a third time with the same attack. Ebinuma managed to stay standing but was clearly in agony. When the referee signalled for the match to continue, Ebinuma wasted no time in grabbing hold of Mukanov’s right lapel with his injured left arm and drove him backwards with an ouchi-gari that scored ippon. That had the crowd roaring in approval. If there’s anything a crowd loves more than an underdog it’s an injured player with the will to win. Ebinuma had executed the throw of the tournament and won Japan its second gold medal.

Ebinuma JPN nurses his arm after resisting an armlock in the final

Ebinuma JPN screams with joy after winning u66kg gold

Final Results 1. EBINUMA, Masashi (JPN) 2. MUKANOV, Azamat (KAZ) 3. FUKUOKA, Masaaki (JPN) 3. ZANTARAIA, Georgii (UKR) 5. CHIBANA, Charles (BRA) 5. PULYAEV, Mikhail (RUS) 66kgs medal ceremony (L-R) Silver: Azamat Mukanov KAZ, Gold: Masashi Ebinuma JPN, Bronzes: Masaaki Fukuoka JPN and Georgii Zantaraia UKR

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Medal Winners

Under 66kgs bronze Masaaki Fukuoka JPN

u66kgs bronze: Azamat Mukanov KAZ

Under 66kgs gold medallist, Masashi Ebinuma of Japan

Bronze: Georgii Zantaria UKR u66kg

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Individuals Day 3

Women’s 57kg

With Japan’s World and Olympic Champion Kaori Matsumoto having retired, the top contenders in Rio were France’s Automne Pavia, Mongolia’s Sumiya Dorjsuren, Germany’s Miryam Roper and home favourite Rafaela Silva who were seeded 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th respectively.

Pool A

Pavia’s easily won her first fight against Senegal’s Hortance Diedhiou with a tai-otoshi for ippon within the first two minutes. She also didn’t have much difficulty overcoming her Russian opponent Tatiana Kazneyuk, throwing her with an osoto-gari and ashi-barai for yuko each, before smashing her to the mat with a soto-makikomi for ippon. Her third match however, against Japan’s Anzu Yamamoto, was very scrappy with both of them putting in unconvincing attacks at the edge of the mat. In the end, Pavia won by penalties.

Pool B

Silva, the silver medallist at the last world championships in Paris, was determined to win a gold medal on home ground. She came out blazing in her first match, throwing USA’s Hana Carmichael with uchimata at the edge of the mat. The American, who was lucky to concede only a yuko, fought a defensive game and was penalized up to three shidos. In the final moments, she decided to throw caution to the win and came in with an uchimata attack that Silva rode and countered for waza-ari. Silva nearly suffered an upset when her second match opponent, Romania’s Loredana Ohai, scored with a very low, rolling uchimata for yuko. The Romanian then seemed content to kill time. With just 20 seconds left in the match, Silva salvaged the situation with a low kosoto-gari that scored waza-ari. That was a close shave for Silva who took no chances in her third match where she threw Kosovo’s Nora Gjakova with a sweeping kosoto-gari for ippon.

Yadinys Amaris COL (blue) defeated Johanna Mueller GER by an ippon in round 1 of the u57kg category

Carla Grol NED (white) throws Adel Van der Walt NZL for ippon during the u57kg eliminations

Pool C

The top favourite in this pool was Mongolia’s 2nd-seeded Dorjsuren but it was little-known Vlora Bedeti of Slovenia (ranked 76th) who came through on that day. Bedeti didn’t have it easy in her first match and had to rely on penalties to beat Canada’s Joliene Melancon. Her second match victory, against Honduras’ Cergia David, was more decisive. She first threw with an uchimata-makikomi for waza-ari followed immediately with a hold-down for waza-ari-awasete-ippon. Her third fight against Dorjsuren was won on penalties. She nearly got defeated in her fourth match, when Israel’s Camila Minakawa threw her for a waza-ari in the opening minute. Two minutes into the contest Bedeti struck back and scored waza-ari followed by a hold-down for waza-ari-awaseteippon. She was through the semi-finals. Double European champion Filzmoser AUT (white) lost her first u57kg contest to Franssen NED after returning to competition just 4 months after breaking her arm 32

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Vlora Bedeti SLO (white) defeated Camila Minakawa ISR by an ippon on her way to the u57kg bronze medal


Miryam Roper GER armlocks Kifayat Gasimova AZE into an ippon submission on her way to the u57kg bronze medal

Marti Malloy USA (blue) throws Ketleyn Quadros BRA for the first of two yukos as she advanced to the u57kg final

Pool D

The top favourite in this pool was Germany’s Roper but the confident American Marti Malloy, ranked just outside the Top 10 (she was 11th), was the one who topped the pool. In first fight, against Venezuela’s Anriquelis Barrios, Malloy took advantage of a poor attack to go into groundwork and apply a juji-gatame for ippon. Malloy was down by a shido in her second bout, against Serbia’s Jovana Rogic, when she managed to counter a yoko-sutemi to score a yuko. It was enough to win the match. Next she scored two yukos against her Brazilian opponent, Ketleyn Quadros, both times with tai- otoshi, which she probably learned from her coach, American World Champion Michael Swain. This brought her up against Roper. Malloy was down by two shidos with more than half the match gone when she surprised Roper with a sumi-gaeshi that scored ippon. This was also a favourite technique of Swain’s.

Marti Malloy of the USA (blue) threw Miryam Roper of Germany for ippon with a rolling stomach throw

Marti Malloy USA defeated Jovana Rogic SRB by a yuko on her way to the u57kg final

Roper GER defeated Gasimova AZE on her way to the u57kg bronze medal

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Semi-finals

The first half of Silva’s semi-final match against Pavia was fairly even with both players getting two shidos each. Then Pavia, who was more defensive, got her third shido. Not one to take a chance, Silva ramped up the attacks, throwing Pavia with ouchi-gari for waza-ari followed immediately with a pin. When Pavia managed to turn out of the hold-down, Silva immediately slapped on an armlock. Although both players were way outside the mat, the new rules allowed the play to go on. Perhaps inspired by Ebinuma the day earlier, Pavia refused to submit and lasted long enough for the referee to call matte. But try as she might, she could not score against Silva before time ran out. It was Brazil through to the final. Bedeti had fought well throughout the day but she was outclassed by Malloy in their semi-final match. The American first threw her with a sode-tsuri-komi-goshi for waza-ari score and then with a stick-foot kosoto-gari for yuko. These two scores were enough to win her a place in the final.

Rafaela Silva BRA (blue) attacks Automne Pavia FRA during the u63kg semi-final

Rafaela Silva BRA (blue) throws Automne Pavia FRA for a wazari that eventually secured her a place in the u63kg final

Automne Pavia FRA (white) resists an armlock attempt by eventual gold medallist, Rafaela Silva BRA during their semi-final match

66kgs medal ceremony (L-R) Silver: Azamat Mukanov KAZ, Gold: Masashi Ebinuma JPN, Bronzes: Masaaki Fukuoka JPN and Georgii Zantaraia UKR

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Vlora Bedeti SLO (blue) defeated Anju Yamamoto JPN by one shido to win the u63kg bronze

Bronze

The bronze medal match between Bedeti and Yamamoto was a scrappy one and at the end of five minutes, the Slovenian was ahead with two shidos against the Japanese player’s three. In the bronze medal match between Pavia and Roper, the French player was probably the more confident of the two as she had won in each of the four times they had fought in the past. But Roper, who was seeking revenge for her April defeat at the Budapest Europeans, managed to break Pavia’s winning streak by catching her with an opportunistic sasae-tsuri-komi-ashi that scored ippon.

Miryam Roper GER sweeps the legs from under Automne Pavia FRA to throw her for ippon and win the bronze medal

Miryam Roper of Germany wildly celebrates defeating Automne Pavia of France to win the u57kgs bronze medal

Miryam Roper of Germany wildly celebrates defeating Automne Pavia of France to win the u57kgs bronze medal

Miryam Roper of Germany gives the “thumbs up” with her coach, Michael Bazinsky, after winning the bronze medal

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Rafaela Silva of Brazil celebrates winning the u57kgs gold medal in front of her ecstatic home audience

Final

With the home crowd cheering for her, Silva was clearly not prepared to accept a silver medal. Within the first minute she swept Malloy off her feet and rolled her onto her back. The referee scored waza-ari, so Silva continued with groundwork. When the referee called matte and the line judges began to scrutinize the video playback, Silva had already started crying tears of joy. She knew she had done it. This was confirmed seconds later when the referee cancelled his earlier call and awarded Silva an ippon. Final Results 1. SILVA, Rafaela (BRA) 2. MALLOY, Marti (USA) 3. BEDETI, Vlora (SLO) 3. ROPER, Miryam (GER) 5. YAMAMOTO, Anzu (JPN) 5. PAVIA, Automne (FRA)

Rafaela Silva of Brazil (white) sweeps the legs from under Marti Malloy of the USA for ippon to win the gold medal

Rafaela Silva of Brazil celebrates winning the u57kgs gold medal in front of her ecstatic home audience

Under 57kgs medal ceremony (L-R) Silver: Marti Malloy USA, Gold: Rafaela Silva BRA, Bronzes: Viora Bedeti SLO and Miryam Roper GER

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Weeping after her gold medal victory, Rafaela Silva is comforted and photographed by her fans as she leaves the mat


2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Medal Winners

Bronze medallist, Miryam Roper of Germany, smiles broadly after receiving her u57kgs medal

Under 57kgs gold medallist, Rafaela Silva of Brazil

Under 57kgs silver medallist Marti Malloy of the USA

Under 57kgs bronze medallist: Viora Bedeti of Slovakia

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Individuals Day 3

Men’s 73kg

Rule changes dictates that at the 2013 Rio World Judo Championships each country could send a maximum of nine players for the men’s and nine for the women’s competition. In the previous World Championships in Paris, the maximum was 14 for men and 14 for women. Japan had sent two players for the -66kg division and that strategy paid off. Its top player, Masashi Ebinuma won a gold medal while the alternate, Masaaki Fukuoka, won a bronze medal. In the -73kg division, Japan also sent two players and this proved also to be a correct strategy although in an unexpected way.

Pool A

The top player in Pool A was Mongolia’s Nyam-Ochir Sainjargal who was ranked 1st. Also in this pool was Riki Nakaya, a world champion, who was now ranked 8th. The both of them were bound to clash for top position in this pool. Sainjargal defeated his first opponent, Ghana’s Emmanuel Nartey, with a drop ippon-seoi-nage for ippon but only after a surprisingly difficult first four minutes. His second bout, against North Korea’s Hong Kuk-Hyon, also provided to be difficult and Sainjargal had to rely on a penalty win. For some reason, Sainjargal had difficulty throwing his opponent from the Dominican Republic, Lwili Santana, and again had to rely on penalties to win, although in this case he was awarded ippon because Santana had incurred up to four penalties and was given a hansoku-make. This brought Sainjargal up against Nakaya, a big thrower. The two had fought two years ago at the 2011 Paris Grand Slam. That time, Nakaya won. This time, Sainjargal was to gain his revenge. A fierce battle of grips ensued with neither man coming close to a throw. With less than a minute to go and down two shidos to one, Sainjargal unleashed one of the most devastating throws of the tournament. He attacked Nakaya with osoto-gari and when Nakaya stepped out of it, Sainjargal immediately followed up with a big sweeping kosoto-gari that sent the Japanese crashing to the ground. The impact of that throw was so massive that it caused Nakaya to suffer a concussion. He lay on the ground for several minutes before being taken out in a stretcher. Nicholas Delpopolo of the USA (white) throws Hasan Vanlioglu of Turkey for ippon (10 points) to win their u73kg contest

Sainjargal MGL counters Nakaya JPN for ippon to reach the u73kg semi-final

Sainjargal MGL counters Nakaya JPN for ippon to reach the u73kg semi-final

Pool B

The top contender in Pool B was Mongolia’s former -66kg world champion Khashbaatar Tsagaanbaatar, who had moved up a weight class. Even so, he was ranked 4th, which meant Mongolia had two players in the Top 5 in this category. But it was the world silver and Olympic bronze medallist Ugo Legrand from France who would come up tops. Because there were so many players in this category, Legrand has to endure many fights to get to the top spot. His first about was against Kenya’s Isaac Kinyanjui. Legrand countered him for waza-ari and then held him down for ippon within the first minute. His second bout ended even faster, with his kosoto-gari twitch technique scoring ippon against Seychelles’ Nady Jeanne within 10 seconds. His next bout, against the wily Khashbaatar was a tactical match and Legrand had to rely on penalties to win. He also used tactical play to defeat his next opponent, Uzbekistan’s Mirali Sharipov who eventually got hansoku-make after receiving four shidos. His final bout for top position was against Kazakhstan’s Dastan Ykybayev whom he scored a yuko against with osoto-gari. 38

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Pool C

Italian coach and Sydney Olympic champion, Giuseppe Maddaloni, observes his player from the side of the mat

Top favourite in this pool was Belgium’s Dirk Van Tichelt who was ranked 2nd. The only player who could seriously stand in his way was Slovenia’s Rok Draksic, the reigning European champion, and indeed the two did meet in the quarterfinal. Along the way, he defeated Germany’s Igor Wandtke with an ippon-seoi-nage for yuko; Ecuador’s Fernando Ibanez, with penalties (hansoku-make); and the Belarusian Aliaksei Ramanchyk with two drop ippon-seoinages for waza-ari-awasete-ippon. That brought him up against Draksic who seemed determined to engage in grip fighting despite the new rules penalizing such behaviour. In the end, Draksic accumulated enough shidos to be disqualified, giving Van Tichelt his second hansoku-make win of the day.

Murat Kodzokov RUS (white) throws Andrea Regis ITA for ippon during their u73kg contest

Pool D

In this pool was Japan’s alternate Shohei Ono. Although he was ranked below his compatriot Nakaya (15th compared to 8th), the pair did meet in the 2012 Tokyo Grand Slam where Ono won convincingly. He was a rising force to watch. His unseeded status brought him up against South Korea’s double World Champion Wang Ki-Chun for his first match. To everyone’s surprise, within three minutes, Wang was given four shidos, earning him a hansoku-make disqualification. Ono made quick work of his next opponent from Cyprus, Neoklis Skouroumounis, first throwing him with a well-timed foot-sweep, then a whirling uchimata for ippon, all within a minute and a half. His next opponent, Hungary’s Miklos Unvari, showed more interest in grip fighting than attacking and earned himself a hansokumake in the process. This brought Ono up against the 3rd-ranked Dutch player Dex Elmont, a crafty fighter with good tactical skills with throwing capabilities. Their match was quite even and was one of the few in the competition that actually went into Golden Score. With two shidos and one yuko each, it was a tense situation. Elmont decided to go for broke attacking all out with a determined kosotogari that got spectacularly countered for ippon. But credit must go to the Dutch player for trying.

