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JOE BALD PARK

VISION 2040


JOE BALD PARK

DRURY UNIVERSITY, HAMMONS SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, CENTER FOR COMMUNITY STUDIES FALL 2013

VISION 2040


JOE BALD PARK VISION 2040 This book is designed for the vision of Joe Bald Park on Table Rock Lake. It has compiled multiple layers of analysis, observation and research to give the best possible recommendation that we believe will be of the most benefit to the site, surrounding neighborhoods, nearby communities and Table Rock Lake region. It is not to be taken as the final vision for Joe Bald Park. Rather, it should be used as a tool to help the community define their own vision of what Joe bald Park should become over the next 20-30 years. In this book we dreamed big. We understand that at first glance, not every recommendation may seem possible or even plausible. Understanding that this vision looks 30 years into the future will make it easier to comprehend the contextual scope of this vision.

“We looked at Joe Bald Park not as what it is, but rather, as what it could become.�


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Committee Members:

Organizations

Project Administrators:

Architecture Advisors

Dave Liebenow Chamber Dennis Wood Stone County Jim Sandberg Corps Greg Oller Corps Becky Shortt ` Corps Joe Schrodt KC Mayor Kenny Smith BW Administrator Pete Wenners Fishing Guide Cy Murray White River Electric Jacci Gamble KC ED Rich Gamble Bait Store Terry Sanders Water Patrol Doug Rader Sheriff Jay Steed Developer Jerry Dodd Commissioner PJ Baez Business Owner Earl Sketers Fishing Guide Rodney Raley Corps Ryan Hamilton Marinas Andy Austin Conservation Dept Shane Bush Conservation Dept John Moore Clear Water Comm. Scott Fleetwood Resident Jay Gaunt Straightline Canvas Terry Whaley Ozark Greenway

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Ozark Rivers Heritage Foundation Kimberling City Chamber of Commerce Drury University CCS University of Missouri Extension Kimberling City Rotary Club First Impressions Printing Co Ozark Greenway Joe Bald Vision Committee

Jay G. Garrott, RA Professor and Director Center for Community Studies Hammons School of Architecture Drury University

David Beach Assistant Professor Architecture

Project Consultant:

Students:

Jeff Barber, Architect, LEED AP State Specialist Housing/Environmental Design University of Missouri-Extension

Mikhail Digman Zachary Mette Melyssa Prenger Juan Trejo

Jayon You Assistant Professor Architecture


TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SITE PREPARATION ACCESS PARKING SOCIAL SPACES EDUCATION SUSTAINABILITY ECONOMICS SEASONAL VS YEAR ROUND TRENDS UTILITIES MANAGEMENT ADA SAFETY SIGNAGE PHASING

TRENDS 10 10 11 12 13 14 14 15 15 15 16 16 16 17 17

RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES

20 30 32 40 46 52

SMART GROWTH ACTIVE LIVING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE FUEL COSTS

64 76 84 88

92 98 104 116

RECOMMENDATIONS MASTER PLAN LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL

146 150 156 162 174 178 180

SYNTHESIS

SITE CONTEXT REGIONAL LOCAL SITE PICTURES

NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

120 122 123 124 125 126 134 136 138 140 144

CONCLUSION INDEX

184 186


This vision is a collaboration of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Ozark River Heritage Fund, Drury University’s Center for Community Studies, University of Missouri-Extension, and Joe Bald Vision Committee. The Corps initially suggested that a committee be founded to decide what should happen with Joe Bald Park, a site that had been closed for 15 years. That committee was formed from business owners and citizens from the Kimberling City area who then went to Ozark River Heritage Fund. Drury University’s Center for Community Studies was brought in to give the vision a fresh set of eyes as well as a focus on the long term survivability of the park. Also, Kimberling City has success with the involvement of Center for Community Studies in the past. The vision aims to revitalize Joe Bald Park for the benefit of the surrounding neighborhoods, Kimberling City and the entire Table Rock Lake region. The park itself is a 68 acre piece of land located and the end of the Joe Bald peninsula. It was closed by the Corps 15 years ago due to its lack of revenue. The vision project will not only look at the short term needs of the site but also how the site should evolve over a 30 year period. This includes looking at the contextual information of the site, of the culture of the Ozark regions and the growing trends that will impact the site in the years to come. The site is a beautiful piece of property on perhaps the clearest and cleanest lake in Missouri. Joe Bald Park is a prime location on this lake and it cannot benefit anyone being closed. The reactivation of this park could bring an economic, social and environmental stimulus to the area. It could in-turn become an activity hub for all of Table Rock Lake. Keeping this in mind we developed a concept statement that out vision will follow:

Our goal is to revitalize Joe Bald Park through social interaction within the natural landscape. With this concept in mind we present our research, analysis and recommendations for Joe Bald Park.


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


JOE BALD VISION 2040

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SITE PREPARATION ACCESS PARKING

ES.1 The main parking area In Joe Bald Park

SOCIAL SPACES EDUCATION

PREPARATION

ACCESS

SUSTAINABILITY ECONOMICS SEASONAL VS. YEAR ROUND TRENDS UTILITIES MANAGEMENT ADA SAFETY SIGNAGE PHASING

RESEARCH

ISSUE: The Current State of the Site

CONCERNS: Joe Bald Park has technically been closed for more than a decade. During this time the site has been neglected and allowed to become overgrown. The existing structures on the site are falling apart and are targets for vandalism. They are also a health and safety liability to the users of the park as well as an eyesore.

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that before any major development is started that the site be restored to an acceptable state. This means removing the derelict structure and cleaning up the trash that has accumulated. Once this has been accomplished, it must be maintained.

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT

ES.3 Entry to Joe Bald Park

ISSUE: Vehicle Access to Site.

CONCERNS: Joe Bald Road is the only vehicular way to access Joe Bald Park. Roughly 10,000 residents live off this six mile stretch of road that connects Kimberling City to Joe Bald Park. While the proposed program will benefit these residents it will also increase the traffic. Currently, the road is very narrow and while users still tow their boats on it to the boat launch at Joe Bald Park, the increase in vehicular traffic will only increase the likelihood of an accident. The continued growth of Kimberling city and the surrounding areas will also contribute to this concern. RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that Joe Bald Road be widened in accordance with MODOT standards. While the expansion may intrude onto the easement or the property of the roadside land owners it would make traveling on Joe Bald Road safer and easier for all residents and visitors alike.

RECOMMENDATIONS

ES.2 Example of the derelict structures on site

ES.4 Vehicle access


11 ISSUE: Circulation Within the Site

RECOMMENDATIONS: We recommend a hard surface lake side path that will circulate Joe Bald Park and continue to the surrounding neighborhoods. At latter stages this path would continue to Kimberling City and eventually all around Table Rock Lake. It would be below the 936 foot flood plain that is owned by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This path would be ADA accessible and serve both pedestrians and bikers.

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend keeping the existing vehicular roads within the site. These roads already lead to the main programmable places. The northern loop road would serve as the main circulation on site. The secondary southern loop road would serve as service circulation for the programmed spaces.

CONCERNS: Currently, there are no pedestrian paths or bike routes to access the site. This condition forces people to drive to the site. This is an issue because driving requires gas even though the park is relatively close to all the residences of Kimberling City. In addition, this excess driving is an environmentally unfriendly practice. This inability to access the site in a variety of manners limits the park’s potential.

ISSUE: Boat Access to the Site.

ES.6 Interior trail

ES.7 Courtesy dock for site access from the lake.

CONCERNS: Joe Bald Park is located at the approximate center of Table Rock Lake. While a boat launch exists on site, there is no way to dock a boat on site if a visitor arrived to Joe Bald Park by boat. This is a huge inconvenience because boating is a large part of the culture of the Table Rock Lake and Ozark area. This also forces people to access the site from land and while Joe Bald Park is located conveniently via water, it is difficult to reach by land.

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that courtesy docks be placed at the site. This will provide access to the site and embraces the context of the Ozark lake culture. These day-use docks would be free to use and would encourage a variety of activities on site. They would be in compliance with Corps standards. At a later phase more docks could be added in conjunction with the demand.

CONCERNS: If access to the site were improved, a focus must look at how one travels around upon the site. There are preexisting roads on the site that should be utilized and a full range of accessible options throughout the site that accommodate the abilities of a wide range of users. Access must also be considered in conjunction with the variety of activities and programmed spaces that will be proposed for Joe Bald Park.

ES.9 Hiking trails encourage a healthy lifestyle.

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend pedestrian trails to access the different destination points in Joe Bald Park. We recommend that roughly half of these trails are ADA accessible to make sure anyone can use them. These trails would serve as on site hiking paths. To appeal to a wide variety of users, some trails would be defined by the contours, while others would go against the terrain. This creates trails of varying difficulty to appeal to different users. RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that the parking and roadways be built using sustainable practices. This means using permeable surfaces, integrating vegetation to the lot, controlling water runoff, and following practices of Low Impact Design (LID). Any parking lots added must be ADA accessible.

ES.8 Sustainable parking as part of keeping the park environmentally friendly.

ES.10 Pedestrian and biking paths

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

ES.5 Lake side bike ride

ISSUE: Pedestrian and Bike Access to Site


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SITE PREPARATION ACCESS PARKING SOCIAL SPACES EDUCATION SUSTAINABILITY ECONOMICS SEASONAL VS. YEAR ROUND TRENDS UTILITIES MANAGEMENT ADA SAFETY SIGNAGE PHASING

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SOCIAL SPACES AND DESTINATION POINTS ISSUE: Destination and Social Points Onsite

CONCERNS: After access to the site has been established there must be something to do. Hiking and biking trails could be considered an activity, but the site has the potential to become so much more. The site must be economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable. This means establishing programs that promote people coming together, generate revenue, all the while, protecting and accentuating the natural beauty of Joe Bald Park. RECOMMENDATION: We recommend a series of pavilions on site. They would be located on the north end of the site near the rock beach. They would surround a communal fire pit and be constructed from on site materials, thus minimizing the environmental impact of construction. These pavilions would host events and activities that provide social interaction within the community. These pavilions would be available to rent out for large functions, thus contributing to the economic sustainability of the site.

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend a nondenominational chapel be located on the steep slope on the north bluff of the site overlooking the lake. A small path would lead down to a dock for boat access. We propose that this building cater to gatherings such as wedding ceremonies, prayer vigils, and other events that would call for a more private atmosphere. It would include areas for the ceremony, receptions, bathrooms, and preparation areas. The emotive qualities of this space would work to blend with the landscape and accentuate the natural beauty of its surroundings.

ES.13 non-denominational chapel

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that a programmed area of green space be placed on the northern high point on the site. This space would include a playground and open green space for recreational use. These programs can create an important layer in the social atmosphere of Kimberling City. These recreational areas will provide a fun and safe area for residences and visitors with children or grandchildren. The green space could become a great area for pick-up games or just a nice place to relax.

RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

ES.11 Designated gathering spaces encourage social interaction.

ES.12 While most of the site is wooded, the introduction of a green space promotes different activities.

ES.14 Social spaces


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ES.15 Trail side respite folly

ES.16 Campfire folly

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that as part of the phasing of the park that the courtesy docks develop into a “marina”. The term “marina” comes with the connotation of rentable boat storage, but this is not something we propose for Joe Bald Park. The “marina” would support visitors to the site and be a place capable for hosting large events such as fishing tournaments. The “marina” would host a number of shops such bait and tackle shop, snack shack, and general store. The “marina” would also host a manual boat storage area that would rent kayaks and canoes. Due to the park’s centralized location on the water, the “marina” would also serve to keep the park economically sustainable.

ISSUE: Education

CONCERN: Joe Bald Park and Table Rock Lake have a diverse array of flora and fauna. Currently, there are very few institutions in the area that are capable of educating users about the lake ecology. Joe Bald Park is located at a central part of the lake and has a rich ecosystem. This creates a perfect opportunity to provide educational opportunities for the visitors of Joe Bald Park.

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend a conservation center to educate people about the lake ecology. It would also educate users about the locale flora and fauna of the Ozark region. In addition, this conservation center would be able to teach users about the sustainable processes that went into the park. Groups such as schools or summer camps would be able to come and participate in educational and recreational events at Joe Bald Park associated with the conservation center. Building upon this aspect, the conservation center would, in later phases, would develop lodging facilities. These facilities would be capable of hosting campers, students or other parties interested in immersing themselves in nature while living sustainably.

ES.19 A restaurant can extend the use time of Joe Bald Park

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that a restaurant is established in one of the later phases of the park’s development. It would also provide support for some of the earlier functions such as the non-denominational chapel and the “marina”. We want to give the residents and the visitors to the area a chance to relax and enjoy a nice meal in the beauty of Joe Bald Park and Table Rock Lake.

ES.17 Water folly ES.18 Early rendering of the uses of a marina

ES.20 Educational spaces

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend several follies to be placed throughout Joe Bald Park. These would be private, found spaces that offer a change of pace from the more public pavilions. Each would be unique and focus on its own part of the park. They could be built by volunteers or as part of a school program. Examples of some would be lookouts, tree housed, fire pits, shelters, benches, meditation areas, floating docks, diving platforms or small amphitheaters. The follies would be located off both hard and soft surface trails and at least half of them should be handicap accessible.


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SITE PREPARATION ACCESS PARKING SOCIAL SPACES EDUCATION SUSTAINABILITY ECONOMICS SEASONAL VS. YEAR ROUND TRENDS UTILITIES MANAGEMENT ADA SAFETY SIGNAGE PHASING

RESEARCH

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SUSTAINABILITY ISSUE: Environmental Sustainability

CONCERN: As Table Rock Lake is one of the cleanest and clearest lakes in the Ozark region, it is very important that the programs proposed for the site help to sustain this title. This mentality of preservation must be maintained throughout the entire development of Joe Bald Park. In addition to the lake, the natural environment must also be preserved. RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that a closed loopcycle be implemented on site. This refers to building with on-site materials, collecting rainwater, producing as little waste as possible, and any waste that does accumulate, find ways of recycling that waste on site if possible.

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that all parking added to the site be made with permeable concrete, thus allowing the water runoff to be reabsorb on site and preventing excessive runoff into the lake. We also recommend creating green parking that would incorporate trees and other vegetation that would help filter the water and beatify the lot. Roads would also be made sustainable to reduce runoff and promote water filtration.

ISSUE: Economic Sustainability

CONCERN: The reason that Joe Bald Park was closed in the first place was because it was not making money for the Corps of Engineers. In order for this park to thrive once again it must be economically independent and sustainable. Without this economic sustainability the park runs the risk of closing again.

ES.23 Environmental sustainability

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that some of the profits from the onsite program elements be used for the up keep of the park. These areas would include the courtesy dock “marina�, non-denominational chapel, pavilions, restaurant, conservation school, and green camp. Some of these programs will not be available from the start and in that case a fee system from residents of the area or a user fee would need to be implemented. For start-up costs we recommend a donation program to allow residents of the area to play a part in the development of their park.

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

ES.21 Water filtration

ES.22 Triple bottom line sustainability

ES.24 Economic spaces


15

ES.26 Rising gas prices are a growing trend that cannot be ignored

ISSUE: Utilities

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that 75% of the programs put on the site be able to operate year round. The courtesy dock “marina� would still be able to hold fishing tournaments, non-denominational chapel and pavilions would still be able to hold events and restaurant would be able to operate. The function of the cabins would be able to adapt according to the needs of the community. During the summer months they would be used as a vacation spot. During the school term they would be used as educational facilities. During the winter months they would be able to house hunters. They would also be available for rent to participants in fishing tournaments.

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that utilities for the site be included as part of a closed cycle. Besides conventional means of power, alternative sources such as propane and solar energy should be utilized. Water from the lake could also be drawn, filtered and used by the programs. It then could be treated and returned to the lake or reused within the site.

CONCERN: Being a lake culture, much of the area is based on seasonal use. While it is true that Table Rock Lake and Joe Bald Park get used more in the warmer months, it should be able to operate year round. Because the businesses and lake culture is more orientated towards tourists, a social void is created in the winter months for the local population.

ES.30 Solar panels as an alternative energy solution for Joe Bald Park

ISSUE: Trends

CONCERN: A large part of this project was to look ahead 30 years and to develop the site not just for now but also for the future. This park needs to meet the immediate needs of the current residents and also for the children and grandchildren of those residents and users. The programs implemented on Joe Bald Park must be flexible enough to meet future needs. To anticipate those needs several growing trends were looked at that will apply to the future conditions of Joe Bald Park, Table Rock Lake and the entire Ozark region.

ES.27 Jogging can be part of a healthy lifestyle

CONCERN: Currently, there is no water or electricity running on Joe Bald Park. This is obviously a problem since many of the proposed programs need running water and electricity. These utilities must be added to the site but in a way that does not destroy or inhibit the natural environment. As per our concept these elements must be sustainable, both economically and environmentally.

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that the growing trends of Smart Growth, rising fuel costs, Healthy Lifestyle Initiative, and Active Living initiative be an aspect in the development of the site. These trends help us anticipate and respond to the needs of the future visitors of the area.

ES.28 active living community action model

ES.29 active living by design ES.31 Areas with year round usage

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

ES.25 Some of the benefits of Smart Growth

ISSUE: Year Round Usage


JOE BALD VISION 2040

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SITE PREPARATION ACCESS PARKING SOCIAL SPACES EDUCATION SUSTAINABILITY ECONOMICS SEASONAL VS. YEAR ROUND TRENDS UTILITIES MANAGEMENT ADA SAFETY SIGNAGE PHASING

RESEARCH

ISSUE: Management

CONCERN: Over the years, Joe Bald Park has been managed by several different parties. While this issue has recently been exacerbated, the question remains of how and by whom should the park be managed. While this issue is really up for the residents and users to decide, what we can do is provide a variety of options and precedents for reference. RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that several different models of management be looked at for Joe Bald Park: leaving it Corps managed, leasing it to an nonprofit organization, leasing it to a for-profit company, leasing it to a non-profit with a business outlook, selling the site to the Missouri Department of Conservation, selling it to any of the previous, or having it managed by the community. All of these options have their pros and cons. RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that as part of a networking program, the development of Joe Bald Park could be in collaboration with various organizations such as schools, collegiate universities, businesses or NGOs.

ISSUE: Handicap Accessibility

CONCERN: With the demographics of the surrounding areas, handicap accessibility is a must. The problem lies within the terrain of Joe Bald Park. It is comprised of two sizable hills and most of the park is heavily wooded. The site must accommodate all levels of activity and lifestyle limitations.

ES.33 Handicap dock

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that all major programmed spaces (courtesy dock “marina”, nondenominational chapel, etc...), be ADA accessible. Also, at least 50% of the hiking trails and follies should be ADA accessible. In addition, at least ten-percent of the courtesy docks should be ADA accessible. ISSUE: Safety

CONCERN: As the site is isolated from the more urban areas around Table Rock Lake, the safety of users, especially during the evening and after dark, is paramount. The site has a history of negligence and unseemly activity so it is in the program’s best interest to reverse this trend.

ES.34 Handicap accessible

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that several safety practices be put into action at Joe Bald Park. Trails would be lit by trail side solar lights. We also recommend that the police patrol the park periodically. It is important to instill a sense of responsibility among the residences around Joe Bald Park. By doing so, we can count on the local residences to report any issues that may hinder the well-being of anyone visiting Joe Bald Park and Kimberling City.

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

ES.32 Park lighting for nighttime park safety

ES.35 Neighborhood responsibility


17

ES.37 Plant identification

ISSUE: Phasing

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend a signage program throughout the Table Rock Lake region and Kimberling City that identifies Joe Bald Park and its programs. This would help to introduce new users to the park and also help to generate interest in future developments. It would help inform tourists to the region that this park exists and that there are great things to do there. It would also provide directions for first time visitors to the location of the park.

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend that the park be developed in a series of phases. The phases would start with activating the low hanging fruit: the program with the lowest start-up cost, but can generate a lot of income and social value. The development would build from this first item, generating more social interest to in turn generate more revenue for park up-keep and future development. Pages 180 - 181 lay out our five recommended phase. It is important to remember that phases do not have a defined time frame. They are laid out in a way to define that item A has to come before B and so on.

CONCERN: Currently, there is no identifiable connection between Joe Bald Park and the surrounding areas. People discover the site on their own or hear about it by word of mouth. Visitors to the lake and Kimberling city have no way of knowing about the park. There also is nothing that informs the population of the processes that are at work with in the park.

RECOMMENDATION: We recommend a signage program within the park that would inform users about the natural and sustainable practices utilized in the day to day programs, as well as in the construction process. For example, one sign could inform the user about a certain kind of plant, while another could discuss the water run-off system. These signs would become part of the educational aspect of Joe Bald Park.

CONCERN: The programs that has been proposed for Joe Bald Park cannot be done overnight. It will be an ongoing process that will take a number of years to complete. The money to develop these programs simply does not exist at the moment. The problem posed is how to create the highest social value with the lowest economic costs to facilitate the concept.

ES.39 Phase 1

ES.42 Phase 2

ES.40 Phase 3

ES.43 Phase 4

ES.38 Tree identification

ES.41 Phase 5

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

ES.36 Plant identification

ISSUE: Signage


RESEARCH


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

HISTORY BRIEF HISTORY OF MISSOURI The State of Missouri has a long history. The area was inhabited by indigenous people for thousands of years before the European exploration and settlement. Before 1000 CE, there was a complex Mississippian culture in the region centered at the present-day St. Louis, Missouri. Across the Mississippi River, Cahokia was the center of these large cities where massive earthwork mounds were built for religious, political and social reasons. Much later in 1750, the first European settled along the Mississippi River. St. Louis became the center of a regional fur trade that extended up the Missouri River and the Mississippi River. After the Louisiana Purchase, which added 530,000,000 acres of territory, Thomas Jefferson commissioned the Lewis and Clark Expedition in 1803. The campaign had two objectives; the primary objective was to explore and map the newly acquired territory and find a practical route to the west, the secondary objective was to study the area’s plants, animal life, and geography, while establishing trade with the Indian tribes. This helped Missouri earn the nickname “Gateway to the West”

RES.2 Cahokia characterized by massive earth mounds

RES.1 The Louisiana Purchase added 530,000,000 acres of territory

RES.3 Fur traders descending the Missouri River

RES.4 The Louis and Clark Expedition route


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Missouri was settled by Southerners coming up the Mississippi River and Missouri River, they had brought along slaves. Missouri was admitted to the Union as a Slave state after the Missouri Compromise of 1820. Congress agreed that no state north of the 36°30’ (Missouri’s southern border with Arkansas) could join the Union as a slave state. Maine entered the union as a free state as a compromise to balance Missouri’s admittance. Missouri plays a significant role in the American Civil War, in 1861 as the southern states began to secede from the Union, Missouri legislature voted decisively to remain within the Union. Missouri was a border state which sent men, armies, generals, and supplies to both opposing sides. The state had its star on both the Union flag and the Confederate flag. By the end of the war Missouri was to supply nearly 110,000 troops to the Union and 40,000 troops to the Confederate Army. Missouri saw over 1,200 distinct fights within its State border. The first major Civil War battle west of the Mississippi river took place on August 10, 1864 within the Ozarks at Wilson’s Creek.

The biggest concern for the large slave-holder populations of Missouri was that a Federal law would decree that if a slave physically entered a free state, he or she would be free. Throughout the length of the Civil War Missouri citizens of opposing sides engages in guerrilla warfare throughout the entire state. This was the irregular warfare tactics that include ambushes, sabotage, raids, and hit-and-run. The geography of Missouri, with its forests, caves, etc. allowed for this type of warfare, also it is said that Jesse James a former member of the guerrillas used the Merrimac Caverns as a hideout. After the Civil War Missouri was in shambles, the conflict had split the population into three bitterly opposed factions: the anti-slavery unionists whom had identified with the Republican Party, the segregationist conservative unionists, whom identified with the democratic party; and the pro-slavery, ex-confederate secessionists. RES.8 Missouri being a northern state was allowed to join the Union as a slave state through the Missouri Compromise

Confederate Flag

RES.5 The two opposing flags during the civil war

RES.6 Missouri Civil War sites

RES.7 Missouri Citizens engaged in guerrilla warfare

RES.9 Jesse James was a former member of the guerrilas.

HISTORY

Union Flag


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS

HISTORY LOCATION The territory that now makes up the State of Missouri was part of the Louisiana Purchase. The area was purchased in 1803 from France by President Thomas Jefferson. Missouri became the 24th state to be admitted to the union in August 10, 1824. The “Show Me State” is located in the Midwestern region of the United States at the heart of the nation. Culturally, Missourians, especially the ones in the southern part of the state, consider themselves Midwestern and Southern at once due to the proximity to the Southern regional border and due to Missouri historically being considered a Southern State throughout history. The State of Missouri is bordered by eight neighboring states: Iowa, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska.

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

RES.11 The Regions of the United States (Midwest in Orange)

RES.10 Location of the State of Missouri

RES.12 Landscape with buffalo on the upper Missouri. Watercolor by Karl Bodmer 1833


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GEOGRAPHY OF MISSOURI

Northern Plains

The State of Missouri is near the geographical center of the United States. This lends the state to have a wide variety of distinct geographical features. The state is divided into three major physiographic divisions: the Northern Plains, the Mississippi Alluvial Plain, and the Ozark Plateau. The Northern Plains make up for a third of the state’s geography. The region accounts for the entire northern section of the state; the southern border of the region is largely defined by the Missouri River, however the Osage plain in the western portion of the state extends to meet the Ozark Plateau. The Northern Plains region is characterized as the Disected Till Plains. The region is lowland, consisting of a beautiful countryside known for its plains and prairies. The region features soft rolling hills, and has many streams carving the landscape. The Mississippi Alluvial Plain accounts for the smallest region of the state; this area includes the lowlands of the extreme southeast Missouri. The extent of the Mississippi embankment runs from Ste. Genevieve to the Arkansas border. The area is a beautiful undulating

countryside that is well drained. However, the land is swampy within the region’s lowest points. Missouri’s largest geographical region is the Ozark Plateau. This region comprises of about twothirds of the area of the state. This region comprises the highlands, which make up the highest points of the state. The Ozark region is essentially a low dome, which is deeply dissected, dominated by a ridge. This belt of highlands is relatively even, it run from near the Mississippi River down into Arkansas. Within the region the landscape can be undulating or highly rugged and dissected. The southernmost part of the state is characterized by its majestic forested Ozark and Ouachita Mountains.

RES.13 Soft Autumn hills in the Ozark Mountains

RES.14 Swampy land in the Alluvial Plains

Ozark Plateau

Alluvial Plain

RES.16 Northern Plains mixed prairies and soft rolling hills

HISTORY

RES. 15 Missouri is near the geographical center of the United States, it has three distinct physiographic divisions: Northern Plains, Mississippi Alluvial Plain, and the Ozark Plateau


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT

HISTORY OZARK’S PRE-WHITE HISTORY The Ozark region has seen many prehistoric discoveries of fossils and remains as late as before the last ice age within the area’s karsts landscape. Throughout the area there have been countless discoveries of remains of the indigenous people who resided in the area around 12,000 B.C. The Indian tribes that inhabited the area were the Osage; they thrived within the Ozark karsts topography. They made the caves naturally carved out of the limestone, their temporary shelters. These aboriginal people did not live entirely in the rock shelters, but rather, they moved frequently following herds of mammoth and mastodon. The earliest discovery are believed to be have been made by John W. Bland in 1872. He discovered a series of items in a cave near his home town in the present Benton County. He discovered a basket made of cane, a needle made of owl bone and there are even accounts of a moccasin made of grass, however there is no knowledge of what has become of the said objects.

RECOMMENDATIONS

RES.17 Painting of Ozark Bluff Dwellers by Steve Miller

RES.18 The Osage tribes inhabited Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Kansas

RES.19 Exploration of Southern Missouri’s caves

RES.20 site of rock shelter


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In the 1900s the American anthropologist M. R. Harrington set out on an expedition to explore the rock shelters of the Ozarks. He and his team found a great quantity of object well preserved within the cliff shelters. The typical deposits that were found in all of the rock shelters included ashes, fragments of limestone and shale, dried grass, leaves, sticks, cane basket splints, Indian hemp in various stages of preparation, fragments of baskets, bones of food animals, and skins. Some of the weapons and tools found in the rock shelters include: heavy flint points, wooden shafts, and pieces of cane shafts for spears. There were also remains of mats, baskets, and nets that represent the tribes’ expertise in weaving.

The discovered uniformity of a single culture within the region and due to the cliffs locally known as “bluffs”, Harrington coined the popular term “Ozark Bluffdweller”, which he applied to the ancient inhabitants. Later a note of urgency was experienced when plans were announced for the building of the Table Rock Dam. The concern was that the valuable sites and precious remains of these prehistoric people would be submerged under water and lost forever. Quick action proceeded where significant salvage operations were conducted by the University of Missouri and the University of Arkansas. Today there are many opportunities for the further explorations to take place within the Ozarks caves.

RES.21 Some examples of weapons, tools and baskets found in rock shelters by M. R. Harrington

RES.23 large entrance to a large rock shelter

HISTORY

RES.22 Bluff Dweller Cave found and explored in 1925


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT

HISTORY OZARK’S WHITE SETTLERS The settlers of the area were attracted to area for many reasons; one of the most important was for the wilderness trail. The history of this trail is that once buffalo migrated along the present Highway 13 from the Kickapoo Prairie at Springfield to winter grazing on the north Arkansas Prairies. The buffalo followed the ridges and, thus, they made a trail along the way. Indians then followed the trails jumping from one hunting ground to the other. White settlers found that the old buffalo trail through the wilderness was the easiest route south from Springfield. They called it the Wilderness Trail. Early wagon freighter then followed in the footsteps of the buffalo and the Indians. They crossed the White River at the present Kimberling city. This was one of the shallowest points on the White River. The ford at this location remained until the Mabry Ferry was established.

The trails were used extensively by wagon freighters who ventured north transporting goods, especially the abundant white oak timber from the area. There was a great demand for this timber in Springfield, Missouri because of the resource could be used for railroad ties. Springfield was significant because of its train yards that could then transport the goods to St. Louis and the rest of the settled country. The Wilderness Road crossed the White River at the Radical campground and at Linchpin, the present Branson West. Soon the Wilderness Road gained popularity and so did the surrounding campgrounds on either side of the White River. The Radical campground soon developed into the town of Radical. At one point there were hundreds of wagons on both sided of the river waiting to cross due to high floodwaters. In 1922 the Mabry Ferry was located at the town of Radical.

RES.24 Buffalo migrated along the present highway 13

RES.25 The old Maybry ferry circa 1922

RECOMMENDATIONS

RES.26 Wilderness road and Mabry ferry crossing


27

The ferry was soon taken over by the Kimberling family who saw high traffic year round. The population of the surrounding area continued to grow, and so did the demand of travelers crossing the White River. On December 10, 1933, the old Kimberling ferry was replaced by the first metal bridge. Today a portion of the original bridge still exists just below the new Kimberling City Bridge, submerged below the Table Rock Lake. The population of Radical and the surround area continued to grow, and after the damming of the White River, Radical was flooded and Kimberling City was established. There are opportunities to scuba dive in the areas to see this historical bridge and learn about the natural lake ecology.

Reed Springs

Radical

Berryville

RES.27 Typical log house of the early Ozark settlers

RES.29 The old Kimberling ferry

RES.30 The original bridge below the new current Kimberling City Bridge before the lake was completed and filled.

HISTORY

RES.28 The wilderness route passing through Radical, Missouri leading to Springfield, Missouri


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

HISTORY OZARK IDENTITY AND CULTURE The physical location of the Ozarks is a geologically defined region in Missouri. However there is an ethnic definition of the area that describes the identity and the culture of the region and its inhabitants. The word Ozark refers to a region of people living on the Ozark Plateau who share a distinct culture, architecture and dialect. The regional Ozark culture was derived by the early American pioneers who settled the area in the 19th century. At the beginning of the 19th century the first America settled the area came west from the Southern Appalachians. In the 1840’s Irish and German immigrant populations also came to the area. The early settler’s identity stems from their way of life and their reliance of living off the land. The early settlers relied on hunting, fishing, and trapping as well as foraging the rural landscape to supplement their diets and income. This aspect of the traditional Ozark culture was been preserved. It has even been interpreted into the entertainment and commercial venues of the region; however, the theme parks and theaters of the area have little in common with the traditional Ozark culture.

RES.31 The first settlers came west from the Southern Appalachians

Today hunting and fishing are common recreation activities of the area, these activities attract many tourists to the area looking to experience the quieter way of life. The traditional Ozark culture includes the telling of stories, folk lore, and tunes that were passed down orally between generations. In the 20th century, square dances became an important social avenue that was incorporated anywhere that people gathered; such as around mills, timber camps, springs, etc. The most significant traditional instrumentalist in the Ozarks is the fiddler. The community fiddlers were revered for carrying the local tunes, whereas the regionally traveling fiddlers brought new tunes and entertainment. Today there remains active community tradition bearers; however they are decreasing in numbers. RES.32 Famous Arkansas fiddler

RES.33 The Missouri Ozark hillside


29

The Ozark religion was similar to the Appalachia, predominantly Baptist and Methodist during the periods of the early settlement of the region. It tends to be conservative and individualistic, with Anglicans, Assemblies of God, Baptists including Southern Baptists, Church of Christ, Pentecostal denominations as well as Catholics. There are many religious organizations that are headquartered in the Ozarks; the Assembly of God and Baptist Bible Fellowship International in Springfield, and the Pentecostal Church of God in Joplin.

RES.34 Enjoying the current river in the Ozarks

RES.36 traditional bearer demonstrating barrel making craft

RES.37 View of Ozark Mountains

HISTORY

RES.35 The picturesque and magnificent Table Rock Lake.


JOE BALD VISION 2040

DEMOGRAPHICS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Chart Title DEMOGRAPHICS

RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

There is a population of residents that should be included when looking at enhancing the community and developing the Joe Bald Park. The closest city to the site is Kimberling City, Missouri. According to the 2010 census, within Kimberling City there were 2,400 people, 1,147 households, and 774 families residing. The city is important to the future development of the park because it can offer additional amenities to park users. The population of the greater area of Kimberling City, the area within the 65686 zip code, doubles the area’s population and as important as Kimberling City. The total population of the 65686 zip code area is 4,920, which has grown by 12.95% since 2000. Along Joe Bald Road alone there is an estimated 1,000 residents. It is important to consider the entire surrounding area when planning the future development of Joe Bald Park. The analytical graphs and figures represent the entirety of the area’s population.