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Shohei Ono of Japan (blue) gets to grips with former double world champion, Ki-Chun Wang of Korea

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Semifinals

The semi-final match between Sainjargal and Legrand was a tough one and with less than a minute left, the Frenchman was down two shidos against one. Rather than going for a penalty win, Sainjargal attacked with a big uchimata which Legrand was able to ride and roll for a waza-ari score. This won him a ticket to the final. In the other semi-final match, Ono showed his class by throwing Van Tichelt with a classic osoto-gari for ippon within the first minute.

Legrand FRA (blue) countered this attack by Sainjargal MGL to roll him to the mat and score wazari to reach the u73kg final

Legrand of France celebrates reaching the u73kgs final after defeating his Mongolian opponent Sainjargal

Eventual champion, Shohei Ono of Japan, adjusts his judogi after winning the semi-final against Van Tichelt BEL

Eventual champion, Shohei Ono of Japan (blue), throws Dirk van Tichelt of Belgium for ippon

Nicholas Delpopolo of Eventual champion, Shohei Ono of Japan (blue), throws Dirk van Tichelt of Belgium for ippon

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Ykybayev KAZ (white) throws Van Tichelt BEL without score eventually losing the bronze medal contest by a wazari

Day 3

Men’s 73kg

Elmont NED counters Sainjargal MGL for a wazari during their u73kg bronze medal contest won by Elmont

Van Tichelt BEL (blue) throws Ykybayev KAZ for a wazari to eventually win the u73kg bronze medal contest

Bronze

In the first bronze medal fight, Van Tichelt was already ahead by two shidos when in the final moments he countered a desperate reverse seoi-nage attempt by Ykybayev to score waza-ari. In the other bronze medal fight, Elmont scored with a sharp ouchi-gari for yuko, then countered a sode-tsuri-komi-goshi for waza-ari against Sainjargal. He then played it safe and rode the time out for a well-earned victory.

Dex Elmont of Holland smiles broadly after winning the u73kgs bronze medal

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Day 3

Men’s 73kg Final Shohei Ono of Japan (blue) throws Ugo Legrand of France for a yuko before later throwing him for ippon

Shohei Ono of Japan (blue) throws Ugo Legrand of France for ippon (10 points) to win the u73kgs gold medal

The two finalists, Legrand and Ono had fought once before but that was three years ago at the 2010 Tokyo Grand Slam, where the Frenchman prevailed. But in getting to the final, Legrand had already fought six matches, including two against Mongolians, and was clearly worn out. Ono, who had fought five matches going into the final and who was clearly the hungrier of the two, struck first with a whirling uchimata for yuko. It would have scored higher had it not been an overthrow. At the halfway mark, Ono struck again, this time with a hane-goshi – a throw seldom seen at international level – that had Legrand airborne and flat on his back for a perfect ippon.

Shohei Ono of Japan (blue) throws Ugo Legrand of France for ippon (10 points) to win the u73kgs gold medal

Shohei Ono of Japan (blue) throws Ugo Legrand of France for ippon (10 points) to win the u73kgs gold medal

Final Results 1. ONO, Shohei (JPN) 2. LEGRAND, Ugo (FRA) 3. VAN TICHELT, Dirk (BEL) 3. ELMONT, Dex (NED) 5. SAINJARGAL, Nyam-Ochir (MGL) 5. YKYBAYEV, Dastan (KAZ) Shohei Ono of Japan (blue) throws Ugo Legrand of France for ippon (10 points) to win the u73kgs gold medal

Shohei Ono of Japan (blue) throws Ugo Legrand of France for ippon (10 points) to win the u73kgs gold medal

“Give me a kiss!” Shohei Ono of Japan (blue) confronts Ugo Legrand of France before throwing him for ippon

Shohei Ono of Japan (blue) confronts Ugo Legrand of France before throwing him for ippon

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The under 73kgs medal ceremony (L-R) Silver: Ugo Legrand FRA, Gold: Shohei Ono JPN, Bronzes: Dirk van Tichelt BEL and Dex Elmont NEDanthem

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Medal Winners

Bronze medallist Dirk Van Tichelt BEL during the u73kg medal ceremony

Under 73kg silver medallist Ugo Legrand FRA during the Japanese national

Bronze medallist Dex Elmont NED during the u73kg medal ceremony

Shohei Ono wearing his u73kgs gold medal during the Japanese national anthem

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Individuals Day 4

Women’s 63kg

The number one seed going into Rio was Israel’s Yarden Gerbi who had done well in the IJF tour circuit, most notably the recent Moscow Grand Slam in July, but had yet to add any major world title to her name. Other top contenders were the Japanese player Kana Abe, winner of the IJF World Masters in Tyumen and France’s Clarisse Agbegnenou, the reigning European champion. As with many other weight categories, the -63kg women’s division at the 2013 Rio World Championships had seen a change of guards since the 2011 World Championships in Paris and the 2012 Olympic Games in London. Many of the top players like Slovenia’s Olympic Champion Ulska Zolnir and Japan’s double World and Olympic Champion Yoshie Ueno had retired although France’s double World Champion Gevrise Emane (ranked 6th) was still competing.

Pool A: Yarden Gerbi (ISR)

Gerbi, who has a more than a passing resemblance to Spain’s World and Olympic Champion Isabel Fernandez, won her first match, against El Salvador’s Karla Catota Quijano, with a textbook uchimata for ippon. She won her next match, against Italy’s Valentina Giorgis with a classic ogoshi for ippon. Her ippon victory over Slovenia’s Tina Trstenjak, with an osoto-gaeshi turned into makikomi, brought her to the top of her pool.

Pool B: Kana Abe (JPN) Yarden Gerbi of Israel (white) throws Tina Trstenjak of Slovenia for ippon

Like many Japanese female players, Abe’s groundwork was very strong and she used this to good effect in her first match, against Sweden’s Mia Hermansson, by turning her over for a hold down that scored ippon. She footswept her next opponent, Spain’s Isabel Puche, for waza-ari before pinning her for waza-ari-awasete ippon. This brought her up against her team mate, Miki Tanaka (ranked 5th), whom she threw with tani-otoshi for waza-ari and then with uchimata sukashi for yuko. Tanaka managed to get a counter against Abe’s sasae-tsuri-komi-ashi attempt but it wasn’t enough to win the match as it scored only a yuko. It was Abe through the semi-finals.

Yarden Gerbi of Israel (white) grips Tina Trstenjak of Slovenia before throwing her for ippon

Yarden Gerbi of Israel (white) throws Karla Catota Quijano of El Salvador for ippon

Kana Abe of Japan during the eliminations on her way to winning the u63kgs bronze medal 44

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Brazillian fans enjoy the break during the Rio World Judo Championships

Pool C: Clarisse Agbegnenou (FRA)

Agbegnenou won her first match, against Morocco’s Rizlen Zouak, quite easily by taking her down with sumi-gaeshi for yuko, then pinning her for ippon. Her second match, against Portugal’s Ana Cachola, was won in quick fashion as well, first with a harai-makikomi for waza-ari and then osoto- gari for waza-ari-awasete-ippon. She also didn’t have much problem with her German opponent, Martyna Trajdos, whom she threw for ippon with a soto-makikomi. This victory meant she topped Pool C and thus raised the prospect of meeting her team mate Emane in the semi-finals.

Clarisse Agbegnenou of France (white) throws Ana Cachola of Portugal for ippon

Pool D: Gervrise Emane (FRA)

In contrast to Agbegnenou, Emane had a much more difficult time in her pool. In her first match, against Sweden’s Ann Berholm, she got thrown with a massive tani-otoshi. She was fortunate it was given only a yuko and not more. Halfway through the match, she evened the scores with a drop seoi- nage for yuko. From then on it was a scrappy battle of grips and Emane got through on a penalty win. Emane’s next two matches, against USA’s Hannah Martin and the Netherland’s 3rd-ranked Van Emden were also won by penalties. It was not a very inspiring performance by France’s double world champion.

Anicka Van Emden of Holland bares her teeth during her u63kgs bronze medal contest

Clarisse Agbegnenou FRA defeated Martyna Trajdos GER on her way to the u63kgs final

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Semi-Finals

Gerbi had shown in the earlier rounds that she was more than capable at throwing but in her semi- final match against Abe, Gerbi showed that she was just as competent on the ground. Halfway through their contest, Gerbi strangled Abe with a highly unusual strangle that involved pulling the skirt of her own jacket across the neck of her opponent and pressing down hard with her left leg. It had the Japanese player tapping and the surprised judo world naming it the Gerbi Choke. It was new against old in the other semi-final, an all-French affair, when Agbegnenou squared up against Emane. The hungrier Agbegnenou was the aggressor and within the first two minutes, Emane had racked up two shidos. Agbegnenou then went for the kill with a running osoto-gari that took the both of them off the mat before landing Emane flat on her back. Under the new rules, the throw was valid. Ippon!

Yarden Gerbi of Israel signals her pleasure at reaching the u63kgs final

Yarden Gerbi ISR (white) strangles Kana Abe JPN into submission while Abe taps wildly to reach the final

Yarden Gerbi of Israel smiles broadly at reaching the u63kgs final

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Yarden Gerbi ISR (white) strangles Kana Abe JPN into submission to reach the u63kgs final

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Bronze

Anicka van Emden NED (white) throws Kana Abe JPN for a wazari to win the u63kgs bronze medal

At 31 years old, Emane might be at the tail-end of her career but she proved in her bronze medal match that she still had plenty of throwing power. When her Slovenian opponent Tina Trestenjak rushed at her at the edge of the mat, Emane retreated only to swing into standing ippon seoi-nage for ippon. Both players were outside the mat area when it happened but that doesn’t matter under the new rules as the action began inside the mat. Interestingly, the second bronze medal match was also won with a standing ippon-seoi-nage, executed by Netherland’s Van Emden against Japan’s Abe. It only scored waza-ari but it was enough to win the match as Abe was unable to get back the score in the time left.

Gevrise Emane FRA celebrates winning the u63kg bronze medal

Anicka Van Emden Anicka Van Emden of Holland throws Martyna Trajdos of Germany for a wazari

Anicka Van Emden NED after defeating Martyna Trajdos GER to reach the u63kgs bronze medal contest

Legendary Dutch coach, Chris de Korte, congratulates Anicka Van Emden on winning her u63kgs bronze

Anicka van Emden of Holland (white) defeated Kana Abe of Japan to win the u63kgs bronze medal

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Final

The final was between two players who knew each other well. Gerbi and Agbegnenou often trained together and were apparently good friends. But that doesn’t mean they wouldn’t fight each other hard. Gerbi launched her French opponent in the opening seconds of the match with a koshi-guruma that scored yuko and then proceeded to apply the same unusual strangle that she did against Abe. It was just as effective. Actually even more so as Agbegnenou passed out before she had a chance to tap. A genuinely concerned Gerbi gracefully saved her celebrations at winning the gold until she stepped off the mat.

Yarden Gerbi ISR smiles broadly after defeating Clarisse Agbegnenou FRA with a strangle for ippon

Final Results 1. GERBI, Yarden (ISR) 2. AGBEGNENOU, Clarisse (FRA) 3. EMANE, Gevrise (FRA) 3. VAN EMDEN, Anicka (NED) 5. TRSTENJAK, Tina (SLO) 5. ABE, Kana (JPN) Gerbi ISR (white) throws Agbegnenou FRA for a wazari and then strangles her into submission to win the u63k Gold Medal Yarden Gerbi ISR accompanied by her coach Shany Hershko, leaves the mat area after winning the u63k Gold medal

63kgs medallists (L-R) Silver: Agbegnenou FRA, Gold: Gerbi ISR, Bronzes: Emane FRA and Van Emden NED

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Medal Winners

Picture Caption: Under 63kgs silver medallist: Clarisse Agbegnenou FRA

Under 63kgs bronze medallist, Clarisse Agbegnenou FRAanthem

Under 63kgs bronze medallist: Anicka Van Emden NED

Under 63kgs gold medallist, Yarden Gerbi of Israel during the Rio World Judo Championships,

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Individuals Day 4

Men’s 81kg

The men’s -81kg division had a mix of old guards and newcomers. Still competing was Russia’s World Champion Ivan Nifontov. Notable newcomers were Brazil’s Pan-American Champion Victor Penalber and Georgia’s European Champion Avtandil Tchrikishvili. Missing from the line up were South Korea’s Olympic and double World Champion Kim Jae-Bum and Germany’s Beijing Olympic Champion Ole Bischof.

Loic Pietri of France (blue) throws Suk Woong Hong of Korea for a wazari

Sergiu Toma of UAE (white) throws Aleksej Nefedov of SRB for ippon

Pool A: Loic Pietri (FRA)

Pool A was supposed to belong to the top seed Penalber but in the end, it was underdog Pietri of France (ranked 16th) who came through. Not many players would relish meeting a South Korean opponent in the first round but Pietri was unfazed, scoring with a very Korean-styled reverse seoi- nage for waza-ari against Hong Suk-Woong, followed by two counters for yuko each. It was a very creditable start to what would become the day of his life. Pietri reverted to a traditional drop ippon-seoi-nage, which scored waza-ari, to win his next match against Netherlands’ Neal Van Der Kamer. He used the very same technique to upset the home favourite Penalber, and this time he scored ippon. To top the pool, he would have to get past Russia’s Ivan Vorobev. For this fight, he used reverse-seoi-nage which scored waza-ari. He was through to the semi-finals.

Loic Pietri of France (blue) throws Suk Woong Hong of Korea for a wazari

Ivan Vorobev RUS throws Borche Tosheski MKD for a wazari on his way to the bronze medal

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Alain Schmitt of France during his pool contest with Sven Maresch GER

Pool B: Uuganbaatar Otgonbaatar (MGL)

The top player in Pool B was Japan’s newcomer Keita Nagashima who was ranked 5th, but his inexperience showed and he was eliminated in his first match. Instead, it was Mongolia’s 18th- ranked Uuganbaatar Otgonbaatar who topped the pool, showing what a judo powerhouse his country had become. Otgonbaatar is a tough fighter but not a big thrower and had to rely on penalties to defeat his first opponent, China’s Zhang Wentao. The next match was quite an even one with Otgonbaatar scoring first, against his Georgian opponent, Levan Tsiklauri, with a yoko-sutemi for yuko. Tsiklauri struck back with an osoto-gari for yuko. With just a minute left in the match, Otgonbaatar scored with an opportunistic tani-otoshi for yuko. He pinned New Zealand’s Ivica Pavlinic after his opponent tried an unsuccessful sumi-gaeshi. Otgonbaatar’s big throw of the day came in his quarterfinal match against Marcel Ott of Austria, when he countered the Austrian’s footsweep with a kosoto-gari for ippon.

Alain Schmitt of France during his pool contest with Sven Maresch GER

Pool C: Avtandili Tchrikishvili (GEO)

The 2nd-ranked Georgian Tchrikishvili totally dominated this pool. He demonstrated just how strong he was in his opening match against Aliaksandr Stsiashenka of Belarus by completely lifting his opponent off the ground – after Stsiashenka tried to execute a sacrifice technique – and executing an ouchi-gari that had both of them airborne. It was a massive ippon. Next, he launched Argentina’s Emmanuel Lucenti with a cross grip uchimata that scored ippon. A hugging kosoto-gari sent his awkward Iranian opponent, Amir Ghasemi Nejad, crashing to the ground for yet another ippon. The only player who managed to avoid being thrown by this tough Georgian was France’s Alain Schmitt, who was ranked just above Pietri at 15th. Schmitt lost by ippon however when he was penalized up to four shidos and got hansokumake.

Pool D: Ivan Nifontov (RUS)

It’s been four years since Russia’s Nifontov hit his peak, winning the World Championships in Rotterdam in 2009, but he was still a force to contend with. He defeated his first opponent, Tajikstan’s Farhod Rahimov with a strangle for ippon. His next opponent, Portugal’s Carlos Luz, was overly defensive and got a hansoku-make disqualification. He threw Belgium’s Joachim Bottieu with a waza-ari for yuko and rode the time out to top his pool.

Ivan Nifontov RUS strangles Farhod Rahimov TJK into submission

Avtandili Tchrikishvili of Georgia (white) throws Aliaksandr Stsiashenka of Belorussia for ippon

Alain Schmitt FRA (white), here defending against an attack, defeated Sven Maresch GER by a shido penalty

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Day 4

Men’s 81kg

Semi-finals

Pietri scored early with a reverse seoi-nage for yuko in his semi-final match against Otgonbaatar. A minute later, he scored another yuko with an opportunistic counter. With his eyes set on the final, Pietri fought tactically for the rest of the match and rode the time out. In the other semi-final match, Tchrikishvili’s gripping proved too strong for Nifontov who incurred two shidos before getting thrown by a hip technique for yuko. Rather than play a tactical game, Tchrikishvili continued to go after Nifontov. When an exchange of attacks caused the Russian to go to the ground, Tchrikishvili was right on top of him and eventually gained a submission by armlock. It was his fifth ippon of the day.

Loic Pietri FRA (white) celebrates defeating Uuganbaatar Otgonbaatar MGL to reach the final

Otgonbaatar MGL (blue) attacks Pietri FRA but eventually lost to the Frenchman who went on to win the gold medal

Bronze

The first bronze medal match was supposed to be an all-Russian affair pitting Vorobev against his compatriot Nifontov. But Vorobev won the match without fighting as Nifontov failed to show up, probably due to an armlock injury sustained in his fight against Tchrikishvili. In the second bronze medal fight, Schmitt scored early against Otgonbaatar with a cross-grip morote-seoi-nage for waza-ari and then played a tactical match until time ran out. His victory meant France would have a guaranteed two medals from this category as his compatriot, Pietri, was in the final.

Avatandili Tchrikishvili of Georgia defeated former World champion, Ivan Nifontov of Russia to reach the final

Alain Schmitt FRA (white) throws Uuganbaatar Otgonbaatar MGL for a wazari to win the u81kg bronze medal

Ivan Vorobov RUS throws Marcel Ott AUT for ippon to reach the bronze medal contest

Alain Schmitt FRA (white) throws Uuganbaatar Otgonbaatar MGL for a wazari to win the u81kg bronze medal

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Final

Avtandili Tchrikishvili GEO catches Loic Pietri FRA with a foot sweep during the u81kg final but eventually lost to Pietri

On paper, Pietri was the underdog. Not only was he ranked far below Tchrikishvili, he was physically nowhere as imposing as the tough Georgian. But this was his moment to shine and he was the first to attack, attempting to catch his opponent by surprise with the drop ippon-seoi-nage that had worked so well for him in his preliminary rounds. But Tchrikishvili was prepared for the attack and countered him for yuko. What the Georgian didn’t expect was Pietri’s next attack, which was a reverse-seoi-nage – a technique popular amongst the Japanese and South Korean players but rarely seen amongst Europeans. The waza-ari score put Pietri ahead. With three minutes left on the clock, Tchrikishvili piled on the pressure while Pietri played a tactical game. By the last minute of the fight, Pietri had accumulated three shidos and was in danger of getting hansokumake. Tchrikishvili continued his onslaught but Pietri managed to survive and won himself a gold medal as time ran out on the clearly frustrated Georgian.

Final Results 1. PIETRI, Loic (FRA) 2. TCHRIKISHVILI, Avtandili (GEO) 3. VOROBEV, Ivan (RUS) 3. SCHMITT, Alain (FRA) 5. NIFONTOV, Ivan (RUS) 5. OTGONBAATAR, Uuganbaatar (MGL)

Avtandili Tchrikishvili GEO (blue) lost the final to Loic Pietri FRA by a wazari

Pietri Loic of France (white) throws Avtandili Tchrikishvili of Georgia to win the u81kgs gold medal

Pietri Loic of France (white) throws Avtandili Tchrikishvili of Georgia to win the u81kgs gold medal

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Avtandili Tchrikishvili of Georgia is stunned at having lost the u81kgs final to Pietri Loic of France

Pietri Loic of France celebrates winning the u81kgs gold medal

u81kgs medal ceremony (L-R) Silver: Tchrikishvili GEO, Gold: Pietri FRA, Bronzes: Vorobev RUS and Schmitt FRA

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Medal Winners

Under 81kgs bronze medallist: Alain Schmitt FRA

Under 81kgs silver medallist: Avtandili Tchrikishvili GEO

Under 81kgs bronze medallist: Ivan Vorobev RUS

Under 81kgs gold medallist, Loic Pietri of France

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Individuals Day 5

Women’s 70kg

The women’s -70kg division saw a slate of new faces among the top ranks with the sole exception of France’s Olympic and triple World Champion Lucie Decosse who was ranked third going into the 2013 Rio World Judo Championships. Top favourite was the number one seed Kim Polling of the Netherlands, while Colombia’s Yuri Alvear was a dark horse. She was the surprise world champion in the 2009 World Championships in Rotterdam and a bronze medallist in the 2012 London Olympic Games.

Pool A: Kim Seong-yeon (KOR)

Kim Polling did well winning her first two matches by ippon but became unstuck when she met another Kim, the little-known Kim Seong-Yeon from South Korea (ranked 8th). They had fought twice before, the most recent being the 2013 Dusseldorf Grand Prix, and in both cases, South Korea’s Kim lost. But this time around, it was the South Korean who would prevail. Kim won her first match against Australia’s Sara Collins with a very low, one-handed sode-tsuri-komi- goshi for ippon. That put her up against the Mongolian player, Naranjargal Tsend Ayush, whom she threw with a very fast reverse seoi-nage followed immediately with a pin for ippon. In Kim’s next match, Polling threw her with a high-grip ouchi-gari into makikomi combination that scored a yuko and then rolled her into a hold down. Kim managed to escape though and moments later, responded with a massive kouchi-makikomi that scored waza-ari although it could have easily been an ippon. In ramping up her attacks Polling managed to score another yuko with uchimata and Kim had three shidos on the board, but it was not enough to salvage the situation and in the end, it was the South Korean who went through to the semi-finals.

Pool B: Laura Vargas Koch (GER)

Although it was another Dutch player, Linda Bolder (ranked 4th), who was the top favourite in Pool B, it was the player ranked just beneath her, Germany’s Laura Vargas Koch, who won the pool. Vargas Koch won her first bout, against Ecuador’s Vanessa Chala, with a tsuri-komi-goshi for ippon. Her next opponent, Cuba’s Onix Cortes-Aldama, was a much tougher proposition. The Cuban scored a yuko in the opening seconds and then attacked relentlessly, causing Vargas Koch to get two shidos before throwing her with a harai-makikomi that scored another yuko. With two yukos on the board, the Cuban then switched tack and began to fight defensively, trying to ride the time out. With just about 30 seconds lef, Cortes-Aldama was dangerously at three shidos when Vargas Koch hooked in with an ouchi-gari that took her down for waza-ari, followed by a pin for waza-ari-awasete-ippon. Compared to the Cuban, her next opponent, Angola’s Antonia Moreira, was an easier fight. Vargas Koch scored a waza-ari in the first minute with an ouchi-gari attack followed by a hand movement that landed the Angolan largely on her back for waza-ari. It was the soft landing that prevented it from being an ippon. Moments later, Vargas Koch ended the match with an ouchi-gari into kouchi- gake combination that smashed Moreira to the ground.

Laura Vargas Koch of Germany (white) throws Vanessa Chala of Ecuador for an ippon on her way to the final

Laura Vargas Koch GER (white) throws Onix Cortes Aldama CUB for an ippon

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Laura Vargas Koch GER (white) won her first contest against Vanessa Chala ECU by ippon on her way to the u70kg final


Yuri Alvear COL (blue) defeated Olympic champion, Lucie Decosse FRA on her way to the u70kg gold medal

Pool C: Hwang Ye-Sul (KOR)

Canada’s 2nd-ranked Kelita Zupancic, a Pan-American champion, was the top favourite here but it was another South Korean, the 11th-ranked Hwang Ye-Sul, who eventually topped the pool. Hwang won her first match, against Luxembourg’s Lynn Mossong, with penalty win. Her second match, against Zupancic looked headed the same way when in literally the very last second (with exactly one second left on the clock) Hwang countered a desperate hiza-guruma attack by Zupancic to score waza-ari. After that, a yuko win against Brazil’s Maria Portela, earned her a place in the semi-finals.

Pool D: Yuri Alvear (COL)

France’s Lucie Decosse had peaked at the 2012 London Games and was no longer in top form in Rio (since London, she had lost twice, in the 2013 Paris Grand Slam and the 2013 Tyumen World Masters, both times to Kim Polling). However, she was still a serious contender and would have probably made it to semi-final if Colombia’s World Champion Yuri Alvear did not stand in her way. Alvear had a good draw, with two byes before meeting her first opponent, Puerto Rico’s 27th-ranked Maria Perez. The Puerto Rican gave her a bit of scare though, scoring two yukos from seoi-nage and ashi-barai before succumbing to Alvear’s last-minute kosoto-gari counter which scored waza-ari. It was a close call for Alvear, who had to face Decosse next. Perhaps having been jolted by her near defeat to a relative unknown, Alvear came out fighting hard against Decosse causing the French player to get two shidos before attacking her with a rolling soto- makikomi for yuko. She continued with the hard attacks and by the end of the match, not only was Decosse had accumulated three shidos. This was not the Decosse we saw in London. 2 0 13 R I O W O RLD J UDO C H A MP I O N S H I P S

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Laura Vargas Koch of Germany (blue) defeated Seongyeon Kim of Korea with this throw for her second yuko

Kim Polling NED (white) throws Ye-Sul Hwang KOR for ippon

Kim Polling NED (white) throws Ye-Sul Hwang KOR for ippon

Laura Vargas Koch GER (blue) defeated Seongyeon Kim KOR to reach the u70kgs final

Semi-finals

In the first semi-final match, between Kim and Vargas Koch, the German player scored first. She came in with a high-grip hooking ouchi-gari. When the South Korean tried to counter with an uranage, she turned the attack into a kouchi-gari and scored yuko. Kim struck back with a kosoto-gari for yuko. Both players were even when time ran out so the match went into Golden Score. When Vargas Koch took another high grip stance, Kim decided to go for broke and went for a direct-attack ura-nage. Vargas-Koch hooked in for a kouchi-gari as she was launched into the air and landed on top. She was given a yuko and a passage to the final. Alvear threw Hwang with a soto-makikomi for waza-ari followed by a pin for yuko. The South Korean managed to wriggle out of the hold, conceding only a yuko. Alveare then attacked with a sticky-foot kosoto-gari which scored another yuko. With her eye set on the final, Alvear continued with the attacks and scored yet another yuko with a hip throw which she followed up with a pin for waza-ariawasete-ippon.

Lucie Decosse FRA (blue) defeated Maria Portela BRA to reach the bronze u70kg medal match

Bronze

In the first bronze medal match, Hwang was clearly outclassed by Polling who threw her in the opening seconds with an ura-nage that scored waza-ari followed immediately with a hold-down for waza-ari-awasete-ippon. In the other bronze medal match, it was Kim who opened up the accounts in the opening seconds, throwing Decosse with drop sode-tsuri-komi-goshi for yuko. Try as she might, Decosse was not able to get back the score and at the end of five minutes, Kim was the winner. It was a good result considering the fact that Kim was recovering from an injury and had not done much training in the lead up to the competition. Decosse meanwhile stood motionless for several moments as it dawned upon her that she would be leaving Rio without a medal on her planned retirement day from competition judo.

Lucie Decosse FRA (blue) defeated Maria Portela BRA to reach the bronze u70kg medal match

Laura Vargas Koch of Germany (blue) defeated Seongyeon Kim of Korea with this throw for her second yuko

Dutch coach, Marjolein van Unen, congratulates Kim Polling on winning the u70kg bronze medal

Judo legend, Lucie Decosse FRA, has trouble controlling her emotions after losing the bronze to Seongyeon Kim KOR

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Day 5

Women’s 70kg

Final

With a second world championship title in sight, Alvear came out blazing, throwing Vargas Koch in the opening seconds with a massive hip throw that looked like it deserved a higher score than the yuko that it received. She rectified that with her follow-up throw, another hip technique that scored ippon. Alvear was double world champion! Final Results 1. ALVEAR, Yuri (COL) 2. VARGAS KOCH, Laura (GER) 3. POLLING, Kim (NED) 3. KIM, Seongyeon (KOR) 5. HWANG, Ye-Sul (KOR) 5. DECOSSE, Lucie (FRA)

Olympic champion Robert Van De Walle BEL presented medals during the medal ceremony

Twenty three year old Laura Vargas Koch GER leaves the mat after securing the u70kg silver medal

Yuri Alvear COL (blue) throws Laura Vargas Koch GER for ippon to win the final and add the gold medal to her 2009 World title

Under 70kgs medal ceremony (L-R) Silver: Laura Vargas Koch GER, Gold: Yuri Alvear COL, Bronzes: Kim Polling NED and Seongyeon Kim KOR

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Medal Winners

Under 70kgs medal ceremony Bronze: Seongyeon Kim KOR

Under 70kgs medal ceremony Gold: Yuri Alvear COL during the Rio World Judo Championships

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Under 70kgs silver medallist, Laura Vargas Koch of Germany

Under 70kgs medal ceremony Bronze: Kim Polling NED

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Individuals

Day 5

Women’s 78kg

The women’s -78kg competition was an interesting one where none of the top seeds of each pool had managed to get through to the semi-finals. Plenty of surprises were in store, not least of which was the little-known finalist from North Korea.