Population by Gender

Chart Title 53% 5%

15%

5%

2%

9%

47%

2%

Population by Age 35%

Chart Title

Median age: Chart Title 6% 5%

15%

5%

7%

9%

7%

58 years old

14%2%

3

6 7 1Under 5 150 8 25-14 339 1 9 315-24 335 2 425-44 677 3

21%

4 545-64 1, 604

32%

5 1, 815 665+

6%

35%

2Female 2, 588 4

2%

37%

1Male 2, 332

5

3%

7

Kimberling City within

51%

15%

9

zip code Chart 65686 Title

Chart Title 5%

5%

9%

49%

2%

2%

1 City 2400 1Kimberling

2Rest of Zip2 Code Area 2520 3

21% RES.41

6

8

RES.40

RES.38 Kimberling city (red), 65686 zip code blue outline

2

21% RES.39

1

4 5

35%

6%

6


31

Chart Title

Chart Title

Careers and Occupations Chart Title

Title

98%

5%

15%

5%

9%

2%

2% 21%

0.71% 0.14%

0.12% 35%

1%

6%

5%

5%

Native American 3 3 4 4 Hispanic 5

5%

2%

61

5Black 6

27

6Two or More Races 35

0%

10%

5%

15%

5%

4%

8

9%

2%

2%

2%

23%

21%

18%

13%

6%

35%

5%

30%

9 1Danish 39 2Dutch 43

35%

21% 19%

45German 56Irish

822

357

67Italian

127

15%

25% 5%

5%

11 Person Households 570

1

2%

2%

22 or more Person

Households 1,702 2

3 21%

4 5 6

6%

35% RES.46

7

Chart Title

Poverty level

8 9

8%

2%54% 2% 21%

12% 35%

75%

9%

Chart Title

RES.44

9

Chart Title

4French 127

3

Title Housing Occupancy inChart zip code 65686

26% 15%

8

Household Size

3English 495

9American 629

9%

4Farming, 4Fishing, Forestry 0

6 6Production,Transportation

Chart Title

RES.45

2

9

5%

3Sales and3Office 540

7

78Swedish 63

RES.43

2Service 291 2

5 5Construction and Repair 151

6%

35%

1Management 493 1

1

8

5%

2%32% 2%

9%

7

0.55%

Population by First Ancestry Chart Title2% 15%

2One Race, other 7

2

6

Chart Title

RES.42

1White 150 4, 822

1

2Renter1 Occupied 418 3Seasonal 902 2

4Not occupied 260 3 5

6%

Chart Title

1Owner Occupied 1, 854

15%

5%4% 5%

9%

90% 1

2%

8

21%

3Above poverty level 4, 608

2

6%

4

6 7

2%

1Individuals in poverty 253 2Family in poverty 59 3

4 5

RES.47

35%

6%

6

DEMOGRAPHICS

Population by Race Chart


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

COMMUNITY MEETINGS FIRST IMPRESSION On August 28, 2013 we visited the Kimberling City community and Joe Bald Park for the first time.. Our first impressions of the area occurred on Highway 13 as we drove to Table Rock Lake. We observed the characteristic forested and untouched natural mountain landscape of the Missouri Ozarks. Along the way we viewed many of the area’s natural land features; balds or prominent mountain with glade-type vegetation that is surrounded by forest and lime stone bluffs that break up the undulating landscape. Further along the highway, we observed the many business highway branching off of the main road leading to communities off of Highway 13. Once we arrived in the City of Kimberling City we noticed the landscape had become more hilly and rugged. We viewed residences in the distance nestled within the Ozark forest and through the trees we saw glimpses of Table Rock Lake. Arriving at the Table Rock Lake Area Chamber of Commerce we met with members of the Park’s Advisory Committee and Chamber of Commerce. They gave us an introduction of the area and its history; they told us the significance of the Kimberling City Bridge, the City of Radical and the Old Wilderness Road. They gave us a briefing on the Joe Bald Park site, its prime location on the lake, and its economic importance for the area. We were also provided a detailed description of the Corps of Engineers’ ownership of the park site and history behind the park’s closure. Before we adjourned the meeting with members of the Park Advisory Committee and Chamber of Commerce, we asked everyone in attendance to describe their wants and desires, “vision”, for Joe Bald Park. We were then given a bus tour of the City of Kimberling City. The focus of the tour was to develop an understanding city and community’s fabric: such as the local businesses along Highway 13, the different residential sections of the community and their housing stock, the local grocery store and shopping mall, the

Kimberling City Bridge, the Port of Kimberling City Marina and Resort, and the Kimberling City Town Hall and Area Library. We then traveled down Joe Bald Road to Joe Bald Park and experienced firsthand the notoriously narrow and curvy Joe Bald Road. We observed the residences with shallow front yards that abutted the road, the steep drop-offs alongside the road, beautiful panoramic views of Table Rock Lake, and the park’s detachment from both Highway 13 and City of Kimberling City. All of a sudden we arrived at the Park and entered park road with the overgrown vegetation on either side. At the end of the park road we arrived at the existing boat launch. Here Dennis Wood, Presiding Stone County Commissioner, met us with his boat to show us Joe Bald Park from the water approach. This gave us an important perspective, the view of the Joe Bald Park site from Table Rock Lake and its proximity to the confluence the James River and White River.

RES.49 Getting a different perspective of the site

RES.48 On Table Rock Lake looking back to the Joe Bald Park site


33

INITIAL DOCUMENTATION We documented the paved roadways of the park, as well as the many ATV and deer trails. We witnessed the existing unkempt condition of the picnic areas, the restrooms, and the man-made structure on the site. We analyzed their functionality and proximity to one another; noting the possible reuse of these infrastructures.

RES.51 walking the shoreline and observing the connection to the lake.

RES.50 Taking the breathtaking views in of the lake and the surrounding gorgeous Ozark landscape

COMMUNITY MEETINGS

We visited the Joe Bald Park site a second time on August 31, 2013. This time we came to examine the site more closely. We split the four member design team into two, two-person groups. One group took entire northern section of the park, while the other group took the remaining southern section of the park. Each group documented the current condition and qualities of the site using maps, field notes, and photographs. Each group walked the shoreline of their section of the park to better understand the relationship of Joe Bald Park to Table Rock Lake. The team later concluded that this shoreline was one of the most important assets of Joe Bald Park. Each group noted areas with grand view and vistas looking out to the lake, especially, along the western side of the peninsula with the vistas of the afternoon sunset. The groups documented the terrain as it changed from a relatively level grade along the west shoreline to a more rugged and rocky grade along the north and south shorelines. We documented the natural vegetation of the park site including the trees and their classification, dimensions, and character. We noticed a variety of deciduous trees throughout the site and many evergreen trees along the southern shoreline. Likewise, we noted the areas that were overgrown and those clear of grasses, shrubs, and underbrush. Each group walked the central part of the site. Here we experienced a landscape more evocative of the surrounding Ozark landscape with its rugged and hilly nature. We took particular note of the two knolls on the site; these being the highest points on the site. The group in the south observed a drainage ravine that had been carved by the site’s natural hydrology. The group in the north observed the rock beach and at the northern most point of the site, observed large stones visible just beneath the water. These were noted as key feature of the site that could act as prime swimming waters.


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

COMMUNITY MEETINGS ROTARY CLUB MEETING The design team met with and gave a presentation to the Table Rock Lake Rotary Club on September 13, 2013. The purpose of the meeting was to gain a greater audience for the project, create a dialogue, and a greater level of investment in the project from members of the community. We each presented the research of successful parks that we had studied, comparing the particular precedents to Joe Bald Park. We presented the: geographical location, scale of the sites, programs and activities within each park, and the agencies involved. We then presented the assets and challenges of the Joe Bald Park site at many scales including: • the immediate site, we presented an analysis of the pros and cons as we had witnessed and previously documented, • the local site, we presented our analysis and expressed the growing importance of the connection between the site and the surrounding communities, • the regional site, we presented our analysis of the connection between Joe Bald and metropolitan cities within the surrounding region. We presented some of the current trends including: • the rising fuel costs and the implications of its increase for the future development of the park, • the nationwide initiative of active living by design and its impact on communities, • the importance of developing a park in the area so to promote the health and wellbeing of the local communities. We each also spoke of our individual preliminary vision and ideas for the future development of the site. After the presentation we were able to meet with the Rotary Club members individually. We spoke to them further about our individual preliminary proposals and ideas, which lead to a discussion of Joe Bald Park’s development, their concerns, and the potential impact and implications for the area. We spoke of the immediate

neighborhoods and the potential of a broader audience. There was a consensus among the club member present that the expansion and improvements of Joe Bald Road was vital; they agreed that the commute to Joe Bald Park should be more pleasant and less dangerous. They also voiced concerns about the additional traffic, noise, and pollution that would be introduced to area with the development of the park.

RES. 53 Rotary Club International seeks to involve the entire community

RES.52 Meeting the Table Rock Lake rotary club


35

FIRST ANNUAL COMMUNITY PICNIC development of the site. We reminded the community members that their feedback on all matters would be the most important and that through their cooperation we could create a more accurate vision for the future development of Joe Bald Park. Each community member gave us their own desires for the Joe Bald Park intervention. The most prevalent concern that we received was; “they detested the idea of overdeveloping the site and ridding the area of its natural character”. We encourage community members to write down their own personal vision for Joe Bald Park on our notepad. This was tremendously successful; it allowed us to have a document of the community’s concerns in their own words and allowed the community members to see what other were saying. View notepad on page ##. RES.55 First Annual community cook-out and fun

The Community Picnic was designed to bring the community together and it did just that.

RES.54 The many booths and community members in the First Annual Community picnic

COMMUNITY MEETINGS

The design team attended the City of Kimberling City’s First Annual Community Picnic on September 21, 2013 at the Port of Kimberling Marina and Resort. The intent of the picnic was to provide a venue to connect the community with the local non-profit and civic organizations that serve the area. The purpose of our presence at this community-wide picnic was to inform the community members about the conditions at Joe Bald Park, the Joe Bald Park Visioning Project and Drury University’s involvement in that project, and the need for greater community involvement in the collaborative visioning process. The design team setup a booth with display boards that discussed our research of other successful parks, the growing national trends, such as increasing fuel costs, Smart Growth and Active Living, and the assets and challenges of the Joe Bald Park site. We displayed a satellite image denoting the location of Joe Bald Park on Table Rock Lake. The boards denoting the assets of the park included documentation of the park’s topography, existing views and vistas from the park to the lake, and the vegetation and natural features present on site. The boards denoting the challenges included documentation of the flood pool line, the park’s only open area, the lack of pedestrian routes to the park from the surrounding neighborhoods, and the overgrown and unkempt present conditions of the park. Throughout the day we met with community members and presented the boards and engaged in a dialogue where we expressed our ideas for the future


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

COMMUNITY MEETINGS FIRST COMMUNITY MEETING Our first community meeting was held on September 23, 2013 at the First Christian Church in the City of Kimberling City. The purpose of the community meeting was to host a forum where we could formally present our initial research and observations to the community and seek to promote a community dialogue about the future of Joe Bald Park. Members of the public, Army Corps of Engineers, Joe Bald Park Visioning Committee, Table Rock Lake Chamber of Commerce, city and county elected officials, newspaper and television media, University of Missouri-Extension, and Drury University Center for Community Studies met to officially begin the vision process. Community members were encouraged to write down their questions, recommendations, and comments for what they thought about the presented ideas. Some of the notes can be found on page 41. We introduced the project and spoke of our invitation to produce a long term vision for the development of the Joe Bald Park from both the Ozark Heritage River Foundation and the Army Corps of Engineers. We presented a brief of what we had done thus far: we talked about our site visits, the feedback that we had received from the Rotary Club meeting, and the First Annual Community Picnic. We presented the research that we had completed on the nationwide trends that would affect any long term development. We presented Active Living by Design, Active Living by Network, the long term fuel cost projections, and Smart Growth. We explained the trends’ many benefits if they were to be incorporated in the visionary project. We presented our initial analysis of the site, including the assets and challenges at various scales. We described the immediate site, local site, and regional site in detail. We described the natural qualities, existing conditions of the park and future opportunities and

connections that could be expanded upon so to make the park more accessible. We presented our investigations and critiques of successful park that we had researched. We compared the particular parks to Joe Bald Park, describing the geographical location, proximities to cities, scale of the park site, programs and activities within each park, agencies involved, and management and ownership of the parks. After the presentation we were able to meet with community members to answer any immediate questions or concerned as well as to begin a dialogue about what they felt they wanted or needed in the Joe Bald Park. Lastly, we were able to get statistical feedback by presenting a survey to the community members. Questions and Results start on page 42.

RES.57 Presenting to the community

RES.56 Taking note of community members feedback and comments


37

SECOND COMMUNITY MEETING dialogue where we clarified our design choices, expanded upon what we had presented, and received a second opinion on how well we had captured the community’s collective vision. Lastly, we were able to get statistical feedback by presenting a survey to the community members.

RES.59 Welcoming community members at the doors

RES.58 Community members looking over our prepared boards

COMMUNITY MEETINGS

The second community meeting was held on October 14, 2013 at the First Christian Church. The purpose of this community meeting was to present design team’s four individual concepts for the vision of Joe Bald Park. Members of the public, Army Corps of Engineers, Joe Bald Park Visioning Committee, Table Rock Lake Chamber of Commerce, city and county elected officials, newspaper and television media, University of Missouri-Extension, and Drury University Center for Community Studies met to critiques, give opinions, ask questions and provide direction for the Joe Bald Park 2040 Visionary Project. Community members were again encouraged to write down their likes, dislikes, questions, recommendations, and comments for what they thought about the presented ideas. The team introduced the project and presented a brief of what we had done thus far: we talked about our site visits, the feedback that we had received from the Rotary Club meeting, the feedback from the First Annual Community Picnic, and talked about the discussions and feedback from the first meeting. We presented our initial mission statement for the project which read, “Our group’s visionary project aims to connect the community to the natural landscape while promoting a positive, active, and healthy lifestyle through different social, economic and environmental practices.” The team then presented each member’s conceptual vision for the long term development of Joe Bald Park. We referenced the ideas and feedback that lead us to generate our proposed visionary concepts. We each presented our own interpretations showing the master site plan, plan details, perspectives, and sections to represent our project. We expressed the value that each of our schemes provided and the impacts it could have on the community. After the presentation we asked the community members to join us at our presentation boards and encouraged them to critique our work. This created a


JOE BALD VISION 2040

COMMUNITY MEETINGS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

FOCUSED SITE ANALYSIS

RESEARCH

The design team visited Joe Bald Park for the third time on October 28, 2013. This time we came for the purpose of examining the site in great detail and we also came to document the key areas where in our individual schemes we had introduced structures and paths. We used these field notes and observations as a means to compare our individual proposed intentions based upon whether our designs were a suitable fit for the qualities of Joe Bald Park. As a group we walked the shoreline and central part of the site. We visited the specific areas that were in question and proceeded to document and photograph the site conditions. We engaged in a discussion of potential places where we could move some of our programmatic elements. This onsite analysis gave us a more comprehensive foundation upon which to justify some of our selected structures and paths locations. This time we examined the existing infrastructure including: the paved roads, ATV trails, and deer trails more closely. We followed the routes and came to realize the importance of incorporating these existing routes into our design proposals. We also took special notice of the shoreline; we had gathered through community feedback that the connection to the lake was of primary importance and that walking trails around the entire site was a great development opportunity. We documented the terrain along the shore and the potential clearings that would host the lakeside path. We documented the areas along the way that had the best views and vistas onto the lake. We came across a local daily visitor of the site. We took the opportunity to ask for his opinion of the park and asked him for his feedback on what area of park had the greatest potential for development and which areas should be kept natural. He was excited to hear about the future possible development of the site, he replied by saying that he admired the natural character of the site,

HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

but expressed his enthusiasm for bringing more locals to the park by introducing a variety of programs ranging from pavilions to a conservation center. When we traveled into the City of Kimberling City for lunch, we took the opportunity to talk with several business owners and community members about their views of the park. We asked them for their wants and needs. Some of the responses are on page 40.

RES.61 Taking note of the inclines of the site

RES.60 Closely examining and walking on existing roads and trails on site


39

THIRD COMMUNITY MEETING presented the phasing for the development of the park, outlining the most economical, and sustainable sequence that the park could be developed. After the presentation we asked the community members to join us at the presentation boards and encouraged them to critique our work. This created a dialogue where we clarified our design choices, expanded upon what we had presented, and received opinion on how well we had captured the community’s collective vision. Lastly, we met collectively as a large group and engaged in a communitywide discussion. We listened to the dialogue of community members talking about the opportunities and agents that could help the development of the park. The community members excitedly provide recommendation and began talking about a strategy to start implementing some of the visionary ideas.

RES.63 Presenting our single visioning concept to the community

RES.62 Displaying our boards to the community members, to emphasize our previous presentation

COMMUNITY MEETINGS

Our third community meeting was held on November 04, 2013 at the First Christian Church. The purpose of the community meeting was to host a forum where we could formally present to the community the design team’s single vision concept. Members of the public, Army Corps of Engineers, Joe Bald Park Visioning Committee, Table Rock Lake Chamber of Commerce, city and county elected officials, newspaper and television media, University of Missouri-Extension, and Drury University Center for Community Studies met to offer opinions, critiques, and ask questions about the latest vision for the Joe Bald Park 2040 Project. Community members were again encouraged to write down their questions, recommendations, and comments for what they thought about the presented idea. We presented our reactivation process of the site, displaying the contrast between the existing conditions of the site and the resulting outcome due to the process. We presented the idea of designing sustainably and how attainable the system could be achieved. We referenced the ideas and feedback that lead us to generate a park that leads by example and not just maintains the natural environment and the lake but preserves it as well. We presented the entrance, expansion of the roads, and parking on site and the incorporation of vegetation acting as a natural storm water filtration system. We presented the concepts for the conservation center and cabins, restaurant, welcome center and the ideas behind their development, qualities, and flexibility of each structure. We also presented the social zones of the scheme including: the pavilions, green park space, tree house playgrounds, and many follies placed throughout the site. We represented the social, environmental, and economic impact of the programs of the site. We talked about the adjacencies of the structure to one another, to the lake, paths and connections within the park. We


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH

COMMUNITY FEEDBACK FIRST ANNUAL COMMUNITY PICNIC INTERACTIVE NOTE PAD

COMMUNITY FEEDBACK: DIALOGUE BUBBLES

HISTORY How often do you visit Joe Bald Park?

DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

Community Vision: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Community Center Community Garden Nature Center Farmers Market Playground Wedding Pavilions Developed Trails Walking Trails ATV Tracks Bicycle Accessible Swimming Fishing Tent Camping Boat Parking Food Edible Gardens Open Fire Cooking Picnic Areas

What is the one thing that the area needs?

Oh, everyday! Me and my dog come here to walk.

We need a safe playground for kids to play in!

What is there to do here? Here...Nothing really... Branson is just up the road.

How significant could Joe Bald Park be in the future?

I don’t even know why they closed it in the first place.

What is the most important feature of Joe Bald? The natural and scenic qualities!

Who should the Park be developed for?

The local community members, but also for visitors


41

COMMUNITY MEETINGS: STICKY NOTES

Meeting 2

• Widen the Road to the park, it is dangerous!

• Conservation center is a great idea

• Do not overdevelop the site

• Providing student housing might not be enough

• Provide walking and hiking trails

Meeting 3 • Can you include an aquarium? • The project should include scuba diving platforms

• Think about year round use

• The playground, and the tree structures are great

• Provide courtesy docks

• The idea of pavilions and follies is great

• I like the flexibility of the follies and pavilions

• Keep the land natural and scenic

• I like the idea of secluded areas throughout the park

• The tournament center could be a great feature

• Keep the development away from the shoreline

• Who will own/manage the park?

• Joe Bald park can be managed by the State of Missouri

• We don’t want another lake of the Ozarks.

• A ferry might not work within the next 50 years

• The site is too small for a marina!

• Provide camping areas

• Do not allow shooting ranges

• Provide docks for disabled people and children

• Where will the funding come from?

• Include a playground

• The park should include a restaurant

• Keep the boat launch

• Think more about the Lake

• The sustainability aspect and water management is a perfect educational opportunity • The site has a perfect balance between natural and developed areas

COMMUNITY FEEDBACK

Meeting 1


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

COMMUNITY FEEDBACK CLICKER QUESTIONS AND RESPONSES Session 1 9-23-2013 72 Participants 68.18% male 31.82% female 1. How often do you use Joe Bald Park? More Than Once a Week Once a Week

TRENDS

Seasonally

SITE CONTEXT

Never

20.83% 20.83% 8.33%

11.11%

Once a Month

19.11% 2.78%

Annually

5. Should the program be for seasonal use of year round?

Youth

Seasonal

Responses

Responses

Daily

3. Who should the target age group be for this project? 0%

Adults

1.41%

Families

11.27%

All Age Groups

80.28%

7.04%

Retirees

Responses

8.57%

Year Round

87.14% 4.29%

Indifferent

16.67%

RECOMMENDATIONS 2. How important is Joe Bald Park to the Table Rock Lake community?

Responses

Very Important Important Neutral

Less Important Not Important

4. On what geographical scale should the Joe Bald Park vision be aimed?

6. Would you pay upkeep services for a program on Joe Bald Park?

Internationally

Yes

Responses

40%

21.43% 12.86% 7.14%

18.57%

Nationally

Regionally Locally

0%

5.8%

44.93% 49.28%

Responses

No

Indifferent

61.97% 28.17% 9.86%


43

Responses

70%

Yes

18.57%

No

11.43%

Indifferent

9. Would you use Joe Bald Park more if there was a walking/cycling path to the site?

Responses

Responses

Yes

52.86%

Indifferent

15.71%

31.48%

No

11. Which passive activities would you like to see on the site? Meditation Garden

14.19%

Picnic Area

Japanese Stroll Garden Botanical Garden Sculpture Park

I don’t Want These Activities

Responses

Hotels

Condos

2.03%

0.68%

10. What active living option would you like to see on the site?

7.43%

16.89% 7.43%

Butterfly House

8. What types of developments would you like to see on the site?

39.86%

8.11%

6.08%

12. What types of conservation/education opportunities would you like to see on the site?

Responses

Responses

Biking

14.29%

Education Center

14.29%

Hiking

19.25%

Conservation Center

19.25%

Dining Establishments

11.49%

Traditional Sports

12.42%

Botanical Garden

12.42%

Educational Institute

10.81%

Shooting Range

28.57%

General Park

28.57%

Marina

18.24%

ATV / Motocross

2.48%

Aquaponics

2.48%

None Needed

19.59%

None Needed

11.8%

Event / Tournament Center Outdoor Experience Shop Amphitheater

13.51% 15.54% 8.11%

Paintball

Skate Park

I Don’t Want These Activities

5.59% 5.59% 0%

Edible Landscape Farmers Market Organic Cooking

5.59% 5.59% 0%

COMMUNITY FEEDBACK

7. Would you use Joe Bald Park more if there was a place to dock your boat on site?


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT

COMMUNITY FEEDBACK CLICKER QUESTIONS AND RESPONSES Session 2 10-14-2013 16 Participants 60% male 40% female 1. How often do you use Joe Bald Park?

More Than Once a Week

0%

6.25%

Once a Week

18.75%

Seasonally

31.25%

18.75%

Once a Month

6.25%

Annually

5. Would you prefer a separation of “tourist” and “local use” spaces on the Joe Bald?

Very Important

Strongly Agree

Responses

Responses

Daily

3. How important is the Joe Bald Park site to the Table Rock Lake “economy”? 18.75%

Important

50%

Neutral

25% 0%

Less Important Not Important

6.25%

Responses

0%

18.75%

Agree

12.5%

Neutral

25%

Oppose

43.75%

Strongly Oppose

18.75%

Never

RECOMMENDATIONS 2. How important is Joe Bald Park to the Table Rock lake “experience’?

4. What scale should the Joe Bald vision be focused on?

6. Would you be more likely to use the site if you had more choices of activities?

Very Important

Internationally

Yes

Responses

Important Neutral

Less Important Not Important

43.75% 43.75% 6.25% 0%

6.25%

Responses

Nationally

Regionally Locally

0% 0%

56.25% 43.75%

Responses

No

Indifferent

93.75% 6.25% 0%


45

Responses

Strongly Agree

62.5% 6.25%

Neutral

Oppose

0% 0%

Strongly Oppose

8. Should some areas be cleared to provide space for picnicking?

Responses

Strongly Agree Agree

Neutral Oppose

Strongly Oppose

11. Should the site be managed by a non-profit or a for-profit organization?

Water Trail

30.43%

For-Profit

Community Greenway

13.04%

Responses

31.25%

Agree

9. What options should be considered for improving transportation access to Joe Bald? Water Taxi Shuttle

Responses

8.7%

Courtesy Docks

Improve / Widen Joe Bald Road No Improvement Needed

32.61%

33.33%

Water Based Private Transit

0%

Water Trail For Personal Water Craft

0%

Local Shuttle Transit - Regional

0%

Local Shuttle Transit - Community Wide Bicycles

Golf Carts

Horse and Other Draft Animals

I’ll Keep My Car

Indifferent

25%

50%

2.17%

10. Which would you consider, assuming the 40-year trend in fuel cost resulting in $12-16 per gallon? Water Based Public Transit

25%

13.04%

12. How should the Joe Bald Park site be developed?

Responses

66.67%

Non-Profit

Responses

6.25%

6.25% 0%

18.75% 6.25%

0%

31.25%

18.75% 12.5%

By the Corps of Engineers

0%

By Others with a Long Term Lease from the Corps 50%

Sell the Site to the State

25%

Sell the Site to the County

12.5%

Sell the Site to a Private Developer

6.25%

Sell the Site to a University or Research Coalition 6.25%

COMMUNITY FEEDBACK

7. The vision should protect or restore the natural environment of the site.


JOE BALD VISION 2040

NATURAL LANDSCAPE

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OZARKS NATIVE PLANTS AND TREES RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT

Native plants are species that are of the regional area and acclimated to the seasonal climate. This vegetation has evolved over thousands of years; as far as to the last ice age. There is a great diversity of native plants within Missouri and countless native species only found in the Ozarks. These native plants have evolved with the local geology, climate, and wildlife. Native plants have longer roots, which allow them to perform better and last longer during dry periods. They are an important element of the landscape because they act as food and homes for the local wildlife, help with the management of storm water, reduce the amount of maintenance of the landscape, and provide endless educational opportunities. Well established native plant communities help resist the invasive of nonnative plants and animals that can bring diseases and crush a local ecosystem.

It is important to document and analyze the existing vegetation at Joe Bald Park to determine the native species. This will help determine which foliage should be kept and which should be removed. The preservation of the existing native plants at Joe Bald Park is important, but so to is the incorporation of a greater variety of native species. In Missouri there is a growing trend to using native landscaping, xeriscaping, as a norm rather than as an exception. The benefits that native landscapes provide are fueling a “no” pesticides and fertilizers and a “yes” to biodiversity movement. There are individuals who may be consulted to help with soil analysis and the use of native landscaping at Joe Bald Park. The University of Missouri-Extension, Department of Conservation, Army Corps of Engineers, Landscape Architects, and arborists could provide more information about the soil, wildlife and impact of using native plants.

RES. 64 Native plants produce plenty of necter that attract and sustain butterfiles and other wildlife

RES. 65 The native plants can act as outdoor classrooms where kids can learn about the local vegitation

RECOMMENDATIONS

3 feet

15 feet

RES. 66 The Root systems of non-native vs native species

RES. 67 Adults learn about how they can introduce native plants into thier own gardens and yards by learning from experts


47

OZARK GRASS SPECIES Grass Specimens:

Dropseed

• Bent Grass

Height: 2-3 feet Prefers dry, rocky conditions Used as accent or ground cover

• Blue Grass • Fescue • Rye Grass • Bahia Grass

Indians in the Midwest ground the seed produced by the plant and made a tasty flour. Dropseed is also a highly nutritious seeds sought after by birds.

• Bemuda Grass • Blue Grass • Blue Grama • Buffalograss • Carpet Grass • Centipede Grass

RES. 68 Dropseed grass is a grass species native to the Ozarks

RES. 70 Dropseed grass grows seeds that it will eventually drop, allowing it to spread across the land

RES. 69 Buffalo grass is a native grass species that is ideal for ground cover

RES. 71 Buffalo grass when mature will drop seeds alowing it to flourish and spread throughout the land

Buffalo Grass Height: 4-6 inches Prefers full sun and dry clay or average soil Used as ground cover

• Zoysia Grass • Dropseed

Its an attractive, fine-textured, low-wateruse native grass. This is a warm-season perennial that is exceptionally cold- and drought-tolerant, and has no known disease or insect problems.

NATURAL LANDSCAPE

• Seashore Paspalum


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

NATURAL LANDSCAPE OZARKS TREES

RESEARCH Persimmon HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK

Height: 35-60 feet Prefers dry, clay soil, dry soil, shallow rocky soil. Great use within rain garden, provides edible fruit.

NATURAL LANDSCAPE

Black walnut

PRECEDENT STUDIES

Height: 75-100 feet Prefers normal to clay soils, drought tolerant Great use as a shade tree, provides edible nuts.

LITERATURE

TRENDS

RES. 72 Persimmon trees

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

RES. 74 Black walnut tree

Black gum Height: 30-50 feet Prefers full sun or part shade, likes clay or wet soil Great use as a shade tree, street tree, and for rain gardens

Wild plum

Height: 15-25 feet Prefers normal to dry soils, drought tolerant Great use to attract birds and as an accent

RES. 73 Black gum tree

RES 75 Wild plum tree


49

FLOWER SPEICIES Purple Prairie Clover

Missouri primrose

Purple prairi clover

• • •

Butterfly milkweed Floss flower

Anelonia Missouri black-eyed Susan

Feather celosia

• • • • •

Vinca

Lantana Petunia

Garden verbena

Prairie blazing star

Height: 18-24 inches Flowers: May-September Prefers prairies, and glades, workes well in dry soil

Missouri black-eyed Susan Height: 12-30 inches Flowers: June-October Prefer the Ozark limetone and dolomite glades in rocky prairies.

RES. 76 Purple Prairie clover

RES. 78 Missouri black-eyed Susan

Butterfly milkweed Height: 18-24 inches Flowers: May-September Prefers prairies, glades and rocky, open places.

Missouri primrose Height: 10 inches Flowers: May-August Prefers Missouri’s glades, bluffs, and rocky prairies.

RES. 77 Butterfly milkweed

RES. 79 Missouri primrose

NATURAL LANDSCAPE

Full sun Specimens:


JOE BALD VISION 2040

NATURAL LANDSCAPE

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RAIN GARDEN PLANTS RESEARCH Southern Blue Flag HISTORY

COMMUNITY FEEDBACK

Height: 35-60 feet Prefers dry, clay soil, dry soil, shallow rocky soil. Great use within rain garden, provides edible fruit.

NATURAL LANDSCAPE

Golden Alexanders

DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS

PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS

Height: 75-100 feet Prefers normal to clay soils, drought tolerant Great use as a shade tree, provides edible nuts.

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

RES. 80 Souther Blue Flag

RES. 82 Golden Alexanders

RES. 81 Swamp Milkweed

RES. 83 Palm Sedge

Swamp Milkweed Height: 30-50 feet Prefers full sun pr part shade, likes clay or wet soil Great use as a shade tree, street tree, and in rain gardens

Palm Sedge

Height: 15-25 feet Prefers normal to dry soils, drought tolerant Great use to attract birds and as an accent


51

FLOWER SPECIES Celandine poppy

Celandine poppy

Height: 16-18 inches Flowers: March-July Prefers wooded slopes, and moist soil

Columbine

Crested iris

• • • • • • • • • •

Coleus

Cardinal flower

Wishbone Flower Angel wings Begonia

New Guinea impatiens Polka dot plant

Pale purple coneflower Ninebark

Crested iris

Height: 5-10 inches Flowers: April-May Prefer lowland wooded areas or streams, also works well in well-drained soils

RES. 84 Celandine poppy

RES. 86 Crested iris

RES. 85 Cardinal flower

RES. 87 Pale purple coneflower

Cardinal flower Height: 24-48 inches Flowers: July-October Prefers muddy or gravel banks within the Ozarks

Pale purple coneflower Height: 24-36 inches Flowers: May-October Prefers woodlands and moist soil, can tolerate sunny conditions.

NATURAL LANDSCAPE

Shade Specimens:


JOE BALD VISION 2040

PRECEDENT STUDIES THE MISSOURI DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

The mission of the Missouri Department of Conservation is to Restore, Conserve, and Regulate Missouri’s over-stressed fisheries, forests, and wildlife populations. There are two specific parks that MODOC regulates that have similar characteristics with Joe Bald Park. They are the Russell Emmenegger Nature Park and Powder Valley Conservation Nature Center. These two parks are located in close proximity of each other on the outskirts of the St. Louis metropolitan area. The similarities of the parks run by MODOC and Joe Bald Park include a prominent natural aspect, adjacency to neighborhoods, and a body of water acting as the major focal point for activities. Because of these similarities, the parks run by MODOC provide us with a good example of ideas that we can implement in the Joe Bald Park Visioning Project. The two parks, though they are run through the same organization, are very different from each other. The Russell Emmenegger Nature Park acts more as a traditional park. It is equipped with hiking and biking trails. Some of the trails are paved and some are not. This provides a variety of people the opportunity to interact with nature. There are also open green spaces that provide room to play a variety of sports. The Powder Valley Conservation Nature Reserve is unique in a number of ways. It has a trail system that is completely accessible to handicapped and nonhandicapped people alike. In addition to the trail system, there is also a very advanced education center. The center includes interactive displays that teach people about nature and different ways of living a lifestyle that promotes the protection of nature. In addition, Powder Valley has a number of snakes, fish, insects and small mammals on display to teach visitors about the animals that live in the Missouri area. Powder Valley also has classrooms, libraries, and other sources for information based on the Missouri ecosystem. When looking at the MODOC parks, we need to understand that these parks are located in a city with a

much larger population than Kimberling City or Branson combined. With this thought in mind we can translate the ideas behind the MODOC parks into something that is applicable to Joe Bald Park. In addition we are not only looking at the physical things that the MODOC parks have, we also want to look at the ideas that have helped them to be successful parks. By taking the ideas from the MODOC parks, we can analyze them and redefine them to fit the context of Joe Bald Park and Kimberling City. The examples that we have taken from these parks can be broken up into four categories: goals, objectives, methods, and needs. The goal of the MODOC is to restore, conserve, and regulate Missouri’s natural habitats. This goal acts as the guiding principle behind the decisions made in these parks. For example, if someone were to propose the idea of creating an outdoor classroom along a trail, MODOC would likely look favorably on that because it could be used to educate the public about preserving nature. The objectives look at what needs to happen in order to achieve the main goal. MODOC has multiple objectives that, if implemented properly, will achieve their goal. The first objective deals with people’s interaction with nature. By creating the means necessary for people to go out and be one with nature, an appreciation for nature can develop. This appreciation can create a sense of responsibility within the community that makes sure that the community is conscious about how they act within the park. This sense of responsibility will (to a certain extent) acts as a deterrent from littering, vandalism, and other actions that could potentially harm the ecosystem. The next objective looks at the importance of education. By educating the public about the park and wildlife in general, people will gain knowledge about what they can do to treat and preserve nature on a level in tune with their lifestyle.

RES.88 From left to right: Russel Emmenegger Nature Center, Powder Valley Conservation Nature Center

RES.89 Yellow Outline: Neighborhoods Blue Outline: Businesses


53

RES.90

RES.92

RES.93

RES.94

Another objective is to create social opportunities for the community. In order to maintain interest in MODOC’s goals of conservation, MODOC brought a number of events to their parks. These events spark the public’s interests and keep them coming back to the park on a regular basis. Some of these events include group nature walks, bird watching events, concerts, lectures, and much more. A good variety of events will insure that visitors will not get bored and stop supporting the parks. These objectives work to the overarching goal of MODOC of conserving nature. If we adopt similar aspects of MODOC’s objectives, then we should be able to experience the same success as these parks. The next category is methods. This category lists the things necessary in order to meet the objectives. When looking at the objective of creating interaction with nature, a method of going about that would be to create nature trails to guide people through the land without harming any of the vegetation or wildlife. A method of integrating education includes setting up classrooms and creating relationships with professionals to come

and educate the public about nature and conservation efforts. The last objective deals with how to promote social activities. The methods of going about this could include providing social spaces designed for gatherings or casual interaction. In designing the education center at Powder Valley, many of the displays are oriented in a way that multiple people can interact with them at the same time. This has the opportunity to create dialogue about the different subject matters presented in the center. The last category is needs. This refers to all the literal things that MODOC needed to add to the park to make sure that their goals could be met. This includes the actual trails, the sports facilities, the education center and all the exhibits that go into it. This part of the MODOC parks will probably be the least relevant to our work with Joe Bald Park because many of the things implemented in the MODOC fit the context of St. Louis, not Kimberling City. That is not to say that some things that work at the MODOC parks will not work at Joe Bald Park.

RES.95

RES.96 Missouri Department of Conservation logo

PRECEDENT STUDIES

RES. 91


JOE BALD VISION 2040

PRECEDENT STUDIES

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS

RES.97 Chihuly’s glass art in conjunction with the gardens create a unique experience

MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN

COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

The mission of the Missouri Botanical Garden is, “To discover and share knowledge about plants and their environment in order to preserve and enrich life.” This botanical garden is located in St. Louis, Missouri, but has satellite locations around Missouri. MOBG is a major destination point for visitors of St. Louis. Admission to MOBG is eight dollars for adults and free for children. By keeping the prices low, people are encouraged to visit the gardens. Throughout the summer months, MOBG partners with different artists to create unique experiences of art and horticulture acting together. The artists range from small-time locals, to internationally renowned artist. In addition, free concerts take place every Thursday during the summer. This mixture of art, music, and botany makes the MOBG a cultural center unlike most in the Midwest. On average, MOBG receives 900,000 visitors a year, making it the fifth most visited garden in the United States.

RES.98 Gardens at the Missouri Botanical Garden

MOBG is a leading St. Louis organization in conservation, sustainability, and education. These three aspects are exemplified in almost every aspect of the gardens. One of MOBG’s satellite locations is the Shaw Nature Reserve. The sole purpose of this reserve is to conserve Missouri’s rich horticulture. In addition, it serves as a “nature lab” in which they come up with new ways of practicing sustainability and conservation. MOBG has one of the largest collections of rare and endangered species of plants in the Midwest. Some of the organizations associated with MOBG work to revive different Midwest plants and reintroduce them into the natural ecosystem. MOBG holds the title for some of the most extensive sustainability projects in the world. For example, the Plastic Pot Recycling Program collects plastic pots not only from their own facility but from gardens all around St. Louis. This program ensures that

RES.99 A map of Missouri Botanical Garden


55

as few as possible recyclable plastics get sent to a landfill. In addition, because MOBG is a garden, water is a highly valued resource. Some of the water conservation measures that MOBG implements are rainwater collection, runoff control, and water treatment. These methods ensure that a minimal amount of water is wasted or leaves the site. It also ensures that the water that goes into the ground is not contaminated. The plants that are grown at the MOBG act as natural filtration systems that purify the water. MOBG’s sustainability does not stop at its plants. Sustainable measures are incorporated in almost every aspect. A majority of the buildings located in MOBG and its satellite locations are LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certified. Solar panels and

RES.101 Recycling plastic planters

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Obist quae a pore volora sit qui dest es unt ab id

RES.100 Sustainable water filtration methods.

other sources of clean power are implemented to reduce the dependability of being on the grid. Many of the building are also made from recycled materials. MOBG hosts educational opportunities for the public to teach them methods of gardening with sustainable practices. This refers to alternatives to typical lawn care, which has a very negative impact on the environment. There are excursions hosted by MOBG that go around the country to look at and study the flora. Many of these excursions result in case studies about different species of plants in relationship to Missouri’s native plants. With this information, MOBG works with government officials in order to promote legislation to preserve the Midwest wildlife.