Olympic silver medallist, Gemma Gibbons of Great Britain (white), throws Anar Seitimova of Kazakstan

Pool A: Marhinde Verkerk (NED)

The number one seed and the home favourite was Brazil’s Mayra Aguiar. She had done well coming in first place in both the 2013 IJF World Masters in Tyumen and the 2012 IJF World Masters in Almaty. She was also this year’s Paris Grand Slam winner. However, on that day, it was 11th-ranked Marhinde Verkerk from the Netherlands who prevented her from topping the pool. Verkerk’s first fight was against Japan’s World Junior Champion Akari Ogata. It was not an action- filled match and at the end of five minutes Ogata had accumulated three shidos while Verkerk had none. This brought Verkerk up against Canada’s Amy Cotton. The only score of the match was a yuko from a seoi-nage attack by Verkerk which Cotton tried to counter but ended up landing on her side instead. Verkerk then went up against Aguair. When the fight reached the last minute mark, it was still scoreless although they had a shido each. Then Aguair got another shido. With time running out, she attempted a desperate drop seoinage which allowed Verkerk to apply a sankaku armlock. Aguair tapped.

Olympic silver medallist, Gemma Gibbons GBR, lost her second contest to Viktoria Turks UKR by ippon

Pool B: Kaliema Antomarchi (CUB)

Olympic silver medallist, Gemma Gibbons GBR, lost her second contest to Viktoria Turks UKR by ippon

The top favourite here was France’s 4th-ranked Lucie Louette, the reigning European champion and winner of this year’s Paris Grand Slam. But she would make a shock exit in the first round. Her opponent was Cuba’s little-known Kaliema Antomarchi (ranked 70th). Midway through their match, Antomarchi attacked with an osoto-gari that Louette stopped by grabbing the Cuban’s leg. This earned her a hansokumake. Antomarchi then fought Australia’s Isabelle Kopecny, whom she threw with a clever uchimata into kouchi-gari combination for ippon. After that she fought Ukraine’s Viktoriia Turks who scored first with a tai-otoshi for waza-ari. Antomarchi struck back with a yoko-sutemi that scored a yuko. In the final minute, she managed to execute a hopping uchimata that landed Turks flat on her back for ippon.

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Olympic silver medallist Thiele GER lost to the eventual gold medallis, Sol PRK, by 2 shidos n the toughest fight during her route to the gold medal Sol PRK (w) defeated Olympic silver medallist Thiele GER by 2 shidos

atherine Roberge of Canada (blue) defeated former world champion, Audrey Tcheumeo of FranceSol PRK, by 2 shidos

Pool C: Sol Kyong (PRK)

Hungary’s 2nd-ranked Abigel Joo’s first fight was against the unknown North Korean Sol Kyong who had earlier beaten Germany’s Kirsten Thiele through penalties. With two hands gripping Joo’s right sleeve, Sol threw Joo with a sode-tsuri-komi-goshi for yuko in the opening seconds of their match. When Joo attacked with a hooking osoto-gari, Sol surprised her with a massive osoto-gaeshi that sent the Hungarian smashing to the ground for ippon. Against Japan’s Sato, Sol yet again attacked with her two-hands-on-one-sleeve sode-tsuri-komi-goshi which scored yuko. Sato evened up the scores with a kosoto-gari for yuko. Then Sol threw with her trademark two-on-one sode-tsuri-komi-goshi once more, this time scoring waza-ari. That was enough to win her the match and a place in the semi-finals.

Pool D: Catherine Roberge (CAN)

Pool D’s top seed was France’s Audrey Tchemeou. Although she had not had any major victories of late, she was ranked 3rd and as a former world champion, she was the favourite. But this pool would also see an upset, this time through Canada’s Catherine Roberge. Roberge’s first fight was against the Dutch player Iris Lemmen, whom she threw with tani-otoshi for waza-ari. Spain’s Marta Tort Merino scored first with a tai-otoshi for yuko but Roberge won the match with another tani-otoshi for waza-ari. Roberge had a tough time in her match against Tchemeou and was down by two shidos, with less than a minute to go, when a standing armlock attempt by the French player ended up with both players on the ground and Roberge on top. She proceeded to pin Tchemeou for ippon.

MGL with the help of her fansRuika Sato JPN (w) defeated Munkhtuya Battulga

Catherine Roberge of Canada (blue) threw former world champion, Audrey Tcheumeo of France, for ippon

atherine Roberge of Canada cannot contain her excitement after reaching the semi-final

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Semi Finals

Recently resigned President of the All Japan Judo Association, Haruki Uemura, is welcomed by IJF Secretary Jean-Luc Rouge

The semi-final match between Verkerk and Antomarchi was decided by a yuko score from a seoi- nage by the Dutch player. Try as she might, the Cuban player could not get a score before time ran out. Sol, who had earlier thrown two opponents with her unusual two-hands-on-one-sleeve sode-tsurikomi-goshi, did that same technique on Roberge in their semi-final match. Not only did she do it from a standing position, she even somersaulted in the air to ensure it would end in an ippon. It was a crowdpleaser.

Audrey Tcheumeo FRA (white) narrowly defeated Kaliema Antomarchi CUB by a yuko to win the bronze medal.

Legendary Dutch coach, Chris de Korte, coaches Marhinde Verkerk during the u78kg semi-final

Bronze

Home favourite Aguair didn’t disappoint the crowd when she won her bronze medal match by throwing Roberge with a well-time tai-otoshi that spun the Canadian flat onto her back for ippon. In the other bronze medal fight, after scoring yuko with a kouchi-gari early on, played a tactical match against Antomarchi and only conceded one shido before time was up. The bronze medal was hers.

Mayra Aguiar BRA (white) throws Catherine Roberge CAN for ippon to win the u78kg bronze medal

Marhinde Verkerk and Dutch fans after winning the silver medal Former World champion, Audrey Tcheumeo of France celebrates winning the u78kgs bronze medal

Mayra Aguiar BRA (white) throws Catherine Roberge CAN for ippon to win the u78kg bronze medal

World Ju-jitsu champion, Vincent Parisi FRA, interviews u78kgs bronze medallist Audrey Tcheumeo for French TV

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Final

In the final, Verkerk was the aggressor. Sol was down by two shidos when she attacked with an unexpected reverse seoi-nage that scored waza-ari. It was a score too big for Verkerk to get back and for the first time in the competition, a true underdog had become world champion. 1. SOL, Kyong (PRK) 2. VERKERK, Marhinde (NED) 3. AGUIAR, Mayra (BRA) 3. TCHEUMEO, Audrey (FRA) 5. ROBERGE, Catherine (CAN) 5. ANTOMARCHI, Kaliema (CUB)

Kyong Sol PRK defeated former World champion, Marhinde Verkerk NED for the u78kgs gold medal

Gold medallist at u78kgs, Kyong Sol PRK, weeps during the medal ceremony

Marhinde Verkerk of Holland shows her silver medal accompanied by the President of the Dutch Judo Federation, Jos Hell

Under 78kgs medal ceremony (L-R) Silver: Verkerk NED, Gold: Sol PRK, Bronzes: Aguiiar BRA and Tcheumeo FRA

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Kyong Sol PRK defeated former World champion, Marhinde Verkerk NED for the u78kgs gold medal

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Medal Winners

u78kgs bronze medallist Audrey Tcheumeo FRA

u78kgs Silver medallist, 2009 World champion Marhinde Verkerk NED

Under 78kgs bronze medallist, Mayra Aguiiar of Brazil

Under 78kgs gold medallist, Kyong Sol of the Peoples Republic of Korea

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Individuals

Day 5

Men’s -90kg

At world level competitions it’s very rare that things go according to expectations. You have top seeded players spread across four pools but there is almost always an upset and sometimes even top seeds get knocked out in the first round. But in the Men’s -90kg division, all the favourites topped their pools.

Pool A: Varlam Liparteliani (GEO)

Although he has yet to win a world or Olympic title, Georgia’s Varlam Liparteliani is one of the most feared fighters in his category. He got through his pool rather easily, defeating France’s Ludovic Gobert with uchimata for waza-ari, Germany’s Marc Odenthal with haraigoshi for ippon, and Sweden’s Joakim Dvarby through hansoku-make (the Swede was overly defensive).

Pool B: Kirill Denisov (RUS)

Russia’s reigning European Champion Kirill Denisov also did not have much difficulty getting through his pool, defeating all his opponents by ippon. First, he obtained a submission from USA’s Colton Brown through a standing armlock – something that rarely happens in top competition. Then he threw for ippon, Switerland’s Ciril Grossklaus with a superbly-timed kouchi-gari, just as Grossklaus was attempting a footsweep. In his third match, against old rival Lee Kyu-Won of South Korea (who had defeated him in the final of the 2009 Rotterdam World Championships), Denisov proved that his earlier ashi-waza was no fluke by throwing Lee with a doublestab ashi-waza for ippon. First he attacked with kosotogari and when Lee retreated, he swept him for ippon. He also used ashi-waza in his fight against Portugal’s Celio Dias whom he threw with kosoto-gari for ippon.

Olympic silver medallist, Gemma Gibbons GBR, lost her second contest to Viktoria Turks UKR by ippon

Ilias Iliadis of Greece throws Joakim Dvarby of Sweden for an ippon in the u90kg division 66

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Olympic silver medallist, Gemma Gibbons GBR, lost her second contest to Viktoria Turks UKR by ippon


Former Olympic and World champion, Ilias Iliadis of Greece (white) throws Karolis Bauza of Lithuania Karolis Bauza of Lithuania (blue) throws Islam Bozbayev of Kazakstan for ippon

slam Bozbayev KAZ (white) throws Popol Misenga COD for ippon

Pool C: Asley Gonzalez (CUB)

The Cuban men’s team tends to stand in the shadows of their much stronger women’s team. However, among its members is Asley Gonzalez whose drop morote-seoi-nage is arguably the best in the world today. He used it to devastating effect against his opponents. In his first match, he sent Serbia’s Aleksandar Kukolj flying through the air with it. For his second match, against South Korea’s Gwak Dong Han, he had to use a combination attack. As the South Korean stepped off his drop morote-seoi-nage, Gonzalez swept his far back foot with kosoto-gari that had the Gwak landing flat on back. His third opponent, Hungary’s Krisztian Toth, was wary of the morote-seoi-nage but gpt caught when Gonzalez came in with a seoi-otoshi that scored waza-ari.

Pool D: Ilias Iliadis (GRE)

If there was a crowd favourite, it would have to be Greece’s Olympic and double World Champion Iliadis, a big thrower with plenty of personal charm. He began his campaign scoring ippon by side- stepping Slovakia’s Milan Randl’s kosoto-gari and landing on top of him. In his second fight, he threw Dutch World Champion Guillaume Elmont with a tsuri-komi-goshi for waza-ari. His third match was won by hansoku-make when his opponent, Kyrgyzstan’s Chingiz Mamedov stopped a hip throw attack with his left hand. Everyone was still waiting for Iliadis to execute a big throw and he didn’t disappoint in his fourth match, against Lithuania’s Karolis Bauza, whom he launched with a massive uchimata that had the crowd roaring. He was through to what would probably be the most exciting semi-finals in the championships, with all top seeds fighting.

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World number one, Varlam Liparteliani of Georgia, celebrates winning the u90kgs semi-final

Asley Gonzalez CUB celebrates reaching the final after defeating Ilias Iliadis GRE, in the background

Semi-finals

Varlam Liparteliani of Georgia, attacks Krill Denisov of Russia during the u90kgs semi-final

Although the first semi-final fight, between Liparteliani and Denisov, did not produce any scores, it was an exciting match nonetheless with both men taking their grips and attempting to throw the other. They each other well, having fought many times before. Denisov had won in five of their seven previous encounters but in Rio, it was Liparteliani who would emerge victor though it was through a penalty win. The other semi-final match also did not produce any score after five minutes of play. Iliadis was the experienced fighter with many major titles in his belt. Gonzalez was the hungry newcomer, yet to get his first world-level title. In the Golden Score portion of their fight, it was the Cuban who emerged victor, dispensing with his usual morote-seoi-nage and instead adopting a crossgrip drop sode-tsuri-komi-goshi. It only scored yuko but that was enough to win him a place in the final.

World number one, Varlam Liparteliani of Georgia, celebrates winning the u90kgs semi-final

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Ilias Iliadis GRE defeated Joakim Dvarby SWE by an ippon to win the u90kg bronze medal

Bronze

Although he had failed to make it to the final, Iliadis was determined not to leave Rio without a medal. In his bronze medal fight against Dvarby, he showed total commitment in his double-sleeve sode-tsurikomi-goshi by executing a somersault to ensure a score. He got yuko as the Swede managed to land on his side. In the last minute of their match, Dvarby went for broke and attacked with a big hugging kosoto-gari which Iliadis countered with a crowdpleasing hip throw worthy of two ippons. Denisov, who had been throwing all of his preliminary round opponents all day with ashi-waza, was back in form after his semi-final defeat. He made short work of Toth, throwing the Hungarian with a classic twitch kosoto-gari for ippon within 30 seconds.

Ilias Iliadis GRE defeated Joakim Dvarby SWE by an ippon to win the u90kg bronze medal

Kirill Denisov of Russia (blue) throws Krisztian Toth of Hungary for ippon

Ilias Iliadis GRE defeated Joakim Dvarby SWE by an ippon to win the u90kg bronze medal

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Day 5

Men’s -90kg

Asley Gonzalez of Cuba screams with joy after winning the u90kgs gold medal

Final

Just as the semi-final match between Liparteliani and Denisov was a nail-biting affair despite no score on the board, the final between Liparteliani and Gonzalez was equally tense despite no throws being successfully executed. In the end, it was decided by penalties with the Cuban ahead by one shido against two as he had attacked more, quite often just before the Georgian could establish his favourite grip. It was a largely a tactical match but an exciting one nonetheless. Final Results 1. GONZALEZ, Asley (CUB) 2. LIPARTELIANI, Varlam (GEO) 3. ILIADIS, Ilias (GRE) 3. DENISOV, Kirill (RUS) 5. DVARBY, Joakim (SWE) 5. TOTH, Krisztian (HUN)

Asley Gonzalez of Cuba (blue) defeated Varlam Liparteliani of Georgia to win the u90kgs gold medal

Asley Gonzalez CUB consoles Varlam Liparteliani GEO after defeating him for the u90kg gold medal

Asley Gonzalez of Cuba (blue), here under attack, defeated Varlam Liparteliani of Georgia to win the u90k Gold

Under 90kgs medal ceremony (L-R) Silver: Liparteliani GEO, Gold: Gonzalez CUB, Bronzes: Denisov RU

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Medal Winners

Under 90kgs bronze medallist and former Olympic and World champion, Ilias Iliadis of Greece

Under 90kgs gold medallist, Asley Gonzalez of Cuba at the Rio World Judo Championships

Under 90kgs silver medallist: Varlam Liparteliani GEO during the Rio World Judo Championships

u90kgs Bronze: Kirill Denisov RUS during the Rio World Judo Championships

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Individuals Day 6

Women’s +78kg

Although home favourite Maria Suelen Altheman of Brazil was the top seed in the women’s +78kg division, the top favourite was Cuba’s Idalys Ortiz, the 2012 London Games champion. None of the other +78kg medallists from London was in Rio: Japan’s Mika Sugimoto, China’s Wen Tong and Great Britain’s multi-medalled Karina Bryant, who had recently retired, were all missing.