RES.102 Endangered species of orchid at Missouri Botanical Garden

RES.103 The Conservation Club provides opportunities for learning and social interactions

PRECEDENT STUDIES

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JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

PRECEDENT STUDIES “Be local, let your environment inform your decisions, and think about how your grandchildren might be influenced by your actions.” John Hardy, Founder of Green School

GREEN SCHOOL

Green School, located in Bali, Indonesia, overlaps the boundaries between school and living in the everchanging world of tomorrow. This abstract idea means basing the decisions today on the needs of tomorrow. Today we live in a world that faces many challenges. The constant threat of global warming, the rising costs of energy, the exhaustion of renewable and nonrenewable resources, and the detached lifestyle many Americans live are just a few of the issues we face today. Looking at a camp located in a country like Indonesia may not seem to make sense at first, but if we analyze the context we will find there are several aspects that Joe Bald Park and Green School share. Kimberling City and Bali both rely heavily on tourism. This is an important factor to look at when trying to figure out how to program Joe Bald Park to be successful on a year-round basis. The Green School, though it caters to those who are able to make time to attend and are able to afford tuition, manages to be successful by providing an enriching experience through a variety of activities ranging from education, athletics, conservation and sustainability, and creative arts. The primary way of traveling around Bali is with an automobile. Like Kimberling City, and most of America, Bali’s infrastructure is tailored around the automobile. This singular means of transportation is an inconvenience to the Green School because it relies on a transportation system that is not environmentally sustainable. Joe Bald Park has a similar access problem. Currently, the only way to get to Joe Bald Park is to drive on a road with no sidewalks. Access by boat is possible, but it requires that you beach your boat onto the shore, which many people are not comfortable doing because it can damage their boat. The Green School is also located near a residential area. One admirable aspect of the Green School is that

RES.104 The Green School’s building accurately reflects the context of the area

it works with the locals. By collaborating with the local population, the Green School is able to make sure that their efforts fit the context of their location. This is an important aspect that we need to look at when creating programs for Joe Bald Park. Many of the residences that live near Joe Bald Park see the park as an extension to their backyard. It also makes sense that through the years of living near the park a sense of responsibility for the park’s well-being has developed. By creating programs that ensure that the park maintains its inherent natural beauty and give locals the opportunity to be part of the developments that occur, Joe Bald Park can reflect the context of the area. The attention paid to the context of the facilities is important in creating a project that is successful and sustainable. There are many ways in which the Green

RES.105 Map of the surrounding area. Blue: residences, Green: soft jungle, Orange: Green School, Dark Blue: river, Red: highway


RES.106 Green School facilities and farms

RES.107 Green School class in session

RES.108 Growing the cocoa beans

RES.109 Harvesting the cocoa beans

RES.110 Bamboo grown on the site

RES.112 Bamboo being used as the primary building material

School follows the context of its location. The Green School was built from the large bamboo that grows on the site. With the help of the locals, architects were taught about construction methods and forms they could create using this local material. This gave them a school that has architectural significance while using age-old construction methods. The Green School teaches the students about different agricultural practices. Nestled in the heart of the school are plots of farmland that students use to grow a variety of crops. The school looks at farming techniques that take advantage of the rainy climate of Indonesia. Through terrace farming they can take advantage of the rain and produce a bountiful harvest. The crops they produce are native to Indonesia, including coca, rice, and corn. With the help of the locals, the school takes the coca grown on the site and produces chocolate. The Green School has been established on

core values that look to nurture a respect for the natural world. In order to attain this goal, the Green School works toward several objectives. It heightens the students’ environmental awareness, develops the students ecological values, provides an understanding of waste and water usages, teaches the students to be keenly aware of the local environment and the impact on the global environment, and harmonizes the students relationship with the land and how it can provide food, shelter, and energy in sustainable ways. These objectives are also fundamental to creating a program that protects the inherent natural beauty of Joe Bald Park while being economically sustainable and a unique experience. The Green School is an excellent precedent for Joe Bald Park. The attention to context, integration of the local population, and sustainable efforts are all elements that we can work together to create a positive experience for visitors to Joe Bald Park.

RES.111 Preparing the cocoa

RES.113 Cocoa being produced into chocolate

PRECEDENT STUDIES

57


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT

PRECEDENT STUDIES ROCKYWOOD DEEPHAVEN CAMPS Rockywood Deephaven Camps is located on the northern half of Squam Lake in New Hampshire. The mission of the Rockywood Deephaven Camps is to provide a peaceful respite from the demands of everyday life. On Squam Lake, there are three small towns nearby the camp: Holderness, Moltonborough, and Ashland. Holderness is the main area for boat storage. Moltonborough and Ashland are main areas for shopping and retail. The adjacencies of these towns to RDC are similar to the adjacencies between Joe Bald Park, Kimberling City, and Branson. The size of the RDC is similar to Joe Bald Park and both are located on a clear lake. These similarities make RDC a good example to look at for developing Joe Bald Park. The way RDC is set up is fairly simple. Split in half, you have the Rockywood section and Deephaven section. Each is supported by its own dining hall, office, and staff.

RES.115 Rockywood Deephaven Camp is located on the Northern part of Squam Lake. It’s adjacency to other towns are similar to that of Joe Bald Park and it’s surrounding cities

RECOMMENDATIONS

RES.114 Red: Cabins, Blue: Recreational, Yellow: Support Areas

RES.116 Red: Pathways, Blue: Hiking Trails, Yellow: Roads

RES.117 Red: Bedrooms, Blue: Social Space, Yellow: Service Areas


59

The residential cabins are situated along the waterfront with their own docks for recreational use. The dining halls, offices, and library are built in close conjunction. Other support spaces like wood storage and ice houses scattered around the camp for the convenience of the campers. The larger recreation areas such as ball fields, tennis courts, and playgrounds are centrally located between the two camps. The circulation of the camp is organized by a hierarchy of layers. There are worn footpaths that provide circulation between cabins and act as shortcuts to other programs around the camp. The next level is the hiking trails. These trails run through the camp and lead into the surrounding forest. In this trail system there are different levels of difficulty for different levels of hikers. The last layer is the major circulation roads. These are drivable roads for the visitors to get to their cabins. In addition, these roads act as service roads for deliveries, trash pickup, and emergencies. One interesting aspect of the RDC is that each cabin has a unique feeling to it. By doing this, returning campers have the opportunity to have a different experience from the last time they stayed at RDC. Though the cabins have their own unique characteristics, all the

RES.119 Peaceful Respite

cabins share similar spaces. They all have bedrooms, living rooms, bathrooms, a kitchen and a screened in porch. RDC looks to connect people with each other and nature in an intimate way. By not providing televisions in the cabins, families can focus on each other. This facilitates things like family game night or just old fashioned conversation. Parking is strategically located to promote people to walk or bike to the different facilities around the camp. Motor boats with more than 25 HP are not allowed on the lake. People spend their time on the lake in canoes, kayaks, or small sailboats, all of which are available for rent at the lake. These aspects of the RDC ensure that people’s connection with nature is clean and pure. The combination of promoting family values, connection to the landscape, low impact activities, as well as RBC’s similar aspects to Joe Bald Park are the reasons why RBC was chosen as a precedent for the development of Joe Bald Park. This camp has been in operation for more than 100 years. In the beginning it was only a few cabins and camp grounds, but as it became a more popular vacation spot, it has grown into a highly praised vacation destination.

RES.123 Sunfishing on the lake.

PRECEDENT STUDIES

RES.118, 120, 121, 122. Rockywold Deephaven Camps provide a multitude of activities with a focus on lake activitiws


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH HISTORY DEMOGRAPHICS COMMUNITY MEETINGS COMMUNITY FEEDBACK NATURAL LANDSCAPE PRECEDENT STUDIES LITERATURE

TRENDS

PRECEDENT STUDIES INCREDIBLE EDIBLE Incredible Edible is a movement that is beginning to sprout up around the world. It is the result of a reevaluation of the urban landscape in small towns and big cities alike. The Incredible Edible movement looks to rid the dependency on large scale food manufacturing as the only source for produce in towns by creating gardens for people to freely take advantage of. To study the advantages and disadvantages of Incredible Edible, we looked specifically at a town called Todmorden located in West Yorkshire, United Kingdom. The town’s population is very similar to Kimberling City, just shy of 15,000 residences. Todmorden’s economy is based mostly on small to mid-sized markets run by locals. In addition, Todmorden is a commuter town where people reside in the town’s city limits, but tend to work in other towns or cities. The automobile is the main

method of traveling to and from the town though there is a railroad that runs through the town. Within the town, people usually walk to markets, restaurants, or where ever they need to go. For a small town, in an increasingly changing world, it is important to address the challenges in trying to establish this “green route” for their city. Due to their dependency on imported food, officials were in favor for a program that provided self-sustaining practices. Due to economic hardships in the town, many buildings had become vacant and eventually decrepit. Some buildings were torn down leaving empty lots; others have been left standing, usually occupied by squatters. A resident of Todmorden began planting vegetable gardens in a few lots and on rooftops around the town. Word eventually got around and more

RES.125 Community working together to beautify town

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

RES.124 With the participation of the community, new innovations emerge that make the best use of the spaces available

RES.126 Once vacant lots are now points of interest with beautiful gardens


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RES.127 Planting the seeds

RES.129 Picking ingredients

RES.128 Selling the extra produce in markets

RES.130 Enjoying the produce grown in town

RES. 131 Map of the growth of Incredible Edible

RES.132 Children getting involved the beautification of their town

PRECEDENT STUDIES

participants began taking part in this urban gardening. Once enough people got involved, “Incredible Edible” became a sanctioned organization. As the organization has grown, a set of values have been established. IE looks to encourage a lifestyle that promotes the local community. IE looks to create an awareness of how small towns fit into the global society. IE teaches people how to care for and live off the environment. IE creates agricultural ecosystems intended to be sustainable and selfsufficient. IE teaches the skills of gardening to the people who take part in this organization. IE instills a sense of responsibility in the community members to be more aware of their environment and each other. What started out as a novel idea to introduce healthy and local produce for everyone has now inspired a movement that involves schools, churches, local markets, farmers, and health centers. Since IE was first established, more than thirty towns in England have taken up the “incredible edible approach”. Incredible Edible has gone worldwide and occurs on every continent except for Antarctica. In the United States alone, IE is established in Washington, California, Illinois, New York, and has great potential for success in a place like Kimberling City.


TRENDS


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SMART GROWTH ACTIVE LIVING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE FUEL COSTS

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

SMART GROWTH WHAT IS SMART GROWTH? Smart Growth refers to strategies for better building and maintenance of towns and cities. Smart Growth deals with a multitude of issues that cities face and provide solutions that support the development of cities and towns. The major issue that Smart Growth looks to avoid is urban sprawl. In studying Smart Growth, we looked at two main sources to get our information. These include the book Design Manual for Low Impact Design and the website www.smartgrowthamerica.org. These are two good sources for getting information about Smart Growth and proper ways of practicing Smart Growth.

URBAN SPRAWL

Urban sprawl refers to the expansion of automobile oriented, low density development. There are three main components to urban sprawl. There is the leapfrog development, strip development, and singledimension development. Leapfrog occurs when developers build new residences away from existing urban areas, bypassing vacant plots of land. The land is usually less expensive because it is further away from already developed land. Though developers and home buyers save money by purchasing this land, the price of traveling to urban areas is much more costly than living in a more compact and better developed areas. Leapfrog development also promotes commercial zoning districts. The plots of land that are skipped over usually become areas for commercial stores and restaurants. Some people look at this as a good thing because these commercial districts generate revenue in towns and cities. However, these commercial districts also have a major problem. The separation

between residential and commercial areas means more and longer commutes. In addition, the roads within these commercial districts are hardly constructed with foot and bicycle traffic in mind. This makes driving the only sensible method of traveling, which is a problem if you are a resident that lives near enough to a commercial district to walk or bike. Lastly, the leapfrog method is a primary reason for the diminishing natural landscapes and ecosystems in and around our towns and cities. The second category of urban sprawl is strip development. This occurs when extensive commercial development occurs in a linear pattern along both sides of a major roadway. This method of development is good on paper but due to poor planning, and corner cutting practices, the positive aspects of strip development are lost. For example, these areas are usually wrought with traffic congestion due to poor design of access ways and circulation. These areas also have a reputation for being unsightly. However, if governments could plan ahead to secure sufficient right-of-ways, green spaces could be developed to beautify these areas. As with leapfrog development, strip development does not promote alternative modes of transportation, which leads to non-mixed land use and more driving for people living in residential areas away from commercial areas. The final category is low density, single dimension development. This usually refers to large residential subdivisions with detached homes on relatively large plots of land. This development has several issues, they lengthen the commuting distance, they take up space, and they are environmentally harmful. By grouping all the homes near each other and not allowing mixed land use, people have to drive everywhere. Subdivisions are inefficient with land. Subdivisions have the least people per square acre. As the population increases the amount of land needed to provide this sort of lifestyle will increase as well. The environmental impacts of single dimension

T.1 Urban Sprawl: A maze of homes and endless neighborhood roads


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development are also a major concern. The large amounts of land needed to provide space for homeowners destroys natural ecosystems around towns and cities. In addition, standard lawn care in these suburban areas is harmful to the ecosystem. The pesticides used to keep our lawns green are harmful to the wildlife living near a subdivision. Some developers also look for the cheapest initial costs with lawns. They may try to plant grass that is not native to the area, but might be cheaper in the short term. To keep this grass alive, homeowners might find themselves using more water and pesticides than if they planted grass that grew naturally in their area. One thing to keep in mind is that urban sprawl is not so much a way of urban planning, but more so the lack of planning. Urban sprawl occurs when urban planning decisions are made hastily and without thinking in the long term.

THE 10 POINTS OF SMART GROWTH

MIXED LAND USE

T.2 Creating sensible solutions to urban planning issues

Smart Growth promotes mixed land use to create a vibrant community. In many cities and towns, zoning laws state that different uses for land need to be separate. This creates residential districts, commercial districts, open spaces, and institutional facilities all in separate places. Though this seems like a more organized way of urban planning it does not create vibrant communities.

T.3 The town of Beaver Creek, Colorado allows residences, grocery stores, and retail all to be built near each other. By condensing the activity, there are more social interactions, resulting in a more vibrant community.

With mixed land use, residences, grocery stores, offices, and retail stores would all be close enough to walk. Mixed land use looks to create healthier communities by making walking a more viable option. With more walkability, people will cut down on how much they have to drive to get to everyday destinations. Adopting and updating plans and sub-plans are important in developing mixed land use communities. Outdated master plans are an issue many communities face. By regularly updating general master plans and making detailed plans of specific areas, communities can work at achieving goals that address the most current and pressing issues. Zoning usually causes problems for mixed land use development. In order for mixed land use to be implemented, there needs to be a revival of zoning

T.4 This bakery gets most of its business from the residences that live near the shop. It is a gem in the community.

TRENDS

Smart Growth is a worldwide movement to create smarter towns that benefit people on an individual and holistic level. There are ten main points to Smart Growth that have helped to improve the quality of life for the people that have used Smart Growth as guides to developing their towns. The ten points are: Mixed Land Use, Compact Building Design, Variety of Housing Opportunities, Walkable Communities, Attractive Communities and a Sense of Place, Natural Environment, Developing Existing Communities, Variety of Transportation, Predictable, Fair, and Cost Effective Development Decisions, and Community Collaboration.


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SMART GROWTH

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SMART GROWTH ACTIVE LIVING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE FUEL COSTS

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

ordinances. This will allow city planners to integrate different types of developments, creating mixed land use. Grants are another way to work towards mixed land use communities. Grants are helpful because it creates a financial incentive for Smarter Growth. The additional funds from grants mean developers can work to design more attractive communities and provide more features like transportation and beautification of a community. The final aspect of mixed land use is promoting local neighborhood stores within residential areas. This goes back to making towns more convenient for the resident. By placing neighborhood stores and markets in residential areas, homeowners will not have to drive as often or as far to do daily activities like grocery shopping.

COMPACT NEIGHBORHOOD DESIGN Smart Growth looks to design towns with compact neighborhood design. This principle not only looks to develop communities with buildings that are closer together, but also have multiple uses within each building. The point is to be more efficient with land use, which results in preservation of the natural landscape.

T.5

When looking to create compact communities it is important to set up endorsement programs that explain the benefits of compact living. Many people do not prefer compact living, but if they were to understand the benefits of compact living, then this system of development may get more support. Housing styles are a major priority to home buyers. An advantage of compact neighborhood design is that it can facilitate a wide range of housing options. The goal is not to say people should live in large scale housing projects, but instead should look to take what they need and avoid taking up excess space. Some compact neighborhood design options include cottage housing, subdivided warehouse space, duplexes, condos, and apartments. Compact neighborhood design has been proven to be a deterrent of crime in many neighborhoods. By implementing front porches, well lit attractive common spaces, narrow streets with sidewalks, and general activity, the criminal activity will be riskier and, thus, crime rates will go down. The last aspect to look at is on-site best management practices. This refers to the construction and maintenance of these neighborhoods. It is important that during the design, construction, and maintenance of these facilities that the environment be considered and preserved.

T.6 Proper on-site management means that buildings are built properly and are taken care of.

T.7 A variety of housing means a variety within a community


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RANGE OF HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES Smart Growth looks to provide a wide range of housing opportunities and choices. In order for towns and cities to function properly, there needs to be a variety income levels among the citizens. The towns and cities need to be able to provide housing for all of these citizens. In Minnesota, the Twin Cities’ Metropolitan Council established the Greater Minnesota Housing Fund; a program that looked to better match housing supply with housing demand. The fund works with employers of local businesses to assist entry level employees in paying for housing near the work place. This practice benefits both the employer and employee. The employee builds equity and can enjoy the security a home brings. When the housing is located near the job, employees can enjoy short commutes to work or even walk, bike, or use alternative modes of transportation. Because the employer is making an investment in their employees, there will be a stronger connection between the two parties and both sides will experience greater loyalty from each other. Employers will also enjoy the savings derived from the decreased need to train new employees. These saving will come from the fact that the employer will not need to increase wages to retain and attract employees.

T.9

Towns and cities need to be encouraged to include a fair share of affordable and moderate range housing. When creating affordable housing, several factors should influence how much and where these houses should be located. Planners should look at how strategically placing the houses can reduce commuting times and congestion on the streets. Planners should also understand the balance between jobs and housing, and a mitigation of the concentration of poverty. These factors can help dictate what kind of housing should be developed as well as how much and where they should be located. There is a trend of criticism towards newly developed neighborhoods and towns. The issue is that builders are able to achieve economies of scale by mass producing similar building types and designs. The effect is that every house or storefront looks the same. In order to avoid this homogeneity, buildings should have significant variation in order to make each place more personal for the owner. In a large scale housing project outside of Denver, CO, the master developer hired ten different home builders and sold them finished lots, one block at a time. The scale of the project was large enough to ensure efficient home production while having a variety of houses in the neighborhood. T.10 Walkability and bikability are important aspects to promoting a healthy lifestyle within a community

TRENDS

T.8 Different housing options include apartments, condos, duplexes, and detached houses. These are a few of the many options that people look for when moving into a new town or city


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SMART GROWTH ACTIVE LIVING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE FUEL COSTS

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

SMART GROWTH WALKABLE COMMUNITIES Smart Growth promotes walkable communities. More so than ever, home buyers have expressed interest in communities that are walkable. One way to analyze this is to create a series of walking trails in and around neighborhoods. However, Smart Growth looks to go beyond simply creating trails with no further purpose than recreation and exercise. Smart Growth looks to make walking an attractive option for accomplishing daily tasks. The first step in creating a walkable community is planning. Most cities and towns are not designed with walkability in mind and, thus, there is no infrastructure to accommodate aspect. Master plans should be updated to include a pedestrian master plan. This plan should provide an approach to walkability that is consistent, yet allows flexibility. This plan should include model codes and ordinances, technical guidelines, estimated project costs, public transit and automobile traffic coordination, and land acquisition and growth issues. In addition, the distribution of parks, recreational facilities, and schools should be taken into consideration when planning walkability routes. When designing a pedestrian master plan, the general public should be encouraged to participate, especially those who would be most likely to take advantage of walking routes. These groups of people includes senior citizens, children, people with disabilities, people who do not own cars, and those who would use these routes for recreation, such as runners, and bicycle enthusiasts. The design of walking paths should take advantage of green infrastructure. Simply putting a sidewalk next to a road can cause more problems than good. People may feel exposed to oncoming traffic, as well as, the direct exposure to the sun and car fumes can make for an uncomfortable experience. By planting street trees, and using greenery as a division between road and walkway, many of the issues can be alleviated.

T.11 Creating walking paths to everyday destinations can potentially help community members save money on gas. This alternative form of transportation is not only free but is healthy as well.

This greenery will provide shelter, beauty, urban heat reduction and a separation from automobile traffic. There is also the opportunity to integrate water runoff control systems with green infrastructure. Walking routes should be designed with the safety of the pedestrian in all aspects. This includes creating safe access to the walkable routes and transit areas, updating technologies for traffic control, creating visual cues to indicate pedestrian right-of-way, providing

sufficient lighting, and the considering the demographics of the area being fitted with walkable routes. All of these methods implemented accordingly will ensure a safe experience. Providing a walkable community can be very expensive, especially when the infrastructure has not been planned for walkability. In order to protect this investment, communities should provide the policy framework and resources to properly maintain the


SENSE OF PLACE

T. 12 Scenic Lakeside Trails

Smart Growth fosters distinctive, attractive communities with a strong sense of place. This means establishing an identity to a community that is unique, but also highlights the character of the community. Community green spaces are shared parks that are incorporated into residential blocks. Vacant lots and blighted areas make for good community greens sites. In addition to beautification, community greens can act as the first step to the further development of these decrepit sites. Communities should assess their highway systems to determine if they are being underused. Small towns with highways running through the “downtown�

area face this problem regularly. A solution to this is to transform the highway into a boulevard. Boulevards are intended to serve cars, buses, bicycles, and pedestrians efficiently and elegantly. Boulevards typically have four vehicular through-lanes with a wide, tree lined central median. On the outer edges of the through-lanes are a pair of landscaped medians that separate the faster moving traffic from slow-moving, one way traffic lane for deliveries, bicycling, and parking. These secondary lanes can contain a sidewalk and create a refuge for pedestrians so they do not have to cross seven lanes of traffic at once. These boulevards have the potential to become walkways with opportunities for retail, restaurants, offices and residences along either side to create a vibrant community. Communities should develop a comprehensive wayfinding system in town centers. This is just as important to small towns as it is for large cities. In addition to helping people navigate around town, they also connect people to local history, unique neighborhood features, and attractions. Highlighting cultural assets through public art and special events can create opportunities for memories to be made in communities. Public sculptures, murals

T.13 The Coffee Cartel at the Central West End is a popular place in St. Louis, MO. This cafe gives people the opportunity to feel like a member of the community by interacting with others or just by observing the activities around them.

on building walls, and galleries bring out the character of a community. Creating events that incorporate these features and looking to local artists to provide the art will add a personal touch that the community can take pride in. Waterfronts have always been a popular place for social activities. Incorporating previously mentioned ideas such as boulevards, walkways, green infrastructure, and mixed land use, can make waterfronts attractive areas that people from near and far will come to experience. The importance of creating a sense of place is important to creating a vibrant community. Many small towns fall victim to placelessness due to poor planning and lack of creativity. These methods can guide a community to creating a unique atmosphere that will help bring success into their community. Smart Growth development looks to preserve open space, farmland, natural beauty and critical environmental areas. Preserving land has been the center of many state and local land-use programs due to the public demand for preservation. Conservation programs have the potential to be incorporated in almost every point of smart growth. When looking at mixed land use, walkable communities,

T.14 Public art helps to create a unique character in a community. This piece located in Springfield, MO accepts donations from passerbys to give to charities.

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TRENDS

walkways. Instilling a sense of responsibility in the community members to take care of their pedestrian system will ensure its proper upkeep. This includes reporting any issues that may occur with the system, setting up organizations to help keep the pedestrian system in pristine condition, and general good practices of not littering or vandalizing the walkway.


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SMART GROWTH

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SMART GROWTH ACTIVE LIVING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE FUEL COSTS

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

T.15 Water is a very valuable resource, so keeping it clean is a priority. These four steps can make sure that water gets filtered and clean before entering ground water reservoir

transportation, and housing options, conservation and sustainability practices can be implemented in order to protect our environment and add beauty to our communities.

PRESERVATION OF OPEN SPACE

When planning for a community, designers should take into account nature’s Eco services. Nature’s services range from water filtration to carbon sequestration to plant pollination. Many designers do not take advantage of these services because they do not have an accepted monetary costs and benefits associated with them. It is difficult to assess these services into a monetary amount, but what an energy company found out after assessing 12,000 acres is that the natural landscape provided roughly 32 million dollars in Eco services. This is a powerful incentive to assess a plot of land’s Eco services and promote natural ecosystems in communities.

STRENGTHENING EXISTING COMMUNITIES

Smart Growth looks to strengthen and direct development toward existing communities. After years of poor planning and inadvertently following urban sprawl ideas, communities are recognizing the consequences of

poor development. A main goal of Smart Growth is to use the resources that existing neighborhoods offer and to maintain the value of the public and private investment already made in those areas. Developing the infrastructure in a community is a way to revitalize diminishing communities. Adding walking paths, greenways, mixed land use and compact neighborhoods will help improve the quality of life in communities that have not been well thought out. These retrofitting measures will be difficult, especially in areas that struggle to generate revenue. However, by making the necessary improvements, communities will enjoy new life and the benefits that will follow. One issue that many communities face is storm water control. For already developed communities, encouraging infill by adopting innovative storm water regulations and practices will improve water control and filtration. This links to preserving drinking water, creating natural scenery, and creating green space for recreational use and beautification. This simple measure, though it will not solve all the problems, can help communities that have not been designed with Smart Growth in mind. These measures can act as the starting point to redeveloping towns into Smart Growth oriented communities. T.16 Plants help to filter water. This is important in keeping Table Rock Lake in the good condition it currently is.


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T. 19 Biking, walking, and running paths are a popular alternative to driving to everyday destinations.

TRANSPORTATION OPTIONS

judge how sustainable a building may or may not be. In order to improve our transportation systems, a similar rating system should be implemented with our roads and walkways. This rating system can go beyond looking at sustainability. Issues like ease of access, accident potential, emergency efficiency, and attractiveness are other categories circulation systems can be judge on. With the integration of the rating system, designers will be motivated to design better circulation systems. An increasingly popular alternative to the automobile is bicycle riding. Communities should create comprehensive bicycle programs to accommodate this rising trend in transportation. A good program considers all the points of a trip. This includes the trail heads, routes, resting points, destinations, and bike storage. A major issue that bikers face today is the issue of changing rooms and showers. Some communities, such as those in Denver, CO and Iowa City, IA, require bicycle parking for larger commercial buildings. There are also businesses like HOK in St. Louis, MO that provide showers and changing rooms for their employees. Encouraging the development of these amenities will help promote people to bike to work. Communities like Springfield, MO have redesigned many of their streets and created signage for bicycle routes and bicycle lanes. This effort to create a bicycle network has nurtured a bicycle

Smart Growth promotes a variety of transportation options within a community. Even though many Americans use personal automobiles for everyday use, there has been a growing interest in improving all forms of transportations. This includes mass transit, biking, and walking. Many alternative forms of transportation support healthy living. Walking or biking to everyday destinations is not only a good form of daily exercise, but it also creates opportunities for social interaction. When developing transportation systems it is vital that planners consult with emergency responders early in the design stage. With their input, designers can create attractive transportation systems that will allow emergency responders to circulate quickly and efficiently around a community. In many cases, emergency responders keep records of different trends regarding accident control. For example, wide streets actually experience more accidents that narrower streets. Wide streets encourage faster speeds resulting in more harmful accidents. Also, contemporary subdivision design is a hassle for emergency responders. Limited access points and cul-de-sacs in private neighborhoods impede effective access. Currently, there are many rating systems to

T.20 Public transportation is helpful for people who do not want to drive but live far away from their destination.

T.21 Boulevards cater to all the main methods of transportation. In addition, they have a great opportunity to help beautify a street.

TRENDS

T.17

T.18 Emergency responders know trends that can help avoid accidents. Designing with them will ensure emergencies are handled


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SMART GROWTH

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS T.22 Community members taking part in the decision making process.

SMART GROWTH ACTIVE LIVING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE FUEL COSTS

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

community within Springfield, MO. Biking has gone so far as to become a subculture within the United States. Around the country bicycle enthusiasts get together for large scale events and races that help towns and cities generate large amounts of revenue.

FAIR DEVELOPMENT

An important quality to Smart Growth development is that the decisions should be predictable, fair, and cost effective. In order to get Smart Growth off the ground, local governments had to develop new laws, complex agreements, incentive packages, and make personal sacrifices. As Smart Growth became

more understood and widely accepted, approval process became more streamlines, developers have a better understanding of their product and how to attract endusers, and new solutions have developed that go beyond individual sites and span so far as entire districts and even jurisdictions. Elected leaders and public officials should be educated about Smart Growth. When they understand the goals of Smart Growth they will be better prepared to determine what sorts of projects are good for the community they work for. Organization is crucial to the developing predictable, fair, and cost effective projects. In places where organization is an issue, communities find themselves “reinventing the wheel,� every time they try

T.24 In order to implement Smart Growth strategies, some legislation, agreements, and incentives will have to pass. This stage can be very tedious and require sacrifice of time and energy in order to make these improvements.

T.23 Announcing developments help to keep the public up-to-date about how their community is evolving.

T. 25 Educating elected officials about Smart Growth will help them to make better decisions about the development of their community.


to make any developments. By creating pattern books, planners can streamline construction to get projects off the ground sooner, which will enhance project marketability. It is also important to make zoning codes and other land development regulations simple to use and easy to read. It is a major inconvenience to planners and communities when they have to waste time trying to interpret nonsensical codes.

The final and most important category of Smart Growth is community involvement. The current development process satisfies neither the community nor the development community. New techniques for integrating the community into the planning and design stages of Smart Growth development projects should be implemented to make sure that all parties involved understand each other and are working to a similar goal. Using third party groups are a good way of making sure a wide range of stakeholder views are considered. This group may be able to share pros and

cons of a proposed project or they may be able to provide testimony as to why something should or should not be considered in a plan. To be credible these groups need to be rooted in the community and must represent an array of community interests. To create dialogue about Smart Growth and to see how it can be implemented in a community, public officials and community members should make visits to towns and cities that have adopted Smart Growth strategies. Though plans and diagrams are helpful in getting ideas across, actually experiencing the pros and cons of a community’s development decisions is more beneficial. Planners will be able to tell exactly what aspects work and what do not. This will ensure smarter and more efficient development of a community. Before any real development can occur, planners and officials need to understand how their community works. By conducting place audits, they can determine the barriers and opportunities for Smart Growth. These audits should include the following: a local presenter who describes a particular local problem or situation, a visual introduction to community design, a walk in the community to identify good and bad conditions, a

T.28 A third party mitigator helps to create dialogue about development. This dialogue makes sure that ideas are well thought out.

T.29 Presenting ideas in public forums are vital to making sure the public knows what is happening and allows them to offer their input.

COMMUNITY COLLABORATION

T.26

T.27 Community input is vital to Smart Growth developing. This makes sure that the proposed ideas meet the needs and desires of the community, which is the ultimate goal of any community development project.

TRENDS

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JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SMART GROWTH ACTIVE LIVING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE FUEL COSTS

SITE CONTEXT

SMART GROWTH discussion of people’s observations on the walk, and agreement on possible action items and/or proposed improvements. The final step is to distribute free videos and plans to illustrate local planning goals. This will give community members a vision for the future of their town, which they can either accept or bring up issues that may not have been addressed in the plans. This will work to making sure that the master plan is comprehensive and will have a positive influence on the community.

SUMMARY

Introducing Smart Growth strategies in developing towns will ensure that they grow into vibrant communities. The ten categories of Smart Growth act as guidelines to successful urban planning, but are not the

T.30 Assets include the boat slip, views, nature, existing roads, and flat spaces.

T.31 Joe Bald Park is centrally located on the lake, making it a great location for activities.

T.33 Challenges include the 936’ flood area, dense woods, and inadequate roadways.

RECOMMENDATIONS

T.32 Interaction within nature is a vital concept to our vision. Here we see children interacting with each other and that natural surroundings.

T.34 Creating a sense of place makes areas more special for visitors.


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T.35 Mixed building types create a diversity of activities and thus a vibrant community.

end-all-be-all of community development. It is important to look at each town as being its own unique entity and the issues that it faces might not be able to be solved with cookie-cutter policies. Developers should look at the specific assets and challenges of a community and reformulate Smart Growth ideas to solve the issues a community faces. It is also important to keep in mind that community development should be thoroughly examined. Even though many communities struggle with funding new projects, cutting corners is not a viable solution in the long run.

RELEVANCE TO JOE BALD PARK

T.36 Walkable communities promotes impromptu interactions between people, even if its just a simple “hi�.

Even though Joe Bald Park is more of a

T.38 Implementing different strategies to keep the water clean

T. 39 Walking on the Joe Bald Landing

recreational facility than a town, Smart Growth principles are directly applicable and should be implemented. The only category that does not currently apply to the Joe Bald Park Visionary Project is the development of a variety of housing. However, this does not mean that it cannot be taken into consideration in the development of the rest of City of Kimberling City. The design team encourages City of Kimberling City take the steps necessary to begin Smart Growth development. As stated before, this means educating leaders and community members about the pros and cons of Smart Growth. If City of Kimberling City can adopt the ideas mentioned in this section, then City of Kimberling City has a very good chance at growing into a thriving and vibrant community.

T.40 Septic systems as an alternative to hooking up plumbing

TRENDS

T.37 Multipurpose areas host a variety of events, organized or otherwise.


JOE BALD VISION 2040

ACTIVE LIVING

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Obesity in Children and Adolescents 20 Years Ago

RESEARCH TRENDS

T.41 Active Living Example

ACTIVE LIVING BY DESIGN

SMART GROWTH ACTIVE LIVING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE FUEL COSTS

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

T.42 Healthy Eating Example

Obesity is becoming more and more common among Americans. Nearly two-thirds of the American population can be considered overweight or obese. Obesity is not only in adults; there are three times as many obese children and adolescents as there was twenty years ago. Obesity is occurring at an alarming weight. There is a connection between the advancement of technology and the steady rise in obesity epidemics. The more advanced technology has gotten, the more obese people have become. Things like elevators, drivethru restaurants, and cul-de-sac suburbs have allowed people to experience less and less physical activity. Little things that people used to gain exercise from such as stairs, have been removed from people’s lives. This has resulted in a negative effect on issues relating to health. Physical inactivity is the cause of about 200,000 deaths a year. With this unsettling statistic in mind, programs such as Active Living by Design have been created. Active Living by Design has a mission, a mission to create community led change by working with local, state, and national partners to build a culture of active living and healthy eating. They analyze how the places people experience, places where people live, work, and play, affect public health. They analyze the different factors in these places that take away physical activity. They come up with a vision where physical activity and healthy eating choices are easy and accessible to everyone. A model exists to help in the understanding of this process. Developed during the time that the first

T.43 Obesity in Children and Adolescents Currently

T.44 Obesity in America Past and Present

T.45 2/3 of the American Population are Obese


T.47 Five P Strategy

T.48 Short Term Changes

T.49 Intermediate Changes

T.50 Health and Lifestyle Changes

FIVE P STRATEGIES

Local Offices

Preparation

Existing Programs and Resumes Coalition and Advisory Groups Businesses and Non-Profit Groups Engaged Residents

Promotions Programs Policy

Physical Projects

RWJF Funding

ALbD Technical Assistance

twenty five communities participated in Active Living by Design, the Active Living by Design Community Action Model clearly explains the steps for how Active Living by Design works. There are five individual steps that ultimately result in a healthier community. The first step is finding supports. Support is needed from certain groups so that when a vision for a certain community is formed, action can be taken to implement the plan. Examples of the support a project would need are local officials, existing programs and resources, coalitions and advisory groups, business and non-profit groups, and engaged residents. All of these groups are essential in the actions that will be taken next. The next step is the strategies, commonly known as the five P’s. The five P’s are a comprehensive approach for how to introduce more activity into a community. Each strategy consists of specific tactics for characterizing the type of work needed to introduce this action. The first one is preparation. This is a really important first step in the process of making a community active. Preparation is steps taken to get ready for action, such as cementing partnerships in the community. This also includes the analysis part of the project; collecting data to plan which activities would be the most effective. This is when a

SHORT TERM CHANGES

INTERMEDIATE CHANGES

HEALTH AND LIFESTYLE CHANGES

77

Partnership Capacity to Mainstreaming Chances Physical Activity Promote Active Living for Active Living Obesity, Diabetes, High Community Physical Awareness of Health Blood Pressure Environment Benefits of Active Living Social Support from Family/Peers Media Coverage Policy Changes Community Mobilization

T.51 Active Living by Design Community Action Model

budget is put into place and finances are discussed. The next P is promotion. This is essential to the success of the program. By promoting the project, there is a connection with the general public. The public is introduced to the idea of implementing more activities into their community for the benefit of the people. Promotion is done through the media, in forms of presentations, news releases, fact sheets, etc. Connecting with the intended audience is very important for the future of the project. The third P is programs, organized ongoing activities that engage individuals in either direct or indirect physical activity. These programs, also called clubs, are activities such as walking clubs or bicycle recycle initiatives. Other less direct active living programs reward people for doing activities, such as benefits for employees. The fourth P is policy. This P is the key to institutionalizing a health supportive environment. This stage requires that there are changes in public policies and standards. In this step, many relationships are formed with groups that deal with policies, such as a policy board. The education given to the people that make policies is important for the overall vision. The last and final P is physical projects. These are strategies that impact the more built environment. Examples include removing barriers and

enhancing safety. This is where people look for where improvement could be introduced in a physical place. The next step in the Active Living by Design Community Action Model is to introduce short term changes. These are things like partnerships to promote active living and healthy eating, spreading awareness of health benefits of routine activity and healthy eating, social support from people in the community, media coverage, policy changes, and community mobilization. All of these are short term changes that are a beginning step for changes that will benefit the community permanently. The fourth step is to introduce intermediate changes such as mainstreaming opportunities for active living and healthy eating. These changes are a development of the short term changes, but still need to be developed into more permanent changes. The last step is health and lifestyle changes. These ultimately result in reduced health risks. Ideally over time, factors such as obesity will go down and diminish. The Active Living by Design program provides easy access to some means of physical activity. They provide people with bicycles, subsidized gym

ACTIVE LIVING

T.46 Support

SUPPORTS


JOE BALD VISION 2040

ACTIVE LIVING

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS

T.52 People of All Ages Are Able to Enjoy Bicycling

T.54 Healthy Food Provided at Group Meetings and Community Gatherings

SMART GROWTH ACTIVE LIVING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE FUEL COSTS

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

memberships, encourage use of public transit, etc. These are activities in which people of all ages can participate. They make it easy to provide healthy choices when groups gather and need food. Another factor of this is that they keep in mind food allergies among other things to make sure everyone has healthy food options. At functions, alcohol is common, so they suggest keeping the intake level of alcohol moderate. Recycling is also an issue that the program focuses on. They suggest to people that they should choose healthy options in bulk such as a pitcher of water as opposed to individual bottles. Another key issue the program addresses is positive language that will motivate all people to achieve their goals. These are just some of the practices the program follows and teaches to communities. The Active Living by Design is mainly based on grants. They have obtained a lot of money in the past in order to help out these communities. For instance, the way the program first began is that it started with

a grant to help 25 cities across the country. These cities are pretty well known; cities such as Sacramento, CA and Nashville, TN. Profiles for each city were made in grants of $200,000 for the research over a five year time period. The grants came from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to support an increase in physical activity in these areas. A lot of work went into collecting information on different topics such as background information of the partnerships and community, challenges, accomplishments, maps and photos that highlight the work, resources developed, and contact information for each key agency in the program. The resulting profiles are very important in the advancement of each of the cities when it comes to physical activity and healthy eating. In addition to the investment by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, $269 million dollars were collected by the Active Living by Design Program. Programs are anxious to see a sustainable change in their neighborhoods, cities, counties, and regions. This relates

T.53 Public Transit is Better for the Environment and the Community

T.55 Community Motivation is Key

T.56 Water Purifier Will Limit the Amount of Plastic Waste


79

T.57 Albuquerque Trail Program Help Set Up by Active Living by Design

T.58 Hunts Point Riverside in Bronx, NY Helped Set up by Active Living by Design

T.59 Created the Buffalo Blue Bicycle Sharing Program for Buffalo, NY

T.60 New Bloomingdale Trail in Chicago, IL

T.61 New Morgana Run Trail in Cleveland, OH

to Joe Bald Park as proof that funding can be found if the project is important enough for the community. In conclusion, Active Living by Design provides communities with a chance to progress to where they are living in a healthier way that will make the community last a lot longer. By following a long term step plan, the community can benefit a great deal by the time the process is over. It takes a lot of work and effort by everyone involved, but it will be well worth it because of the benefits to the health of the community members. There are many grants available that can help make this happen. If the Kimberling City community is truly dedicated, the community can make Active Living by Design happen.

HOW ACTIVE LIVING BY DESIGN COULD BE POTENTIALLY IMPLEMENTED INTO JOE BALD PARK

There are many ways in which Active Living by Design can be incorporated into the Joe Bald Park vision project. Although most of the examples listed are urban areas, rural areas such as Kimberling City can benefit from a program like this as well. Every community, big or small, has the potential to change in order to be a healthier city or town, depending on the willingness of the community to adapt to the changes. Active Living by

Design could be very beneficial to the Kimberling City area. In our vision for Joe Bald Park, we implemented several programmatic elements that involve Active Living by Design: • The first aspect of Active Living by Design that is the most evident is the trail system that extends throughout the park. This more than satisfies the physical activity portion of Active Living by Design because multiple activities can take place on these trails. For instance, grandparents can take their grandchildren for a walk on a nice day. The trails consist of gentle slopes that are easy for the elderly. People can go to Joe Bald Park to bike, run, walk, race, jog, etc. The list of physical activities that have the possibility of being conducted on these trails is endless. One of the key things about Active Living by Design is making it easy for people of all ages to participate in using the design. The trails are perfectly accessible to anyone that wants to use them. Trails like these would make it easy for the people of Kimberling City to get in more exercise. The water side trail that circles the whole site is easy for the residents of Joe Bald Road to use. Since there are a significant number of people that could use this trail, the impact would be substantial. • The next option we included into our vision was social green spaces. The main green space includes three parks, something Kimberling City is in

T.63 Healthy Food Can Easily be Chosen in Restaurants

desperate need of since the only one is unsafe and too small for children to actually run around and have fun. There are three different parks because of the different age groups: toddler, children, and young adult. Obesity in children is becoming common, so it is important to start introducing children to physical activity at a young age. At the toddler park, there would be swings and slides. The equipment would help already growing muscles become stronger and will make it more fun for children to play. The second park is meant for kids, ages 6 - 12. It has more choices for physical activity because those children are able to do more things, such as monkey bars, merry go rounds, etc. This park will make improvements in the physical activity aspects that are important to the health of growing children. The last park is meant for children 12 and over. This park should to be creative. In this day and age, it is more common to find a preteen on the couch playing video games than exploring and enjoying the outdoors. Building a park that would be “cool” to hang out in would be the way to introduce physical activity to this group. The park targeted to this age group is not the average park. It consists of interconnected tree-houses that focus on house different activities. It is like a giant jungle gym. Something like this that requires kids to do physical activity to reach their “hangout spot” would be ideal for reintroducing exercise to this group. Making ways for young adults to be active is critical because

ACTIVE LIVING

T.62 Some of the First 25 Active Living by Design Grants Went to These Cities


JOE BALD VISION 2040

ACTIVE LIVING

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS

People of All Ages Are Able to Enjoy Bicycling

T.65 Trail System in Joe Bald Park

SMART GROWTH ACTIVE LIVING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE

•

FUEL COSTS

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

•

T.64 Example of a successful trail sign that could be placed in Joe Bald Park

the eating habits at this age tend stay with people for the rest of their lives. This age is where having healthy children is important. The next vision idea introduced in the Joe Bald Park Vision 2040 project is the idea of a park folly system. Follies are individual points of interest spaced around the site. The reason these have a connection to Active Living by Design is because they rely on the trail system to function. These places are not places that can be reached by car or any other transportation that does not involve exercise. They are only reachable by foot or bicycle, making them a perfect example of Active Living by Design. These spaces, each one being different, will encourage people to move about the site through physical activity. Again, these follies are easily reachable by all ages, everything on the site being ADA accessible. The fact that each folly is different will make people want to visit them all. The next element of the vision that includes a lot of factors relating to Active Living by Design is the courtesy dock marina. The courtesy dock marina is one of the most important features of the site since it is created for what the site is already being used for: boats. However, there are a lot of other aspects of the courtesy dock marina that could provide a chance for physical activity and healthy eating. A feature that is being built into the courtesy dock marina is a tournament center. The majority of the time, this will be used for fishing tournaments. Since fish is


81

T.66 Healthy Choices in Vending Machines

healthy and the majority of the fish will go back into the community, this is a great example of Active Living by Design. Healthy eating is a really important part of being healthy. By eating fish freshly caught from a source already known, a lot of the chemicals and preservatives of shipped fish will be eliminated. This will be a great benefit of the tournament center. Another aspect of the courtesy dock marina is that it includes some shops that are a short distance away. The third aspect of the courtesy dock marina is that it is includes a fishing pier. Piers are perfect for walking. Some of the trails actually lead onto the boardwalk of the courtesy dock marina so that people can observe the hustle and bustle of the activities taking place on the docks. They can take a moonlit stroll on the pier, gaining the advantage by actually enjoying exercise. Since people are naturally curious, they will be drawn to walk, fish, or swim off the pier, all of which are physical activity. The last feature of the site that has a lot of benefits to it is the manual boat dock area. Relaxing on a boat is nice, but actually powering the boat through physical manpower is even better. The rent shop located just by the dock makes it simple for everyone to gain by operating a canoe, kayak, or paddle boat. The educational facility on the site has a lot to offer as far as Active Living by Design goes. Any eating establishment on the site has the potential to be really healthy or to at least provide really healthy choices. Since this is a mess hall for mainly campers,

generally children, healthy food is not going to be desired as much as say a pizza would. But something like serving a vegetable or a fruit with every meal would make it easier for children to eat better. Eating healthy is not all about just eating fruits and vegetables all of the time, a balance between the good and bad can be considered healthy as well. Another aspect the facility has to offer is the idea of the camp itself. With the educational aspect of the camp, outdoor classes are used daily, classes that require a bit of a walk to get to. There are a lot of features on the site that would be great for demonstrations or teaching children about the outdoors. All of them require walking or jogging to reach. There are many other physical activities done in a camp setting and they would be done here as well. The common area near the camp facilities would also be a source of physical activity. The vending machine providing snacks would provide healthy choices. The major healthy food facility on site would be the lake side restaurant. This restaurant would provide the typical restaurant foods of burgers and steak, but it would also provide reasonably priced choices for healthy food. This will make it easy and convenient for people to eat healthy without spending too much money. Missouri has a lot of local natural plants that are edible and healthy. Taking these things directly from the site would make them that much better. All of the food could be local with no chemicals or preservatives, making the food that much better for

T.68 Locally Caught Fish

the community to eat. Options such as salad bars would also be very beneficial. From the restaurant, there is view of the pier. Since people like to take walks after they dine, this would help promote physical activity after healthy eating. The last significant feature on the site that would encourage people to be healthier in order to promote Active Living by Design would be the welcome center. This is where the running of the park takes place. It has a map of the site, where all of the trails are to make it easy to get around and so people can pick their destination that can be easily reached. A trail conveniently crosses right by the welcome center, making the journey to a folly easier. The proximity it has with the park encourages people to let their children play and maybe even play with them. Healthy snacks inside of the welcome center encourage people to stock up on energy for their walks on the trails.

ACTIVE LIVING

T.67 Hiking to Outdoor Classrooms to Promote Physical Activity


JOE BALD VISION 2040

ACTIVE LIVING

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SMART GROWTH ACTIVE LIVING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE FUEL COSTS

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

T.69 Gardening as an Activity

T.71 Bike path and Walking Path by the Road

ACTIVE LIVING NETWORK Physical activity is very important in making communities healthy. The recommended goal for the average person is to get in at least thirty minutes of physical activity in a day. This is possible in many different ways, such as walking or biking to the store, gardening in a garden, or playing in a neighborhood park. One aspect that is really important in making physical activity available for people is to make it safe and convenient. For instance, statistics say that 43 percent of people with safe places to walk get the recommended amount of physical activity whereas only 27 percent of people without a safe place to walk meet that requirement. Creating a safe place has the potential to increase the amount of people that are active by 25 percent. Just having a safe place to walk can also make the numbers for how many children are obese drop considerably as well. Children should be able to walk to school instead of using a less active form of transportation. This is where the Active Living Network comes into play.

The goal of the Active Living Network is to promote design that is activity-friendly by building a partnership with major programs and companies that have an input in the health aspect of how designs are built. There are three key points that are interconnected into the mission of Active Living Network. The first one is raising awareness about the health benefits that could be included into designs. The more people are aware, the more companies and programs that can get involved in order to make more active friendly designs. The second one is getting the programs and companies involved to collaborate on designs that will make them committed to creating a more healthy community. The last point is to translate the data gathered to make it easily understood by everybody. The more easily it is understood, the more people will be able to help with the project. The Active Living Network is similar to Active Living by Design, but it focuses more on the physical activity side of it as opposed to the healthy eating side.

T.70 Building Partnerships Is Really Important to Active Living Network

T.72 Sidewalks So Kids Can Walk to School

T.73 Playgrounds Make Kids More Active


83

T.74 Adventure Cycling Association

T.75 Feet First

T.76 League of American Bicyclists

Partners

T.77 National Association of Community Health Centers

T.78 National Recreation and Park Association

T.80 Being Active in a Park

They are all about trying to reincorporate physical activity into community members’ lives through innovative and creative ways. As mentioned before, obesity is a huge issue. Active Living by Network goes deeper into analyzing the causes for obesity and ways that they could reverse the obesity trend. Instead of focusing on the individual people with diabetes, they focus on the whole, such as how things like neighborhoods, transportation systems, buildings, parks, and open spaces can reintroduce physical activity in ways that people would want to be more active. These would include, as an example, staircases in buildings. In relation to Joe Bald Park, the site is already being used by people for exercise purposes. The amount of people that use it for exercise, however, is slim. If the site were to be developed, using the research from Active Living Network, the site could be used by a lot more people in the community. Right now, there are no built trails or walkways, just roads that people are using. Considering the ages of the majority of the community, these roads would not be considered safe, which may be why a lot of people do not go to Joe Bald Park to walk or ride bikes. Improvements on the site would make physical activity more possible for every age group, incorporating activities for children and elderly. Incorporating Active Living Network could greatly improve Joe Bald Park.

T.81 Making Active Use of Green Spaces

T.82 Active Transportation System

T.83 Neighborhoods

ACTIVE LIVING

T.79 Incorporating Stairs into Building Design


JOE BALD VISION 2040

HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SMART GROWTH ACTIVE LIVING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE FUEL COSTS

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

T.84 Farm Fresh Food

T.85 Healthy Choices in Schools

HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE The Healthy Lifestyle Initiative is similar to Active Living by Design. It works with community members to create a healthier community. This consists of incorporating policies and environments that give community members access to healthier food and more opportunities for physical activity. The way in which Active Living by Design and Healthy Lifestyle Initiative are different is that Active Living by Design is more about how the built environment can assist people to become healthier, whereas the Healthy Lifestyle Initiative focuses upon policies and environments. Similar to Active Living by Design, Healthy Lifestyle Initiative works with partnerships and collaborations. Specifically, Healthy Lifestyle Initiative works with the local government, public health agencies, business leaders, economic development and planning commissions, local food and farm groups, schools, youth, and churches. The significance of the power of these connections is important in that in order for policies to be made, groups like the local government and business leaders are the ones to make them happen. These partnerships also ensure that the needs of the community are incorporated into the master plan in order to overcome health factors in that specific community. The reason that policies are so important is that they influence a majority of the decisions made by an individual every day. If healthy food choices and easy access to physical activity are evident, then community

members will be able to make the decision to be healthier easier. More people in the community will be healthy and not show signs of being overweight, obese, and sedentary in their lifestyle. For the average person, the healthy choice has to be the easy choice. Policies and environments can help make that happen. A policy is a principle or a protocol to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes. In other words, it is a rule for the betterment of the people affected by the policy. There are two types of policies; formal and informal. Formal policies are policies that are strict. A local ordinance that says people cannot smoke in public buildings would be an example of a formal policy. An informal policy would be rules that people should follow, but they are not legally issued. Examples of informal policies could be rules encouraging healthy eating in schools. Incorporating policies such as these are the building blocks for improving the community one rule at a time.

T.86 No Smoking In Public Areas

T.87 Partnership is the Key to Starting Healthy Lifestyle Initiative


85

T.88 School Environment

T.89 Social Environment

T.95 Social Networking

HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE The built environment is also an important factor in Healthy Lifestyle Initiative. The built environment is the majority of what exists around us, such as streets, sidewalks, buildings, parks, workplaces, school environments, and social environments. Even social networks and normal behaviors of the people can affect the health of a community. The environment of the community is very important in that if the environment does not have many healthy aspects, or if everyone in the community has a negative attitude when it comes to physical activity and healthy eating, the community will not be benefited. It is all about working together to build a healthier environment for the betterment of the community. T.90 Buildings are a main element in the buildt environment that could have a negative or positive health effect on the community.

T.92 Up to date sidewalks make it easier for people to exercise.

T.93 A plentiful amount of parks provides locations for people to be healthy.

T.94 The workplace has a lot of potential to be more healthy.

T.97 The leaders in the community have a big impact on the health of the community. People will follow them.

ACTIVE LIVING

T.91 The roads have a big effect on the healthy lifestyle of the community.

T.96 Built Environment on the Health Outcomes


JOE BALD VISION 2040

HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS

T.98 The community needs to be involved for action to happen.

HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE FIVE STEP PROCESS

SMART GROWTH ACTIVE LIVING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE FUEL COSTS

PURPOSE SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

VALUE

VISION

In order to develop a community, there is a five step process that communities can follow and alter based on what the community needs. These five steps are to help the communities move through the process of developing a healthy lifestyle. Based on past communities that have followed this process for developing a plan, 12 to 18 months is needed plus time to actually set the plan into action. In step one; the goal is to form partnerships with leaders and members of the community. This is when questions such as why do we need to improve the community, who needs to be included in this process, who will make it happen, and how does the community go about improving the community are answered. The answers to these questions are organized and used to develop purposes, values, and vision statements. This is also when a lot of collaboration begins on choosing the partners needed to make this project happen. The purposes, values, and vision statements are referred back to the collaborative based on the groups that join the partnership. Many resources are available to help communities with these steps: The toolkit Building Effective Community Partnerships, “Like, Hello! We’re Right Here!”-Parks and Recreation as Partners in Healthy Community Initiatives, Engaging the Community PowerPoint, Creating Healthy Communities, Community Coalition Resources Link, and The World Cafe are all given as reference materials. The Building Effective Community Partnerships tells communities how to work together to develop shared goals and strategies. Case studies are

T.99 Providing the community with surveys will gather the research necessary to improve the community.

included in this tool kit as examples. “Like, Hello! We’re Right Here!”-Parks and Recreation as Partners in Healthy Community Initiatives informs communities that it is also important to involve programs such as s parks and recreation in the partnerships. Engaging the Community PowerPoint explains how to engage community stakeholders, who to engage, and opportunity for engagement. Creating Healthy Communities is a manual for how to develop rural areas for the Healthy Lifestyle Initiative. The Community Coalition Resources is a link to inform the community on how to spot the weaknesses in partnerships. The World Cafe uses seven design principles to show communities how to have effective conversations in meetings. These resources and this step are just the first in at least a year long process. Step two is all about assessing the resources, needs, and desires of the community. This step is all about gathering useful data from and about the communities by means of surveys, government data, etc. Time also needs to be taken to understand the real versus the perceived challenges. This is done by both qualitative and quantitative methods. The results are then publicized. There are many resources the community can use to achieve a better understanding of the real and perceived challenges and opportunities such as Community Survey- Example from Dent County, The Community Toolbox - Community Assessment, Vision to Action, Healthy Communities Toolkit, Office of Social and Economic Data Analysis, USDA Economic Research Service Food Atlas, and Walkability Checklist


T.101 Publci Speakers to Gain Knowledge

T.102 Developing an Action Plan

Develop an Action Plan that Helps Change Policies

STEP 5

Learn From Other Communities and Experts

STEP 4

STEP 3

Figure Out the Needs and Desires of the Community

Find Resources to Follow Through on the Action Plan

T.103 This five step process, easily applicable to Joe Bald Park, can make the community have a positive future.

- How Walkable is Our Community. Community Survey - Example from Dent County shows the community a high quality survey that can help them assess the needs of the community. The Community Toolbox - Community Assessment provides tips for thoroughly addressing the community’s needs. Vision to Action provides information on how to properly collect information on a community. The Healthy Communities Toolkit provides examples on three important areas of community resource and needs. Office of Social and Economic Data Analysis provides research conducted on specific states available for use by communities. This includes demographics, needs, decision support, collaboration, economic development, education, and public health. The USDA Economic Research Service Food Atlas allows searches to be made on different communities to see the community’s current ability to access healthy food and its success in doing so. The Walkability Checklist - How Walkable is Our Community rates peoples walkability in specific neighborhoods. All of these are valuable resources in helping communities conduct the needed research. Step three is all about gaining education from others from different forms such as guest speakers, the web, and other examples. By studying these sources and analyzing the speaker’s expertise, gaining knowledge from similar initiatives in other states, and studying policies and environmental changes that have been successful, the community can benefit. There are also many resources to help the communities out in this step

as well. What do we want? How can we make it happen? Planning and Executing a Policy Change Strategy is a presentation that explains all about policy. The Power of Stories: From Personal Narratives of Community Action provides insight on how to tell the story of the community. Center for Obesity Prevention and Policy Research is a search-able database of Missouri health policies that have been written. ENACT Local Policy Database is a search-able database about national policies about physical activity and nutrition. National Association of Counties provides demographic information on particular areas. Mayor’s Guide to Fighting Childhood Obesity educates mayors about specific policies they can implement in their communities to help childhood obesity problems. National League of Cities Policy Tool Kit also helps leaders with policies that could reduce the amount of kids with childhood obesity. NCSL Healthy Community Design Resources provides the most recent policy options for communities to be healthier. Step four is about crafting a plan with attainable goals that help the health of the communities. This is an accumulation of all the information gathered in the previous steps. The three criteria for a program to be put into the plan is if it can lead to policy and environmental changes, serve as an example that can be used elsewhere, or become sustainable over time. There are resources to help the community with this step as well. Developing an Action Plan gives the community help on developing a plan. Tips for Creating an Effective Action Plan provide easily followed tips. Action Plans gives more information

on how to develop the plan. HLI Action Plan Example - Lafayette County is a high quality action plan as an example. All of these resources will help to form a final plan the community can easily use. Step five, the final step, is all about seeking resources for implementing the final plan. This can be done looking in the community for help and also seeking outside help in the form of grants, awards, and donations. A lot of resources help the community with this final step. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance provides applications for a lot of federal grant and funding programs. Grants.gov is a storehouse for information on over 1000 grants and provides access to $500 billion annually. MoDOT Highway Safety Grants provides grants. There are a lot more website and programs out there that provide grants and information on how to get grants. These five steps make it easy and possible for communities to achieve their goals of becoming more active and healthy as a whole. By following these five steps, the Healthy Lifestyle Initiative can happen in communities worldwide.

ACTIVE LIVING

T.100 Collecting Grants for Funding

Gather Leaders to Begin Building Partnerships

STEP 2

STEP 1

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JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SMART GROWTH ACTIVE LIVING HEALTHY LIFESTYLE INITIATIVE FUEL COSTS

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

FUEL COSTS FUEL COSTS In America, gasoline is arguably the most important resource because we place so much value on vehicles. It is common these days for a family of four to own three to four cars. Our cities and towns are designed with the idea that people will drive to work, shops, entertainment, and back home in private vehicles. This is not a sustainable way of living. At the current rate of gasoline consumption, the supply will be exhausted in the near future. Through the simple, yet accurate, theory of supply and demand, this will cause fuel prices to grow to unprecedented highs. The price of gasoline does fluctuate, however the overall trend is for gasoline’s price to go up. The only time that the price has dramatically decreased was in 2008 during the country’s worst economic recessions. In Christopher Steiner’s book, $20 per Gallon, he predicts that the price of a gallon of gasoline could rise to as much as $20 per gallon in a matter of 20 to 30 years. This led him to ask the question “Could $20 per gallon gas make us happier?” As crazy as that sounds, Steiner does present many valuable points. In 2008, before the recession, gas cost just over 4 dollars per gallon and American as a whole drove 100,000,000,000 (one hundred billion) less miles. Furthermore, for every gallon of gasoline consumed in a car that gets around 25 mpg, 14.1 pounds of CO2 is emitted. That means during that time we emitted 650,000,000 less pounds of carbon into the atmosphere because gas was too expensive. This sort of example proves that if gas exceeds the demand, that most people will change their lifestyle to accommodate. Eventually gasoline may become so expensive that it will become more economically beneficial and efficient to move closer to work where walking and biking will make more sense than driving. This is a trend that we may begin to see if gasoline were to hit eight dollars a gallon. At this price the cost of driving will have tripled and living in the suburbs or a rural setting outside a town may not be economically sustainable.

These trends will also become catalysts for the job market. Jobs that explore alternative sources of energy will become very popular. In addition, America will need new civil engineers to reconstruct our towns and cities to be better suited for public transportation, walking and biking. Small, rural, communities will be the most affected by the gasoline shortages and skyrocketing prices. There are several ways a rural town can survive the rising prices of gasoline. • Compact Living • Self Sufficiency • Inexpensive Housing • Variety of Transportation Options • Mixed Land Use

T.105 Reduced driving in the U.S. due to high fuel costs

T.106 Walking, when able, saves money.

T.104 Condensed living reduces fuel costs

T.107 Bike paths are a good way to encourage alternative modes of transportation


89

T.108 Missouri’s average gas price vs the nations’. T.110 Missouri’s 132 Month average price shows a general rise in gas prices with the exception of the onset of the recession.

T.109 The Clean air act as a start to environmental sustainability

T.111 Towards the late 2000s less miles were being driven as gas prices continued to rise

FUEL COSTS

These strategies insure minimal gasoline consumption. It will take time for small towns to adopt these theories, but it will be necessary to survive. Kimberling City is the closest small town to Joe Bald Park. Its survival, and in turn Joe Bald Park’s, depends on being able to recognize these trends and responding to them now instead of when it is too late. To help cope with these trends, different modes of transportation should be made available. This means making biking and walking more feasible and safe. Also the boat culture at Table Rock Lake will have to evolve to accommodate these raising fuel costs. Smaller manual and wind powered craft will be more utilized for lake transportation and recreation.


SITE CONTEXT


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SITE CONTEXT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY REGIONAL AUDIENCE RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT REGIONAL LOCAL SITE PICTURES

RECOMMENDATIONS

The analysis of the possible future audience of Joe Bald Park is important in determining the scale and scope of what the park should offer. Joe Bald Park could connect to many metropolitan cities within Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma. The figure to the right illustrates three large cities: Springfield and Joplin, Missouri, and Fayetteville Arkansas within the immediate 50 mile radius. Within this radius are also countless communities, towns, and cities that should also be mentioned including Nixa, Kimberling City, and Branson, Missouri, Eureka Springs, Springdale, and Rogers, Arkansas. In the future these neighboring communities, towns, cities, and metropolitan areas will play the most significant roe in Joe Bald Park’s renewal. In the future, assuming the current trends in the rising fuel costs continue, there will be a significant decrease in travel. As the commute time to the site increases there will be a marketable decrease in the frequency of visits to the site. Therefore, we suggest that these communities within the 50 mile radius will be crucial for the future development of Joe Bald Park.

SC.2 “Drivers respond to an increase in fuel prices in several ways. The most important are: reducing travel, and buying more fuel-efficient vehicles”

Joplin

Springfield

50

100

150

Fayetteville

SC.1 Family departing on a camping trip

http://www.debbirobertson-

SC.2 Within a 50 mile radius there are many audiences to target

250


93

REGIONAL AUDIENCE

SC. 3 St. Louis could provide a large audience

The location of Joe Bald Park on Table Rock Lake in the beautiful Ozarks Mountains allows the site to attract a national audience. Although we suggest that the extent of the primary audience will, more likely, be from within a 250 mile radius or five hour drive. The Joe Bald Park site is located close to several metropolitan cities within Missouri, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. The map to the right illustrates four of the Missouri metropolitan cities that are located within a 250 mile radius of the park: Springfield, Kansas City, St. Louis, and the Jefferson CityColumbia area. (The cities of Little Rock, Fayetteville, Fort Smith in Arkansas and Tulsa, Oklahoma also are located within 250 miles of the park.) These populated areas could provide Joe Bald Park with a large and diverse tourist audience to economically support the park. We suggest that the developments at Joe Bald Park cater to both the needs of the local Table Rock Lake communities and the aforementioned regional metropolitan cities.

SC.4 Kansas City could provide a large audience

Kansas City Columbia

St. Louis

Jefferson City

50

100

150

250

SC. 5The Jefferson City-Columbia area could provide a large audience

SC.6 Within a 250 mile radius people tend to take day trips to parks

SC.7 There are three metropolitain cities within a 250 mile radius: Kansas City, Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri, and the Jefferson City-Columbia area.

REGIONAL

View of the “city center� lack of sidewalks sense of place


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SITE CONTEXT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY REGIONAL CONNECTIONS RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT REGIONAL LOCAL SITE PICTURES

Joe Bald Park is centrally located on Table Rock Lake in the heart of the Ozark Mountains. At a regional scale there is an extensive network of roads, bridges, and streams that connect the site to the other regional amenities and greater state and interstate roadway network. Currently, the most important connections to Joe Bald Park are Joe Bald Road, Highway 13 and Highway 65. Significant development of new roads or the upgrading of the existing roads is unlikely; therefore, Kimberling City and Joe Bald Park will remain dependent on these roads and the car for access. This may become problematic in the coming decades as fuel prices continue to rise and automobile travel decreases.

RECOMMENDATIONS SC.8 Highway 13 offers a great roadway connection

SC. 9 In the future Joe Bald Park site could be accessed by rail

SC.10 Table Rock Lake could offer a great waterway connection


95

ROADWAY CONNECTIONS

SC. 11 Sign pointing to Interstate 44

The network of roadways connecting the Joe Bald Park to the surrounding communities is the most important infrastructural network. The figure to the right illustrates the highways that provide access to the Joe Bald Park. US Highway 65 is a divided 4-lane highway that runs north-south within the State of Missouri and connects with both Interstate 44 and 70; its closest connection to Kimberling City is at Branson, MO. Missouri Highway 13 runs north-south connecting Springfield to Kansas City, MO and to Kimberling City; the closest city to Joe Bald Park. Missouri Highway 13 turns into Arkansas Highway 21 at the state line just south of Kimberling City. Interstate-44 runs east-west across the country and connects Springfield to St. Louis, MO and to Tulsa and Oklahoma City OK. Interstate 44 will be an important arterial traffic route that will bring the regional audience to Ozarks area.

http:// en.wikipedia. org/wiki/U.S._ Route_65

SC.14 Highway 65 runing north-south

SC.16 Interstate 44 connecting Tulsa, Oklahoma, andhttp:// St Louis Missouri

en.wikipedia. org/wiki/I44

I-44

Highway 65 people enjoying a walk

Highway 21 SC.12 Kimberling City Bridge

SC.13 Traveling down highway 65 towards Branson

SC.15 The most important roadway connections leading to Joe Bald Park

REGIONAL

Highway 13


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SITE CONTEXT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RAILWAY CONNECTIONS

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This report contains information that is protected from disclosure by federal law, 23 USC Section 409 and the Missouri Open Records Law (Sunshine Act), Section 610.021 RSMo. Please review MoDOT's policy and procedure manual on the Sunshine Act before releasing any information contained herein.

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Prepared by: Missouri Department of Transportation, Transportation Planning November 2007

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RECOMMENDATIONS

59 ¤ £ ¤ £

!

PICTURES

! ! ! !

SITE

!

LOCAL

! ! ! !! !

REGIONAL

Current

! !

SITE CONTEXT

Currently, the Missouri North Arkansas Railway connects Aurora and Branson, MO. This is part of the Missouri Pacific Railroad. The figure below illustrates the railway and its connections. This is the closest railway to Joe Bald Park. The railway passes through Reed Springs, MO; which is located 10 miles from Kimberling City. The railway is a non-passenger regional freight rail; however, a scenic excursion train does operate on the line out of Branson, MO. The rail traffic consists mostly of coal, but it serves as a key transportation line for the area because it also transports such items as grains and frozen foods. We suggest that in the future there will be opportunities to connect Kimberling City/Joe Bald Park with other regional audiences through this rail connection.

!

TRENDS

There are currently no national or state supported passenger train routes that connect to Kimberling City/ Joe Bald Park. The figure below illustrates the current rail passenger service in Missouri. The transportation agencies of the nine Midwest states are sponsors to the Midwest Regional Rail Initiative (MWRRS). The vision of MWRRS is to meet current and future regional travel needs through significant improvements to the quality of passenger rail service. According to MODOT there are economic benefits to the rail system, “The system will generate resource savings in automobile operating costs, airport and highway congestion relief, and reduce energy usage and exhaust emissions.” There is a potential to incorporate the Joe Bald Park with this initiative in the future, if the target audience includes the greater 250 mile radius. Commuting via train in the area is not common, but in the future this form of transportation would be very beneficial.

! ! !

RESEARCH

412

84 P O

162 T S

CARUTHERSVILLE

§ ¦ ¨ 155

Multimodal Operations 2217 St. Mary's Blv Jefferson City, MO 6 Phone: (573) 751-2

164

60

80

100

T S 108

Dunklin

¨ § ¦ 55

Prepared by: Missouri Department of Transporta June 2009

ghsmdata01\wilket1\GIS\Maps\Multimodal\Railroads\rail_passenger.mxd

SC. 17 The opportunity for a future amtrack routeto Kimberling city

SC.18 The current Pail passenger sevice in Missouri

SC.20 The current freight lines throughout souther Missouri

ghsmdata01\wilket1\GIS\Maps\Mu


97

WATERWAY CONNECTIONS

SC.21 Possible tour boat and water access to site via Table Rock Lake

The confluence of the White and James Rivers is located just north of Joe Bald Park. The impoundment of these rivers by Table Rock Dam has created Table Rock Lake. The illustration at the right shows Beaver Lake to the bottom-left and Table Rock Lake in the center. From this illustration we can easily see that Joe Bald Park is ideally located in the center of Table Rock Lake. Along Table Rock Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 745 miles of shoreline are many communities that can easily access Joe Bald Park via the waterway. This waterway connection is by far the more convenient method for regional residents to access the park and should be developed.

James River

Joe Bald Park

White River

SC.23 Areal view of kimberling city and Table Rock Lake

SC.24 Kimberling City Bridge and Table rock lake below

SC.25 White River offering a great waterway connection to Joe Bald Park

REGIONAL

SC.22 View out to Table Rock lake from Kimberling City bridge


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SITE CONTEXT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SITE LOCATION RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT REGIONAL LOCAL SITE PICTURES

The single most important asset of Joe bald is its location at the center of Table Rock Lake in the beautiful Ozark Mountains. The park is located on a peninsula at the confluence of the White and James Rivers. The figure to the right illustrates Joe Bald Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s location within the Table Rock Lake impoundment basin. The convenience of the waterway connection to other shoreline communities is apparent from this map. Land access to the park is much more difficult for people living on the lake than for people coming from Springfield, Nixa, Ozark, Branson and Hollister, MO. We believe that there is a great opportunity to attract residents from the lake community if the water access was considered and optimized.