IJF Referee Director, Jan Snijders NED (L) and Head Referee Director, Juan Carlos Barcos ESP, at the Rio World Championships

Pool A: Maria Suelen Altheman (BRA)

Altheman outpowered her first opponent, Kazakhstan’s Gulzhan Issanova, causing her to get hansoku-make from four shidos. She changed tack for her second match and threw her South Korean opponent, Kim Eun-Kyeong, with an osoto-makikomi that scored yuko and followed that up with a pin for ippon. She was through to the semifinals.

Pool B: Emilie Andeol (FRA)

The favourite in this pool was Turkey’s 5th-ranked Belkis Zehra Kaya but there was also France’s 6th- ranked Emilie Andeol who was a serious contender for the top spot in this pool. Andeol threw Argentina’s Samantha Da Cunha in the opening seconds of their match with an impressive standing sode-tsuri-komi-goshi that scored waza-ari. This was quickly followed up with a pin for waza-ari- awasatte-ippon. That brought her up against Bosnia-Herzegovina’s Larisa Ceric (ranked 54th) who had unexpectedly beaten Kaya to get to the quarter-final. But she was no match against the very powerful Andeol and ended up with hansoku-make after accumulating four shidos.

Former World champion and double Olympic silver medallist, Neil Adams MBE, working with the IJF on rule changes

Pool C: Idalys Ortiz (CUB)

Olympic champion and top favourite, Ortiz, had no problems with her first opponent, Ecuador’s Marlin Viveros, whom she threw with an impressive standing sode-tsuri-komi-goshi for ippon within the first few seconds of their match. She had more difficulty with her next opponent, Germany’s Jasmin Kuelbs, and had to rely on a penalty win. Nevertheless, she was through to the semi-finals.

Jasmin Kuelbs of Germany (white) defeated Maryna Slutskaya of Belarus after Slutskaya received 2 penalties

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Pool D: Megumi Tachimoto (JPN)

Japan’s 3rd-ranked Megumi Tachimoto impressively won both her matches in Pool D with an ippon. She threw her Chinese opponent Jie Kang with an ouchi-gari and then proceeded to pin her for the first ippon. And for her second one, she used harai-goshi against South Korea’s Lee Jung Eun. This earned her a ticket to the semi-finals. Megumi Tachimoto JPN (blue) held Jie Kang CHN for ippon (10 points) on her way to the bronze medal

Japanese fans supporting Megumi Tachimoto during the o78kgs Quarter-Final

Kuelbs GER (b), throwing without score here, lost to the eventual gold medallist Ortiz CUB by a yuko

Olympic champion, Ortiz CUB (white) defeated Kuelbs GER by a yuko in the o78kg quarter-final

Jung Eun Lee KOR (blue) threw Megumi Tachimoto JPN and was awarded a wazari but it was removed

Jung Eun Lee KOR (blue) threw Megumi Tachimoto JPN and was awarded a wazari but it was removed

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Idalys Ortiz CUB (white) defeated Megumi Tachimoto JPN by a shido (penalty) to reach the o78kg final

Semi-finals

The fierce battle between Altheman and Andeol did not produce any scores but the crowd didn’t care as the home favourite was ahead, with one shido against two, when the bell rang. The audience roared its approval. Although both Ortiz and Tachimoto were both big throwers, their bout also produced no scores and in the end, it was the Cuban who was ahead, with one shido against two. It would be a Cuban- Brazilian final.

Maria Suelen Altheman BRA celebrates reaching the o78kgs final after defeating Emilie Andeol FRA

IJF director, Michal Vachun CZE (L) discusses judo with 1996 Olympic silver medallist and fellow director, Armen Bagdasarov UZB

A venue reception area display at the Rio World Judo Championships,

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Maria Suelen Altheman BRA celebrates reaching the o78kgs final after defeating Emilie Andeol FRA

Bronze

As if to make up for the lack of throws in her semi-final bout, in the opening seconds of her bronze medal match, Tachimoto unleashed a devastating haraigoshi which sent her opponent, Bosnia- Herzegovina’s Larisa Ceric, whirling through the air for a massive ippon. In the other bronze medal match, Lee opened up the accounts by throwing Andeol with a drop ippon-seoi-nage that scored yuko. When Andeol attempted her own drop ippon-seoi-nage, Lee managed to block it and proceeded to strangle the French player into submission.

IJF General Secretary and former French World champion, Jean Luc Rouge watches a contest during the finals

The draw for Sunday’s team competition is carried out by Vladimir Barta, left, and Daniel Lascau

Jung Eun Lee KOR (blue) throws Jasmin Keulbs GER for a yuko eventually winning by a wazari

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Day 6

Women’s +78kg

The young Brazillian fans celebrate Maria Suelen Altheman of Brazil reaching the o78kgs final

Final

With both bronze medal matches decided by ippon, anything less than that for the final of the women’s heavyweight division would have been a disappointment. As it turned out, the final was indeed decided by an ippon although not for the player the home crowd was rooting for. Ortiz showed her class by executing a well-time tsubamegaeshi against Altheman’s attempt at a footsweep. This produced a waza-ari but Ortiz proceeded to pin her opponent for waza-ari-awasete ippon. Final Results 1. ORTIZ, Idalys (CUB) 2. ALTHEMAN, Maria Suelen (BRA) 3. TACHIMOTO, Megumi (JPN) 3. LEE, Jung Eun (KOR) 5. CERIC, Larisa (BIH) 5. ANDEOL, Emilie (FRA)

Olympic gold medallist, Idalys Ortiz CUB (blue) defeated Maria Suelen Altheman BRAl by an ippon

Olympic gold mWomen’s heavyweight medallists (L-R) Silver: Altheman BRA, Gold: Ortiz CUB, Bronzes: Tachimoto JPN and Lee KOR 76

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Olympic gold medallist, Idalys Ortiz CUB celebrates defeating Maria Suelen Altheman BRA


2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Medal Winners

Women’s heavyweight bronze medallist, Megumi Tachimoto of Japan

Women’s heavyweight silver medallist, Maria Suelen Altheman of Brazil proudly showing her silver medal

Over 78kg bronze medallist, Jung Eun Lee of Korea

Women’s heavyweight gold medallist and Olympic champion, Idalys Ortiz of Cuba at the Rio World Judo Championships

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Individuals Day 6

Men’s -100kg

The men’s -100kg division saw a mix of old and new faces. Double world silver medallist Henk Grol from the Netherlands was there still trying for his first world title. And so were two big throwers who had moved up from the -90kg division: Azerbaijan’s Elkhan Mammadov and Japan’s Takashi Ono. However, one notable player missing from the line-up was Russia’s Olympic champion, Tagir Khaibulaev.

Jasmin Kuelbs of Germany (white) defeated Maryna Slutskaya of Belarus after Slutskaya received 2 penalties

IJF Referee Director, Jan Takashi Ono JPN(L)throws Snijders NED and Ramadan Darwish EGY Head Referee Director, forJuan the winning yuko ESP, Carlos Barcos at the Rio World Championships

Pool A: Elkhan Mammadov (AZE)

Mammadov, who had fought in the 2012 London Games at -90kg has been competing in his new - 100kg category throughout most of 2013 and had managed to accumulate enough points to become the No. 1 ranked player in his division. Ono, in contrast, had not done the same and was ranked 50th. They were in the same pool and were bound to meet. Mammadov had a tough first fight against Israel’s Or Sasson, conceding two yukos from seoi-nage and kouchi-gake before scoring a waza-ari in the last minute with a tremendous cross-grip sode- tsuri-komi-goshi. Perhaps stunned by his near defeat in the first round, Mammadov scored early in his next match against Spain’s David Alarza, throwing him with a yoko-sutemi for wazaari in the opening seconds. It was enough to win him the match. That brought him up against Ono, who had shown some difficulty adjusting to his new weight class. Although he won his first match by ippon, Ono’s other two fights went to time. Mammadov and Ono had fought several times before, mainly in the -90kg category although they fought each other in the 2013 Dusseldorf Grand Prix in the -100kg category. On that occasion, Ono won. However, in Rio, it was Mammadov who prevailed. After scoring a waza-ari with a very low tsuri-goshi, Mammadov decided to ride the time out. By the end of the match, he had accumulated three shidos but under the new rules, his waza-ari score meant that he was the winner.

Former World and Olympic champion, Keiji Suzuki, points at Takashi Ono after he lost the quarter-final

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Former World champion and double Olympic silver medallist, Neil Adams MBE, working with the IJF on rule changes

Kurbanov UZB (white) throws Maret FRA for a wazari

Kurbanov UZB (white) throws Maret FRA for a yuko

Pool B: Soyib Kurbanov (UZB)

The favourite in this pool was Iran’s 4th-ranked Javad Mahjoub, but it was the little-known Soyib Kurbanov (ranked 57th) from Uzbekistan who would top the pool. Kurbanov’s first bout was against Algeria’s Lyes Bouyakoub who scored first with a sumi-gaeshi for waza-ari. But Kurbanov struck back with an osoto-makikomi that scored ippon. This brought him up against Mahjoub whom Kurbanov stunned twice with counters, the first landing Mahjoub on his side for yuko and the second, on his back for ippon. After that he had to fight Latvia’s Jevgenijs Borodavko, whom he threw with osoto-makikomi followed by a pin for ippon. This brought him up against France’s Cyrille Maret who wasn’t able to stand up to Kurbanov’s unusual gripping style. He threw the French player twice with haraimakikomi (for waza-ari and yuko) before landing him flat on his back with a counter for ippon. 2 0 13 R I O W O RLD J UDO C H A MP I O N S H I P S


Groll NED (w) twists out of this attack by Peters GER

Pool C: Henk Grol (NED)

The favourite in this pool, the Netherlands’ 2nd-ranked Henk Grol, sailed through to the semi-finals as expected. He won his first match through hansoku-make after his South Korean opponent Shim Ji- Ho got four shidos. He won his second match by countering Tunisia’s Anis Ben Khaled’s uchimata Khaled with a ride-and-roll technique that scored ippon. If there was anyone who could stop Grol it would have been Germany’s Dmitri Peters, whose imposing physique made him look suited to be in the next weight category. Grol had to rely on penalties to win this one, but he was through to the semi-finals.

Peters of Germany throws Garcia of Mexico for ippon

Pool D: Lukas Krpalek (CZE)

This pool featured the up-and-coming Lukas Krpalek (ranked 3rd) from the Czech Republic. He probably had the hardest first fight among the top seeds as he had to face World Champion Maxim Rakov, who had slipped to 12th place in the rankings but who was still a force to be reckoned with. Krpalek, who is very strong on the ground, attacked Rakov with newaza the moment he had the opportunity to do so. Rakov tried to stand up to get a matte call but as did so, Krpalek straightened his arm, forcing him to tap. Krpalek also used newaza to win his next match, against Portugal’s Jorge Fonseca, but instead of an armlock he rolled him into a pin for ippon. His next opponent, the very tough Ramziddin Sayidov of Uzbekistan, took him to time but lost out as he had two shidos on the board compared to Krpalek’s one.

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Henk Grol of Holland (white) throws Lukas Krpalek of the Czech Republic for ippon with a foot sweep

Day 6

Men’s -100kg

Henk Grol of Holland (white) throws Lukas Krpalek of the Czech Republic for ippon with a foot sweep

Semi-finals

Mammadov came out blazing in his semi-final match, throwing Kurbanov with a side takedown that scored yuko. Then as Kurbanov attacked with an ouchi-gari, Mammadov countered with a hiza- guruma for waza-ari. In the other semi-final match, between Grol and Krpalek, it was the Czech player who was more aggressive. With one minute left, Grol had two shidos compared to Krpalek’s one. Perhaps to avoid getting another shido, Krpalek attacked with a weak uchimata which Grol managed to counter for ippon. A devastated Krpalek couldn’t believe what had just happened.

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Henk Grol of Holland (white) throws Lukas Krpalek of the Czech Republic for ippon with a foot sweep

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Bronze

In the first bronze medal match, Krpalek again was the aggressor and forced his opponent, Ono to get two shidos. With just 10 seconds to go, Krpalek received a shido. Ono then came in with desperate uchimata which Krpalek countered for yuko, literally seconds before the bell rang. The second bronze medal match was a really exciting one. Peters came out attacking Kurbanov with a lapel grip seoi-nage and kept attacking with this technique throughout the match. Kurbanov adopted a defensive strategy, blocking the attacks and even managed to counter it once, for a yuko score. Peters kept attacking and Kurbanov kept defending, earning a couple of shidos in the process. With 10 seconds left in the match it looked like Kurbanov’s strategy would pay off but the relentless Peters came in with one more seoi-nage attack. This time it worked and a waza-ari was scored.


Peters GER(w) strugles with Sayidov UZB before holding him for ippon

Dimitri Peters GER stretches his jaw to reduce the stress as he steps on the mat to fight Soyib Kurbanov UZB

Dimitri Peters of Germany (white) attacks Soyib Kurbanov of Uzbekistan throwing him for a wazari to win the bronze medal

Dimitri Peters of Germany (white) throws Ramziddin Sayidov of Uzbekistan Dimitri Peters of Germany (w) celebrates defeating Soyib Gurbanov of Uzbekistan for the u100kgs bronze medal

Dimitri Peters of Germany (white) attacks Soyib Kurbanov of Uzbekistan throwing him for a wazari to win the bronze medal

European champion, Lukas Krpalek CZE (blue) defeated Takashi Ono JPN to win the u100kgs bronze medal

European champion, Lukas Krpalek CZE (blue) defeated Takashi Ono JPN to win the u100kgs bronze medal

Dimitri Peters of Germany (white) attacks Soyib Kurbanov of Uzbekistan throwing him for a wazari to win the bronze medal

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Final

Elkhan Mammadov AZE (white) twists out of an attack by Henk Grol NED to eventually win the u100kgs final

In the gold medal match between Mammadov and Grol, it was the Dutch player who was more aggressive in the first half of the match. Then with about two minutes to go, Mammadov attacked with his trademark cross-grip sode-tsurikomi-goshi which only managed to knock Grol down to his front but Mammadov kept the momentum going and managed to roll Grol onto his back. This was too soft a roll to be given an ippon so it was awarded a waza-ari. This was a score too big for Grol to get back. He had just earned his third world silver medal while Mammadov got his first gold. Final Results 1. MAMMADOV, Elkhan (AZE) 2. GROL, Henk (NED) 3. KRPALEK, Lukas (CZE) 3. PETERS, Dimitri (GER) 5. ONO, Takashi (JPN) 5. KURBANOV, Soyib (UZB) Elkhan Mammadov of Azebaijan celebrates after winning the u100kgs final

Elkhan Mammadov of Azebaijan celeElkhan Mammadov of Azebaijan kisses the mat after winning the u100kgs final

Elkhan Mammadov proudly wears the Azebaijan flag after winning the u100kgs final

u100kgs medallists (L-R) Siver: Grol NED, Gold: Mammadov AZE, Bronzes: Krpalek CZE and Peters GER

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Medal Winners

Under 100kgs bronze medallist, Lukas Krpalek of the Czech Republic

Under 100kgs silver medallist, Henk Grol of Holland

Elkhan Mammadov of Azebaijan after being awarded the u100kgs gold medal

Dimitri Peters of Germany after being awarded the u100kgs bronze medal

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Individuals

Day 6

Men’s +100kg

In the Men’s +100kg category there’s only one obvious favourite and that’s France’s five-time World Champion Teddy Riner. There were other big men in the category – Brazil’s Rafael Silva, Germany’s Andreas Toelzer, Georgia’s Adam Okruashvili and not forgetting three-time World Champion Alexander Mikhaylin – however none of them was a serious threat to Riner.