Highway 13

RECOMMENDATIONS

Joe Bald Park

SC.26 Location of Joe Bald Park: Stone County

SC.27 Centrally Located on Table Rock Lake


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LOCATION ON LAKE The map at the right illustrates the position of Joe Bald Park at the confluence of the White and James Rivers The hashed blue and white section of the map represents the James River basin and the blue to the left of the park is the White River basin. Their impoundment by Table Rock Dam, which is located just off the map to the right, forms the impoundment area for Table Rock Lake, which is represented by all of the blue and hatched blue area. The yellow circles represent some of the communities located around the lake. The largest yellow circle to the upper-right from the park is the City of Kimberling City. At Kimberling City is the only bridge that crosses Table Rock Lake; thus, a significant amount of regional traffic travels down Highway 13 and through Kimberling City and by the access point at Joe Bald Road. We foresee that within the next 20-40 years that the number of communities and people living on or near Table Rock Lake will rise significantly, yet their car mobility will continue to decrease due to rising fuel coat. Thus, more direct, localized, and easily accessible lake activities will be important to develop.

SC.28 Show boat on Table Rock Lake

SC.29 The location of the surrounding towns and cities on Table Rock Lake

LOCAL

Joe Bald Park


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SITE CONTEXT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY REGIONAL COMPETING PARKS RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT REGIONAL LOCAL SITE PICTURES

Currently, Table Rock Lake has a limited number of parks available for use. Also, there are a minimum number of high developed areas around the lake at this time that helps contribute to the natural character of the Lake. We believe that the Joe Bald Park section of the lake is of great value and that the right to develop directly along the lakeside should be strictly limited to maintain its character. The figure to the right illustrates the parks owned and managed by the Army Corps of Engineers, camping sites around the lake, State and U.S. Parks, and boat launch locations.

RECOMMENDATIONS

SC.31 Map detailing the parks and campgrounds on Table Rock Lake

SC.30 View of Table Rock State Park


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LAND CLASSIFICATIONS Table Rock Lake was created in 1954 by the Army Corps of engineers by the impounding the White River. The Army Corps of Engineers has developed a master plan that guides the management of the lake, its shoreline, and government lands around the lake. The primary objective of the Army Corps of Engineers is to manage Table Rock Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoreline to insure the general public receives the full enjoyment of the recreational and fish and wildlife benefits of the public lands and waters, both now and for generations to come. The map at the right illustrates the classifications of the lands along the surrounding shoreline of the Lake. Joe Bald Park is classified as recreational-high intensity. This means that the park land is intended to be developed for the public, the designation of the park as a high recreational areas acts as an asset because the surrounding areas do not hold this classification.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/

Land Classification

SC.32 Map detailing the land classification of the shoreline

LOCAL

Recreation- Intensive Use Recreation Recreation - Low Density Use Natural Area Natural Area


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SITE CONTEXT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY KIMBERLING CITY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT REGIONAL LOCAL SITE PICTURES

RECOMMENDATIONS

The relationship between and connection of Joe Bald Park to Kimberling City, MO is significant because the city’s residents would be the largest portion of the park’s visitors, as well as the city has a variety of amenities and services that can be used by non-local park visitors. Quite often, Kimberling City residents merely see regional visitors passing through the community on their way to the lake, Branson or Springfield, MO. But, the development of the park allows Kimberling City to become a way point where visitors could stop before continuing on to Joe Bald Park. The design team noticed that there were a limited number of entertainment and public space activities in the Kimberling City area. The development of Joe Bald Park into a park and community area would provide needed recreational opportunities and public green space for the citizens of Kimberling City and the region. The map to the right illustrates Kimberling City’s limited community entertainment and outdoor (nonlake) recreational opportunities.

M

Joe Bald Rd

M

Kimberling Area Library has a small playground and community garden Port of Kimberling Marina has a small playground, Joe Bald Park 2040 Large Playground Walking/cycling paths Pavilions Conservation Center

SC.33 The exisiting access to Joe Bald Park via Joe Bald Rd and the lack of community and park areas in the area


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IMMEDIATE NEIGHBORHOODS There is a neighborhood that abuts Joe Bald Park and several others that are located along Joe Bald Road. It is estimated that 1,000 people live along this stretch of Joe Bald Road. There is a great opportunity and need to connect these neighborhoods to Kimberling City and Joe Bald Park in a more direct and safe manner. Kimberling City does not have pedestrian or bicycle paths within the city. The design team believes that it is crucial to develop a pedestrian and bicycle network throughout the community and that the network should also Kimberling City to Joe Bald Park. We further suggest that Joe Bald Road be improved and that a pedestrian/ bike path be added alongside the road. Additionally, we have determined that other pedestrian/bike paths could be developed on the Corps of Engineers owned property that exists between the 936 foot flood pool elevation mark and the lake level. The map to the right illustrates Joe Bald Road, neighborhoods along the Joe Bald Road, and possible pedestrian/bike path connections. Neighborhoods

M

Joe Bald Park

Library Marina Dining Retail Airways Airport

Joe Bald Rd Pedestrian Route Joe Bald Rd Pedestrian Route below flood line SC.34 The location of the site, the proximity to Kimberling City and the amenities and neighborhoods in the vacinity

LOCAL

M


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SITE CONTEXT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ASSET: LANDSCAPE RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT REGIONAL LOCAL SITE PICTURES

RECOMMENDATIONS

Joe Bald Park has a variety of assets that should be carefully examined when looking at the development of the park. Joe Bald Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest asset is its landscape. The site sits at the end of a peninsula at a major bend in the lake with a 270 degree panoramic view of the water and Ozark hills; a prime location on Table Rock Lake. The site is beautiful; it has a sense of natural beauty through its entirety and is home to a wide variety of Ozarks flora and fauna. There are two knolls, which are the prominent land features of the site and three natural drainage areas that are carved into the landscape that should be preserved. The design team has identified two areas on the site that provide good locations for development because they have a grade 3:12 or less, a limited number of older trees, gorgeous views of the lake, and are separated from important ecological areas. We further recommend that care be taken to balance the preservation of the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural features and development of man-made improvements. The diagram to the right illustrates the natural features of the site; including knolls, drainage areas, lake views, and flat buildable areas. Legend Knoll Drainage Flat areas Views SC.35 The location of the knolls, the drainage for the site, the flat areas and the grand views out to the lake


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ASSET: LAKE ACCESS The greatest asset of Joe Bald Park is its location on Table Rock Lake. Joe Bald Park is located on a peninsula with a 270 degree view of the lake at the confluence of the White and James River, practically at the center of Table Rock Lake. Joe Bald Park is at a prime location on the lake to hold water related events such as: fishing tournaments, water sport events, and camps and lake ecology education classes. The design team believes that there are great opportunities for these relationships between the park and lake to be developed further. The diagram to the right illustrates the rivers, current lake access point to Joe Bald, important views of the site from the lake, and possible development areas.

Legend Lake path Access to site Views from lake

SC.36 The location of the current access from the lake, the views from the lake, and the areas ideal for future development

SITE

Development areas


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SITE CONTEXT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ASSET: BOAT LAUNCH RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT REGIONAL LOCAL SITE PICTURES

Joe Bald Park has a single public access boat launch site; currently, this is the only open area of the park. This boat launch is located at the west edge of the park. This is relatively flat area with limited parking. The design team believes that the location of the boat launch is ideal given the site topography, geology, and depth of surrounding water. Although this boat launch location is somewhat exposed to the wind, we recommend leaving it at this location and expanding the number of launch slips and parking. The diagram to the right illustrates the existing boat launch, surrounding parking spot, existing roads, and lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shallow areas along the shoreline of the park.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Legend Boat Launch Immediate lake area Parking Access road SC.37 The location of the existing boat launch, the existing parking, and the access from land by the access road


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ASSET: COVES There are three coves within the boundary of the park. They are an asset to Joe Bald Park because they house calmer waters ideal for a variety of functions and activities. The design team believes that these coves could be locations for boat docks. Care should be given when considering these coves for possible boat dock locations due to their exposure to wind and boat wakes. Although still somewhat problematic, we would recommend that the large cove adjacent to the boat launch area be considered as the more feasible site. We believe that this cove has the greatest potential for future development because of its adjacency to the existing and proposed boat launch, proximity to the existing park road, and dramatic views it offers across the lake towards the setting sun. We have assessed the southern cove as second best and the northern cove as third. Whichever cove or coves are developed, it is important to maintain the natural character and beauty of these sites. The diagram to the right illustrates the location of the three coves and their views out to the lake.

Legend Coves

SC.38 The location of the cives on site and the views out from these inlets

SITE

Views from coves


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SITE CONTEXT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ASSET: BEACH ACCESS RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT REGIONAL LOCAL SITE PICTURES

RECOMMENDATIONS

The slope on the western side of the site is relatively low. The site to the north features a beautiful rock beach that extends further north until the landscape changes into a more rugged and steep slope as the shoreline flows back to the southeast. There are beautiful views out to the lake along the entire stretch of the beach, but currently there are many obstructions of trees and debris that break up the beach perimeter of the site. There is a potential for the beach to also expand to the south, where the land is also relatively flat. The design team suggests that this southern shoreline area is of great value due to its natural beauty and location and, therefore, minimum to no development of structures should be allowed on this beach shoreline. We strongly recommend that a walking/cycling trail be developed along the beach shoreline between the 936 foot elevation and waterline from the rugged landscape and shoreline of the south, continuing through the beach areas to the west and end in the north among the rugged shoreline. The future development of the beach could potentially be the greatest asset for Joe Bald Park. Introducing a lakeside trail would showcase the ever changing features of the site, while providing great views out to the lake. The diagram to the right illustrates the location of the rock beach, rugged landscape of the extreme north and south sides of the site, possible expansion of the beach, and proposed of a lakeside trail. Legend

Rock beach Rugged landscape Possible expansion of beach Lakeside trail

SC.39 The location of the rock beach, the expansion of the beach and the rugged landscape on site


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ASSET: INFRASTRUCTURE There are existing roads and trails within Joe Bald Park. These roads are placed within the site according to the topography of the site. They currently act as the roadway that begins at the entrance to the park and lead into both the northern and southern section of the park. Throughout the site there are also many scattered ATV and deer trails winding from the adjacent neighborhoods into the site. The design team recommends that the paved roadway be kept and widened to accommodate the future growth of Joe Bald Park. There are many benefits in using these existing infrastructures: they are located according to the topography of the site, connect both the northern and southern parts of the site, and it is economically viable to keep the routes. We suggest that the scattered ATV and deer trails also be kept and new trails constructed to allow further enjoyment of the entire site. The diagram to the right illustrates the existing roads, ATV and deer trails and topography of the site.

Legend Existing Road

SC.40 The location of the existing infrastructure on site including the paved road, ATV trails and deet trails

SITE

ATV and deer trails


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SITE CONTEXT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY CHALLENGE: FLOOD LINE RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT REGIONAL LOCAL SITE PICTURES

RECOMMENDATIONS

Joe Bald Park has a variety of challenges that should be carefully examined when considering the development of the site. One of the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greatest challenges is the flood pool elevation for Table Rock Lake, which is 936 feet. All of the land around the lake between this 936 foot elevation and lake level is owned by the Army Corps of Engineers. This restricts what can be constructed or removed on this governmental land. Therefore, close communication and cooperation with the Army Corps of Engineers is important throughout the entire design and construction phases of the park. The design team recommends that all structures be built or elevated above this 936 foot flood line to protect them during flood events. The diagram to the right illustrates the 936 foot flood line constraint at Joe Bald Park.

Legend 936 Flood Line Flood Pool Basin

SC.41 The location of the 936 flood line as determined by the Corps and the flood pool basin


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CHALLENGE: PARKING Currently, Joe Bald Park has a limited number of parking spaces. There is a small parking lot on the western side of the park near the boat launch. During the high season, there is insufficient parking available for all of the people who use the boat launch. We recommend more parking spaces be added to accommodate the addition of park activities and programs throughout the site. The construction and operation of these parking areas must follow sustainable best practices, for more information view page 122. Further, we recommend that the parking areas be conceived of as flexible spaces shared by two or more adjacent park areas or activities. The diagram to the right illustrates the current parking and proposed additional parking spaces.

Legend Current Parking Future Parking Future Overflow Parking

SC.42 The location of the current parking and the future sites idal for the expansion and addition of parking lots

SITE

Existing Roads


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SITE CONTEXT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY CHALLENGE: DENSE TREES RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT REGIONAL LOCAL SITE PICTURES

RECOMMENDATIONS

Joe Bald Park consists of a diverse and beautiful landscape. There are many areas that must be preserved. There are areas on the site with many old growth trees and unique natural features. The preservation of these areas is important for the survival of the ecosystems within these areas. One of the areas with a high density of trees that should be preserved is located at the northern part of the site. This area is characterized by tall, older trees, and a rugged topography. There is a greater area of dense trees in the southern and central parts of the site that should also be preserved as much as possible. The design team suggests that these natural elements should act as constraints for placing the developed areas and structures on site. We recommend that these identified areas and other regions that are identified as special features to this site, including the drainage ravines, are preserved. The diagram to the right illustrates the areas of dense trees.

Legend Dense Trees

SC.43 The loaction of areas containing dense trees that should be preserved


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CHALLENGE: SITE HAZARDS Within the cove adjacent to the existing boat launch, there are hazardous materials such as screws, nails, and scrap metal that was dropped and lost in the water; when the area was used as an assembly location for boat docks. This cove needs to be cleared of these hazardous items before it could be developed as a Courtesy Dock marina or swimming area. Throughout the park, there are also a number of concrete picnic tables, structures, and bathrooms houses that are in disrepair and will need to be removed. In addition, there is a great deal of trash and vegetation litter that has collected since the park has been closed. The design team recommends that these structures be removed and trash and debris cleaned up as soon as possible for the safety of park users. The diagram to the right illustrates the cove and existing structures locations.

Legend Existing Structures

SC.44 Location of the existing roads, and the many site hazards

SITE

Existing Roads


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SITE CONTEXT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY CHALLENGE: ENTRANCE RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT REGIONAL LOCAL SITE PICTURES

RECOMMENDATIONS

Joe Bald Park is located adjacent to a residential area. Along the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eastern property line there is a buffer of trees that creates a natural boundary and separation from the adjacent neighborhood. Joe Bald Road ends at the one entrance into the park. The design team recommends that a natural tree buffer of at least 200 feet should be maintained as a boundary between the neighborhood and park. We further recommend that the entrance to the park remain in its current location and be expanded upon to create a more welcoming arrival point at the park. The diagram to the right illustrates the residential area to the east of the site, the buffer of trees that should be maintained, and the entrance into the park.

Legend Adjacent Neighborhood Tree Buffer Entrance Joe Bald Rd SC.45 Location of Joe Bald road, entrance into park, the adjacent neighborhood, and the tree buffer that should be kept


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The diagrams to the right illustrate the various areas identified as having great value. These areas should be kept natural or see limited development. These areas of value include: the property between the 936 foot elevation and the lake level, the tree buffer between the adjacent neighborhood and Joe Bald Park, the existing dense tree and ecological areas on site, the rugged shoreline landscape along the north and south of the site, and the natural drainage system on site,. The sixth diagram is an overlay of the previous five criteria and shows the areas with the highest values (the ones with the most overlap or darkest red tone) and the resulting areas favorable for development (the ones with the least overlap or limited to no red tone).

SC.46 Lakeside flood line

SC.48 Neighborhood tree buffer

SC.50 Dense trees & Ecological areas

SC.47 Rugged landscape

SC.49 natural drainage

Sc.51 Overlay

SITE

MAPPING OF THE VALUES


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SITE CONTEXT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT

SC.57 The natural rock beach on site

REGIONAL LOCAL SITE PICTURES

SC.52 Potential space for Joe Bald Landing

SC.55 Potential space for the non-denominational chapel

RECOMMENDATIONS

SC.58 The site provides great views to the lake

SC.53 Entry to Joe Bald Park

SC.56 Potential space to input places for social interaction

SC.54 The site has a natural beauty unique to the Ozark region

SC.59 Smaller coves provide spaces for smaller gatherings


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SC.60 Potential place for courtesy docks

SC.62 Existing rock beaches are perfect for swimming areas

SC.63 Unique rock formations scatter the park

SC.64 One the coves on site

SC.61 Unique growth creates special places in the park

SC.66 The density of trees filter the views to the lake

PICTURES

SC.65 Central cove as a potential site for the marina


RECOMMENDATIONS


PLACE HOLDER PAGE FOR FOLD OUT MAP


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS

LID CONSTRUCTION CONTEXT Currently, the natural environment covers a large portion of the site has never been touched. The development of the park’s structures, utilities, roads, trails, and parking should not be constructed using conventional construction methods that can harm the environment but rather by following sustainable best practices with minimal site disturbance.

RECOMMENDATION

We recommend that the expansions made to these circulation infrastructures be constructed using the LID Low Impact Development guidelines. This is a sustainable and environmentally conscious way to build, it is a strategy where the construction of these roads, parking lots, and trails does not cause damage or harm the environment or lake. The images below illustrates the before and after effects of conventional construction methods.

THE BENEFITS Designing with LID • • • • •

Resulting damage caused by an excess of storm water runoff

Reduces the amount of rainwater going into lake Slows the flow and speed of rainwater Reduces the hard surfaces that block water infiltration Incorporates native vegetation and trees Improves the look of the site

THE DAMAGE Designing without LID • • •

Increase the amount of toxins going Into the lake Increases the flow and speed of rainwater Provides a large barren slab of hard material

REC.3 Damage of property and flooding due to slope of the site

FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER

REC.4 Flash flooding due to an exess of storm water runnoff

CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

REC.1 Before the construction of conventional parking lots, nearly all rainfall is taken up by plants, evaporates, or infiltrates into the ground.

REC.2 After the construction of conventional parking lots, surface water increases significantly, and evaporation and infiltration decrease driving the polluted water into the Lake.

REC.5 Roadways crumbling due to erosion


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ROADS Examples of Soft Engineering Permeable Concrete

CONTEXT

CONSTRUCTION USING LID

Joe Bald Park has existing roads that provide connections throughout the site. These existing roads are 25 feet wide ,allowing one way traffic. The roadways follow topography of the site; the least steep areas of the site.

The expanded areas of the roadways should be constructed using permeable materials. The figures to the left illustrate some typical construction methods using permeable material. We recommend using permeable concrete because of its low cost and maintenance. LID construction may be more costly than conventional construction methods initially, but in the long run they pay for themselves. The use of permeable materials will help the storm water filter back into the ground and, thus prevent excessive unfiltered storm water from going into the lake. We recommend planting native plants and trees at the edge of the roadways to further help with the management of storm water. This is necessary because of the slope of the site is steep and the vegetation will help slow down the unfiltered water and allow it to soak in instead of rushing into the lake.

RECOMMENDATION

Pervious Joint Paver

We recommend that all of the current roads be kept because it is the most economical and environmentally sensitive strategy. Additionally, we believe that the roads need to be widened to allow 2-way traffic in order to accommodate the future increase of vehicular traffic throughout the site; hard shoulder should be provided along both sides of the road to allow for by bicycles and other forms of transportation.

Riparian Buffer

Reinforced Gravel Paving

Existing Road Reinforced Grass Paving

Bike path Infiltration Basin Riparian Buffer

Natural Environment REC.6

REC.7 Plan view of the existing road and the expansion and additions based on the LID guidlines

Existing Road No Curb

Natural Environment

Infiltration Basin

Natural Environment

No Curb

Permeable Concrete

REC.8 Section of the roadwas using the LID guidelines

LID CONSTRUCTION - ROADS

No Curb


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT

TRAILS CONTEXT Currently, driving to Joe Bald Park is the only viable option of getting there. In the future, with the growing trends such as raising fuel prices and the healthy lifestyle initiative, driving may not be a sustainable option. There need to be alternative multimodal transportation options reaching Joe Bald Park. This issue is already being addressed by including Courtesy Docks, but there needs to be more alternative access option by land.

RECOMMENDATIONS

RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

We recommend that several series of paths be developed to Joe Bald Park. The main one would be a hard surface waterside trail that would extend from the park into the adjacent neighborhoods thus enabling the residents to bike or walk to the site. Since this trail would have a hard surface it would be able to go within the 936 foot flood pool area. Initially this shoreline trail would create a loop within Joe Bald Park, but it would eventually be extended to the adjacent neighborhoods and on to Kimberling City. In the neighborhoods this trail would be right below the 936 foot flood pool line on Army Corps of Engineer property, not on residential property. Trails such as this one would encourage an active and healthy lifestyle, increase property values, and reduce crime rates. This trail would need to be handicap accessible. Trails would also be started around the interior if the site. These would be soft surface and narrower than the shoreline trail. These trails would be hillier because they would not always follow a single elevation line. These trails could be implemented in several ways. Firstly, the job could be outsourced to an outside organization. This would probably be the quickest way, but more expensive. The second option would be in install a system of sweat equity. This system would gather volunteers to build these trails throughout the site in exchange for fee access to the site or events. This

system ideally gets the community more involved with the development of Joe Bald Park and creates a more physical connection between the user and the landscape.

MATERIALITY

The hard surface shoreline trail would ideally be made out of concrete. The hard surface path should be 10 to 12 feet wide to accommodate pedestrian and bicycle users. The inland trails would be surfaces with dirt, gravel, and asphalt and be 5 to 8 feet wide.

REC.9 All ages can participate in a bike ride.

REC.10 Trail section

REC.11 Trails on site


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PARKING

REC.12 Example of wet swale

REC.13 Example of storm water

RECOMMENDATION

The design team recommends that the existing parking lot be removed and that its replacement and all future parking lots are constructed using the LID guidelines. Based upon our proposed site plan, there should be ample parking spaces for the programs and activities on site. However, we have determined that certain parking lots could be shared between two areas. This would greatly cut down on the amount of space to

allot for parking. We recommend that the parking lots be placed at a reasonable distance away from the activities and lake. The proximity and the connections to trails should be highlighted so to encourage walking on site.

CONSTRUCTION USING LID

It is crucial that the parking lots within the park be designed and installed using the LID guidelines. This is important because parking lots can create negative environmental conditions due to the amount of water runoff that they shed, the pollutants that they collect upon their surfaces, and the heat that they absorb and release. We recommend that at least 70% of all parking lots be constructed of permeable concrete that allows the surface water to seep into the ground. These parking lots should also incorporate storm water retention areas with native plants and trees to further allow the water a chance to seep back into the ground instead of being flushed off the site into the lake. Wherever possible, native plant rain gardens should be used to slow down

Compacted Subgrade Filter Course Permeable Concrete Curbless edge

REC.15

Stormwater Planter Natural Check dam

Amount of rainwater runoff REC.14 Plan of storm water planter system based on the LID guidelines and the reduction of the amount of rainwater runoff

REC.16 Section of storm water planter system based on the LID guidelines

TRAILS - PARKING

CONTEXT

Joe Bald Park currently has a limited number of parking spaces; the only parking is at the west edge near the boat launch. This parking lot can accommodate 30 cars. This parking lot has been constructed using conventional construction methods.


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

COURTESY DOCKS The Context Before establishing any type of boat dock, we need to understand the site. Joe Bald Park is conveniently located near the middle of Table Rock Lake. This will make traveling to the site by boat especially easy for anyone that lives on the lake. The flow of the water wraps around Joe Bald Park from north to the south. Because Joe Bald Park is on the inside of the water bend, minimal amount of debris will wash onto the shore. The water of Table Rock Lake has a reputation for being very clean. This is something that we would like to maintain, even with the addition of parking for motor boats. The topography of Joe Bald Park presents a challenge to placing docks around the park. In many places, the water is too shallow near the shore. These areas are good for development on the land, but not for boat docks. There are areas where the water is deep near the shore. This is good for boat docks, but in these areas the land near the water is too steep for efficient development. In regards to where any boat docks may occur, the road system will be a helpful asset in determining where they should be placed. One of the biggest issues of boat docks on the site is the fluctuating water levels. The maximum high of the flood pool impoundment is at the 936 foot elevation mark. This creates an issue for any buildings that we would like to have associated with the Courtesy Dock. Another issue is how the docks will function as the lake level rises and falls. These are the main points that were considered in the design of the boat dock.

REC.18 This is where we propose the courtesy be built. The area is strategically located near the existing road and has great views.

Recommendations

In our mission to reactivate the site, we recommend that a Courtesy Dock be added to Joe Bald Park. Currently, Joe Bald Park has a boat launch and a few parking spaces. People who boat to the park have no way to land their boats except to pull them up onto the

REC.17 It is important to cater to a variety of lake visitors.


Phases REC.19 Joe Bald Park is centrally located on Table Rock Lake. This makes it a convenient location for people who live around the lake to travel to by boat

REC.20 Assets: views, existing roads, and buildable land

REC.21 Challenges: 936 line, dense wooded areas, condition of facilities

nearby beach. This is an issue because the beach is made up of small pebbles and rocks, which could scratch the underside of the boats. Many of the people who live in Kimberling City own boats. They range from canoes to speedboats. Through a poll taken at one of the community meetings, we discovered, from those people present, that they would be more likely to visit Joe Bald Park if there was a Courtesy Dock located on the site. We also heard from the community that a large scale marina would have potential at Joe Bald Park.

Users

When designing anything for the vision for Joe Bald Park, it is essential to understand who would be the potential users of the facility we add. This is especially true for a Courtesy Dock. We recommend developing the dock in a series of phases that will be discussed in the next section. Each phase responds to the facilities that are at Joe Bald Park and the number of people who would use those facilities. Currently, Joe Bald Park is primarily used by the locals. Part of the reason why it is such a locally oriented park is access. Joe Bald Road is the only road that goes to Joe Bald Park and the only way to access the site by water requires boaters to run their boats onto the

The development of Joe Bald Park will take time. The master plan cannot be implemented all at once site. Instead, the development of Joe Bald Park should be done phases. The first phase for the Courtesy Docks would start out small. We propose that a small floating dock be added south of the boat launch as a first step. As Joe Bald Park gains in popularity, more developments will occur around the park. In order to accommodate the boaters coming to the park, more boat docks will be required. Of course, the expansion of the Courtesy Dock should occur accordingly to number of visitors that come to the park. In the third phase, the social expansion phase, there will be a great number of visitors. It will be likely that this phase will see the need for expansion of the boat dock. We suggest a dock that could support thirty boats of varying sizes be built at this time. The final phase for the Courtesy Dock will occur once all the developments have been implemented around the park. Because some of the program allows for overnight activity, the dock should provide some overnight boat accommodations. The visitors that come to Joe Bald Park will be from outside the local area. It is likely that they may come to Joe Bald Park with their boats and because of this; therefore we suggest that a gasoline station be added at the Courtesy Dock. To promote active living and sustainable practices, we suggest the final expansion of the Courtesy Dock to include a manual boat rental area. The introduction of such a Courtesy Dock will encourage people to visit Joe Bald Park..

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CD.9 Stage I: Simple Courtesy Dock

REC.22 Stage II: Expansion, Main walkway, Multiple Access

REC.23 Stage III: Expansion, Pier, Seating, Gardens, Pavilion, Manual Boat dock and Rental.

COURTESY DOCKS

beach. By introducing a Courtesy Dock the site becomes more accessible for the people who live around the lake and wish to access it by boat. For instance, if you drive from Kimberling City to Joe Bald Park, it would take you fifteen to twenty minutes. However, if you were to drive a boat from Port of Kimberling Marina and Resort to Joe Bald Park, you would get there faster. The addition of a Courtesy Dock makes the access to Joe Bald Park more convenient for a large portion of Table Rock Lake residences.


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS

COURTESY DOCKS Small Courtesy Dock

Medium Courtesy Dock

This small dock will provide daytime boat docking for the visitors to Joe Bald Park. These visitors will be looking to enjoy the new trails, the beaches, an event in one of the new pavilions, or just to be immersed in the natural landscape of Joe Bald Park. Because of the small scale of developments that occur in the park during this first phase, the dock may only need about twelve to sixteen spaces. This dock should be covered to provide shelter for visitors seeking refuge from inclement weather. The dock should include small storage units that can be locked for the convenience of the visitors. An adjustable gangway will be used in order to keep the dock functional despite the rising and falling water levels.

The small Courtesy Dock will be upgraded at the discretion of the community. The medium Courtesy Dock will still cater to day users as no overnight activities will have been established yet. It is important to design this second phase to cater to the final expansion phase while at the same time catering to the immediate needs of the visitors. The expansion of the dock should include the pathway to the dock. A path will run along the shore line with different access points for people to enter the dock. These access points will be oriented to the boat slip, parking lot, and to the future site of the pedestrian path from where the general store and tackle shop will be placed. This path and access points should be equipped with lighting fixtures, benches, planters and trash cans. The design for the actual dock calls for a deck that runs parallel to the on-land trail. Two secondary decks will project from the main deck. This is where the boat docks will occur. One of these secondary decks will actually be the small Courtesy Dock introduced in phase one. With the increasing popularity of the park, it will be important to cater to all the different kinds of boats that will potentially visiting the site. This includes house boats and yachts. The medium Courtesy Dock will use double dock spaces. This is where two boats are able to share one space and each boat has its own deck to enter and exit the boat. This allows for flexibility in parking. Larger boats will be able to take up an entire space while two smaller boats can share one single dock spot. Each dock spot will be equipped with cleats to tie boats up to and lockers for storage. The secondary decks will be covered in case of inclement weather. As a security measure the Courtesy Dock will be well light and a small building will be added for a dock manager. The medium Courtesy Dock should have enough spaces for roughly 36 mid-sized boats to double park.

PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

REC.24 Simple Courtesy Dock Example.

The medium Courtesy Dock is a response to the growing popularity of Joe Bald Park, with the introduction of more activities in the park, more people will visit the park. It is important to provide enough boat docks to encourage visitors to come by boat and avoid using their car.

REC.25 Medium Courtesy Dock Example

The Final Courtesy Dock The final phase of the Courtesy Dock expansion turns the dock itself into a destination point. The major additions include a pier, more dock spaces, an on-deck tournament center, a separate area for manual boats to dock, and a canoe and kayak storage area where people can rent manual powered boats. The pier will provide a unique experience to the Table Rock Lake community. This pier will be roughly 350 feet long extending out to the west south-west. At the end of the pier will be a search light. This search light will be designed in a manner that expresses the character of Joe Bald Park and Kimberling City and symbolize the growth of the region. Around this light will be seating for people to relax, and enjoy the view or meditate. This pier could host events like open air art and craft shows and host activities associated with the tournament center.


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COURTESY DOCKS

REC.26 Large Courtesy Dock Detailed Plan

Because of the increased number of activities at Joe Bald Park, more dock will be necessary. In this final phase, there should be dock for 70 mid-sized boats. In addition to these dock spaces, the pier will be able to act as an additional dock for very large boats that might not be able to fit in a regular dock space. By this time, there will be overnight activities located at Joe Bald Park. Because of this, it will be necessary to provide some overnight boat dock. However, it will be important to limit these spaces and make them available only to those using the site activities. The residences that live near the area will want to store their boats at this facility but should refrain from this in order to provide space for visitors from other communities. This could be accomplished by establishing an overnight fee that deters people from docking their boats there for long periods of time, but not so expensive that people would rather not park there and visit Joe Bald Park. Through the community meetings, we learned of the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desire to set up a pavilion that could host a series of tournaments and other social events. These include fishing tournaments, concerts, barbecues, boat races and more. This pavilion will have to be hooked up with electricity; provided by solar panels located on the roof. There will need to be space made available for a stage that could be set up in times of tournaments or other events. The stage would be able to be stored nearby or on the dock. There should be areas dedicated for seating around the pavilion. This seating will be oriented around the space dedicated to the stage. The seating should also be permanent which will allow for impromptu gatherings. The additional space set aside of manual powered boats will be introduced on the east side of the dock. A separate manual boat dock is a step to preventing accidents between large motorized boat and manual powered boats. Adding a building located near the manual boat dock will be where people go to rent out canoes, kayaks, paddle boats, and sailboats. By providing these facilities we are promoting healthy activities that do not harm the Table Rock Lake ecosystem. In addition to these major additions, there are several other things that should be implemented in the


JOE BALD VISION 2040

COURTESY DOCKS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS

REC.27 Planter boxes will help add attractiveness to the dock.

SITE CONTEXT

final addition to the Courtesy Dock. Covered seating areas will occur along the main deck with planter boxes between them. In addition to flowers, these planter boxes will grow small trees to provide shading on the dock while providing an aesthetic appeal that is in tune with the natural beauty of Joe Bald Park. A small scale gasoline fill station will be provided for people who chose to launch their boat from Joe Bald Park. Other aspects include lockable storage space for the boaters, seating spread out around the boat dock spaces, light around the dock, and guard rails around the edges. These elements will be added to help make the experience for boaters as fun and safe as possible. At our community meetings, we learned from the community members that this proposed location has one major issue and that is that the water is too shallow for some boats. We decided to keep this location for several reasons. The areas where the water is deep enough all have the same issue; the shore is too steep to efficiently and inexpensively build anything. These areas are also heavily wooded and clearing out the trees

RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK

REC.28 Ground lights will ensure people know where the edge of the dock is during the evening.

would contradict our mission to preserve as much of the natural beauty as possible. The final issue is that all the other areas we could build a dock at are not located near enough to an existing roadway. This is contradictory to our mission of creating an economically sustainable plan for Joe Bald Park. The cost of building new roads, clearing out trees, and the fact that these other areas are located away from the other programs in the park make the area south of the boat launch the most viable location for the Courtesy Dock. In order to solve the issue of the shallow water, we propose that a retaining wall be built in the water and that some of the ground be dug out to provide space for larger boats to maneuver around the dock. This will not be such an issue in regards to the natural environment because currently, only two trees would need to be removed to make room for the retaining wall. Another issue brought up by the community members was the fact that the water levels tend to fluctuate frequently compared to other lakes. The simplest solution is to make sure that the Courtesy Dock is able to float. Adjustable gangways will connect

REC. 29 An on site boat gas station can help generate revenue. This could be an expansion of the existing locally owned gas station nearby.

REC.30 Seating on the dock will create meditative spaces with great views.

WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

CD.17 A possible solution to the issue of low water levels is to create a retaining wall that will allow the dock to be opperational during times of low and high tide.

REC.31 On site storage will be convenient for boaters looking to store valuables. Could potentially be rented out.


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the floating dock to the retaining wall and as the water levels rise and fall, the dock and gangway will adjust accordingly.

REC.32 View of the Pavilion on the Courtesy Dock. Fishing tournaments, concerts and other events will take place here creating a fun social atmosphere.

REC.33 View of the Pier from the courtesy dock. A sculpture that reflects the character of Kimberling City is placed at the end. This will act as a symbol that helps to make this area distinct.

Many people in the Kimberling City will be concerned about who would be running a facility like a Courtesy Dock. Currently, the Corps of Engineers own the land, but they may be willing to sell or lease the land. Ultimately, an issue like this would have to left up to the community, but we do have some recommendations that may help. A facility like this could be run by the city. This would mean that local tax dollars would be set aside to help maintain the dock and pay for the additions that will be made. The local government would be in charge of hiring local citizens to run things. The second idea would be to lease or sell the land to a private citizen who would then be in charge of the operations of the dock. This would include hiring people to run the dock and maintain it. There may need to be incentives established for the owner to make the necessary developments in correlation with the rest of Joe Bald Park. The final option we suggest would be to create a partnership with an existing company or organization to run the dock. In addition to running the docks, they would be able to sponsor events that would bring people and revenue into Kimberling City. Because of the activities that the Courtesy Dock will provide, there will be an opportunity to create partnerships with the other facilities that will be implemented at Joe Bald Park. The partnership that we see as vital is the one between the Courtesy Dock and the Eco Camp. Students, campers, and families that use the camp will be interested in taking part in activities that occur on the lake. The Courtesy Dock should also have a partnership with the Welcome Center. From the Welcome Center, day visitors can reserve dock space, manual powered boats, and other water related equipment. It

Government Org.

Lease out the Land

Private Investors

Hire Employees

Run the Facilities

REC.34 Potential Management Strategies

Eco Camps Education Center Pavilions

Courtesy Dock

Restaurant

Welcome Center

REC.35 Partnership Opportunities

Partnerships around JBP is necessary to note that renting out equipment should also be able to happen at the dock. People who do not know about the different activities at the Courtesy Dock can go to the Welcome Center and if they learn about something they are interested in, they can make the proper arrangements. Lastly, the Courtesy Dock should have a partnership with the Restaurant. We feel that it would be a great experience for visitors to have the option to dine on a dock. We imagine that the views from the Restaurant will encourage people to take walks after dinner along

COURTESY DOCKS

Management

Corps of Engineers


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION

COURTESY DOCKS Courtesy Dock and out on the pier. Physically connecting the Restaurant dock with Courtesy Dock will encourage people to go out and explore the Courtesy Dock. If public events, like a concert, are occurring at the Courtesy Dock pavilion, people at the Restaurant will be interested in taking part in this social activity. This also works the other way. People taking part in an event associated with the Courtesy Dock pavilion will likely go to the nearby Restaurant. These partnerships encourage the different functions of Joe Bald Park to work together to provide a unique experiences for the visitors. If these partnerships work together and are managed properly, all parties involved will profit from the collaboration.

ROADS REC.37 Partnerships with Eco Camps will allow children to enjoy on-the-lake activities like canoing

TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING REC.36 Boat show

REC.38 Because fishing is a very popular activity on Table Rock Lake, Facilities like the pavilion on the dock can host fishing tournaments and other events.


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Incorporation of Trends

Conclusion

This Courtesy Dock responds to the trends that are emerging. Within Smart Growth, we see an incorporation of mixed land use, walkability, sense of place, and community collaboration. Active Living ideas come through with the manual boat rental facility, and the fact that the Courtesy Dock provides a scenic space for people to walk or run for exercise. The Healthy Lifestyle Initiative is dealt with primarily with physical activity and social interaction.

In Conclusion, A Courtesy Dock is essential to reactivating Joe Bald Park. By creating the opportunity to park boats at Joe Bald Park, the greater Table Rock Lake community will be more encouraged to visit the park. As the different phases of Joe Bald Park are carried out, the Courtesy Dock will need to develop and grow accordingly. It is vital that the Courtesy Dock is managed by people who have the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best interest in mind. This and partnerships with other facilities around Joe Bald Park and Table Rock Lake will ensure that Joe Bald Park becomes a vibrant and profitable asset to Kimberling City and the Stone County Area.

REC.39 A section cut of the dock.

REC.40 A perspective of the pavilion.

REC.42 The courtesy docks will enable people from all over to enjoy Joe Bald Park

COURTESY DOCKS

REC.41 The Joe Bald Courtesy Dock Master Plan


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT

PAVILIONS CONTEXT

CORE GROUP OF PAVILIONS

In its current state, Joe Bald Park does not provide any structured spaces for social gatherings. Its central location on the lake and its popularity with the adjacent neighborhoods makes it a prime location to initiate and hold such functions. This central location also lends itself to the potential of being a social hotspot, not only for the surrounding population, but for the entire Table Rock Lake area and the Ozark region.

The cluster of 3 pavilions on the north-west shoreline is accented by the rocky beach located there. The rocks on this point of land differ from the rest of the beach; they are large and flat akin to the Table Rock of Table Rock Lake. This gives the point a sense of uniqueness that makes it memorable. This interesting facet combined with encouraged social interaction creates a unique dynamic. The key point about these pavilions is that they begin to break down the barriers that bare social interaction between different groups of people. They are separate pavilions, but they are orientated towards each other and the communal fire pit to encourage different users to interact with one another. There is something primal about fire that draws people together. It is this emotive quality of gathering and warmth that we want to produce. There is nothing quite like sitting with friends, old or just made, around a fire on a lake. This connection to both nature and to other people is something special that this site has the real possibility to create. This point is located between two shelves that are perfect for scuba diving. The western shelf is more shallow and great for beginners while the eastern shelf drops to one of the deepest parts around the site making it terrific for more advanced divers. This duality of experiences lends itself to the uniqueness of this point and diversifies the potential activities that can spring from social spaces. Joe Bald Park is used by many people in the summer months as a swimming spot. This cluster of pavilions is located along the most popular swimming shore and would serve a as base of operations for a day at the lake. While these are examples of what programs these pavilions could support, ultimately they are not programmed; the program is left up to the user.

RECOMMENDATION

RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK

We recommend that a series of pavilions be installed at Joe Bald Park to encourage social interaction. A core cluster of pavilions would be centered on a communal fire pit to encourage social interaction between different groups of people. Others would be scattered throughout the site for multiple functions such as fishing tournaments, family gatherings, and recreational activities.

LOCATIONS

The core group of pavilions would be located along the north-west shoreline, one would be located in the programmed green space, one would be located beside the retail area near the parking lot, and one is located at the Courtesy Dock.

WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP

REC.44 Green Space Pavilion

MANAGEMENT PHASING REC.43 Cluster of pavilions

REC.45 Location of the pavilions


GREEN SPACE PAVILION The pavilion located within the programmed green space serves as a generic park pavilion. Its proximity to the open space and playground makes it ideal for kid friendly and family orientated interactions. Parents or other family members could sit out of the sun while still watching their children. It would be a great place for a picnic or just a spot to reflect upon nature. A part of this pavilion would be an outdoor classroom that would work in conjunction with the educational and conservation center. The dual function of recreation and education creates and environment that encourages environmentally friendly practices in a fun way for people of all ages. This central location within the park as well

as its proximity to the Welcome Center also makes it a great meeting place for visitors arriving at the park. This pavilion would serve as an impromptu gathering space for everyday use, but could also be rented out for larger parties or family reunion. This not only allows for a variety of user options, but also helps keep the park economically sustainable. We recommend that the pavilion be made from local materials, such as wood and stone. The form and construction of the pavilions such be kept simple to blend naturally into the landscape and to make them easy to construct. Construction of the pavilion could be undertaken by volunteers from the community.

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REC.48 Example of a stone fire pit

REC.47 An evening around a the central fire pit of the clustered pavilions

REC.49 Daytime proviedes great views and fun

PAVILIONS

REC.46 Spaced slats provide shelter, privacy and filtered light


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER

FOLLIES CONTEXT As stated previously, Joe Bald Park is a beautiful area, yet it has no place for social engagement to occur. In previous recommendations we addressed the need for larger scale social areas, but there is still a lack of spaces for small scale social interaction or private meditation among nature.

RECOMMENDATION

We recommend that multiple follies be installed on the site. These follies would be small found spaces set within nature and often made with found material. They would each have its own unique structure that would encourage a different emotive quality or activity. Each would also focus on something in its context, such as a rock outcropping, cluster of trees, the swaying tree tops above, ravine, sound of wind blowing through the evergreens, or the lake in the distance.

LOCATIONS

The follies would be spread throughout the park. On the site map we have located several areas we believe are excellent locations for a folly.

CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING REC.50 Trailside respite folly

1. The terrain along the northern shoreline is very steep and hard to build upon. That being said anything that is build there has the opportunity to be very dynamic. The two follies here would be cantilevered over the shoreline or dig into the hillside. Cantilevering over the terrain provides a dramatic view of the lake and can provide a more open social interaction space. Digging in to the hillside gives the folly a more secluded feel and focus on the individual.

2. The south-west shoreline has a gentle slope and no major programming activities. The tree density here is also much lighter than other area on the site. Any folly here should be more open and welcoming. Since it is close to the shoreline we recommend a series of fire pits for this folly. These fire pits should vary in distance from both the lake and shoreline path to provide different degrees of privacy and openness to the fire pits; you might be at one and be able to interact with people passing on the shoreline path or have a secluded private fire pit with a small group of people.

REC.51 Observation folly

3. In the central area of the southern peninsula is one of the highest spot on Joe Bald Park. We feel that this is a good spot on the site for an observation tower.

4. Another folly would be located on the rock bed in the southern half of the site. This folly would be more focused on path and the individual. It would be a place for meditation. 5. Along the trails that run throughout the site are opportunities to provide small respites for hikers. When the trail is close to the water these respites can be docks or viewing platforms on the lake. If the trail is running through the interior of the site, these respites can be simple benches or shelters to observe the beauty of Joe Bald Park.

REC.52 Key areas for follies


MATERIALITY

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The materiality of the follies really depends on their context and purpose. In general, they should be constructed from naturally occurring materials like wood and stone. These are expressed throughout the entire site and would enable the follies to blend with the context. If material is brought in from off-site it should be light and easy to transport as to avoid negatively impacting the environment. REC.56 Floating dock folly

REC.54 natural rock for materials

REC.55 natural trees for materials

1. While most of the follies would be on land, there is also the opportunity to expand out into the lake. Since Table Rock Lake is so clean and clear, many people scuba dive in the lake. The Joe Bald Park peninsula is located next to two rock shelves that are perfect for both experienced and new divers. One of the follies could be a diving platform placed at the bottom of the lake for a destination point for divers.

2. Another water folly could be a floating deck. These kinds of space are perfect for an afternoon picnic and are also good destinations for swimming. As to avoid conflicts between swimmers and boaters we suggest that a floating deck be located off the southern shore of the park. This provides the floating deck with some privacy and does not interfere with any major boat traffic.

In general, these follies are found spaces that are not advertised and enhances the qualities of the park they are placed. They create a sense of exploration and whimsy within the park. Below are different categories of follies that we believe would work well in the park. • • • • • • • • • •

Shelters Observation Platforms Docks Dive Platforms Trailside Benches Floating Docks Fire pits Outdoor Classrooms Tree Houses Grottoes

REC.57 Fire-pit folly

The design team can foresee these follies being implemented throughout Joe Bald Park in a number of ways: • • • • •

The follies could be built by local volunteers as community service A Sweat Equity Program might be developed where people might work in exchange for park admissions or services They could be built as part of the Green School’s design/build curriculum The follies could be built using donations of monies or bequests However they get built, we recommend that at least 50% of the follies must be handicap accessible

REC.58 Taliesin West structure

As a precedent for what these follies should aim to achieve, we recommend that the vision team study the work by the students at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture at Taliesin West, Scottsdale, Arizona. • • •

Each student had to construct a structure and live in it for a semester The qualities that those structures sought to instill were the unification of form, materials, landscape and context; the same qualities that the follies at Joe Bald Park seek http://taliesin.edu/shelters/shelters1.html

REC.59 Taliesin West structure

FOLLIES

REC.53 Example shelter folly


JOE BALD VISION 2040

SIGNAGE

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

JOE BALD PARK

RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP

REC.60 Major road overhead sign-age

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR OFF SITE SIGNS If Joe Bald Park is going to become a tourist attraction there needs to be clear wayfinding signage place along the regional highways. Since Joe Bald Park is located 6 miles off of Highway 13 it is important to provide excellent directional and informative signs how to get there and what is offered at the park. There are two locations where signage is important: • •

The first location is at the Joe Bald Road and Highway 13 light. These signs need to be visible to both the north and south bound traffic. In addition, signage along Joe Bald Road must provide clear directions. We recommend that the distance to the park entrance should also be given on the signs.

The signage that is developed should convey the character and qualities of Joe bald Park: nature first, the inseparability of man and nature, conservation, sustainability, and education. The signs within the park and directing someone to the park should be compatible; they should be seen as being related. Natural materials, that are common to the Ozarks region, should be utilized.

MANAGEMENT PHASING REC.61 Signage at the entrance of Joe Bald Park


139

REC.63 Building name sign

REC.65 Directional sign

REC.62 Educational fact sign

Whether you arrive at Joe Bald Park by road, trail, or water, the onsite signage is of great importance for directing you to your destination and providing you information about your surrounding context. These signs should also have a character and quality to them that expresses the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s values as mentioned previously. Regardless of whether it is a large directional sign pointing you towards the Restaurant or a small trail sign identifying the flora along the trail, they need to relate to one another and provide a commonality of experience. There are a number of buildings recommended for the park: Welcome Center, Nondenominational Chapel, Nature Center, Follies, Restaurant, Courtesy Dock and Eco Camp. These buildings all need a sign; a sign that is subordinate to nature, but recognizable. One of the important features of Joe Bald Park is its emphasis on education. Signs will be required to point out and explain all of these environmental and sustainable features that have been incorporated into the design of the park. These informative signs could be as simple as naming the flora along the trail or describing and diagramming the design of the sustainable parking lots and how they prevent storm water from flushing the surface pollutants into the lake. These various signs should take into consideration the distance from which they will be viewed and the speed at which someone will pass them when choosing their size, positioning, and layout.

REC.64 Welcome to Joe Bald Park sign

SIGNAGE

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ON SITE SIGNS


JOE BALD VISION 2040

NATURE CENTER

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

REC.65 The Nature Center looks to promote and protect the wildlife around Table Rock Lake.

The Context Joe Bald Park is blessed to have such a rich natural ecosystem. Unfortunately, many people are unaware of this treasure. People see trees and a lake and though they may appreciate them, they do not understand how important it is that places like Joe Bald Park still exist. This attitude usually results in the degradation of the natural environment. Even today, Joe Bald Park is littered with trash from people who have visited the site. The Nature Conservation Center would provide a context for the study of the natural ecosystem of Joe bald Park and the Ozark region. This center could have interactive displays, films, nature walks and lectures, classes, and special events. The center could be responsible for installing the educational signage along the trails. And, the Nature Center could be the primary source for sustainable education in the Table Rock Lake area.

Recommendations

We recommend that a Nature Conservation Center be established at Joe Bald Vision project. The purpose of the Nature Center would be to provide visitors and locals the opportunity to learn about the nature of Missouri and a variety of sustainable practices.

Required Spaces • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Office Welcome Area Permanent Exhibit Temporary Exhibit Reference Library Research Area Small Vet Area Auditorium Two Classrooms Staff Space Loading and Unloading Maintenance Loading and Unloading

These spaces will be required for the Nature Center to run smoothly. In addition to these interior spaces, the park itself will act as outdoor classrooms. We suggest that this facility have two exhibit spaces. The permanent exhibit will cater to the nature aspect of the center. The temporary exhibit will be oriented to sustainability practices and technology of sustainability. The auditorium and classrooms will be used for formal education, while the park and the follies will be used for more informal educational opportunities

REC.66 In addition to nature, the Nature Center will teach sustainabiliy.


REC.67 Displays and viewing areas will help visitors to connect with the landscape REC.70 Temporary displays will show the development of trends in sustainability.

REC.68 A library will be available for people to read up on information related to nature and conservation.

REC.69 Administrative Offices will be necessary in order to organize events and displays.

REC.71 The permenent exhibit will be more oriented towards nature and wildlife of the Ozark area.

The Nature Center will teach people about nature and sustainability. In order to accomplish this there will need to be a series of evolving activities and educational opportunities for people to learn. It is important to keep in mind that not everyone learns the same way. In order to account for this, there will need to be a variety of educational tools incorporated to meet the needs of all the different learning types. Some of the different ways of presenting information include, textbooks, videos, dioramas, and interactive displays. Incorporating these learning strategies into the activities will ensure that the information will be absorbed by a variety of people. In addition to standard displays, we would like to incorporate some unique educational opportunities. We would like to see professional zoologists and botanist come to the center and give demonstrations to the public. This could include an animal handler who teaches the public about the different kind of snakes and gives them the chance to actually hold a snake. This could also include a professional botanist who can lead tours around the park and nearby areas and teach about plant identification. These sort of interactive learning opportunities are critical in order to give visitors a true learning experience. The use of the park and follies as outdoor classrooms will also create a great learning atmosphere. It makes sense that if you are learning about nature; it would be helpful to be in nature. We felt that teaching by example would be the best way to educate people about sustainability. In most cases, sustainable technologies are hidden from view. Within this Nature Center, all the sustainable techniques and technologies would be completely visible to the visitors of the center. It is important for people to see exactly what the processes are for becoming sustainable. We also see this as being an opportunity to show people that sustainability may not be as difficult as they perceive. Getting a better understanding of sustainability could be the first step in a visitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s journey in living a sustainable lifestyle.

Some people believe that sustainability needs a physical object to happen: a solar panel or a water filtration system. The Nature Center would teach other methods of being sustainable like thermal massing and passive heating and cooling. These methods are often over looked, but they are important as well. Many people might think it would be cool to have a house with the entire south side made of windows with no shading devices. Teaching about the passive heating and cooling may help them understand why this would not be practical. One element that is important is to make sure that the Nature Center keeps a positive educational atmosphere. Making this center an area for blame about the environmental state of our planet is not conducive for accepting new ideas.

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Management

A popular question we received at the community meets was, â&#x20AC;&#x153;who would be running such a program?â&#x20AC;? This question was also asked when we first introduced the idea of a Nature Center. Currently, the Army Corps of Engineers owns Joe Bald Park. It is highly unlikely that they would not be willing or able to run something as intricate as a full scale Nature Center. However, we were told that the Corps would be willing to lease out the land, or possibly, sell it. If they were to sell the land, they would first look to selling it to another governmental organization. We recommend that the Joe Bald Park be sold to the Missouri Department of Conservation. We suggest this government organization because they already successfully run a nature center that is very similar to what we are proposing. The Powder Valley Conservation Nature Center, located in St. Louis, MO was a center that we studied and decided that it was a good example of something we would like to do here at Joe Bald Park.

NATURE CENTER

Educational Opportunities


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

NATURE CENTER Additional Aspects In later phases of the Joe Bald Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s development there will be a series of cabin constructed near the Nature Center. These cabins will house students, children, and families. We suggest that the Nature Center be oriented to these visitors. During the times when the visitors are students and children on summer camp, the Nature Center will act as the hub for all the education about nature and sustainability. Families that come and stay in the cabins may want to spend a day at the Nature Center, but most likely they will focus on other activities around the park. In addition to plants and animals at Joe Bald Park, the Nature Center will have at its disposal the Table Rock Lake. It will be critical to incorporate lake ecology in the material that is taught and on display at the center. Education should not be the only thing that happens at the Nature Center, since there will be a large amount of people at the park; it is very likely that not everyone will be so conscious about how they treat the park. Because of this, the Nature Center should be in charge of making sure that the park stays in pristine condition. This could easily be done by organized volunteer groups to go around the park and pick up trash. In addition to establishing groups, the Nature Center could look to schools and the Scout Programs to get volunteers, children that participate could earn volunteer hours while immersing themselves in nature. Lastly, the Nature Center will be the headquarters of all sustainability efforts on the site. We believe that all the facilities at Joe Bald Park should make strides to become sustainable. By putting the Nature Center in charge of maintaining the sustainability systems, places like the Joe Bald Park Landing, Welcome Center, and Restaurant can focus on their business while still practicing sustainability. Another important aspect to the Nature Center includes parking. In order to follow Smart Growth principles, we seek to encourage walking to the Nature

Center. However, this may be too inconvenient for the people who work there every day and the elderly. We suggest that there be parking for the staff members, plus handicapped parking spaces located adjacent to the center. By limiting the parking, more people will be encouraged to walk to the center and enjoy the nature of the park on their way to the Nature Center.

Design

Much like the other buildings designed at park, taking into account the culture and character of Joe Bald Park and Kimberling City will be important factors in guiding the design of the facility. In accordance with sustainable practices, the majority of the materials used to build the nature center should come from the site in order to avoid shipping materials to the site. Unlike the other facilities, there will need to be special attention to sustainability. Since we want this facility, in particular, to be completely sustainable, we will need to take into account what will be the repercussions for every design decision. This ranges from the placement and type of windows, to what sort of HVAC unit used. Some of the things that we wish to incorporate in the design of the Nature Center include water collection and filtration,

REC.72 The nature center will actually impliment sustainable practices. This goes with the idea of teaching by example.

REC.73 A series of nature oriented events will be hosted by the nature center. Here we see campers studying the ecosystem.

REC.74 Events like aniimal handling can take place at the Nature Center.


143

Conclusion

Nature Center Restaurant

Waste Management Recycling Composting Utilities Water Collection Water Purification

The Landing

Waste Management Solar and Wind Power Utilities

Eco Cabins

Waste Management Recycling Water Purification Solar and Wind Power Maintenance Utilities Septic Systems

Courtesy Docks Solar Power Plants and Vegetation Maintenance

The Nature Center will be an area where people can learn about Missouriâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nature and sustainability practices. The main method of teaching will be by example through real life lessons. We believe the best teaching tool and classroom will be the actual Joe Bald Park itself.

REC.76 This shows what sort of things the nature center could assist other facilities in regards to sustainability.

REC.75 Because the MO dept. of Conservation has a nature center like the one we propose, they could help run this facility.

REC.77 The education goes beyond the nature center, it will be important to use the park itself as a classroom as well.

REC.78 The nature center will connect with the local community in park clean-up and maintenance projects.

REC.79 The nature center will be in charge of maintaining sustainable practices and systems around the park.

NATURE CENTER

solar and wind energy harvesting, passive heating and cooling techniques, and materiality. With these measures in place we can begin to look at the actual appearance of the building. Because technology will be an important aspect of the Nature Center, we feel that it should integrate more contemporary design ideas. In essence, the Nature Center will act as a symbol for Joe Bald Park and Kimberling City representing their devotion to preserving nature.


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT

NON-DENOMINATIONAL CHAPEL CONTEXT As of now, Joe Bald Park does not have any enclosed spaces for spiritual or social interactions. The inherent beauty of the site is a great catalyst for these kinds of interactions. The Ozarks region is a very religious area and the residents have a deep spiritual connection to the land. This Non-Denominational Chapel would provide the park and region with a facility that would enhance this spiritual connection or experience.

RECOMMENDATION

RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER

We recommend that a Non-Denominational Chapel be constructed at the park that would attract people to come and seek a heightened spiritual awareness within this wayside chapel nestled in the natural beauty of the Joe Bald Park overlooking Table Rock.

LOCATION

This chapel should be located along the northern portion of Joe Bald Park. The denser trees and vegetation in this area would give the chapel a more private and secluded setting appropriate for reflection and meditation. The rocky terrain along this shoreline drops off steeply towards the water, providing an opportunity for the chapel to be cantilevered out over the rocks and into the canopies of the trees. This would give the visitor a different perspective for viewing the surrounding environment; nestled among the trees, reaching outward

JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING REC.80 close up of chapel site

and upward into the sky above Table Rock Lake. The view of the lake and the surrounding Ozark Mountains would be breathtaking. The entry to the chapel would be located above the 936 foot flood pool elevation, with the chapel cantilevered out from the rocky bluff over the floodplain. The base and space below the chapel would be concrete and stone to withstand the flood waters.

FUNCTIONS

Besides being a place for spiritual reflection and meditation, the Non-Denominational Chapel could also be rented out for other functions, such as weddings. The beauty and location of Joe Bald Park accentuates the functionality of this chapel. If the beauty of the chapel could match the beauty of its location, people would come from all over Kimberling City, Table Rock Lake, and beyond area to experience this chapel by the lake. What will make this chapel special is the unification of site, architecture, and purpose into a powerful “sense of place”. The epitome of such a chapel and “sense of place” is Thorncrown Chapel in Eureka Spring, Arkansas by E. Fay Jones. Mr. Jones architecture at both Thorncrown Chapel and Pinecote Pavilion, Crosby Arboretum, Picayune, MS are superb examples of the use of simple materials in the creation dynamic structures that elevates ones personal spiritual awareness while fitting into and elevating the context of the surrounding environment. The suggested chapel at Joe Bald Park and Thorncrown Chapel are both in located the Ozark Mountains surrounded by similar landscapes. The sizes of the two chapels are similar as well. (http://www.thorncrown.com/history.html) Besides weddings, the Non-Denominational Chapel should also be able to hold the accompanying functions of the wedding: brides dressing area, reception area, etc. The lower level of the Joe Bald Park chapel should be designed to accommodate these functions. This lower level would the bride’s dressing area, a main gathering space, and outdoor patio. A major part of

REC.81 Potential chapel use

REC.82 location of chapel


145

REC.83 Pinecote Pavilion

REC.84 example stone wall

MATERIALITY

REC.85 vertical wood slats

REC.86 example stone pathway

The materiality of the Non-Denominational Chapel should help to connect the user with the landscape. The lower level should be constructed out of concrete and stone to connect physically with the surrounding stony ground; it should project a sense of connection to the earth. In the proposed design, wood is used on the interior to provide a sensation of lightness and natural tone to compliment the surroundings. The upper section of the chapel should use of light weight wood structural members to relate to the tree canopies. The entire lines of the structure and flow of the space should lead the occupantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes toward the view of Table Rock Lake at the end of the visual axis. The volume of the interior extends upward and outward to encompass more of the view of the surroundings

Precedents

REC.88 exterior perspective

ECONOMICS

This Non-Denominational Chapel has the potential to be both a social and economic contributor for Joe Bald Park. If the architecture is successful in unifying the function, structure and site to create a powerful expression of place, then chapel will become sought out as a place for spiritual connection and social engagement. This cannot be achieved by average architecture. Such a powerful expression of placeness will require great architecture. This park and site has the qualities deserving of a great chapel; a place of spiritual connection. If that is achieved, then the park, community and region will financially benefit from this chapel.

REC.89 Chapel section

REC.90 Level 1 floor plan

REC.91 Basement floor plan

NON-DENOMINATIONAL CHAPEL

REC.87 Thorncrown Chapel

ceremonies are the records of the memories made, often in the form of photographs. The walkway around this chapel would provides a variety of shots for couples and parties with Table Rock Lake, the rock bluff, trees and vegetation, shoreline trail and chapel dock. The lower courtyard with its adjacent dock also gives many options for photographs and socializing. While the chapel connects users to the stone and the trees, the shoreline trail and dock connects users more directly with the water. The goal of this chapel is to elevate oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spiritual awareness of the surrounding natural context while engaging in social interactions. That interaction could be a quiet shared meditative moment or a group marriage celebration. The ideas of accentuating nature and social interaction exist in both.


JOE BALD VISION 2040

NATURE PARK CONTEXT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT

Joe Bald Park is located within the beautiful Ozark Mountains. Known for their forested rugged hills, ravines, and lakes, these mountains served as the inspiration for Joe Bald Park’s Nature Park. As mentioned previously, there are limited entertainment spaces, park areas, and playgrounds in this region of Table Rock Lake.. Therefore, many of the regional communities would benefit from the Nature Park’s playground and social areas.

RECOMMENDATION

RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

CONSTRUCTION: The construction of this habitat would be easy and affordable to create and maintain. Digging out the pond would uncover rocks and stones that could be used to line the pond. We recommend that native plants be planted around and within the pond. The introduction of these nectar rich plants would then attract the wildlife. The dynamic impact of this classroom and playground could be achieved with little upfront cost, but would create a wonderful learning experience.

REC.93 Balance beams made from logs

We recommend that within Joe Bald Park there be a green area where children and families alike can come and experience the fun and challenging of the Ozark landscape. Furthermore, we recommend that it is crucial for Joe Bald Park to incorporate a variety of playgrounds, play structures, and social gathering areas where the visitor’s curiosity can run wild.

OZARK RAIN GARDEN

• • •

Pond Outdoor Classrooms Log Balance Beams

THE CHARACTERISTICS: This playground area is located behind the Welcome Center. The area is illustrated in the figure to the right. The playground includes a pond that is supplemented by rainwater that is collected from adjacent structure. This is a place with a rich ecology, filled with salamanders, frogs, dragonflies, etc. This area would serve as a great outdoor classroom and a place where children and families can stroll along the boardwalk and see the life inhabiting the rain garden. It would be a place where you can get your feet wet. REC.92 Ozark Rain Garden supplemented by storm water, it acts as a educational pond and outdoor classroom


147

OZARK MINI-BALDS • • • •

REC.94 Forts and play places located within wooded areas

Rain garden

Undulating Mini-Balds Balance Beams made of Logs Cut in Half Wooden Forts Rock Forts

THE CHARACTERISTICS: This is a large area within the Nature Park that is mostly clear of trees. We envision this area having a special character that is reminiscent of the Ozarks. The area features an extensive undulating landscape; much like the rugged Ozark Mountains. The terrain is sculpted to allow children and families alike to play, run, roll down, and hide among mini-balds. Within this area is a variety of play equipment. The play equipment is made of all natural items found on site or throughout the Ozarks that have been transformed into a variety of play places and structures. There are balance beams made from logs cut in half, wooden forts that allude to the pioneer cabins, and rock forts that hint of the areas rocky landscape.

CONSTRUCTION: The construction of the landscape will be inexpensive because this is the highest point on the site with the most soil and the current topography already has some undulating qualities. There are opportunities to create expressive and colorful areas where families can frequent. The uniqueness of this area would not only attract a local audience, but would attract a regional audience as well looking to experience a one of a kind play area. The opportunities for including these unique nature inspired play places and playgrounds are endless.

REC.95 Location of Rain garden and Ozark Mini-Balds

REC.96 Section cut of the Mini-Balds, this is a playful sculpting of the terrain where kids and families can run, roll down, or hide

NATURE PARK

Ozark Mini-Balds


JOE BALD VISION 2040

NATURE PARK OZARK CAVERNS:

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS

• • •

Carved Out Log Tunnels Rock and Recycled Drainage Pipe Tunnels Wooden Forts

THE CHARACTERISTICS: This is a playground area that is defined by its many built up earth mounds, each mound may have a variety of tunnels passing through. The mounds may lead to a series of rope swings that children and families can climb on or the mound may have a slide that winds down the slope. The area’s biggest and most characteristic aspect is the hollowed out logs and recycled pipes that create a network of tunnels. These Ozark Caverns allows the visitor to experience nature in a completely different way, instead of just walking by fallen logs the visitors can mimic the activity of squirrels, birds and other animals and make the logs and the pipes their own. We envision this area to have a variety of visitors due to its placement within the wooded area of the park.

CONSTRUCTION: Construction of these play pieces from the found items within nature or the recycling of the drainage pipes would be far less expensive and more entertaining than buying a prefabricated play set. The use of the natural elements would fit seamlessly with the park’s natural context. There are opportunities for local wood carvers from the area to design and construct these pieces and opportunities for local artists to sculpt out the sequence of spaces within this obstacle course.

Healthy lifestyle Sense of place Preservation of Environment REC.99

PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

Wooden trail

Path

REC.97

Tunnels

REC.98 Ozark caverns, this is a grand playground area where there are many tunnels created from logs, etc and mounds for kids to play in


149

OZARK WEB & TREE HOUSES: • • •

REC.100 Ozark web, this is an elevated play place created from logs and rope ladders

Tree-Suspended Playground Tree Houses Wooden Platforms

THE CHARACTERISTICS: This is a playground area that is nestled within the Nature Park’s trees. To access this part of the park the visitor must venture into the wooded area following a pathway into the heart of the woods. Upon arrival the visitor will be greeted with a unique play area that is suspended off the ground by trees and massive log pillars. This Ozark Web will provide countless opportunities to climb, hang, and play. After playing on the suspended playground, the visitor could travel to the tree houses, and wooden platforms nearby. We envision this area as being the most popular, because of the unique interpretation of a nature inspired playground. The Ozark Web and tree

houses will take the imagination on a ride, transporting the visitors to a new world made of ropes and ladders and massive wooden logs. CONSTRUCTION: The construction of the structures is simple and easy to build. Much of the necessary supplies can be obtained from the site or from the surrounding area. These structures would be inexpensive and have some of the most profound impact in terms of memories and value to the local and regional visitors.

Ozark Caverns

REC.101 Location of the Ozark Caverns and the Ozark Web & Tree houses

REC.102 Section of the Tree houses among the sloping terrain and the existing trees of the site

NATURE PARK

Ozark Web & Tree houses


JOE BALD VISION 2040

WELCOME CENTER

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT

REC.103 The location of the welcome center

CONTEXT

RECOMMENDATIONS

Right now, Joe Bald Park is not difficult to get around since upon entering the site the only major road takes you to the boat launch. And, since there are no facilities on the site at the present time, there is no need for signage or guidance. People are still using the site for hiking; however there are no restrooms for them to use. Now the hikers tend to park wherever they wish and walk wherever they want. This has lead to a mixture of trails within the park: ATV, hiker’s, and animals. There is no park office or supervision of the park activities other than infrequent patrols by the Corps staff and local police. Consequently, all the structures and items that had been left in the park when it closed in 1997 have since been vandalized. Because of the remoteness of the Joe Bald Park and the inability to secure its boundaries, the park has been used by some individuals for illegal activities. With the development of the revitalized Joe Bald Park, it will be crucial that the park be secured and that facilities monitored by on site staff around the clock. Furthermore, as the park develops and more facilities and activities are introduced onto the site wayfinding signage will need to be installed and a centralized Welcome Center build at the entry of the park.

We recommend that one of the main functions of the Welcome Center be that it directs people. Upon entering the park people need to know where to go. Wayfinding signage will help, but if there is a certain event or gathering the visitor is looking for they may need direction. Since this will be the first building people will see it makes sense that it would be where people can get assistance. This location at the entrance to the park also makes it a good place to stop after a long drive to freshen up, have a snack, get information, and organize your group before starting your day’s adventure. We suggest that the Welcome Center also functions as the park headquarters. Because of its central location at the entrance to the park, the Welcome Center would ideally serve a welcoming/orientation role, a meeting location, a trailhead, a ranger station, and park office. We also recommend that the Welcome Center be a trailhead connecting many of the hiking trails. This would allow the center’s trailhead to be a convenient starting and ending spot near the entry parking lot.

REC.104 Starting point to the trail system Chapel

Green Space

Welcome Center

Stores

Courtesy Dock

Restaurant Environmental Center

REC.105 Connections with the other major programming on the site Eco Camp

PHASING REC.106 Right at the entrance to the major roads


151

REC.108 Natural stone that would provide the floor

REC.109 The pebble floor, with the pebbles coming from the site

MATERIALITY

REC.107 Trees already in the site that would provide wood

REC.110

WELCOME CENTER

In order for the building blend into the natural landscape of Joe Bald Park, we suggest that the materials use on this building be primarily wood, glass, and stone. The wood and stone materials are natural materials found on the site and the glass is a material that reflects the surrounding context. This limits the cost of transporting and helps with the Welcome Center’s sustainable construction practices. The community members at the meetings expressed a desire to see as much natural landscape as possible and little man-made as practical. The Welcome Center’s design and construction is simple and understated, yet visible and dignified as it should be given that it is the Welcome Center and park office. The design’s verticality of the wood panels and glazing relates the structure to the surrounding tree trunks. The glazing provides views out to the surrounding woods and trails, as well as reflects the surrounding landscape on the building’s facade.


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH

WELCOME CENTER 1

TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK

2

3

4

5

REC.111 The welcome center comes third in the phase

REC.112 Water treatment system

PHASING

SUSTAINABILITY

The Welcome Center building is not going to make the park any money. The reason we suggest that it be developed in phase three and not phase four, when the site would have more money, is because once the park starts becoming more development it will be important to have a place where visitors can get directions. The site is big, big enough to where people cannot just drive around until they find things. Directions are needed to keep people moving smoothly throughout the site. Because of this reason, the Welcome Center needs to be developed sooner in the sequence. The Welcome Center has a lot of connections with the surrounding park activities. At the Welcome Center, there will be maps and information about each. It will also have information about short term events. For example, the Non-Denominational Chapel will have weddings and so will be closed to the public at specific times.

There are many ways for the Welcome Center to be sustainable. Its construction is already sustainable due to the materials used. There may be opportunities to use solar panels for electricity depending on the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s location and exposure to direct sunlight. If the location of the building is practical, solar panels could be used to generate hot water. Water from the lake might be filtered and used for drinking or unfiltered water could be used to flush toilets and irrigate the vegetation. Rain water runoff would be collected and reintroduced to the site in different ways that allows the water to seep back into the ground instead of flow into the lake. All of the lighting could be LED lighting that is more energy efficient. Incorporating small details like these can make big improvements in the environment. REC.113 Environmental effects of different lighting

WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING REC.114 Example of solar panels in use


153

REC.115 Handicapped parking would be plentiful

REC.116 The parking lot/ main entrance/ security entrance

PROGRAMMING Front Parking Lot - The parking lot located directly in front of the Welcome Center is one of four parking lots on the site. This one is the farthest away from the water since it is located almost at the entry the site. This parking lot is the primary location from which people visiting the Welcome Center will come. It is immediately in front of the Welcome Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main entrance, making it easy for the elderly and handicapped to enter the building. Going from the parking lot into the building is a simple matter of taking the stairs or ramp up to the entrance deck.

Security Entrance - The security entrance allows the ranger to can come and go from the building without disrupting the visitors. This entrance is conveniently located near the security office.

REC.117

Trail Running Through the Building - TThe other main entry into the Welcome Center is from the trail that separates the restrooms from the Welcome Center. This trail runs through the breeze way that connects the

REC.118

WELCOME CENTER

Front Entrance - The front entrance is composed of two French doors. This entrance faces the parking lot so it will receive the most pedestrian traffic. Upon entering the building, one will see an open floor plan with an obvious help counter. We suggest a full wall of map that visitors will be able to go study. Upon exiting the building, people will be able to easily go back to their car or begin strolling through the park along the trails.


JOE BALD VISION 2040

WELCOME CENTER

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

REC.120 Inside trail

REC.119 Rack of brochures available for people to take

PROGRAMMING (CONT.) restroom structure to the Welcome Center. This breeze way entry is the only access to the restrooms from the Welcome Center. The Info Area - The information area of the Welcome Center will have three basic areas. The first area would be the wall of maps. Some people do not want to carry maps with them and do not want to waste the paper. Big maps hanging on the wall are perfect for people to take a picture with their phone or iPod. The development of a digital map app that can be easily downloaded to your phone or iPod with reference tabs would be the ideal way to provide this information. Since the world is getting more and more technologically oriented, this is a way to cut down on unwanted waste ending up spread about the trails. The next area would be an area where people can take regional brochures or maps. This section would have more than just maps. It would also have fliers announcing the events going on at the park. The third area would be a desk with a person to talk to about the park and regional issues.