Robert Zimmerman GER (white) and on top here lost to Soo-Whan Kim KOR by an ippon

Pool A: Rafael Silva (BRA)

Home favourite and No 1-ranked Silva thrilled the crowd in his opening match by throwing his opponent, Kyrgyzstan’s Iurii Kravkovetskii with an uchimata for ippon. He then smashed Japan’s Ryu Schichinohe with an osoto-makikomi for ippon to top his pool.

Soo-Whan Kim KOR (blue) throws Robert Zimmerman GER for an ippon

Pool B: Andreas Toelzer (GER)

Toelzer was the man who fought Riner in final of the last World Championships in Paris and has been known to train specifically to overcome Riner’s fighting style. He threw his first opponent, Cameroon’s Joseph Bebeze, with an uchimata for waza-ari within the first minute and then pinned him for waza-ari-awasete-ippon. Toelzer’s next opponent was Tunisia’s Faicel Jaballah, who tried to throw the German with a sumi-gaeshi but ended up getting pinned for ippon instead.

Soo-Whan Kim KOR (blue) defeated Robert Zimmerman GER by an ippon

Former World champion, Mikhaylin RUS (white) defeated Andrewartha AUS on his way to 5th place

Ryu Shichinohe of Japan throws Razaq Muhammad of Pakistan for ippon

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Rafael Silva BRA (white) throws Ryu Shichinohe JPN for ippon


Teddy Riner FRA (white) throws Aliaksandr Vakhaviak BLR for ippon on his way to the gold medal

Pool C: Teddy Riner (FRA)

Despite his ability to execute big throws, Riner has never been a showy player. He does not play to the crowd and his sole objective is to win, by penalties if necessary. As such, he does not come out blazing with attempts at crowd-pleasing throws. Instead, he bides his time, looking for the right opportunity to attack. It took him one and a half minutes to find the right moment to throw his first opponent, Aliaksandr Vakhaviak of Belarus, with an osoto-gari for ippon. It took him longer, past the midway mark, before throwing Cuba’s Oscar Brayson, also with osoto-gari for ippon.

Pool D: Adam Okruashvili (GEO)

On paper, there were two serious contenders here, Georgia’s 3rd-ranked Okruashvili and Russia’s 2012 London Games silver medallist, Mikhaylin. However, the Russian’s performance on that day showed that he was well past his prime. In Okruashvili’s first match, against Poland’s Maciej Sarnacki, he was thrown with a sasae-tsuri-komi-ashi for waza-ari. But Okruashvili struck back in style by throwing Sarnacki with an ura-nage that had the Polish player flying through the air. That brought him up against a sluggish Mikhaylin, who spent most of his time defending. He was eventually given a hansoku-make after accumulating four shidos.

Andreas Toelzer GER (white) threw and then held Joseph Bebeze CMR for ippon

Teddy Riner FRA gets to grips with Oscar Brayson CUB on his way to the gold medal

Ryu Shichinohe of Japan throws Soo-Whan Kim of South Korea for an ippon

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Toelzer GER celebrates defeating former World champion, Mikhaylin RUS to win the bronze medal

Semi-finals

The first semi-final match, between Silva and Toelzer, was mainly a tactical battle for grips. The only thing that excited the crowd was the fact that Silva might make it to the final. In the end, he did win through penalties. After the action less Silva-Toelzer match, the crowd was eager to see a big throw and Riner certainly delivered, launching Okruashvili into the air with a massive uchimata that could have easily been ippon. It was given a waza-ari but it didn’t matter as Riner quickly clamped on a hold-down that Okruashvili didn’t even try to wriggle out of.

Final

The final was what the home crowd was hoping for, a match-up between home favourite Silva and the top favourite Riner. The Frenchman dominated Silva with his favourite high, right-hand collar grip and tight, left-hand sleeve grip from the start and eventually threw him with an osoto-gari for waza-ari followed up by a pin for waza-ari-awasete-ippon. Final Results 1. RINER, Teddy (FRA) 2. SILVA, Rafael (BRA) 3. JABALLAH, Faicel (TUN) 3. TOELZER, Andreas (GER) 5. OKRUASHVILI, Adam (GEO) 5. MIKHAYLIN, Alexander (RUS)

Teddy Riner FRA throws Rafael Silva BRA for a wazari in the crowded arena

World Jujitsu champion, Vincent Parisi (left), interviews Teddy Riner for French TV

Reports by Oon Yeoh, http://www.oonyeoh.com

The medals were presented by (L-R): Jean Luc Rouge (IJF), Marius Vizer (IJF) and Paulo Wanderley (CBJ)

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Teddy Riner FRA throws Rafael Silva BRA for a wazari in the crowded arena

Andreas Toelzer of Germany lost the o100kg semi-final

Heavyweight medal ceremony (L-R) Silver: Silva BRA, Gold: Riner FRA, Bronzes: Jaballah TUN and Toelzer GER

Teddy Riner FRA poses with 2 extended fingers indicating that 2 of his 6 World titles were won in Rio

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Andreas Toelzer of Germany poses with his heavyweight bronze medal

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships Summary and statistics by Hans van Essen

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships Summary and statistics by Hans van Essen

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The Gympasium Maracanazinho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil that hosted the 2013 World Judo Championships.

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships Summary and statistics by Hans van Essen

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships by the numbers Lance Wicks.

673 Athletes 415 Men, 258 Women 123 Nations This World Championships saw 123 nations compete, 60% of the Olympic nations. 38% of the athletes were female. The medals were shared between 33 nations, 27% of the nations entered. Three new nations gained World Champions for the first time: Kosovo, Israel and Azerbaijan. Of the 5 continental unions all but Oceania gained medals, with the majority of medals going to Asia, Europe and Pan-America. Tunisia’s sole bronze medal gave Africa it’s only medal.

going to 10 Nations going to 9 Nations going to 14 Nations

: : :

14 Gold Medals 14 Silver Medals 28 Bronze Medals

Medals:

3 nations Gold for first time: Kosovo, Israel and Azerbaijan.

Medal Table:

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(3,1,3) (2,2,3) (2,0,0) (1,3,2) (1,1,0)

Japan France Cuba Brazil Mongolia

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

- Asia - Europe - Pan-America - Pan-America - Asia

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships by the numbers Lance Wicks.

Men: 1. Japan (3,0,1) - Asia 2. France (2,1,1) - Europe 3. Azerbaijan (1,0,1) - Europe 4. Cuba (1,0,0) - Pan-America 5. Georgia (0,2,0) - Europe

Women: 1. Brazil (1,2,2) - Pan-America 2. Cuba (1,0,0) - Pan-America 3. North Korea (1,0,0) - Asia 4= Israel (1,0,0) - Europe 4= Kosovo (1,0,0) - Europe

Countries

Athletes

AJU: 27 73 EJU: 42 272 JUA: 25 149 OJU: 6 25 PJC: 23 153

The Championships had 716 contests and 2,528 scores were put on the scoreboards. 924 positive scores from throws, hold-downs and submissions. 1604 penalties were incurred (Shido and Hansokumake). Although 63% of all “scores� were penalties, with the new 2013 rules the impact of the shido is greatly reduced.

Contests: Male

Total contests 437 Positive Scores 575 Penalties (incl. HS) 1031

Female

Total contests 279 Positive Scores 349 Penalties (incl. HS) 573

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Teams Day 7

Womens Teams

Day 7: IJF World Team Championships 2013 by Dr Mike Callan

The 2013 World Championships gripped Rio de Janeiro one last time as the team’s competition brought the spectacular display of judo to a close at the Maracanazinho stadium on the 7th day of the event. The exhilarated crowd saw sixteen teams of five judoka compete for the revered Senior World Teams title.

The gold medal plaque held by the Japanese Women’s team

Attention on the Judo Team Event

The IJF were pleased to welcome members of the Rio 2016 Coordination Commission, under the leadership of Dr. Carlos Arthur Nuzman, President of Rio 2016 and the IOC Coordination Commission to observe the final block of the Team Championships. The IJF continue to work hard to encourage the International Olympic Committee to accept the team Event as an additional discipline in the Olympic Games.

Preliminaries

The semi-final welcomed the pool winners Japan, Netherlands, South Korea and Brazil. Japan breezed through their two preliminary matches comfortably winning 5-0 against Russia and Kazakhstan. In almost equal fashion, the Netherlands also advanced to the semi-finals overcoming both Nigera and Cuba by 4-1. Facing Germany in their first match, Brazil satisfied the home crowd with a convincing 4-1 win which lead them to their 2nd preliminary match against France. Proving a challenging match, Brazil managed to better their French opponents with a one win lead of 3-2. Their position in the semi-final was secured. South Korea faced Brazil in the semi-final following their swift 5-0 win over Australia and a more arduous yet impressive 3-2 victory over the current World Senior Team silver medallists, China.

The judo volunteers gather together for the last time as the whole event closes

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Semi-Finals

Japan may have been disappointed with their individual action but they were unmatched in the semi-final as they whitewashed a high-quality Netherlands team 5-0. Brazil had to wait until the 5th fight before sealing their position in the final following a tantalising show down against South Korea with 2013 World Championship bronze medallist wrapping up a 3-2 win against Lee of Korea. The first team bronze medal was won by Cuba who repeated their 2012 result with a fantastic win against Korea, as newly-crowned 2013 World Championship winner Idalys Ortiz (CUB) finished the contest with a 3-2 margin. In their bronze fight against the Netherlands, France demonstrated their class with a defiant comeback after falling behind with a 2-0 score. Lucie Louette (FRA) heroically clinched the win by scoring convincingly against Iris Lemmen (NED) with a yuko from an ouchi gari, along with a second yuko and a waza-ari to mark a remarkable comeback.

(L-R): Emane, Louette, Receveaux, Payet and Agbegnenou celebrate defeating Holland 3/2

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The Final

The final proved a thrilling one as the defending champions, Japan faced the home favourites, and 2012 World Team bronze medallists, Brazil. Japan took the first win as Yuki Hashimoto (JPN) conquered Erika Miranda (BRA) for ippon. Brazil were quick to answer with newly-crowned world champion Rafael Silva (BRA) responding with a tantalising victory against Anzu Yamamoto (JPN), scoring a yuko from an osoto-otoshi that settled the win. Katherine Campos (BRA) suffered an agonising defeat against Kana Abe (JPN) as she was held down for ippon. With Japan leading 2-1, Maria Portela (BRA) ensured the match would go down to the final fight as she beat Haruka Tachimoto (JPN) on shido penalties. The 2013 World Team Champions were decided in the final fight of the match which saw World Championship silver medallist Maria Suelen Altheman (BRA) be penalised for passivity against Megumi Tachimoto (JPN). After five minutes the single shido on the scoreboard remained, proclaiming Japan’s success in defending their 2012 title.

Silva BRA, here defending, defeated Yamamoto JPN but Brazil eventually lost the final to Japan

IJF President, Marius Vizer (right), listens to Tsunekazu Takeda, President of the Japanese Olympic Committee,

The Japanese team about to bow before the final contest starts against Brazil

Tachimoto JPN (white) defeated Altheman BRA to take Japan to 3 wins against Brazil’s 2 to win the gold medal

The Brazilian team preparing for the final against the Japanese

Kana Abe of Japan (white) held Katherine Campos of Brazil for ippon

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The silver medal winning Brazilian Women’s team

L-R: IJF’s media team Tamas Zahonyi, Gabriela Sabau, Mark Pickering, Nicolas Messner IJF director Vlad Marinescu Team members, Yuki Hashimoto (left) and Anzu Yamamoto, celebrate their team winning the gold medal

Gold medal Japanese (L-R back) Tachimoto, Abe, Tashimoto, Tanaka, (Front): Hashimoto, Tachimoto and Yamamoto

“V for Victory” from the Japanese team before they receive their gold medal.

The Women’s medal winning teams of Gold: JAPAN, Silver: BRAZIL and Bronzes: CUBA and FRANCE

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Teams Day 7

Mens Teams

MEN’S TEAMS Preliminaries

The preliminary matches saw Russia, Korea, Georgia and Uzbekistan win their pools to secure their places in the semi -finals. Russia didn’t waste any time, breezing through with 5- 0 wins against Columbia and Cuba. Korea secured their semi-final match against Russia as they defeated Kazakhstan and Germany, 5-0 and 3-2 respectively. Narrowly winning both matches by 3-2, Uzbekistan triumphed against the Ukraine and Japan, to face Georgia in the semi-final, who ousted France from the tournament with a 3-2 win, prior to overcoming Mongolia 4-1.

Odenthal GER (b) defeated Echemendia CUB by a shido throw helping Germany towards the team bronze

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Wandtke GER attacks Mirali Sharipov UZB to throw him for an ippon

Odenthal GER (b) defeated Echemendia CUB by a shido throw helping Germany towards the team bronze

Semi-finals

After resounding earlier wins, Russia continued their impressive streak in their semi-final match against Korea, clinching their spot in the final with 4-1 victory. Alim Gadanov (RUS) set the pace by putting the defending champions ahead with his win against Olympic bronze medallist Jun-Ho Cho (KOR). Denis Iartcev (RUS) doubled their advantage before Olympic bronze medallist Ivan Nifontov (RUS) sealed a place in the final at the expense of Suk Woong Hong (KOR). 2013 World Championship bronze medallist Kirill Denisov (RUS) bested Dong Han Gwak (KOR) before Olympic bronze medallist Alexander Mikhaylin (RUS) suffered Russia’s first defeat against Guham Cho (KOR) as a consolation for the well beaten South Korean team. In the second semi-final, Georgia won by the same margin against Uzbekistan. Olympic bronze medallist and former World champion, Rishod Sobirov (UZB) put Uzbekistan in the lead as he defeated Olympic champion Lasha Shavdatuashvili (GEO). Nugzari Tatalashvili (GEO) levelled the score as he overcame Mirali Sharipov (UZB) before 2013 World Championship silver medallist Avtandili Tchrikishvili (GEO) edged the Georgian team ahead. Georgia’s second 2013 World Championship silver medallist Varlam Liparteliani (GEO) saw his team through to the final with a third win before Adam Okruashvili (GEO) secured win number four. With a 3-2 success against Uzbekistan, Germany fixed their bronze medal win. Rishod Sobirov (UZB) gave Uzbekistan the lead before the German team retaliated with imposing wins. With only 4 athletes, Japan claimed the second bronze medals by dominating their match against South Korea (KOR) to win 4-1.

Odenthal GER celebrates his victory over Doniyorov UZB that ensured Germany won the bronze medal

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Day 7

Mens Teams Final

The gold medal match saw Georgia’s illustrious team face the defending World Team champions, Russia. Opening the match with a win against Olympic champion Lasha Shavdatuashvili (GEO), former European champion Alim Gadanov (RUS) put Russia ahead as he threw Lasha Shavdatuashvili with a uri-nage for a yuko. Zebeda Rekhviashvili (GEO) went down to a defeat against Murat Kodzokov (RUS) as Russia doubled their lead. With a minute and a half remaining Kodzokov attacked with uchi-mata for ippon. Georgia hit back in the third fight as European silver medallist Avtandili Tchrikishvili (GEO) saw off Sirazhudin Magomedov (RUS) on shido penalties as the latter was penalised on two occasions for passivity while Tchrikishvili infringed on one occasion for the same offence. With Georgia back in the match to the disappointment of Russian coach Ezio Gamba near the mat, Varlam Liparteliani (GEO) reinforced their come back when he beat Kirill Denisov (RUS) by one penalty to two. In a repeat of the women’s final the men’s match came down to the last fight. Adam Okruashvili (GEO) faced 34-year-old, former world champion Alexander Mikhaylin. With less than 2 minutes to go Okruashvili held with kami shiho gatame to capture the gold medal for the Georgian team.

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Murat Kodzokov of Russia (white) throws Zebeda Rekhviashvili of Georgia for ippon

Okruashvili GEO celebrates defeating Mikhaylin RUS to win the Men’s team gold medal

Russian coach, Ezio Gamba screams supportively to the Russian team during the team final against Georgia

1980 Moscow Olympic champion and legendary Russian coach, Ezio Gamba of Italy (centre)

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Bronze medal Germans (L-R): Seidl, Englemaier, Odenthal, Maresch, Wandtke, Wieczerzak, Peters Toelzer

The unhappy Russian Men’s team who were awarded the silver medal during the medal ceremony

The gold medal winning Georgian Team (L-R) Zhorzholiani, Tatalashvili, Rekhviashvili, Shavdatuashvili and Tsiklauri

German team (L-R top to bottom): Wieczerzak, Peters, Toelzer, Odenthal, Seidl, Wandtke, Englemaier and Maresch

The gold medal winning Georgian Men’s team

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Georgian coach, Irakli Uznadze, is rewarded for the team’s success by being tossed high into the air 103


2013 Rio World Judo Championships

HALL OF FAME

FOREWORD It is a pleasure to see the judo family gather here in Rio ahead of the World Championships to honour our most deserving judoka on this special occasion. Rio de Janeiro is a symbolic location to stage this prestigious evening as the city will host the 2016 Olympic Games which will lead to the crowning of new judo legends to celebrate and embrace as role models. Today we have gathered to relaunch the IJF Hall of Fame and celebrate the careers and lives of some truly outstanding individuals. Our new inductees will be joining our three current members - Dr. Jigoro Kano, Anton Geesink and Charles Palmer, all of whom were integral in shaping the course of our sport. It is vitally important that we recognise and savour their talents, remember their names and reserve a special place for them to be united in the history of the IJF. These legendary names are responsible for helping to take the sport to new heights in their respective countries, achieving what many thought were unachievable feats, and their success is a testament to their character, selfdiscipline, honesty and integrity, which are all core values of our sport. Their skills and experiences will be passed on to future generations and their accomplishments will live forever in our sport’s great history. IJF and SportAccord President, Marius Vizer of Romania, addresses the audience

Judo is more than a sport. To those we induct today judo was and remains a way of life, a plentiful and fulfilling life, which has been enriched by experiences all over the world as the sport brings people together from all walks of life. Judo is an educational way of life and every hero who walks on the tatami is a role model. We aim to enrich as many lives as we can with the gift of judo and our inductees here today as well as all members of our judo family can continue to spread the positive energy and momentum of our sport. l wish you a memorable time in Rio and thank you for your continued support. Marius L Vizer IJF President

Marcel Pavel, on stage and screen, entertains the audience during a break in the Award Ceremony 104

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1986 George Kerr wearing his red and white belt for his book photo shoot

Tenth dan, George Kerr CBE of Great Britain, receives his Hall of Fame award

1988 Budokwai Display by George Kerr demonstrating Kata

George Kerr Scotland, Great Britain Edinburgh’s living legend George Kerr is one of the most decorated and respected sportsmen in the history of British sport. Kerr was awarded his 10th Dan (Judah) by the IJF for international services to judo in 2010 after a fairytale career which included European Championship honours, top-class refereeing and guiding Peter Seisenbacher to two Olympic gold medals. The Scot became president of the British Judo Association in 2001 and a year later was named as one of the inaugural members of the Scottish Sports Hall of Fame. He was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2011 New Year Honours and also received the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays with Rosette, after being named in Emperor Akihito’s November 2010 honours list.

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Franco Capelletti ITA overseeing the European Team Championships in April 2012 in Chelyabinsk, Russia.

Franco Capelletti ltaly

Franco Capelletti is one of the most lauded names in Italian judo and shares a lifetime of judo experience and knowledge as a Technical Advisor for the lJF and as Vice President of the EJU. The renowned 9th Dan (Kyudan) is also a Kata Commission Director and European Education Commissioner for the IJF and retains a strong connection to the grassroots level of the sport as President of his highly-respected club, Judo Club Capelletti, which he formed in 2002. The famed Italian has recruited and trained specialised teachers to the club including his son Fabio.

Franco Capalletti of Italy (left) receives his award certificate from IJF President Marius Vizer

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Kosei lnoue Japan

Japanese hero Kosei lnoue won admirers the world around during his competitive career. The much-admired judoka won gold at the 2000 Sydney Olympics and celebrated three World Championships triumphs during a glittering career. After retiring lnoue embarked on a trip to Britain on behalf of the Japanese Olympic Committee and was a well-received guest in Edinburgh where he stayed for six months and then in London where he spent a year at The Budokwai, following a longstanding tradition of Japanese greats coaching at Europe’s oldest continuously running club. lnoue is now the head coach of the Japanese team and firmly remains one of the most popular figures in the sport.

Kosei Inoue of Japan, thanks the audience after receiving the Hall of Fame award

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Peter Seisenbacher of Austria, smiles and addresses the audience after receiving the Hall of Fame award

Peter Seisenbacher Austria

Austrian icon Peter Seisenbacher became the first judoka to win back-to-back Olympic gold medals after claiming the top prize at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles and 1988 Olympics in Seoul, South Korea. Shortly after competing at the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games, Seisenbacher made a threemonth visit to Japan and in the words of his coach George Kerr he ‘came back a different fighter’. The Vienna-born standout also won the 1985 World Championships and 1986 European Championships. Seisenbacher has followed the path of his mentor and has already enjoyed similar success as a coach. The former -86kg star was head coach of the Georgian team at London 2012 when Lasha Shavdatuashvili won -66kg gold and is now steering the Azerbaijan team to success at the top level.

1988 Seoul - Peter Seisenbacher AUT celebrates winning his second Olympic gold medal

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David Douillet celebrates his gold medal victory at the 1999 Paris Worlds

Double Olympic champion David Douillet addresses the audience

David Douillet France

David Douillet conquered the world and left a legacy that few will emulate. The imposing Frenchman dominated heavyweight judo for close to a decade as he won honours on every stage. A physical specimen who boasted finesse and power, Douillet won Olympic gold at Atlanta 1996 and Sydney 2000 and won four World Championship titles along with four European Championship medals. Through his illustrious career he worked tirelessly to promote numerous charitable organisations and was held in high regard by his peers. After retiring Douillet established himself in politics with roles such as Minister of Sport and has worked as a TV personality in France.

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1980 Moscow - Ezio Gamba ITA celebrates winning the Olympic gold medal

Ezio Gamba ltaly

Four-time Olympian Ezio Gamba was one of the world’s leading judoka in the 1980’s as he translated continental honours into world and Olympic medals. The Brescia native won gold at the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games and took silver four years later in Los Angeles. The -71kg star won senior European medals including gold in 1982 and came away with two senior world medals in 1979 and 1983 respectively as he prepared for his Olympic challenge. Gamba’s greatest triumph came in Moscow and now over three decades later he plies his trade with the Russian team as head coach. The humble ltalian masterminded Russia’s success at London 2012 as they topped the medal table and is guiding them towards Rio 2016. Gamba also acts as a Technical Advisor for the EJU and IJF and is one of the most sought after figures in the sport.

1980 Moscow Olympic champion Ezio Gamba ITA coached Russia to become the top judo nation at London Olympics

Ezio Gamba of Italy speaks to the audience after joining the Hall of Fame

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1979 Paris Worlds - Rouge FRA attempts to strangle Endo JPN

1975 Europeans - Jean-Luc Rouge FRA throws Muzaev URS during the team event

Jean Luc Rouge of France, speaks to the audience after joining the Judo Hall of Fame

Jean-Luc Rougé France For all the great judo champions France has produced, Jean-Luc Rougé will forever hold the honour of being the country’s first world champion. The four-time European champion helped to shape the sport as a pioneering athlete and after retiring helped to steer the French Judo Federation into becoming one of the most prosperous and visible national judo federations in the world. Jean-Luc Rougé was elected as President of the French Judo Federation in 2005 and in 2011 was elected as the General Secretary of the lJF and has been integral to the success of both organisations. His insatiable passion for the sport and history- making exploits as a world-renowned judoka led the Frenchman to share the secrets to his famed harai-goshi in a highlypopular book.

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Thierry Rey France Four-time European medallist Thierry Rey followed up on his 1979 World Championships gold by winning gold for France at 1980 Moscow Olympic Games. ln 1983, he memorably became European champion at the Pierre de Coubertin stadium in Paris before retiring a year later. In 2007, Rey became president of the judo section for Lagardere Paris Racing, having been responsible for the Paris region for several years and in 2008 became the director of elite sports development for Lagardere Paris Racing and Team Lagardere. A prominent columnist and TV personality, Rey remains an influential member of the judo family in his homeland.

1980 Moscow - Thierry Rey FRA with his Olympic gold medal in Red Square

Patrick Hickey Ireland

Patrick Hickey once said that he owes his life in sport to judo. The lrish sports administrator represented his country on the tatami before going on to fulfil numerous key roles in the Olympic domain. In 1989, Hickey became Honorary Life President of the Irish Judo Association and President of the Olympic Council of Ireland and was Chef de Mission for his country at the 1988 Seoul and 1992 Barcelona Olympic Games. Hickey is currently President of the European Olympic Committee, a member of the Executive Board and Vice President of the Association of National Olympic Committees and since 2012 has been a member of the international Olympic Committee Executive Board.

Patrick Hickey receives his award from Marius Vizer

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1981 Maastricht Worlds - Robert Van de Walle celebrates his World silver medal

Robert van de Walle Belgium

Every athlete dreams of competing at an Olympic Games. Robert van de Walle accomplished that feat five times and was the first judoka to do so. He won gold in 1980 which earned him the Belgian Sportsperson of the Year accolade and eight years later came to the fore again to win bronze in 1988. The Ostend-born judoka competed in the -95kg and openweight categories and with over a decade at the top of the sport he left his mark as an all-time great. The Belgian won seven senior World Championships medals and an astonishing 17 senior European Championship medals including two gold.

Robert Van De Walle of Belgium, thanks the audience for the Hall of Fame award

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1984 Los Angeles - Mohamed Rashwan of Egypt throws Mihai Cioc of Romania for ippon on his way to the final

Mohamed Ali Rashwan Egypt

Two-time world silver medallist Mohamed Ali Rashwan exuded judo’s core values of honour, respect and integrity. In the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic openweight final the Egyptian famously avoided targeting the injured right calf of his opponent Yasuhiro Yamashita and had to settle for silver. Ali Rashwan won an international fair play award for his conduct and the everlasting respect of his compatriots and the Japanese fans. His Olympic result inspired him to win back-to-back world silver medals in 1985 and 1987 in South Korea and West Germany respectively. Ali Rashwan retired from competing in 1992 and is now a topclass international referee and key member of the Egyptian Judo Federation.

Mohamad Ali Rashwan of Egypt, addresses the audience and thanks them after receiving the Hall of Fame award

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Ryoko Tani Japan

Tani (nĂŠe Tamura) Ryoko became the first female judoka to compete at five Olympic Games. Tani won a medal at all five Games including gold in 2000 and 2004 in Sydney and Athens respectively. The seven-time world champion was unbeaten in major competitions between Atlanta 1996 and Beijing 2008 and her unparalleled success saw her become the most popular judoka on the planet. After retiring Tani entered politics and was a member of the Democratic Party between 2010 and 2012. The Japanese star was one of the most dominant judoka the sport has seen and is widely regarded as the greatest female judoka of all time.

2003 Osaka, Japan - Ryoko Tamura of Japan celebrates winning the u48kgs World gold medal

Sydney 2000 - Ryoko Tamura JPN beat Bruletova RUS in the final for the u48kg title and her third Olympic medal.

Ryoko Tani (centre), meets with the IJF and SportAccord President, Marius Vizer and his wife, Irina Nicolae

Ryoko Tani, waves to her fans while receiving the Hall of Fame award

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1984 Vienna Worlds Ingrid Berghmans BEL defeated Marjolien Van Unen NED for the Open gold medal.

Ingrid Berghmans Belgium

Belgium’s Ingrid Berghmans possessed a talent that belonged on the sport’s greatest stage. Berghmans had the opportunity to compete at the 1988 Seoul Olympic Games when women’s judo was a demonstration sport and she won gold. The eight-time Belgian Sportswoman of the Year won an incredible 11 world medals including six gold between 1980 and 1989. The Belgian ace ruled Europe seven times and won four silver and three bronze medals as the most accomplished judoka in the -72kg category

Hall of Fame awardee and former Olympic and World champion, Ingrid Berghmans of Belgiumd

Ingrid Berghmans of Belgium, thanks the audience after receiving the Hall of Fame award

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1978 Paris - Vladimir Nevzorov taking part in the Paris Team Championships

Vladimir Nevzorov Russia

Vladimir Nevzorov captured the Olympic title at the age of 23 as he won the -70kg category at the 1976 Montreal Games. Nevzorov entered the 1976 Olympics as the world champion and European champion and completed an incredible treble which cemented his legacy. Nevzorov, who also won national and European sambo honours, went on to win another European crown before retiring and moving into coaching. After spells with the Soviet national team and France, Nevzorov was head coach for the 2000 Russian Olympic judo team and later became Vice President of the Russian Judo Federation.