The Office - The park office would be multifunctional area that would handle all park management, supervision and upkeep activities. It would be the location for all events bookings. It would the central repository for all park documents. REC.121 The information area in the welcome center


155

REC.122 Example of the security office

Security Office - The security office would be used by the ranger on duty who has the responsibility of overseeing the safety and well-being of the park visitors. For safety purposes, there would be a small gun safe located in this office. Coffee/Snack - Within the Welcome Center will be a small coffee and snack area where people can purchase items. Conveniently adjacent would be both an interior and exterior seating area.

The Lounge - The Welcome Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lounge would be an area where people can relax and talk, plan their day, recuperate, or just hang out. This area would be furnished with comfortable chairs and couches inside the building and chairs and benches in the exterior courtyard.

REC.124 Public restrooms

Outdoor Pavilion Area - The outdoor pavilion area is a multifunctional area that could be used as a classroom, meeting place, picnic area, concert, sun shelter, etc. The option of the programming for this pavilion is open ended.

REC.125 The lounge area in the welcome center

REC.126 Example of the attached pavilion

WELCOME CENTER

REC.123 Coffee and snack area

Restrooms - The public restrooms would be attached to the Welcome Center by the covered breezeway. These restrooms are located near the large central green space with the playgrounds at the Nature Park. The breezeway also serves as part of the Welcome Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trailhead. Therefore, the combination of the visitors to the Welcome Center, the hikers on the trail network and the visitors playing at the Nature Park adjacent will all be using these restroom facilities. Consequently, these restrooms need to be large, well maintained, safe, and monitored around the clock.


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

JOE BALD LANDING The Context

Lakeside General Store

The Joe Bald Park Landing seeks to resolve a number of issues for the local and traveling park visitors. For the local residents visiting Joe Bald Park, running into Kimberling City to get a meal or supplies is inconvenient and time consuming. The drive into Kimberling City along Joe Bald Road requires a two way trip along a narrow two-lane road. With the addition of traffic from the new development at Joe Bald Park this road potentially will become more hazardous. Concerns were raised in the community meetings about creating shopping opportunities within Joe Bald Park. These concerns came from people who own stores in area who could service these new park visitors. The design team is sensitive to this issue and does not want to create negative competition; however, we do believe that providing recreation goods and services on site is needed and would be very profitable. Therefore, we encourage the existing store owners to consider expanding their operations into the Joe Bald Park Landing development. By adding a shopping area within the park, we have to take into account the delivery for the various stores. Currently, there is a road that wraps around the building site where we propose to place the Landing; from this road access for delivery trucks can efficiently be developed.

The Lakeside General Store will cater to people who need simple groceries for their activities at Joe Bald Park. The Lakeside General Store would sell a multitude of groceries, utensils and dish ware, cleaning supplies, and bathroom necessities. The Lakeside General Store will have to take into account that delivery trucks will need to make drop offs at the general store. In our design for the Joe Bald Park Landing, the buildings are oriented to the west, with the general store at the north end. Because of this, it will be

General Store

Pavilion Gardens Snack Shack

Recommendations

This Landing looks at the issues and responds to them accordingly. Altogether, we recommend six different programs that supply the park visitors with recreation goods and services to make up the Landing. The three main programs include the Lakeside General Store, The Sunken Bridge Snack Shack, and Joe’s Tackle Shop. The three minor programs include the Community Gardens, the Pavilion, the Restrooms, and a pedestrian walkway. These programs need to work in harmony to make the park’s visitor’s experience convenient and memorable.

REC.127 It will be important to make this area a place of social activity while being sensitive to the natural environment.

Tackle Shop Restrooms

REC.126 The Landing is located in a strategic area near the existing parking and roadway.

REC.128 Plan of the proposed Joe Bald Landing.


necessary to create a driveway that leads delivery trucks to the east side of the general store. This will ensure that there are no accidents between the pedestrians walking on the west side of the landing and delivery trucks. As mentioned earlier, we would like to avoid any unwanted competition between locally owned businesses and the Joe Bald Park Landing development. Therefore, we encourage local business owners to consider expanding their operations into the Landing. Should the business owners decide not to expand, we would like to see other locals take up the opportunity to start a small general store at the Landing. The competition between the general store at the Landing and other stores in Kimberling City is not necessarily a bad. The Lakeside General Store will also be able to have partnerships with other stores located on the landing. The Sunken Bridge Snack Shack may be able to use the General Store’s storage space to preserve food, and other products that are relevant to a snack area. There could also be special promotions advertised at the snack shack that may encourage people to come into the general store. The general store could also partnership with the people running the nearby gardens. At certain times of the year, the general store would be able to assist in selling the flowers and vegetables produced in the garden.

Joe’s Tackle Shop Joe’s Tackle Shop takes advantage of the high number of people who enjoy fishing on the lake. This store would sell fishing rods, reels, nets, line, bait, vests, waders, hats, and other accessories related to fishing. A fishing license is required to go fishing on Table Rock Lake. Because of Joe Bald Park’s location in relation to Missouri as a whole, many visitors will come from Arkansas, St. Louis, and Kansas City. People from out of state will probably not have Missouri fishing licenses. People visiting Joe Bald Park that live in cities may not have fishing licenses either. Because of this it is imperative that this tackle shop make fishing licenses available. Another opportunity that should not be missed is guided fishing trips. It would be safe to assume that a significant percent of visitors to Joe Bald Park may not have a lot of experience fishing or fishing on Table Rock Lake. Partnering them with a guide will ensure that they have a good time. These guided trips give visitors an opportunity to interact with locals and develop a better understanding of the culture of the area. The guides will also be able to tell people about other opportunities around Kimberling City and Table Rock Lake. Joe’s Tackle Shop gives people who visit Joe Bald Park an opportunity to take part in an activity that is

popular on the lake. By catering to fishing professionals and beginners alike, a wider variety of users can take advantage of the tackle shop.

157

The Sunken Bridge Snack Shack

The Sunken Bridge Snack Shack provides visitors a quick meal while they are enjoying the activities on Joe Bald Park. This would be the perfect option for visitors who do not have the time to enjoy the Restaurant, but want to get something to eat. The snack shack should take into account the guidelines of the Healthy Lifestyle Initiatives by providing food that is fresh and healthy. In addition to cooking its own food, the snack shack could also assist the people who run the garden in selling the fresh produce grown in the nearby garden. The snack shack could specialize in serving fresh caught fish; possible even the customer’s catch. An important aspect to the snack shack is how much it will be used during times of public events like fishing tournaments and concerts. When these larger

Tackle Shop

Public Gardens

Snack Shack

REC.129 The General Store could act as a hub of partnerships between the other facilities on the landing.

REC.130 Joe’s Tackle Shop takes advantage that fishing is already such a popular activity on Table Rock Lake.

REC.. 131It will be important sell avariety of products, yet, keep things compact at the Sunkin’ Ship Snack Shack.

JOE BALD LANDING

General Store


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE

JOE BALD LANDING scale events take place, the snack shack will not be able to handle the large influx of customers. We suggest that during times like these, the snack shack uses food carts that they can scatter around the main park boulevard and on the Courtesy Dock itself.

Community Gardens

The first aspect of the minor programs is the community garden. This garden will allow community members to take part in the beautification of the park. By setting up the gardens like a club, people will be encouraged to get together and discuss plans for the gardens. When working on the gardens, they will be able to interact with visitors of the park. Like the guided fishing tours, this will give visitors a better understanding of the culture of Kimberling City, Table Rock Lake, and Missouri. We suggest a theme for the community gardens be the growing of native plants only, that way park visitors can gain a better understanding of Missouri nature. These community gardens should grow both edible plants and vegetables and flowers.

The Pavilion Taking into account the different types of facilities we are suggesting, the design team felt it would be important to incorporate a small pavilion at the Joe Bald Park Landing. Aside from protecting people from the weather, sun or rain, this pavilion could be used as a dining area for people who bought food at the snack shack. This area would also be utilized by the gardeners during times of plant sales. Otherwise, we see this pavilion being more for unorganized events and small gatherings. Some features that should be added to the pavilion are: electricity, seating, and lighting. With these added, the pavilion will be more suitable as a multipurpose space.

Restroom Facilities

Providing public restrooms and bathhouse will help make the experience of the visitors at Joe Bald Park more enjoyable. Because of all the activity that will be occurring around the Landing, we suggest that these restroom facilities include showers, especially for people who were swimming in the lake.

REC.133 Hiring fishing guides will help visitors to connect with the locals in the area.

NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

REC.132 Partnerships between the general store and the snack shack would give the community gardens a way of selling the fruits and vegitables they grow.

REC.134 Selling fishing licenses would be a good way create revenue.


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Pedestrian Walkway

REC.135 The restrooms are located in an area that is easily accessable to the visitors of the park.

Design

REC.136 The pedestrian walkway will be large enough to hold festivals. Taste of the Ozarks could be a theme.

REC.137 The pedestrian pathway divides the socal space from the parking lot. Adjacent trees will help maintain the natural aspect.

When designing these facilities for the Joe Bald Park Landing the design team sought to create an architecture that reflected the character of the park and Ozarkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s culture, materials, and values. Throughout this entire vision we have sought to use materials that were common to Joe Bald Park in order to avoid having to import materials into the Ozark region. The park and region have an abundance of rock and wood. Therefore, we suggest that these two materials become the primarily materials used in the construction of buildings and features upon the site. The buildings at the Joe Bald Park Landing should be modest and understated so as not to take away from the natural beauty of the site. However, when people look closely at the architectural details like those of the walls, doors, windows, and overhang it should be obvious that a high level of design thought and craftsmanship went into the construction of the facilities. The purpose of these details is to express the high value placed upon the materials as revealed in the artistic workmanship of the craftsman. The Joe Bald Park Landing should be conceived of as a place that will have a high social factor; meaning that by its location, function, and design it will naturally attract people to its location and promote the social exchange between people.

REC.138 Giving people the opportunity to take part in social activities will be important.

REC.139 Incorporating the gardens in a socail area will promote interactions between gardeners and passerbys.

REC.140 The community gardens will give the locals an opportunity to influence Joe Bald Park while creating relationships with each other and locals that visit the area.

JOE BALD LANDING

The design team felt it would be necessary to add a pedestrian walkway in front of these stores. This pedestrian walkway would act as a separator between the stores and the large parking lot just to the west of the Landing. In addition, large trees will be grown on the west side of this walkway to provide shade and a visual separation from the parking lot. The pedestrian walkway will start at northern part of the Landing just past the general store and head south ending at the Courtesy Dock. This will encourage pedestrians to walk by all the stores and make a trip down to the Courtesy Dock. The Courtesy Dock will be roughly twenty five feet wide. This makes it possible for large groups of people to walk along it at once. This will be important during times of large events, like fishing tournaments. The width also makes it possible for certain types of events to occur on the pathway. If an art show were to occur on this pathway, artisans and craftspeople could set up tents along the pathway and people could stroll along.


JOE BALD VISION 2040

JOE BALD LANDING

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE

REC.141 Location was a critical issue. We wanted to make sure the landing was in an area that was easily accessable for the visitors of Joe Bald Park

Responding to Trends

Throughout the process of creating the vision for Joe Bald Park the design team has looked at a number of emerging national trends that are seeking to create better communities. These trends include Smart Growth, Healthy Lifestyle Initiative, Active Living, and rising fuel prices. The team has considered these issues as it developed the design for Joe Bald Park Landing in an effort to optimize the design, functionality, and operations of this small complex of buildings. By placing the buildings close together in a “village” setting, people are encouraged to walk. The integration of the pedestrian walkway throughout this section of the park seeks to encourage people to stroll and linger near the Landing and Courtesy Docks. The creation of walkable environments is a solution to the issues raised in several of the trends: Smart Growth, Active Living, Healthy Lifestyle Initiative, and Fuel Prices. Furthermore, we have conceived of the snack shack as an atypical food and beverages establishment, where the menu offers a healthy cuisine with fresh

locally grown produce and caught fish and wildlife. The themed snack shack would appropriately fit the regional context, while providing healthy and nutritious meals. The public space would include the pavilion, community garden, and outdoor seating area. These areas would be integrated together to help beautify the Landing, create a distinctive gathering space, and promote a “sense of place” that people will want to occupy. This public location at the Landing would provide a beautiful shaded public space next to the retail area, Courtesy Dock, and boat launch overlooking a larger expanse of Table Rock Lake that stimulate socialization both day and night. Either lit by the light of the moon or the glow of a fire pit in the center of the public space, this area would be a positive catalyst for retail sales and social dynamics.

NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING REC.142 Green technologies should be implimented throughout the design.

REC.143Multipurpose space are important to make sure that the facilites get used regularly.

REC.144 Providing adequet service spaces will ensure that people have fun, safe time at Joe Bald Park.


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Conclusion The purpose of the Joe Bald Park Landing is to provide the park visitors with the goods and services they need to have a successful, enjoyable, and memorable experience at Joe Bald Park. In addition to serving visitors, local community members might also come to the park to occur these goods and services as well. The design team hopes that this small retail operation will add to the character of the park, provide some revenue back to the park to help make the park more economically selfsufficient, and provide valued services to the region.

REC.146 In addition to the programs we suggest, the landing will be able to expand and evolve allowing more developments.

REC.147 This lakeside area has potential to be a beautiful area.

REC.148 This lakeside area has potential to be a beautiful area.

JOE BALD LANDING

REC.145 The Landing is a place where locals and visitors can get what they need to have a positive experience on Joe Bald Park and Table Rock Lake.


JOE BALD VISION 2040

RESTAURANT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS

REC.149 A necessity of a restaurant on Joe Bald Park

CONTEXT

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

There is no place to eat at Joe Bald Park and people visiting the park either bring their own food or leave the park to go eat. As the park is renewed, this will need to change. People will want to stay and use the new park facilities all day or for several days and will not wish to leave to find food or eat several times a day. Therefore, several food establishments are needed on site.

RECOMMENDATIONS

The design team recommends that one of the eating establishments at Joe Bald Park be a full service Restaurant. This follows the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission statement well, to promote the renewal of Joe Bald Park through social interaction in nature. As the park develops, there are numerous event areas that could be supported by an on site Restaurant: Tournament Center, NonDenominational Chapel, day visitors, and park staff. The design team also believes that the establishment of a nice Restaurant with a water view and sunset view would be attractive to the regional Table Rock Lake community members. If located close enough to the shore and the Courtesy Docks, area residents could drive their boats to Joe Bald Park to go dining. This Restaurant could serve as the site of wedding receptions and rehearsal dinners or it could cater the events at the Non-Denominational Chapel. The Restaurant could also serve as the location for the concluding tournament banquets. Or, be rented out by

area clubs and organizations for their monthly meetings. So whether it is a reservation for one or a hundred, the Restaurant would be able to meet the needs of the area clientele. We recommend that the Restaurant be located on the shoreline just above the 936 foot flood pool line. We believe that the location proposed adjacent to the Courtesy Dock provides the best location for boater and people arriving by car. The view of the lake from this site is spectacular. Whether it be a midday meal during a tournament or a late afternoon meal as the sun is setting across the lake, or an evening meal with the moon rising over the lake, all will provide dramatic views of Table Rock Lake.

REC.150 Population density on Joe Bald Road

REC.151 Location of the restaurant


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REC.152 Composting with food

REC.155 Composting bins are perfect for restaurants

REC.156 Hands on building by volunteers

REC.153 Composting toilet

REC.154 Filtered water makes the tap water drinkable

There are many ways in which a Restaurant can be sustainable. One way is by having the food comes from regional farms and suppliers to reduce the transportation distance and increase the freshness of the food items. Serving a cuisine that features local produce and meats would support the local farms and provide a strong Restaurant theme. The design and construction of the Restaurant should follow all the sustainable best practices as outlined by LEED, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design guidelines and LID, Low Impact Development Handbook. Materials used in the construction of the building should be from the region, the building should be designed and detailed and equipment sized to meet the precise energy demands for the site and climatic zone, and the long term operation of the Restaurant must be considered in the original design to determine what to do with the food, human, and material waste. The design should utilize as much as possible the wind, sun and rain that falls upon the site during the year. Conservation of energy and the utilization of natural day lighting should both be optimized. Flexibility of the building envelope allow for the optimum utilization of natural ventilation is recommended. The use of LED lights instead of incandescent and fluorescent lights should be used throughout the project.

REC.155 Local farms where Joe Bald Park could get itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s food.

RESTAURANT

SUSTAINABILITY


JOE BALD VISION 2040

RESTAURANT MATERIALITY

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

An important aspect of the design of this Restaurant is to balance its image and place in the Joe Bald Park landscape. It needs to be recognizable as a Restaurant from the water and as you approach the building on land; its presence on the shoreline should not dominate the view. The building needs to blend with the natural landscape. The design team recommends that materials that are present or representative of the Ozark Mountains should be utilized in the design of the Restaurant to help blend the materials and colors of the building with its context. We chose to primarily utilize stone and wood in the Restaurant. We encourage the use of stone from the Joe Bald Park property if possible to maintain the stone textures, color, and sizes of the site. The materials and building supplies used in this Restaurant should all come from the Ozark or Midwest region of America. Glazing is also another important part of making the building blend in with the natural landscape. Since glazing is transparent, people can see right through the building, thus blurring the line between what is inside and outside. Furthermore, using glazing in conjunction with the vertical wood sections helps the building blend with the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tall vertical elements, the trees.

RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK

REC.157 the natural wood that came from the site

WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING REC.158 the trees that are cut down and made into wood for the building


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REC.159 Access to the restaurant by boat

THE EXPERIENCE stroll along the trail to the entry terrace. Whether you arrive by boat or by car the restaurant is easily accessible. Joe Bald Park is located in a high boat traffic area of table Rock Lake. The park is located at the end of a peninsula adjacent to the confluence of the White and James Rivers. The current use of the park area is to launch boats at the public boat slip. Joe Bald Park has tremendous potential to attract a lot of people to the site because of its location on Table Rock Lake and the great beauty of the park. To attract boaters to Joe Bald Park there must be things for them to do and a safe and convenient way to land their boats. The Courtesy Docks which we have added will be a positive factor in getting boaters to land or dock at Joe Bald Park. Combine the ease of park access with the amenity of having a firstrate Restaurant near the Courtesy Docks and the park has convenience and a major attraction to draw boaters to visit. The Restaurant is sited on the western shoreline near the Courtesy Docks above the 936 foot flood pool level. The Restaurant sits on a man-made concrete and stone base that projects up from the 920 foot level of the shoreline. The Restaurant and its base are nestled into the thick vegetation that occurs along this section of the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoreline. The top of the stone base serves as an extended outdoor arrival, dining, and observation terrace around the Restaurant. A series of sloped trails, steps, and a variable ramp attached to the floating Courtesy Dock below all access this elevated terrace.

REC.160 High traffic boating area

REC.161 The restaurant lifted up on the platform

REC.162 Access by vehicle

RESTAURANT

Joe Bald Park is located in a high boat traffic area of Table Rock Lake. The park is located at the end of a peninsula adjacent to the confluence of the White and James Rivers. The current use of the park area is to launch boats at the public boat slip. Joe Bald Park has tremendous potential to attract a lot of people to the site because of its location on Table Rock Lake and the great beauty of the park. To attract boaters to Joe Bald Park there must be things for them to do and a safe and convenient way to land their boats. The Courtesy Docks which we have added will be a positive factor in getting boaters to land or dock at Joe Bald Park. Combine the ease of park access with the amenity of having a firstrate Restaurant near the Courtesy Docks and the park has convenience and a major attraction to draw boaters to visit. The Restaurant is sited on the western shoreline near the Courtesy Docks above the 936 foot flood pool level. The Restaurant sits on a man-made concrete and stone base that projects up from the 920 foot level of the shoreline. The Restaurant and its base are nestled into the thick vegetation that occurs along this section of the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoreline. The top of the stone base serves as an extended outdoor arrival, dining, and observation terrace around the Restaurant. A series of sloped trails, steps, and a variable ramp attached to the floating Courtesy Dock below all access this elevated terrace. On the land side of the Restaurant, access to the entry is at grade. People arriving by car can be dropped off at the door or park nearby in the parking area and


JOE BALD VISION 2040

RESTAURANT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

On the land side of the Restaurant, access to the entry is at grade. People arriving by car can be dropped off at the door or park nearby in the parking area and stroll along the trail to the entry terrace. Whether you arrive at the Restaurant by boat or car there is direct and convenient access to the entry along a pleasant and attractive arrival sequence. Both the land side entry through the courtyard and the water side entry across the outdoor viewing terrace provide positive spatial sequencing. Regardless of which entry you take, you would arrive at a common interior lobby where you would be greeted by the host. To avoid congestion in the lobby, there would be a waiting area and a cocktail lounge adjacent. Restrooms would be conveniently located in this area so that people may freshen up before dining. Discrete views into the first and second floor dining areas will be possible from the lobby area to stimulate the dining anticipation. Views out to the lake and surrounding landscape should be maximized from this lobby as well. The circulation to the second floor dining area should be clearly noticeable by out of the way. The Restaurant should have multiple dining options: indoors first or second floor, indoors large group dining area for banquets, private dining rooms, and outdoor dining on the first floor observation deck or second floor balcony. In all cases, the view of the lake while dining should be a paramount consideration.

RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK

CONCLUSION

WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING REC.163 Access points into the restaurant

In conclusion, the Restaurant needs to be easily accessible from Table Rock Lake and Joe Bald Road, the approach to the Restaurant and the facility itself must be handicap accessible, circulation around and within the Restaurant needs to be clearly defined and utilized to visually link the facility in its landscape, and everything about this Restaurant needs to accentuate the views of Table Rock Lake throughout the day and seasons.


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REC.164 Access onto the decks

REC.166Access to the restaurant by vehicle and pedestrian traffic

REC.168 Clearly defined restrooms are needed

REC.167 Main access point into the building

RESTAURANT

REC.165 View across Joe Bald Park


JOE BALD VISION 2040

RESTAURANT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL

REC.169 Users of a restaurant

REC.171 Users of other aspects of the site

USERS We would hope that the Restaurant could be operated year-round, but, obviously, the peak season will be during the summer months when the weather is better for lake sports and vacationing. However, we do hope that the Table Rock Lake communities can promote year-round tournament activities on the lake or winter activities in the Ozarks that will draw people to this area throughout the year to balance out the seasonal economic swings in the economy of the lake region. If this cannot be done, then it is questionable whether the year-round local population of the area can be able to sustain the Restaurant year-round. The way that the Restaurant has been conceptually envisioned is similar to the mission statement for the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision plan; to promote social gatherings in nature. To promote social gatherings at the

Restaurant, the entire second floor has been design so that it can be closed off for private group events. Since a lot of the park site has been programmed to accommodate group events, such the pavilions, Tournament Center, campgrounds and cabins, Non-Denominational Chapel, and large open green spaces, we suggest that a number of group social events will be scheduled at the Restaurant, such as wedding parties, family reunions, tournament banquets and group meetings. There are many clubs and organizations that already gather in Kimberling City on a regular basis, such as the Rotary Club, Chamber of Commerce, University of Missouri-Extension, and the Corps of Engineers. These groups could use the facilities at the Restaurant with its spectacular setting as a backdrop.

NATURE PARK

REC.172 The Missouri region

WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING REC.170 The Table Rock Lake area

REC.173 The Joe Bald Road residents


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REC.174 Group meetings held in restaurants

REC.175 Enough room for wedding receptions

REC.176 The upstairs of the restaurant has adequate space for group gatherings

RESTAURANT

Within the general area of the Table Rock Lake there is a large population of retired permanent residents that are looking for new experiences throughout the year. If the Restaurant could be developed with the grandeur of the Joe Bald Park setting as envisioned and if the cuisine of fresh locally grown produce and caught meats and fish was well prepared, then the design team believes that people would travel quite a distance to experience the dining experience and return often. The difficulty with this vision is that such a setting and a cuisine maybe pricing the Restaurant out of the market for most of the residents in Stone and Taney Counties.


JOE BALD VISION 2040

RESTAURANT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS

REC.177 Dining is the most important part of the restaurant

SITE CONTEXT

PROGRAMMING Indoor Dining - The way the Restaurant has been planned half the seating is indoor and half is outside. Divided over two floors, this implies that a quarter of the total seating would occur on each floor interiorly. This means that during the winter months and inclement weather the Restaurant can seat only half its capacity. This does create a more intimate dining experience, but may be problematic given the Restaurant’s profitability capacity requirements.

RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING REC.178 Outdoor dining

Outdoor Dining – Half of the Restaurant’s dining space occurs outdoors. The Outdoor Dining is a major feature of this Restaurant’s dining experience. The whole reason for a lakeside Restaurant is so that people can enjoy views of the lake as they eat. The views are plentiful from the outdoor areas around the Restaurant. The first view is of the water. As mentioned before, Joe Bald Park is located at the confluence of White and James Rivers, which feed the Table Rock Lake impoundment. The Restaurant’s location at the point of the peninsula that juts out into the lake as it make the large grand bend around Joe Bald Park provides the Restaurant goers with many amazing vistas of the lake and boat traffic, the forested hills surrounded by the lake, and the broad western sky’s sunsets. The second story Outdoor Dining area, in particular, offers exceptional opportunities for people to observe the lake activities and water sports tournaments that will be held at the park. The views to the east of the building are of the park’s forested hillside. Unlike the long vista of the lake looking west, the views to the east are all short distant


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REC.180 Example of a restaurant kitchen

views of the vegetation, birds, squirrels, and other park visitors.

Kitchen - The Kitchen is probably the most important part of the Restaurant. Another important area of the Kitchen is the serving area or prep area. This area in the Kitchen has to be arranged carefully so that the traffic flow of waitresses and waiters is smooth. Restrooms - The Restrooms must comply with the ADA Standards.

Wine Cellar - The Wine Cellar is a really interesting feature of the site. The elevated concrete platform supporting the Restaurant does not have to be completely solid. This space enclosed within the concrete base will be cool, dark and dry making it an ideal space to store wine.

REC.179 The wine cellar could hold a large variety of wine

Lobby - The Restaurant has one main Lobby with two entrances: an east and west entrance. Located adjacent to the Lobby should be the Restrooms, Lounge, and access to the second floor dining.

REC.181 Example of a high class bar

RESTAURANT

Lounge and Bar â&#x20AC;&#x201C; In the Lounge the Park visitors will be able to relax, have a drink, and socialize. The Lounge will be a important component of the Restaurant. There should be a primary Lounge adjacent to the Lobby and a secondary service Bar on the second floor. The second floor Bar would service large group gatherings, such as weddings, banquets, tournament ceremonies, etc.


JOE BALD VISION 2040

RESTAURANT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS

REC.182 Wineries near Kimberling City

SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING REC.183 Example of a relaxed waiting area

REC.184 Two entrance points


CONNECTIONS

REC.186 Connection with chapel

REC.187 Connection with camp

special dinner and dance nights. The space in and around the Restaurant and would provide a good setting for photographs. The Outdoor Seating area overlooks the lake, which could also be used by photographers.

REC,188 Romantic night time walk on the courtesy docks

RESTAURANT

REC.185 Connection with courtesy docks

The Restaurant has a close relationship with the Courtesy Docks. The dockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proximity is important for many reasons. The reason the Restaurant is on the water is for visibility. Joe Bald Park is located at a point on Table Rock Lake with a large amount of boat traffic. The Restaurant and Courtesy Docks are located so that boats from both directions can easily see them. Boaters can dock their boats, eat, and enjoy the park without having to move their boat. Another connection is with the pier attached to the Courtesy Dock. This pier extends out into the lake to provide a place to fish, an observation point, and breakwater for the Courtesy Docks. The pier would provide a picturesque location for people to take a romantic stroll after dining. The view of the Courtesy Docks and channel from the Restaurant will provide the diners with an active ever changing view of lake activities. During tournament and competitions the diners can watch the activities from the Restaurant. The Eco Camp and Restaurant also have a strong connection. The first connection is their shared parking lot. Whenever people park to go to the Nature Center or Eco Camp, they will also be conveniently located next to the Restaurant. Another strong connection is between the Restaurant and Eco Camp, which will have seasonal programs for people learning about the natural environment and sustainability. Though the camp will offer food services, obviously, the Restaurant will provide a more complete menu and better ambiance. The Restaurant could also be used for special occasions, such as welcoming and farewell dinners for the campers and their families. The pavilions and Non-Denominational Chapel have connections with the Restaurant. The Restaurant would have the capability to host large groups on the second floor, therefore wedding parties and reunions could be hosted. The second floor indoor dining area will have a built-in stage area for live music or lecturers. Additionally, it will have ample space for a dance floor that can be used during the wedding reception or

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JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER

ECO CAMP The Context The Eco Camp looks to solve one main issue. The design tem believes that learning about nature and sustainability does not go far enough in making a real impact in people’s perception about the importance of the natural environment. We wish to create an experience for visitors that take the lessons of the Nature Center further and to a greater depth. Another issue we wish to address deals with the utilization of the cabins and park as a whole. In order to make our vision economically sustainable, we feel that it should be made available year round. In order to do this the correct facilities and supporting spaces will need to be developed to create a positive experience during the colder months. Another issue that was commonly brought up by the community members was the management of such a facility. The design team would look at different management provider options to make sure that whoever runs the Eco Cabins develops them in accordance with the proposed park and Eco Camp mission. The design team also believes that it is important to incorporate a variety of activities around the cabin grounds. These activities should look to promote Active Living and social integration without being a financial

CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

REC.189 Its important to give kids the knowledge they need to live their lives in ways that do not harm the environment.

Recommendations

In the final stage of our vision for Joe Bald Park, we recommend that a series of cabins and supporting buildings be added near the Nature Center. This will allow visitors to Joe Bald Park to not only immerse themselves in nature, but also in a sustainable lifestyle that does not harm the environment. The supporting spaces will include a dining hall and commons building.

Year Round Usage

To make sure that the vision for Joe Bald Park is economically sustainable, we propose that the Eco Cabins and facilities are made available for use year round. For this to succeed, the users will need to be divided into seasonal groups. We propose that the summer camper users be children, university students, families and organizational groups. June to August would be a good time for a summer camp to be held at the site. In the Midwest, lakeside summer camps are very popular. Some example, camps that are experiencing success are Kanakuk Camps, located on Table Rock Lake, and Camp Lakewood, located on Sunnen Lake. These camps will help to provide ideas for how to structure the summer camp. We propose that the camps be broken up into one and two week-long sessions. This would allow more children the opportunity to experience Table Rock Lake and allow the camp to generate more revenue. During the fall and the spring, the design team believes that the cabins could be used by college students. By partnering with a university, students could come to the Joe Bald Park’s Eco Camp and fulfill a range of credits in earth sciences, sustainability, biotechnology, and biomimicry. We believe these individuals would be a prime target because they will soon be entering their professional careers.

Because of Joe Bald Park’s centralized location on the lake the Eco Camp could act as an hub for hunters and their families during the winter. There are a number of good hunting areas around Table Rock Lake; one area that is relatively close is Cow Creek Park. Some alternative groups that could use the Eco Camp include businesses, church, government, and family organizations looking for a place to have a retreat or team building experience. The camp could also be used for conferences, tournament participants, or people attending weddings.

REC.190 The site for the cabins is located away from the main activity areas, this way the people using the cabins will not get distracted by other visitors of the wark.


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Dining Hall

In order to host visitors overnight at Joe Bald Park several facilities will need to be built. These include the cabins, dining area, commons and administration area. In addition to these buildings, there should also be a large fire pit for bonfires, horse shoe pits, sand volleyball court, small outdoor stage with seating for group meetings, and storage sheds for sports equipment and maintenance.

The design team proposes that a dining hall be added to the Eco Camp. This dining hall would primarily service the cabin residences, but can also be made available to day-use visitors. The dining hall should provide breakfast, lunch and dinner, while serving light meals during the in-between times. It is important that the dining hall is large enough to host at least half of the summer campers. By dividing the campers into two groups the dining hall will not have to worry about a large breakfast, lunch and dinner rush all at once. Spaces that should be included in the dining hall include the main seating area, restrooms, an industrial kitchen, a walk-in refrigerator and freezer, a delivery area, and storage areas for tables and chairs. The dining hall will primarily be used during the summer months when the temperature can reach in excess of 100 degrees Fahrenheit. In order to help cool the building, all the walls except those around the kitchen should be retractable with screens that keep the bugs from getting inside the building. Since the Eco Camp is operating completely off the grid, operating the Dining Hallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Industrial Kitchen will be challenging from a design and operational perspective. Furthermore, in keeping with the sustainability mission of the Eco Camp the dining hall should look to produce as little waste as possible. By making sure that everything that is used to operate the facility is recyclable and that all food waste is composted, this goal can be attained.

Cabins

The design team recommends that cabins be added to allow people to immerse themselves within nature and give them an opportunity to experience life completely off the grid. This idea that they are completely independent of the energy grid will be a unique experience that has the potential to influence the users to live more environmentally friendly. All the energy they consume will come from alternative power sources like solar and wind power. The water they use will be collected by rain water catchment systems or, possibly, taken from the lake. These are just a few of the ways that these cabins could be more self-sustaining. We suggest that roughly twelve cabins be built on the site. If in case these cabins are used as a summercamp, ten of these cabins would be for campers while the other two might be for staff members. The cabins should include a commons space that can be converted into a sleeping area depending on the user type, a small kitchen, two or three bedrooms with enough space for multiple beds, one full bathroom, storage closets, an outdoor porch, and fireplace. These cabins should be easily adjusted based on the users and purpose. Social interaction is another aspect these cabins should promote through their clustered arrangement, interior layout, and furnishings.

REC.191 The Cabins will be built in a way that promotes social interaction, but offers the users privacy as well.

REC.192 The mess hall will have a multitude of functions. In addition to serving food, large scale indoor activities will be able to take place here.

ECO CAMP

Facilities


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP

ECO CAMP Commons Space We propose a commons space be part of the Eco Camp grounds. This space will house the administrative areas for running the cabins, dining hall, and various camp events. The administrative area will be in charge of coordinating events for the cabins that take place at the other facilities at Joe Bald Park. This would include renting out canoes from the Courtesy Dock or reserving the Restaurant for a farewell dinner for the campers. The administration area would also be where campers can go to borrow sports equipment. During times when there is not a summer camp, families and organizations can go to this administrative are to set up activities like hiking tours, mountain bike trips, and boat rides. There will also be a larger area that will accommodate indoor activities. This area will provide activities for visitors in times of inclement weather. Within this space there will be a multitude of grouporiented activities which promote social interaction. Some of these activities would include board games, ping pong, card tables, and shuffleboard. In addition to these activities, there will be a lounging area with couches

Management

It is important that the Eco Camp be managed properly to ensure its success. We, therefore, propose that one group own and operate the Eco Camp facilities. This could be a government organization like the Missouri Department of Conservation or an institution like Drury University or a corporation like Bass Pro Shop. Whoever owns the Eco Camp facilities would hire people to be administers, maintenance staff, counselors, food service providers, and guides.

Activities • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Hiking Mountain Biking Fishing Canoing Swimming Camping Spelunking Bird Watching Frisbee Golf Scuba Diving Ropes Course Horse Shoes Sand Volley Ball Bonfires Scavenger Hunts Learning Archery

These are a few of the activity options that would be available at the Joe Bald Park’s Eco Camp. Certainly, many other activities could take place at the Joe Bald Park and the Eco Camp. The main goal of the list is to suggest activities that could promote Active Living while still being economically feasible.

REC.194 There will be a focus on activities that promote team building and social interaction

MANAGEMENT PHASING REC.193 Visitors will be able to enjoy a wide variety of events.

REC.195 The cabins will be minimalistic to make sure people do not get distracted from the natural landscape around them.


177

Conclusion

When creating the cabins and associated facilities, the design team wanted to make sure that we took into account some of the different trends that help to improve communities. As mentioned before, the four main trends we wished to respond to within the park and camp included, Smart Growth, Active Living, Healthy Lifestyle Initiative, and rising fuel costs. The Eco Cabins focus on two main trends, which are the Healthy Lifestyle Initiative and Active Living. The Eco Cabins promote exercise, eating right, and being an active participant in the activities provided by facilitators of the cabins. The Joe Bald Park vision was designed to promote as much walking as possible. In the design we did take into account that some nearby parking was necessary for the elderly, the handicapped, and those visiting the park during inclement weather. Otherwise, people should dock their boats and park their cars, and interact with the park by foot, making sure to take in the natural splendor of the area. This idea responds to the importance of walkability and the preservation of the natural surroundings, as well as using alternative modes of transportation. Sustainability and education are the guiding conceptual principles that resonate throughout the Joe Bald Park and the Eco Camp proposals. By immersing people in nature and sustainable life experiences, the design team believes that the visitors will develop a greater appreciation for nature, understanding of the working principles of sustainable living, and desire to preserve and protect the environment after they leave. The Eco Campâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cabins were located it in the midst of some of the most beautiful forested area at Joe Bald Park. This location will help to create a sense of place that is specific to the Eco Camp cabins and Joe Bald Park. As suggested in the Smart Growth literature, establishing a sense of place is a principal factor in helping to create a vibrant and successful community.