Mikhail Cherkasov receives the Hall of Fame certificate on behalf of Vladimir Nevzorov from Sergey Soloveitchik

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1984 London - Double Olympic champion and World Champion Willem Ruska at the British Open Championships

Willem Ruska Netherlands

The world-renowned Dutchman became the only judoka to win two gold medals at the same Olympic Games as he won the heavyweight and openweight categories at the 1972 Munich Games. Ruska captured the world title in 1967 and 1971 in the heavyweight category with an openweight silver medal to show for his 1969 appearance. During an illustrious career the 10-time Dutch national champion ruled Europe seven times and won three silver and two bronze medals. Ruska retired after the 1972 Munich Games having captured every title in the sport and etching his name into the history books.

Elisabeth Ruska received the award on behalf of her husband, double Olympic champion Willem Ruska of Holland

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1988 Seoul Olympics - Miguel BRA defeated Meilling GER gor the gold medal

Aurelio Fernandez Miguel Brazil

Aurelio Fernandez Miguel stamped his name on the sport by winning -95kg gold at the 1988 Seoul Olympic Games. A seven-time Pan American champion the Brazilian judoka would show the world that he was one of the finest judoka in the sport with success on the sport’s greatest stage. Miguel won a second Olympic medal eight years after his first as he took bronze at Atlanta 1996. The following year he claimed silver at the World Championships in Paris, the third world medal of his career with one bronze and one silver already to his name. After retiring he moved into politics in his native Sao Paulo in 2004 and was re- elected for the city council in 2008 under the banner of the Republic Party.

Aurelio Fernandez Miguel (L) receives a belt and medal as part of the award from CBJ chairman, Paulo Wanderley Teixeira

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1973 Lausanne Worlds - Hector Rodriguez of Cuba throws for ippon to win the bronze medal

Héctor Rodriguez Torres Cuba

The Cuban trailblazer earned the nickname ‘The Volcano of Montreal’ when he won -63kg gold at the 1976 Montreal Olympic Games. Rodriguez became the first Cuban judoka to win Olympic gold and the first non- Japanese judoka to win the lightest category in Olympic judo. The 1973 world bronze medallist paved the way for young Cubans to follow his path and was integral to the continued development of the sport in his country. After retiring Rodriguez coached the national team and led his charges to World Youth Championships success before moving on to work in a High Performance Centre in Madrid. Rodriguez is a member of the Panamerican Judo Union’s Hall of Fame.

Hector Rodriguez Torres of Cuba, thanks the audience after receiving the Hall of Fame award

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Neil Adams Great Britain

1983 British Open - Neil Adams GBR throws Cerna MEX with a devastating uchimata for ippon.

Neil Adams, who was the first British male to win a world title, is the most decorated and celebrated British judoka of all time. Adams won back-to-back Olympic silver medals at the 1980 and 1984 Games in Moscow and Los Angeles respectively. in 1981 he became the first Briton to simultaneously hold a European and world title. As a talent for the ages to marvel at the four-time senior world medallist won eight medals at the senior European Championships including five gold. After a remarkable career which saw him become as popular in Japan as we was in Britain, Adams started a coach education business and was an in demand coach with spells as head coach for Welsh Judo Association and a national coach in Belgium. Adams is currently a commentator and technical advisor for the IJF and the Director of Elite Coaching for the British Judo Association.

Neil Adams MBE, addresses the audience after receiving the Hall of Fame award

Neil Adams GBR armlocks his Japanese opponent in the u71 kgs final to win the 1981 World gold medal

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Journalist Oon Yeoh (L-R) and World champions Mike Swain and Neil Adams MBE at the “Hall of Fame” Dinner

Double Olympic champion, David Douillet of France and World and European medallist Densign White of Great Britain

Relaxing before the meal (L-R) George Kerr CBE, David Somerville and Andrew Scoular from Great Britain

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Former World champion, Nobuyuki Sato of Japan relaxes with Judo Research chairman, Dr Mike Callan of Great Britain

(L-R) DJB President Peter Frese, IJF Secretary Lisa Allan, EJU Commissioner Bernd Achilles and DJB Secretary Reinhard Nimz

Ezio Gamba (left) and Franco Capelletti, both of Italy, relax before they receive their awards

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8th International Judo Research Symposium An oral presentation by Hans-Dieter Heinisch of the Institute of Applied Training Science Leipzig, Germany

Introduction

The 8th International Judo Research Symposium took place on Sunday the 25th of August prior to the 2013 Senior World Judo Championships, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The organisation of the event was a collaboration between the International Association of Judo Researchers (IAJR) and the International Judo Federation.

Participation

17 academic papers from 40 different researchers were selected for participation in the symposium spanning three continents of the world. Authors included world champions Yasuhiko Moriwaki and Florin Daniel Lascau, and Olympic Champion Maki Tsukada. IJF Hall of Fame inductees Dr George Kerr 10th Dan, and Franco Cappeletti 9th Dan were among the observers. The organising group was led by the IAJR Executive members Dr Mike Callan, Professor Michel Brousse, Professor Takeshi Nakajima, Mr Florin Daniel Lascau and supported by Mr Michel Huet and Miss Janine Johnson.

Contents

Following an opening address from IJF Education Director Mr Mohammed Meridja the first presenter was Professor Wantuir Jacini from the Priorit Institute in Brazil. Professor Jacini’s work looked at the “Effect of judo training in social maturity in autistic patients”. The paper demonstrated the benefits of judo practice over a six month period for patients with autism, in particular improvement in their socialisation and communication skills. This important study can have far reaching implications for the value of judo training as a tool to improve social skills or to benefit the lives of people with disabilities. The second presentation from Dr Hans-Dieter Heinisch (Institute for Applied Training Science, Leipzig, Germany) focussed on “Development and evaluation of a specific judo grip-strength-test”. This offered a new approach to measuring grip strength performance in a much more judo-specific way. Utilising athletes from the German national team Dr Heinisch and his colleagues were able to compare both junior and senior grip strength and also compare the sleeve (hikite) and lapel (tsurite) grips. This work is important to help coaches understand the levels of grip strength required for international players. The third presentation “About judo therapy” was made by Professor Nobuyoshi Kume (Tokyo Ariake University of Medical and Health Sciences) and Dr Hideki Kanai (Japan Judo Therapist Association). Their work demonstrated the use of judo therapy as a medical technique for judo injuries including some graphic video of judo therapy in action. The Japan Judo Therapist Association is keen to disseminate information about their work and collaborate with other nations to further improve medial support for judo players.

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Guests inspecting the Academic Poster displays at the 8th International Judo Research Symposium

Specialist shoulder dislocation treatment displayed at the 8th International Judo Research Symposium

Following the presentation audience members were treated to a practical demonstration of the effectiveness of judo therapy in treating injuries. Participants had an opportunity to view a selection of other academic posters and network with each other. Posters were presented by some of the leading judo research universities around the world covering topics spanning performance analysis, physiology, coaching, ukemi, anthropometry and the Olympic qualification process.

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Awards

Awards were presented to the best posters in the symposium. 1st Place. “Association of the ACTN3 and ACE Polymorphisms in Japanese judo athletes”. Kenichiro Agemizu (School of Physical Education, Tokai University, Japan) Shoshin Hirokawa (Graduate School of Physical Education, Tokai University) Toshio Itaka (Graduate School of Physical Education, Tokai University) Seiji Aruga (Sport Medical Science Research Institute, Tokai University) Shuichi Machida (Graduate School of Health and Sports Science, Juntendo University) The research by Professor Agemizu and his colleagues tries to explores the tendency of individual judoka at Tokai University towards a more power based or endurance based style of judo, by measuring their genetic makeup. They hope that this can lead to more focussed training methodologies for individuals. 2nd Place. “Image survey on ukemi in judo”. Hidemasa Tokuyasu (Tokyo Ariake University of Medical and Health Sciences, Japan) Noboru Hashimoto (Tokyo Ariake University of Medical and Health Sciences) Ryuji Okada (Kinki University, Tokyo) Yasuhiko Moriwaki (Kokushikan University, Tokyo) Takeshi Nakajima (Kokushikan University, Tokyo) 3rd Place “A temporal analysis of the women’s u52kg in the 2010 world judo championships”. Bob Challis (Anglia Ruskin University, Judo Research Group, Great Britain) 3rd Place. “The effect of the strength training for collegiate womens judoka”. Shoko Yanagida (Ritsumeikan University, Japan) Kana Koyama (Lighthouse Athletics Co.Ltd) Shun Kasuga (Ritsumeikan University, Center for Athletics and Sports Services) A special certificate of appreciation was awarded to Professor Takeshi Nakajima (Kokushikan University) for his significant contribution to the development of judo research throughout the world. Awards were presented by IJF General Secretary Jean-Luc Rouge. Mr Rouge made an inspiring speech to close the Symposium.

Dr Mike Callan (left) addresses the audience with IJF General Secretary, Jean Luc Rouge

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L-R: Dr Mike Callan with equal third; Shoko Yanagida and Bob Challis and Jean Luc Rouge who presented the certificates

L-R: Dr Mike Callan and 2nd place Hidemasa Tokuyasu (Tokyo Ariake University) and Jean Luc Rouge

(L-R) Dr Mike Callan, Kenichiro Agemizu of Tokai University and first prize winner of the academic competition and Jean Luc Rouge

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Concluding remarks

The research symposium has an important role to build relationships between National Federations and research universities for the benefit of judo. It also illustrates the breadth of judo as an education, a contributor to society and in delivering elite performance. The organisers thanked IJF President Mr Marius Vizer for his support of this Symposium, and judo research activities around the world. Top contestants with certificates for best research documents surrounded by colleagues during the 8th International Judo Research Symposium

(L-R): IJF managers Matthias Fischer, Lance Wicks and Rio 2016 Judo manager, Kenji Saito in discussion

Hundreds of team coaches and news teams attended the competition draw on the 25th August

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PDF downloads 1. A Temporal Analysis of the u52kg Womenís Judo in the 2010 World Championships By Bob Challis, Anglia Ruskin Judo Research Group 2. Olympic Qualification; Top 8 Study By Dr Mike Callan and Florin Daniel Lascau 3. RELATIONS OF LATENT ANTHROPOMETRIC VARIABLES TO SUCCESS IN JUDO BOUT By Hrvoje Sertic 4. The study of Judo-kappo By KAZUHIKO KUBOYAMA 5. Association of the ACTN3 and ACE Polymorphisms in Japanese judo athletes. By Tokai University 6. Who is the Best? Performance Evaluation of Countries in International Judo. By Leandro MAZZEI1; Fl·via da Cunha BASTOS; Veerle DE BOSSCHER and Maria Tereza B÷HME of CBJ 7. Understanding the female judokaís coach-athlete relationship: a British perspective. By Katrina McDonald and Maki Tsukada at Department of Life Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University 8. An analysis of Kumi Kata at the Junior and Senior British Championships 2013. By Anglia Ruskin Judo Research Group 9. Likelihood of Competition Success by Judo Athletes from Accredited Clubs By Nick Fletcher & Dr Mike Callan, Anglia Ruskin University 10.Motion Analysis of the Stand Technique for Men in the World Judo Championship By Ryuji OKADA (Kinki University, Osaka Japan), Hidemasa TOKUYASU (Tokyo Ariake University, Tokyo Japan), Yasuhiko MORIWAKI (Kokushikan University, Tokyo Japan), Takeshi NAKAJIMA (Kokushikan University, Tokyo Japan), and Tetsuzo KURAGANO (Meisei University, Tokyo Japan) 11. Physical strength required for judo By Shoko Yanagida 12. Annual training plan By Shoko Yanagida 13. Effect of judo training in restricted repetitive behaviors in autistic patients poster. By Wantuir Francisco Siqueira Jacini 14. Effect of judo training in social maturity in autistic patients. By Wantuir Francisco Siqueira Jacini

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2013 Rio World Judo Championships - Acknowledgements First and foremost I offer my sincerest gratitude to Marius Vizer and Stefan Vlad Marinescu who have supported this unique project from its conception in early 2013. Many people contributed to this ebook, the first book dedicated to one World Championships and its associated events. The idea was conceived by Oon Yeoh of oonyeoh.squarespace.com who had represented his country, Malaysia, at the 1993 Hamilton World Championships and whose expert reporting of the Rio World’s individual competitions forms the majority of the pages in the book. Without his knowledge, attention to detail and journalistic skills this book would not have been feasible. Considerable thanks must go to Hans van Essen of Judoinside.com who supplied the background analysis of the World Ranking List through his extraordinary database and website. There is no other judo data resource that is so freely available to judo fans worldwide through the internet; a resource that is updated almost daily with new statistics and worldwide competition results. Hans van Essen’s assistance to Oon Yeoh in preparing the reports was unrivalled. Thanks also to Lance Wicks, “Judo coach and IT Geek” at JudoCoach.com, for his excellent analysis “by numbers” of the Rio World Championships where he ensured the daily video streaming of the competition worked flawlessly. Dr Mike Callan is President of the International Association of Judo Researchers (IAJR) at JudoResearch.com and chaired the 8th International Judo Research Symposium held at the Rio World Championships. His work in co-ordinating research into the benefits of Judo is outstanding and he was awarded the IJF Gold Award for the Global Contribution to Judo Education and Research in 2009. Besides writing the excellent IAJR report, which includes downloads of the PDF Research Posters, he kindly wrote the section on the Rio Team Championships. His website is at JudoSpace.com. The excellent short biographies in the Hall of Fame section were written by Mark Pickering, manager at the IJF Media Commission and a keen judoka. Further acknowledgement must go to IJF Media Director, Nicolas Messner, who helped consolidate the project while working all over the world. Both I, as a photographer, and Oon Yeoh as a reporter at the Rio Worlds offer our unreserved thanks to the IJF Media team. Thanks must also be extended to Matthias Fischer, Head of the IJF’s Information Technology Department who gave considerable assistance to Oon Yeoh during his research into the individual contests. Finally, and not least, I would like to personally thank ex British judo international and Commonwealth champion, Paul Sheals and his team at RocketFishLtd.co.uk, who, at very short notice, designed and laid out the excellent eBook that you are looking at now. David Finch Editor and photographer at Judophotos.com

IJF’s media team Tamas Zahonyi, Gabriela Sabau, Mark Pickering, Nicolas Messner IJF director Vlad Marinescu 130

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Marius Vizer, President of the EJU in 2005, before becoming the IJF President

SportAccord General Secretary, Stefan Vlad Marinescu at the 2013 Budapest European Judo Championships

Hans van Essen of Holland loves judo

Rio eBook author Oon Yeoh (MAS) (left) and Liang Hao (CHN) of Shangdong Sports Equipment

Erasmus University, Rotterdam: Dr Mike Callan and his IJF Gold Award for Judo Research

David Finch at London’s Budokwai in 2013 Paul Sheals winning the 1986 Commonwealth Games

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Profile for Judophotos

2013 Rio World Judo Championships Book  

This 2013 Rio World Judo Championships book describes in detail the individual and team competitions that ran from 26 August to 1 September....

2013 Rio World Judo Championships Book  

This 2013 Rio World Judo Championships book describes in detail the individual and team competitions that ran from 26 August to 1 September....

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