The Eco Camp seeks to provide an opportunity for visitors to Joe Bald Park that immerse themselves within the natural environment and provides them an opportunity to experience living completely off the grid. This experience will be a hallmark of the Joe Bald Park experience. Campers, students, families, and a wide variety of other users will be able to take part in the activities that will be available in the park and at the Eco Camp. The ultimate goal is for the visitors to gain a better appreciation for Missouriâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural environment and, hopefully, influence them to make lifestyle changes that will result in a healthier lifestyle for them.

REC.196 The eco cabins give visitors an opportunity to emmerse themselves in nature and teach them about what sort of influence they can make in preserving our beautiful oworld

REC.197 In addition to learning about nature and sustainability, these cabins look to promote healthy living and physical activity within nature.

REC.198 This detail plan shows the layout of the facilities.

ECO CAMP

Trends


JOE BALD VISION 2040

MANAGEMENT

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Ownership & Management

The Corps

SBO

The Army Corps of Engineers, Little Rock District is the current manages the Joe Bald Park property for the federal government. They are the government entity that is in charge of the dam and the management of Table Rock Lake. The Corps has prepared a master plan that acts as a guide for the management of the lake and its shoreline and the government lands around the lake. There are 26 public use areas around the lake of these; the Corps manages 14 parks and 8 public use areas. We have determined that the management of Joe Bald Park could remain with the Corps. We envision Joe Bald Park truly being in tune with nature and retaining the sensitivity to the rustic characteristics of the areas. Under the management of the Corps, Joe Bald Park would see a comprehensive activation of the land, giving the public the priority use of the park. The primary objective of the Corps in the management of the Table Rock Lakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoreline is to insure the general public full recreational enjoyment and fish and wildlife benefits on public lands and waters for both the users of today and for generations to come. The limitation to this strategy is the recent history of federal budget restriction.

There are many opportunity for agreements or partnerships between the Corps and a social benefit organization (Non-profit organization). The goal of a SBO is not to be successful in terms of wealth, but in terms of giving value to the groups of people they administer to. There are many local SBOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that service the Kimberling City area that could be potential candidates for a partnership agreement. We recommend for the community to consider the Ozark River Heritage Foundation. The Ozark River Heritage Foundation currently manages the Dewey Short Visitor Center on Table Rock Lake and operates the Discovery Shop retail store, facilitates special events & education opportunities, among many other functions that it facilitates. We envision the Welcome Center on Joe Bald Park being operated similar to Dewey Short Visitor Center. The SBO could give walking tours of the many activities on Joe Bald Park including: the Eco Camp and Conservation Center, the Outdoor Classroom spaces, the Ozark Nature Park and the many follies.

RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT

1

The Corps

The Corps

2

The Corps

SBO

3

The Corps

State

4

The Corps

County or City

5

The Corps

Private entity

RECOMMENDATIONS LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING

CORPS OWNERSHIP The management of Joe Bald Park is a discussion that is very important for the future of Joe Bald Park. There are a variety of agents that could own, manage, or operate the park or a portion of the activities that take place within the park. The design team is assuming that the federal government through the Corps of Engineers will remain the owner of the land in the future, thus we have identified five different agents that could set up an agreement with the Corps of Engineers where they could be the lease holders of the land and potentially manage Joe Bald Park.

REC.199 Cape Fair Marina managed by the Corps

REC.200 Dewey Short Visitor Center managed by the Ozark River Heritage Foundation


State

County or City

Private Entity

There are opportunities for the Corps to lease the land to the state of Missouri. The future development of Joe Bald Park could see a partnership or an agreement such as the current arrangement between the Corps and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. The Missouri Department of Natural Resources currently operates Table Rock State Park. We recommend that the community consider the alternative of having the Corps lease the land for the maximum amount of time allowable by law to the State. We envision that through this agreement, one of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s departments could then construct the structures that would accompany the Eco Camp, including the cabins, dining hall and Conservation Center. The Missouri Department of Natural Resources could also facilitate and maintain the playground equipment, trails, and cater to the visitorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; curiosity through the teaching of conservation and local ecology, wildlife, and the importance of the sustainable practices used to construct the park.

There are opportunities for the Corps to lease Joe Bald Park either to the county or to the City of Kimberling City. The City of Kimberling City currently operates the Port of Kimberling Marina & Resort. There is the challenge of Joe Bald Park being seven miles away from the Kimberling City limits, but this setback could be minor. The agreement between the Corps and the County or the Corps and the City would need to be in accordance to the desires of the community members because of the classification of Joe Bald Park. Currently, the use of the land is intended for the use of the public and we determine that a large portion should stay public use. We recommend for the community to consider the possible partnership between the Corps and the City of Kimberling City. We envision Joe Bald Park allowing the majority of the site to be public use. The City of Kimberling City could managing the Eco Camp and Conservation Center, Joe Bald Park could even be an off-site expansion to the current Port of Kimberling Marina & Resort.

The development of Joe Bald Park could likewise be leased by the Corps to a private entity. The prime land could be leased to an outdoor company who shares similar values as the community in providing a sensitivity to the natural environment and allowing a connection of the individual to nature. Johnny Morris, the Founder of Bass Pro, has developed Big Cedar Lodge wilderness resort that is on Table Rock Lake. It has been developed with sensitivity to its surroundings and focuses on providing a get-away from the city life and allows visitors to enjoy the environment through numerous outdoor activities. Big Cedar Lodge has water skiing, golfing, scuba diving, cannoning, etc. We recommend that the community consider this alternative, but stress the importance of choosing a private entity that shares the same values as the community. We envision Joe Bald Park offering self-guided tours, trout fishing, and hosting special events within this Ozark paradise similar to what occurs currently at Big Cedar Lodge.

REC.201 Table Rock State Park managed by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources

REC.202 Port of Kimberling Marina & Resor managed by the City of Kimberling City

REC.203 Big Cedar Lodge managed by Bass Pro

MANAGEMENT

179


JOE BALD VISION 2040 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RESEARCH TRENDS SITE CONTEXT RECOMMENDATIONS

PHASING CONTEXT: The proposed program for Joe Bald Park cannot happen all at once. It is a process that will develop over time. Certain features of the program will have to evolve and develop with the site in order to stay relevant. To accommodate this need, we have laid out a series of phases that the design team believes will give structure to this development. There is no real time frame attached to these phases. We are simply demonstrating what has to occur first in order to achieve the desired end program. The phases are also set up in a way so process can be stopped at any phase if the community does not want to developed the park further.

LID CONSTRUCTION ROADS TRAILS PARKING COURTESY DOCKS

PHASE 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ACCESS: The first thing that needs to happen is to provide different modes of access to the site. The program we recommend for this stage would be the waterside trail, interior trails, and Courtesy Docks. These aspects enable users to walk, bike or boat to the site instead of driving. During this early stage the quality and condition of Joe Bald Road must also be analyzed. The future program suggests an increase of visitors to the site. Currently, Joe Bald Road is narrow and it would only be a matter of time be for an accident is caused by the increased traffic. Also in this phase the future development of onsite parking must be considered. The larger gathering places in the program need more parking than the site currently provides. It is best to consider the needs of developing parking environmentally and economically sustainable early and what it will take to make it happen. Lastly, in this phase the site will need to be cleared of all existing ruins of the old camping facilities and benches. In their run down state they are a health and safety hazard to the park visitors and promote vandalism.

REC.205 phasing diagram

PHASE 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DESTINATION POINTS: Now that people can access the site in their preferred way, they need places to interact or gather. At this point we recommend introducing the cluster of pavilions and some of the follies, such as the fire pits and observation tower. These programs are the low hanging fruit of the proposal. They require very little start-up costs, but provide huge social benefits. These spaces would also start to pay for themselves and the upkeep of the park. This phase is the minimum the park needs to develop. By introducing these cheap destination points now the stage is being set for the potential development of late stages. Also in this phase, we recommend that signage be put around the park to provide educational and interesting tidbits about the park. Signage should also be placed throughout the Kimberling City and Table Rock Lake area to promote the park and its development.

PAVILIONS FOLLIES SIGNAGE NATURE CENTER CHAPEL NATURE PARK WELCOME CENTER JOE BALD LANDING RESTAURANT ECO CAMP MANAGEMENT PHASING REC.204 Phase 1

REC.206 Phase 2


REC.207 Phase 3

PHASE 4 – ECONOMIC EXPANSION: While the last phase was more about the social sustainability of the site, phase four is about the economic sustainability. This phase gives the opportunity to the community to set up retail space in the park. This retail space would include bait and tackle shop, snack shop, general store, pavilion, and community edible garden. Separate from this strip is the proposed Restaurant. These spaces would be much more hands on than the other spaces in the park due their monetary generative nature and the amount of people involved on a day to day basis. Phase 4 could conceivable occur during the same time frame as phase 3. The reason we put social development before economic expansion is that we want to be sure the social interest is there before adding a large amount of programming.

REC.208 Phase 4

PHASE 5 – EVOLUTION ENDGAME: The final phase encompasses the fully developed forms of the park program. In this phase the Courtesy Docks have reached full capacity, Nature Center has developed the cabin spaces and recreational aspects, and all the Follies are in place.

181

CONCLUSION: It is important to remember that while these phases encompass the 40 year vision, there is no time frame assigned to an individual phase. We have laid out the things that have to happen before the next stage of development can begin. If the conditions of the park change and the interest have developed more up start capital can be found then the phasing may well change.

REC.209 Phase 5

PHASING

PHASE 3 – SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT: This phase really expands upon the developing social spaces of the park. It is in this phase that the programmed green space is introduced along with the Non-Denominational Chapel and the expansion of the Courtesy Docks to be able to hold larger functions such as Tournament Centers. On the more educational side, this phase is where the Nature Conservation Center is introduced. These spaces are very heavily socially orientated and since they will need some sort of central management, we recommend that the Welcome Center be introduced in this phase. This Welcome Center would serve as the hub from which these new items, the already existing items, and future programs will be managed. These items will be more expensive to start-up but by this time it is hoped that the park will have generated enough interest and residents are involved enough that this will to push the park farther along.


THE MODEL

M.1

M.3

M.2

M.4


M.5


JOE BALD PARK VISION 2040 This concludes our vision for Joe Bald Park. We have researched, analyzed and observed the contextual information of the Ozark region, the Table Rock Lake area and of the site itself. Synthesizing that information, we believe the recommendations stated are the best options to make Joe Bald Park economically, environmentally and socially sustainable not only for the immediate future but for years to come. Using this information as a tool, the community should forge their own vision. This book is only a tool to use in that process. It is very possible that not all the recommendations in this book be realized. It is the communitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; job to analyze our recommendations and use what they think fits their community best and what is right for their vision of Joe Bald Park. They must now build their own future.


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RES.51: google image search RES.52: google image search RES.53: google image search RES.54: google image search RES.55: google image search RES.56: google image search RES.57: google image search RES.58: google image search RES.59: google image search RES.60: google image search RES.61: google image search RES.62: google image search RES.63: google image search RES.64: http://grownative.org/ RES.65: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_3X6qTO5X9_0/TDIiwR5W7SI/ AAAAAAAAAC0/jCJyAG8tYf0/s320/4748477335_f8bbdb491f.jpg RES.66: http://www.kevinsraingardens.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/roots. RES.67: http://www.grasslandscapes.com/index.php?p=1_2_Products RES.68: http://www.northcreeknurseries.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/ plants.plantDetail/plant_id/396/ RES.69: https://www.google.com/search?q=buffalo+grass&espv=210&es_sm=93&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=lTqnUv-7KtT_rAGgqYGIBA&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAQ&biw=1366&bih=623#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=Cy1G1rf2jC93IM%3A%3Bc6EH7snO7zBTsM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fconservationgardenpark. org%252Ffile%252F058bd504-1e1d-4b8a-b12c-9f130e54b042%252FBuffalo-Grass.gif%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fconservationgardenpark. org%252Fplants%252F496%252Fbuffalo-grass%252F%3B600%3B365 RES.70: http://blog.lib.umn.edu/efans/ygnews/2012/09/flowering-plant-video-library-16.html RES.71: http://www.uwgb.edu/biodiversity/phenology/2010/buffaloGrass01.jpg RES.72: http://www.wildflower.org/image_archive/640x480/PCD3937/ PCD3937_IMG0088.JPG RES.73: http://plantedcloud.blogspot.com/2010/10/top-five-nativetrees-for-fall-color.html RES.74: http://www.yourgardensanctuary.com/gardening-around-black-walnuts/ RES.75: http://www.uwgb.edu/biodiversity/phenology/2010/buffaloGrass01.jpg RES.76: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Purple_Prairie_Clover_(2).jpg RES.77: http://www.flyoverpeople.net/galleries/wallpapers/wildflowers/ButterflyMilkweed_1024.htm RES.78: http://blancavalbuena.com/central-park-travel-tips-and-information/ RES.79: http://www.anniesannuals.com/plt_lst/lists/general/lst.gen.


asp?prodid=745 RES.80: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mappix/6214235884/ RES.81: http://wiseacre-gardens.com/wordpress/swamp-milkweed/ RES.82: https://webapps8.dnr.state.mn.us/restoreyourshore/plants/ plant_detail/402 RES.83: http://www.northcreeknurseries.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/ plants.plantDetail/plant_id/360/index.htm RES.84: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mappix/6214235884/ RES.85: http://wiseacre-gardens.com/wordpress/swamp-milkweed/ RES.86: https://webapps8.dnr.state.mn.us/restoreyourshore/plants/ plant_detail/402 RES.87: http://www.northcreeknurseries.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/ plants.plantDetail/plant_id/360/index.htm RES.88: RES.89: Map made by Drury University Community Studies Team RES.90: Map made by Drury University Community Studies Team RES.91: www.clker.com/clipart-cycle-1.html RES.92: www.clker.com/search/inverse/1 RES.93: http://www.teenwordfactory.com/2010/09/4-ways-to-plumpup-your-flat-character.html RES.94: http://www.bigstockphoto.com/image-25521878/stock-vector-vector-sprouts-isolated-on-white RES.95: Map made by Drury University Community Studies Team RES.96: Map made by Drury University Community Studies Team RES.97: https://www.google.com/search?q=missouri+dept+of+conservation&rlz=1C1CHAF_enUS476US476&espv=210&es_sm=93&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=i4zDUundJqnQ2AXl64CwCA&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAQ&biw=1364&bih=639#facrc=_&imgrc=OIlKCj4csCr9tM%3A%3BQwQcfUOJJ6I6UM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww. fogcalendar.com%252Fevents%252Fuploads%252Fmdclogo. gif%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.fogcalendar.com%252Findex. php%253FeID%253D3954%3B738%3B600 RES.98: wikitravel.org/en/St._Louis RES.99: https://www.google.com/search?q=missouri+botanical+garden&rlz=1C1CHAF_enUS476US476&espv=210&es_ sm=93&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=Xo3DUv_kFYmy2wW0zYH4DQ&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAQ&biw=1364&bih=639#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=U1QSjqRhv5BbKM%3A%3BKnH2zz_PVvu0iM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252F3. bp.blogspot.com%252F-4s3cLwVmJp4%252FTeMiq6RaQUI%252FAAAAAAAAAnc%252FeWo4eiAbKGE%252Fs1600%252F_ MG_7375.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fvirginiaburkel.blogspot. com%252F2011%252F05%252Fst-louis-22-missouri-botanical-garden. html%3B1600%3B1280 RES.100: http://www.wikilou.com/1.20.0/index.php?title=File:Missouri_Botanical_Garden_-_Plan,_drawn_1974-1977.jpg RES.101: Drawn by Drury University Community Studies Team RES.102: http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/sustainability-con-

servation/conservation-in-action/at-the-missouri-botanical-garden.aspx RES.103: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Orchids_003.jpg RES.104: http://ww1.prweb.com/prfiles/2012/06/06/9582463/ DSCN1359.jpg RES.105: http://travel-tourisms.blogspot.com/2010/12/ green-school-in-indonesia-attracts.html RES.106: Map made by Drury University Community Studies Team RES.107: http://www.greenprophet.com/2010/11/green-school-is-amodel-for-green-education-everywhere/ RES.108: http://www.seforum.sg/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/ Green-School_classroom.jpg RES.109: http://cocoaphilippinesblog.blogspot.com/2011/04/cacao-pruning-immature-tree.html RES.110: http://static.ddmcdn.com/gif/how-choco-works-2.jpg RES.111: http://www.mc-bambus.de/s-net/Scripts/kontakt.asp RES.112: http://centerforgreenschools.org/main-nav/k-12/curriculum/Greenclassroom.aspx RES.113: warnet.ws/news/41648 RES.114: http://centerforgreenschools.org/main-nav/k-12/curriculum/Greenclassroom.aspx RES.115: Map by Drury University Community Studies Team RES.116: Map by Drury University Community Studies Team RES.117: Map by Drury University Community Studies Team RES.118: Map by Drury University Community Studies Team RES.119: https://www.google.com/search?q=rockywold+deephaven&rlz RES.120: https://www.google.com/search?q=rockywold+deephaven RES.121: https://www.google.com/search?q=rockywold+deephaven RES.122: https://www.google.com/search?q=rockywold+deephaven RES.123: https://www.google.com/search?q=rockywold+deephaven RES.124: https://www.google.com/search?q=sunfish+boat&rlz=1C1CHAF_enUS476US476&espv=210&es_sm=93&tbm=isch&source=iu&imgil=zlfQ6XlAEVV3qM%253A%253Bhttps%253A%252F%2 52Fencrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcQCIC6-0ZpOPl6xqEiyGt_nhEGEjqtPDqXqQbSIyOKjN0Iaieud%253B410%253B396%253Bap7oLZCPLsQ9-M%253B http%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.canadiandesignresource. ca%25252Fsport%25252Fsunfish-sailboat%25252F&sa=X&ei=o5PDUo3xLeXZ2QWZk4HgDA&sqi=2&ved=0CDYQ9QEwBA&biw=1364&bih=639#facrc=_&imgdii=zlfQ6XlAEVV3qM%3A%3BuwpLj2Oj7199eM%3BzlfQ6XlAEVV3qM%3A&imgrc=zlfQ6XlAEVV3qM %3A%3Bap7oLZCPLsQ9-M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww. canadiandesignresource.ca%252Fofficialgallery%252Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252F2007%252F05%252FSunfishSailboat. jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.canadiandesignresource. ca%252Fsport%252Fsunfish-sailboat%252F%3B410%3B396 RES.125: http://www.tineye.com/search/aa8f898889eb3a93390c82b87d012cafe585ba86/

RES.126: http://www.keywordpicture.com/keyword/community%20 working%20together/ RES.127: mostlyunraveled.blogspot.com/2010/11 RES.128: www.rockbrookcamp.com RES.129: www.rockbrookcamp.com RES.130: www.rockbrookcamp.com RES.131: www.rockbrookcamp.com RES.132: Map made by Drury University Community Studies Team RES.133: http://slowfoodolympia.org/schoolgarden.html

TRENDS T.1: https://myspace.com/sean T.2: citytoriver.org/blog/ T.3: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vail,_Colorado T.4: https://www.google.com/search?q=neighborhood+bakery&rl T.5: Image created by Drury University Community Studies Team T.6: http://www.shutterstock.com/pic.mhtml?src=PS5DwrRy6S3EBRIUs8iKRA-1-1&id=6897517 T.7: www.google.com/search/b776a9005d2d2fb1160a0e6a8bc940ac54b2ca7f/ T.8: Drawn by Drury University Community Studies Team T.9: http://clipartist.info/www/COLOURINGBOOK.ORG/Letters/W/ walking_man_black_white_line_art_coloring_book_colouring.svg.html T.10: www.google.com/search/653ec89f7e58b148485d14cfd4d3bc6596a48505/ T.11: http://www.goodenoughmother.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/kids_walking_to_school.jpg T.12: https://www.google.com/search?q=lakeside+trail&rlz= T.13: https://www.google.com/search?q=coffee+cartel&rlz T.14: https://www.google.com/search?q=springfield+art T.15: Image drawn by Drury University Community Studies Team T.16: Design Manual for Low Impact Design T.17: Image made by Drury University Community Studies Team T.18: https://www.google.com/search?q=springfield+art&rlz T.19: http://www.outsideinn.com/oldblog/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/grouserdige.jpg T.20: www.google.com/search/5ade02b06b99d7438393bfad9fecf1884ca6c75d/ T.21: http://www.eeweems.com/richmond-city-book/large-boulevard-richmond.php T.22: http://hilltopproject.com/information/home/ T.23: https://www.google.com/search?q=coming+soon+sign&rlz T.24: http://www.opposingviews.com/i/new-law-removes-term-mental-retardation-from-government-documents T.25: www.google.com/search/41f65ebfe9a3cf0d7b094fb46299723cf13344b0/ T.26: http://laprimeraplana.com.mx/2013/02/19/10-opiniones-ciudadanas-del-pacto-por-mexico/


T.27: http://www.tineye.com/search/f53c9c97114a55a19871159affab52afb9b737e3/ T.28: https://www.google.com/search?q=architects+around+a+table&rlz=1C1CHAF_enUS476US476&espv=210&es_ sm=93&tbm=isch&source=iu&imgil=k7ZYys21sd-2FM%253A%25 3Bhttps%253A%252F%252Fencrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com%252Fimages%253Fq%253Dtbn%253AANd9GcQj6sxF7CY8HeaXkwG5Zoc_1-ShSQ8zjym9K9ohJliKhdzHJLwVQg%253B1300%253B957%253BMZKpJONEQYw7fM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww. dreamstime.com%25252Fstock-photo-four-architects-standing-planning-around-table-looking-down-blueprint-image33403060&sa=X&ei=SKDDUpXLNcbc2AW3poGACA&ved=0CDgQ9QEwBA&biw=1364&bih=639#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=k7ZYys21sd-2FM%3A%3BMZKpJONEQYw7fM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fthumbs.dreamstime. com%252Fz%252Ffour-architects-standing-planning-around-table-looking-down-blueprint-33403060.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww. dreamstime.com%252Fstock-photo-four-architects-standing-planningaround-table-looking-down-blueprint-image33403060%3B1300%3B957 T.29: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Michelle_Kaufmann,_Architect,_presenting_Cusp_Conference_September_2010.jpg T.30: Image made by Drury University Community Studies Team T.31: Image made by Drury University Community Studies Team T.32: Image made by Drury University Community Studies Team T.33: Image made by Drury University Community Studies Team T.34: Image made by Drury University Community Studies Team T.35: Image made by Drury University Community Studies Team T.36: Image made by Drury University Community Studies Team T.37: Image made by Drury University Community Studies Team T.38: Image made by Drury University Community Studies Team T.39: Image made by Drury University Community Studies Team T.40: Image made by Drury University Community Studies Team T.41: https://courtneybend.com/palmetto-running-company-group-runsin-bluffton-and-beaufort/ T.42: http://www.look.com.ua/23860-luk-salat-frukty-paprika-ogurcy-cukkini-pomidory-ovoshi-abrikosy-jabloki-vinograd-limon-nektariny-baklazhan-kapusta.html T.43: diagram by Drury University community studies team T.44: diagram by Drury University community studies team T.45: diagram by Drury University community studies team T.46: http://parttimeofhouse.blogspot.com/2013/08/part-time_7803. html T.47: https://kokoro.mhlw.go.jp/approach/001.html T.48: http://www.spryciarze.pl/poradniki-tekstowe/zobacz/jak-sie-skoncentrowac-na-nauce T.49: http://soulfoodliving.com/?p=624 T.50: http://dsmcommutercorner.wordpress.com/2010/page/3/ T.51: diagram by Drury University community studies team T.52: http://www.hawksmoor.com/cycling-in-windermere-from-our-

guest-house/ T.53: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RER_A T.54: http://5star.zzl.org/History/DrTimKeck.html T.55: http://cafe.mouse.co.il/topic/2995018/ T.56: http://kiddiescornerdeals.com/2010/09/zuvo-water-filtration-system-review/ T.57: http://nmhealth.org/phd/dist3/ T.58: http://brie.hunter.cuny.edu/hpe/2009/09/01/bronx-river-alliance-to-honor-express-editor/ T.59: http://www.finnishdesignshop.us/tableware-dinnerware-iittala-teema-teema-mini-serving-3set-colours-p-5254.html T.60: http://www.sustainable-chicago.com/tag/brownfield/ T.61: http://planning.city.cleveland.oh.us/bike/morgana.html T.62: http://google.com/images T.63: http://google.com/images T.64: http://nevertrade.blogspot.com/2012/07/trail-run.html T.65: http://www.singletracks.com/blog/mtb-trails/riding-the-top-10mtb-trails-in-the-world-part-1/ T.66: http://www.gcak12.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Vendingmachines-offering-better-choices-for-health-620x916.jpg T.67: http://www.village12.org/about-us/how-we-work/ T.68: http://fishndave.blogspot.com/2011/03/weekend-update-318and-3202011.html T.69: http://www.picstopin.com/2560/my-garden-wallpaper/ http:%7C%7Ckhongthe*com%7Cwallpapers%7Cabstract%7Cmy-garden-231050*jpg/ T.70: http://www.vkm-verlag.de/karriere/index.html T.71: http://www.cleveland.com/architecture/index.ssf/2013/05/the_ new_indianapolis_cultural.html T.72: http://cfuw-ottawa.org/Default.aspx?pageId=1167294 T.73: http://www.red-wing.org/redwingplaygrounds.html T.74: http://www.beezodogsplace.com/category/cycling/adventure-cycling-association/ T.75: http://depts.washington.edu/uwbg/images/ T.76: http://bikemd.org/page.php?id=381 T.77: http://www.hugocubias.com/national-association-of-community-health-centers-policy-and-issues-debate-video/ T.78: http://www.naspd1.org/dotnetnuke/ChildreninNature/DesigningNaturalPlayscapes/tabid/175/Default.aspx T.79: http://blogyarq.blogspot.com/2010/04/metamorfosis-1-jose-ulloa-davet.html T.80: http://choose-community.com/2012/07/05/parkplay-series-in-derry/ T.81: http://www.nbcnewyork.com/blogs/go-healthy-ny/Free-Yoga-Tennis-for-Seniors-at-City-Parks-122687964.html T.82: http://www.activetrans.org/bikesharing T.83: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7AOda7V1Ck T.84: http://google.com/images

T.85: http://eatlocalguide.com/sarasota/more-local-healthy-food-needed-in-schools-state-panel-says/ T.86: http://www.thepussycatforest.info/?f T.87: http://www.rogtecmagazine.com/blog/gazprom-and-gasunie-discuss-prospects-of-joint-activities-development T.88: http://google.com/images T.89: http://www.mindorgasms.com/ T.90: http://google.com/images T.91: http://www.123rf.co.kr/photo_5227689_road-street-or-asphalttexture-with-lines.html T.92: http://google.com/images T.93: http://www.picstopin.com/1920/download-backgrounds-park-california-national-yosemite-merced-river-/http:%7C%7Cwww*mycoolbackgrounds*com%7Cbackgrounds%7C22653%7CHalf%20Dome%20 and%20the%20Merced%20River%20Yosemite%20National%20 Park%20California*jpg/ T.94: http://google.com/images T.95: http://www.fansshare.com/community/uploads43/3490/social_ media_management/ T.96: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=1774832&show=html T.97: http://readme.readmedia.com/Ky-Economic-Development-Cabinet-Secretary-Larry-Hayes-commends-community-leaders-CU-for-working-together/3002180/ T.98: http://gcpartnerships.org/page/2/ T.99: http://peluangusahakemitraan.blogspot.com/2011/10/melonjaknya-penumpang-maskapai-domestik.html T.100: https://plus.google.com/+edgardoramirezsosa T.101: http://sandykayepresents.com.au/news/ T.102: http://craigpearce.info/critical-elements-public-relations-strategy/ T.103: drawing by Drury University community studies team T.104: google image search T.105: google image search T.106: google image search T.107: google image search T.108: google image search T.109: google image search T.110: google image search T.111: google image search SITE CONTEXT SC.1: http://www.today.com/id/43225838/ SC.2: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.3: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:StLouisArchMultExpToneMapped.jpg SC.4: http://www.renkus-heinz.com/landmark-kansas-city-venue-getsthe-full-renkus-heinz-treatment


SC.5: http://jeffersoncityswingdanceclub.wildapricot.org/Default.aspx?pageId=1508208 SC.6: http://www.ontravel.com/2011/05/poll-shows-americans-wanta-vacation-this-year/ SC.7: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.8: http://www.google maps SC.9: http://www.amtrak.com/missouri-river-runner-train SC.10: http://www.dnr.mo.gov/env/wrc/interstwtrs/white_river.htm SC.11: http://www.aaroads.com/shields/show. SC.12: www.google maps.com http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._ Route_65 SC.13: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Route_65 SC.14: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Route_65 SC.15: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.16: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I44 SC.17: http://www.amtrak. SC.18: http://www.dnr.mo.gov/env/ SC.19: http://www.dnr.mo.gov/env/ SC.20: http://www.dnr.mo.gov/env/ SC.21: http://visitwhitebird.com/ SC.22: http://www.google maps SC.23: http://www.wikipedia SC.24: http://www.city-data.com/picfilesc/picc49606.php SC.25: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.26: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.27: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.28: SC.28 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Showboat_Branson_Belle SC.29: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.30: http://mostateparks.com/park/table-rock-state-park SC.31: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.32: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.33: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.34: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.35: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.36: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.37: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.38: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.39: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.40: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.41: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.42: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.43: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.44: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.45: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.46: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.47: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.48: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.49: diagram by Drury University community studies team

SC.50: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.51: diagram by Drury University community studies team SC.52: taken by Drury University community studies team SC.53: taken by Drury University community studies team SC.54: taken by Drury University community studies team SC.55: taken by Drury University community studies team SC.56: taken by Drury University community studies team SC.57: taken by Drury University community studies team SC.58: taken by Drury University community studies team SC.59: taken by Drury University community studies team SC.60: taken by Drury University community studies team SC.61: taken by Drury University community studies team SC.62: taken by Drury University community studies team SC.63: taken by Drury University community studies team SC.64: taken by Drury University community studies team SC.65: taken by Drury University community studies team SC.66: taken by Drury University community studies team

RECOMMENDATIONS REC.1: http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/watercyclerunoff.html REC.2: google image search REC.3: http://www.thestar.com/content/dam/thestar/yourtoronto/ the_fixer/2013/08/21/a_wave_of_flooding_in_ravine_at_david_a_balfour_park_fixer/flooding_damage.jpg.size.xxlarge.promo.jpg REC.4: http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/watercyclerunoff.html REC.5: http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/watercyclerunoff.html REC.6: google search soft engineering REC.7: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.8: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.9: www.amilsinn.com REC.10: www.iowasot.gov REC.11: diagram by Drury University community studies team REC.12: http://www.flowstobay.org/documents/municipalities/sustainable%20streets/San%20Mateo%20Guidebook.pdf REC.13: http://www.thestar.com/content/dam/thestar/yourtoronto/ the_fixer/2013/08/21/a_wave_of_flooding_in_ravine_at_david_a_balfour_park_fixer/flooding_damage.jpg.size.xxlarge.promo.jpg REC.14: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.15: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.16: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.17: google image search REC.18: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.19: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.20: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.21: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.22: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.23: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.24: google image search

REC.25: google image search REC.26: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.27: google image search REC.28: google image search REC.29: google image search REC.30: google image search REC.31: google image search REC.32: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.33: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.34: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.35: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.36: google image search REC.37: google image search REC.38: google image search REC.39: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.40: google image search REC.41: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.42: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.43: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.44: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.45: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.46: www.iidudu.com REC.47: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.48: www.bennetbrosstone.com REC.49: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.50: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.51: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.52: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.53: google image search REC.54: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.55: www.heberhiking.com REC.56: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.57: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.58: www.taliesin.edu REC.59: www.archinect.com REC.60: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.61: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.62: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.63: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.64: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.65: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.66: google image search REC.67: google image search REC.68: google image search REC.69: google image search REC.70: google image search REC.71: google image search REC.72: google image search


REC.73: google image search REC.74: google image search REC.75: google image search REC.76: google image search REC.77: google image search REC.78: google image search REC.79: google image search REC.80: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.81: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.82: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.83: www.serenityinthegarden.blogspot.com REC.84: www.bourgetbros.com REC.85: www.supertexture.co.uk REC.86: www.highwayonlyway.com REC.87: www.amandaheinzman.wordpress.com REC.88: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.89: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.90: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.91: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.92: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.93: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.94: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.95: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.96: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.97: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.98: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.99: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.100: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.101: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.102: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.103: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.104: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.105: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.106: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.107: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.108: taken by Drury University community studies team REC.109: taken by Drury University community studies team REC.110: http://www.archiexpo.de/prod/l-antic-colonial/innen-bodenbelaege-kieselsteinen-49730-1096301.html REC.111: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.112: http://www.cityofsacramento.org/utilities/water/water-treatment.cfm REC.113: http://www.customledsupply.com/led-news/ REC.114: http://www.solartime.co/solar-panels/ REC.115: http://q13fox.com/2013/08/07/cheaters-squeezing-out-handicapped-drivers-with-fake-placards/ REC.116: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.117: drawing by Drury University community studies team

REC.118: http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~earlyyrs/ schwyhart/assets/stonecomo.jpg REC.119: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.120: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.121: http://uzdrawiam.wordpress.com/page/4/ REC.122: http://www.mysunnysidetoyota.com/construction.htm REC.123: http://www.clker.com/cliparts/b/0/S/D/m/b/large-manwoman-bathroom-sign.svg REC.124: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.125: http://www.texastimberframes.com/galleries/outdoor-pavilion-withview REC.126: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.127: google image search REC.128: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.129: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.130: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.131: google image search REC.132: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.133: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.134: google image search REC.135: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.136: google image search REC.137: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.138: google image search REC.139: google image search REC.140: google image search REC.141: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.142: google image search REC.143: google image search REC.144: google image search REC.145: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.146: google image search REC.147: google image search REC.148: google image search REC.149: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.150: https://maps.google.com/ REC.151: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.152: http://blueskiesrecycling.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/recycle.jpg REC.153: http://alexandranoguerammyblog.wordpress.com/la-escuela-sierra-nevada/ REC.154: http://theilladelph.blogspot.com/2007/08/in-praise-of-philadelphias-delicious.html REC.155: http://www.growpittsburgh.org/start-a-garden/resource-locator/the-urban-harvester/image/ REC.156: http://www.sandalsfoundation.org/news/beeston-spring-receives-fabulous-face-lift.html REC.157: https://maps.google.com/

REC.158: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.159: taken by Drury University community studies team REC.160: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.161: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.162: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.163: http://google,com/images.com REC.164: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.165: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.166: taken by Drury University community studies team REC.167: http://www.behrendsgroup.com/business-signs/restroom-signs/ REC.168: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.169: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.170: http://abriellev.wordpress.com/2012/08/ REC.171: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.172: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.173: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.174: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.175: http://google,com/images.com REC.176: http://mnprairieroots.com/tag/barn-swallows/ REC.177: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.178: http://globalgumshoe.com/index.php/days-historic-savannah/ REC.179: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.180: http://www.kl828.com/zhengtijiujiao/ REC.181: http://chennai.olx.in/opening-in-kitchen-at-chennai9841004685-iid-563176591 REC.182 http://snokey.com/page/82/ REC.183: https://maps.google.com/ REC.184: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.185: http://www.pr.com/press-release/65929 REC.186: http://www.funbooth.com.au/images/about/boat.jpg REC.187: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.188: http://www.wpclipart.com/buildings/homes/house/house_ symbol_w_tree.png.html REC.189: google image search REC.190: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.191: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.192: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.193: google image search REC.194: google image search REC.195: google image search REC.196: google image search REC.197: google image search REC.198: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.199: http://capefairmarina.com/ REC.200: http://www.bransonstagecoachcampground.com/outdoor-rec reation.html


REC.201: http://www.visittablerocklake.org/index.php?submenu=lake_ access&src=gendocs&ref=LakeAccess&category=Main REC.202: http://www.resortsandlodges.com/top-10/2013-03-11/toptable-rock-lake-resorts/ REC.203: http://www.bigcedar.com/default.aspx REC.204: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.205: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.206: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.207: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.208: drawing by Drury University community studies team REC.209: drawing by Drury University community studies team MODEL M.1: model by Drury University community studies team M.2: model by Drury University community studies team M.3: model by Drury University community studies team M.4: model by Drury University community studies team M.5: model by Drury University community studies team


JOE BALD PARK VISION 2040 Mr. Jay G. Garrott, RA Professor and Director Center for Community Studies Hammons School of Architecture Drury University 900 N. Benton Avenue Springfield, MO 65802 417-873-7271


Joe bald vision 2040